ABEL FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth1 Abel, born say 1710, was a white woman living in Chowan County in July 1737 when she was charged in court with keeping a "Lew'd and disorderly Tippleing house Contrary to the Law" and "Entertaing peoples Servants" [Haun, Chowan County Court Minutes, II:74, 76]. She was probably the mother of

2        i. Bethiah, born say 1737.

3        ii. Serenah, born say 1745.

4        iii. Nanny, born say 1750.

 

2.    Bethiah Abel, born say 1737, was living in Bertie County in March 1770 when her "Mulatto" orphan, Betty, was bound to William Bryan [Haun, Bertie County court Minutes, III:893, 896; IV:74]. Her children were

5        i. Elizabeth2, born about 1758.

ii. ?Zedekiah, born about 1760, a fourteen-year-old orphan bound to Edward Skull to be a carpenter in 1774, no parent named.

6        iii. ?Ginny, born say 1762.

iv. Solomon, born say 1764, orphan of Bethiah, no age or race mentioned when he was bound to William Bryan to be a shoemaker on 28 March 1770.

 

3.    Serenah1 Abel, born say 1745, was living in Bertie County on 30 March 1767 when the court ordered her "Mulatto" children bound out. She complained to the May 1788 Bertie court about the indenture of her daughter Sall to John Bosman [Haun, Bertie County court Minutes III:765; IV:225, 274; VI:225, 721, 733]. Her children were

i. Betty3, born about 1762, eight-year-old orphan of Serenah bound to Keder Harrell on 25 March 1770.

ii. James, born about 1763, four-year-old "Mulatto" bastard of Serenah, bound to Jacob Jernegan on 30 March 1767, about fifteen years old in May 1777 when he was bound to Thomas Pugh, Sr.

iii. Hardy, born about 1765, two-year-old "Mulatto" bastard of Serenah, bound to William Bryan to be a shoemaker on 30 March 1767.

iv. Jacob, born about 1772, "Mulatto" bastard of Serenah, six years old in November 1778 when he was ordered bound to James Gardner to be a shoemaker. He was sixteen in February 1789 when he and Huel Abel were bound to William Pugh to be shoemakers. Jacob was head of a Bertie County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:177].

v. ?Huel, born about 1777, twelve years old in February 1789 when he and Jacob Abel were bound to William Pugh to be shoemakers.

vi. Sall, born say 1780, bound to John Bosman in 1788.

 

4.    Nanny Abel, born say 1750, was the mother of a three-year-old "Mulatto" child, Allen, who was bound apprentice in Bertie County in 1777 [Haun, Bertie County court Minutes VI:797]. She was the mother of

i. Allen, born about 1774, three years old in Christmas 1777, bastard "Mulatto" of Nanny, ordered by the November 1777 court bound to Ezekiel Wimberly to be a cordwainer. He was bound to Lewis Wimberly to be a shoemaker on 7 November 1791.

 

5.    Elizabeth2 Abel, born about 1758, was the twelve-year-old "Mulatto" of Bethiah Abel bound to William Bryan in Bertie County on 28 March 1770 [Haun, Bertie County court Minutes III:896; IV:70, 243; V:454, 497]. She was the mother of

i. Andrew, born about 1771, six-year-old "Mulatto" bastard of Betty ordered bound to William Bryan to be a shoemaker in August 1777.

ii. Jean, born about 1772, two-year-old son of Elizabeth ordered bound to William Bryan in May 1774.

iii. Lemuel, born about September 1772, twenty-month-old son of Elizabeth ordered bound to William Bryan in May 1774.

iv. Serenah2, born about January 1774, four-month-old daughter of Elizabeth ordered bound to William Bryan in May 1774, eight years old on 13 May 1783 when she was bound to Ann Gliston.

v. Anthony, born about 1775, two-year-old "Mulatto" bastard of Betty bound to William Bryan to be a shoemaker in August 1777.

vi. ?John, born say 1778, no age or parent named when he was bound to Joseph Horn to be a cooper on 10 August 1784.

 

6.    Ginny Abel, born say 1762, was ordered bound to William Bryan for six years in August 1777. The same court ordered the indenture of her child,

i. Edy, born about January 1776, a one and one-half-year-old "Mulatto" bastard of Ginney Abel bound to William Bryan by the August 1777 court.

 

A member of the family registered in Norfolk County, Virginia on 10 July 1812:

Margaret Abel, 4 feet 11 In. & a half, 22 years of age of a yellowish complexion... Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no. 73].

 

ABSHIER FAMILY

Members of the Abshier family were

i. John Abscher/ Abshire, born say 1740, a native of Pennsylvania, and his wife Francisca Hargrave, a native of Virginia, had been living in the parish of St. Martin Attapakas in Louisiana for twenty-one years on 10 May 1800 when they consented to the marriage of their seventeen-year-old daughter Rosalie to John Drake, a "Mulato libre natural de Carolina" (free Mulatto native of Carolina) [Hebert, Rev. Donald J., Southeastern Louisiana Records, 1750-1900 (1999), IV:195, cited by Barbara Ellison of Oklahoma in email correspondence].

ii. Josiah Abshier, born about 1762, head of a Anson County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:57] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:12]. He was a corporal in the Revolution and received a pension of $345.97 in December 1826 at the age of sixty-four [NSDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution].

 

ACRE FAMILY

1.    Jane Acre, born say 1738, was living in Truro Parish on 16 May 1759 when she was indicted by the Fairfax County court for having a "Molatto" child. She failed to appear for her trial, so the court fined her 50 shillings [Orders 1756-63, 342, 368]. She may have been related to Benjamin Acres, a "mulatto" boy listed in the 26 March 1718 Westmoreland County inventory of Joseph Bailey [DW 6:272]. Jane was apparently the mother of

i. Rodham, born say 1759, a bastard child bound ordered bound by the churchwardens of Truro Parish to James Moore on 19 June 1759 [Orders 1756-63, 342, 368].

 

ADAMS FAMILY

Members of the Adams family of Richmond County, Virginia, may have descended from the Adams family of St. Mary's County, Maryland, since Harriet Adams's husband Cornelius Lawrence also came from St. Mary's County. Members of the Adams family in Virginia were

i. John, head of a Rockingham County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:14].

ii. John, head of a Richmond County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:411]. He was probably identical to "John Adams of Maryland a free Negro, by Trade a Ditcher" who sued Richard Sherdock, "a free Mulatto," in Lancaster County on 20 December 1776 for assaulting him [Court Papers 1770-1780, n.p.].

iii. Humphrey, head of a Rockingham County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:15].

iv. Milly, head of an Essex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:208].

1        v. Phillis, born about 1789.

vi. Harriet Lawrence, born about 1799, registered in Essex County on 17 November 1828: wife of Cornelius Lawrence formerly Harriet Adams, born free, dark Mulattoe, 29 years of age, 5 feet one and a half inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.54, no.130]. Her husband Cornelius obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County, Maryland, on 28 November 1816: aged nineteen years...light complexion...born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 37] and registered in Essex County on 21 June 1824: born free by certificate of St. Mary's County, Maryland, 27 years of age [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.46, no. 115].

 

1.    Phillis Adams, born about 1789, registered in Essex County on 18 March 1839: born free by certificate of the clk. of Richmond County, black, about 50 years of age, 5 feet 3 inches. She was the mother of

i. Polly, born about 1816, registered in Essex County on 18 March 1839: daughter of Phillis Adams, born free, dark Brown, about 23 years of age, 5 feet 2-2/8 inches.

ii. Robert, born about 1816, registered in Essex County on 28 July 1829: son of Phillis Adams, born free, Black, about 13 years of age, 5 feet 2-2/8 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, pp.34, 62 nos.88, 143, 144].

 

AFRICA FAMILY

1.    Meshack Africa, born say 1735, and his wife Nell were taxable "negroes" in James Wilson's household in Edmunds Bridge District of Norfolk County from 1751 to 1759, called "Africa and Nell" [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-1765, 27, 38, 59, 99, 108, 153]. Wilson set them free by his Norfolk County will with the approval of the governor and Council of Virginia in 1761 [McIlwaine, Executive Journals, IV:188]. He was called "Affrica, a free Negro," on 18 August 1768 when the Norfolk County court ordered him to post bond of 50 pounds to keep the peace for six months because John Coats swore the peace against him [Orders 1768-71, 12]. Meshack and his wife Nell were taxable "free negroes" in Edmunds Bridge District from 1767 to 1780. He was taxable on 50 acres from 1767 to 1770. He was called "Free Africa" in 1772, "FN Africa" in 1773, "Meshack Africa" in 1774 and 1780 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-1780, 26, 51, 92, 128, 181, 191, 222, 247, 280]. He was taxable in St. Brides Parish, Norfolk County, from 1783 to 1796: taxable on his son Meshack in 1787, charged with 2 tithes in 1790 and from 1792 to 1795 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 412, 447, 587, 601, 658, 697; 1791-1812, frames 3, 48, 63, 117, 153, 186]. Meshack was the father of

i. Meshack2, born say 1766, taxable on a free poll in Norfolk County in 1787 and 1789, his tax charged to his father Meshack Africa. He married Hannah Fuller, 4 April 1789 Princess Anne County bond, Beriah Butt surety, 19 April marriage. He may have been identical to Meshack Fuller who was taxable in Norfolk County in 1794 and was a "free Negro" taxable in St. Brides Parish from 1803 to 1811 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 103, 456, 548, 609, 674].

ii. ?Kader, head of a Norfolk County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:802], a "free Negro" taxable in St. Bride's Parish from 1814 to 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 67, 71, 167, 201]. He purchased land in Norfolk County by deed proved in 1817 [DB 47:168].

iii. ?Sally, head of Norfolk County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:802]. She was counted in the list of "free Negroes" in St. Brides Parish with 3 male tithables and 3 cattle in 1815 and was taxable on a free male in 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 71, 201].

iv. Trimagin, taxable in St. Brides Parish, Norfolk County, in 1794, 1796, 1797, 1799 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 117, 186, 313, 204, 313].

v. ?Wright, born about 1775, taxable in St. Brides Parish, Norfolk County, from 1796 to 1800, counted in the lists of "free Negroes" from 1801 to 1817, taxable on 2 tithes and 3 horses in 1814 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 186, 204, 313, 400, 456, 548, 636, 716, 802; 1813-24, frames 167, 201]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Norfolk County on 17 December 1810: 5 feet 11 Inches, 35 years of age, light complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no. 41]. On 24 February 1810 he purchased 60 acres in Norfolk County adjoining Richard Silvester's, Nathaniel Wilson, deceased, Creedle Manning and Arthur Butt for $250, purchased another 10 acres near Creedle Manning's, Broad Branch and Cypress Swamp for $75 on 21 May 1813 and purchased two more tracts by deeds proved in 1817 and 1823 [DB 45:48; 46:63; 47:351; 50:422].

vi. ?Wilson, listed as a "free Negro" in St. Brides Parish in 1816 and 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 167, 201].

 

AILSTOCK FAMILY

1.    Michael1 Ailstock, born say 1725, was sued in Caroline County, Virginia court in a suit which was dismissed on 14 June 1746. He was also involved in several minor court cases in Caroline County in September 1751, June 1762, March 1763 and May 1773 [Orders 1740-6, 606; 1746-54, 275; 1759-63, 317, 393; 1772-6, 242]. He purchased 353 acres in Trinity Parish, Louisa County, on 8 May 1764 [DB C:16-18]. He was involved in a number of Louisa County law suits. On 9 May 1768 the court awarded John Collins, executor of James Collins, deceased, an attachment against his estate for 15 pounds which was executed on an old gun. James Overton sued him on 11 August 1766. Thomas Knighton sued him for 100 pounds currency on 8 August 1768 and another 5 pounds on 15 September 1772. And Knighton was awarded 8 pounds, 10 shillings in his suit against him for slander on 13 June 1769, but the court was of the opinion that the damages were excessive and a new jury awarded Knighton 5 shillings on 9 April 1770. William and Ann Knighton of Caroline County were his witnesses against Thomas Knighton. In July 1771 Benjamin Hubbard sued him in Louisa County for failure to pay his account which included 10 shillings which Hubbard paid Captain Thomas Todd in 1745/6, 15 shillings paid Edward Pendleton in 1750 and 15 shillings for a fur hat on 22 May 1760. In February 1773 he was sued by William Garrett for a promissory note he made (signing) on 7 Mary 1764 to pay Mary Grasam 8 pounds, 6 shillings. In May 1773 George Mitchell sued him for failure to pay his account from 1769 to 1771. The account included 30 yards oznabrug, 10 yards sheeting, a pint of rum, a grindstone, 5 bushels of salt, a quart of rum, powder, shell, buckles, English blankets, 20 yards of oznabrug, a bearskin, 10 yards of cotton, ginger, 52 yards of sheeting, 18 coat buttons, a vest, powder, a quire of paper, 25 yards oznabrug, 5 pairs of sleeve buttons, and another quart of rum ;He sued John Clark's executors on 13 April 1772. On 11 May 1772 the court ordered his suit against Samuel Winston's executors referred to arbitration. David Cosby attended twenty-eight days as his witness against Winston's executors. On 11 May 1772 he was awarded 6 pounds, 8 shillings damages in his suit against William Clasby for trespass, assault and battery [Orders 1760-74, 14; 1766-74, 1, 6, 9, 26-7, 43, 45, 53, 76, 118; 1766-72, 1, 6, 9, 26, 82, 98, 134-5, 169, 195, 199, 297, 327, 363, 364, 408, 426, 484, 486, 487, 491; Judgments, 1770-2, frames 207-10; 1772-3, frames 93-6, 258-9, 810-11; 1773, frames 64-9, 264; April 1774-June 1778, frames 233-40]. In March 1769 he sued Thomas Johnson, Jr., for saying that he had stolen James Tates' pocket book [Judgments, 1769-1770, frames 189-198]. On 8 March 1773 Micajah Davis accused him of stealing ten shillings worth of leather, but the court found him not guilty. David Smith was his witness in a suit against Colonel Johnson for which he was awarded 2 pounds, 9 shillings [Orders 1773, 12, 20, 28]. He and his wife Rebecca sold their 353 acres in Trinity Parish to Moses Going on 13 January 1777 [DB E:127-8]. He was living in Louisa County on 25 December 1777 when he sold two plots of 54 acres each in Louisa County, one on both sides of Gibson's Creek and Anderson's line and the other on both sides of Gibson's Creek [Unrecorded Deeds of Louisa County 1762-1803, 1-2]. On 2 June 1777 the Amherst County court ordered that he post bond of sixty pounds security for his appearance at the next court to answer Mary McCabe for a breach of the peace. He owned land in Amherst County by 5 January 1778 when he and James Hartless were among the freeholders ordered to work on a new road from Irish Creek Gap down Pedlar River to Campbell's Road [Orders 1773-82, 187, 211-2]. He sold property by deed proved in Louisa County court on 11 May 1778, 8 June 1778 and on 8 October 1781. The Louisa County court exempted him from paying county levies (due to old age) on 10 April 1780 [Orders 1774-82, 192, 197, 298, 335]. He was taxable on a horse and 5 cattle in Louisa County from 1782 to 1784 but free from personal tax [PPTL, 1782-1814]. He may have been the Michael Hailstock who was taxable in Richmond City in 1789 and 1791 [PPTL 1787-99]. His 6 September 1791 Louisa County will, proved 13 April 1795, named his wife Rebecca; children Joseph, Michael, Absalom, Mary, Elizabeth, Susanna, and granddaughter Rebecca [WB 3:597]. His suit against William Tatham in Richmond City court abated on 13 March 1792 by his death [Hustings Court Orders 1787-92, 699]. His widow Rebecca was included in a list of free "mulattoes" in Louisa County about 1802 [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 21]. Michael was the father of

i. the parent of Rebecca. Rebecca was listed as a free Negro in Louisa County about 1802 with her two children and her grandmother: Rebecca Ailstock and her 2 children to wit: Robert and Polley and Rebecca the Elder [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 21].

ii. Michael2, born say 1750, called Michael Ailstock, Junr., on 9 March 1773 when his suit against William Johnson, Gent., was dismissed by the Louisa County court. On 11 May 1773 the court awarded him 2 pounds, 4 shillings in the same suit, but granted Johnson a leave to make discounts at the next court. On 8 November 1773 the court attached his goods in the hands of Ann Pulliam worth 1 pound, 17 shillings for a debt he owed James Twopence [Orders 1766-74, 92, 97, 115, 177]. He was taxable in Amherst County in 1782 [PPTL 1782-1803, frame 9], taxable in Louisa County from 1783 to 1794 [PPTL, 1782-1814] and was taxable in Albemarle County from 1795 to 1807, probably related to Patience Alstock who was counted in a "list of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Albemarle County in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 445, 477, 584; 1800-1813, frames 22, 66, 111, 135, 154, 200, 290, 337, 553]. On 6 January 1800 he was ordered to remain in the Albemarle County jail for a breach of the peace until he posted bond of $100 and his securities James Going and Shadrack Battles posted bond of $50 each for his good behavior. He sold property by indenture proved in court on 6 July 1801 [Orders 1798-1800, 380, 393].

2        iii. Joseph, born say 1752.

3        iv. Absalom1, born about 1762.

v. Mary.

vi. ?William1, born say 1764, a "free" taxable in Richmond City in 1784 [PPTL 1787-99], taxable in Henrico County in 1785 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 78].

vii. Elizabeth, married Thomas Mason in Louisa County in April 1791.

4        viii. Susanna, born say 1768.

 

2.    Joseph Ailstock, born say 1752, was awarded 2 pounds, 9 shillings in his Louisa County suit against William Johnson, Gent., on 13 April 1773 [Orders 1766-74]. He was taxable in Louisa County in 1783, 1786, 1793, 1794, 1795 (listed with 3 tithables), and 1796 [PPTL, 1782-1814]. He was taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frame 109]. He was taxable in Lexington Parish, Amherst County, in 1789 [PPTL 1782-1803, 165] and was ordered to work on the road from the Blue Ridge at Irish Creek Gap to the three forks of the Pedlar River in Amherst County on 4 November 1789 [Orders 1787-90, 590]. He was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1798 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 549, 584; 1800-1813, frame 22]. Duncan Holmes sued him in Albemarle County court for trespass, assault and battery on 7 May 1799, and he sued Jacob Burress for the same on 7 August 1799. The suit was dismissed on agreement of the parties on 6 August 1800 [Orders 1798-1800, 215, 267; 1800-1, 116]. He was a "fn" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1803 to 1814: taxable on 12 acres which was transferred to him by Drury Wood in 1803; listed with his unnamed wife as "Blacks Free" in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 488, 534, 594, 638, 724, 758, 823; Land Tax List 1799-1816]. On 13 January 1805 he sold 12 acres on the side of the stage road in Henrico County to Waddy Turner of Richmond for 40 pounds [DB 7:186]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:987]. He was the father of

i. ?Absolom2, born about 1780, a "fn" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in the same list as Joseph Hailstock from 1803 to 1809 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 487, 534, 594; Land Tax List 1799-1816]. He registered in Rockingham County, Virginia, on 5 September 1831: 51 years of Age (A Mulatto Man) and Six Feet high...Free Born as appears by the affidavit of Mary Davis. (His wife?) Sally Ailstock registered the same day: a Mulatto Woman 50 Years of Age...Free Born as appears by the affidavit of Mary Davis [Boyd-Rush, Register of Free Blacks, Rockingham County, 64].

ii. ?John, born say 1782, taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1800 and 1801 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frames 22, 66], a "fn" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in 1803, 1804, 1805, 1807, 1812, and 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 488, 534, 724, 758; Land Tax List 1799-1816].

iii. ?Robert, born say 1786, a "free Negro" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1803 to 1814 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 434, 488, 594, 638, 723, 758, 823; Land Tax List 1799-1816].

iv. Sally, born say 1788, "daughter of Joseph Ailstock," married Reuben Jones, 24 October 1807 Henrico County bond, Absalom Ailstock surety.

 

3.    Absalom1 Ailstock, born about 1762 in Louisa County, may have been identical to "Abra: Ailstock" who married Isabel Ratcliff, both of Louisa County, on 23 December 1784 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 9, 84]. He called himself a seventy-year-old "free born Mulatto" when he appeared in Rockbridge County, Virginia court on 1 October 1832 to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Louisa County, lived there twelve or thirteen years after the war when he moved to Rockbridge County. He was called a ninety-four-year-old "colored freeman" on 29 September 1849 when he applied for increased payments of his pension, stating that he had been occupied at Yorktown digging entrenchments [National Archives pension file S6475, http:/www.fold3.com]. He was taxable in Louisa County from 1785 to 1799 and from 1809 to 1814, in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1814]. Joseph Ailstock dismissed a suit for trespass, assault and battery against Absalom in Louisa County court on 9 September 1793. Absalom produced an account against the Commonwealth which the court certified on 10 September 1793, and he sued Jane Ratliff for a 3 pound debt on 12 September 1796 [Orders 1792-7, 31, 394]. He was taxable in Botetourt County from 1802 to 1810: taxable on 3 horses in 1802, on 2 tithes from 1807 to 1810 and from 1816 to 1821: a "F.N." taxable on 2 tithes and 4 horses in 1816, 3 tithes and 5 horses in 1819 [PPTL 1783-1810, frames 410, 437, 467, 509, 544, 565, 611, 642; 1811-1822, frames 258, 345, 386, 431, 471], a "Mulatto" carpenter with his children on Robert Gillespy's land in "A List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes in the District of John Holloway, Commissioner, in Botetourt County for the Year 1802" and again in 1803 [Orders 1800-04, Loose Papers, nos. 30-36, 51-58]. His wife was probably white or considered white since she was not listed with him, and his son James was apparently born between the time when the 1802 and 1803 list was made. He was head of a Botetourt County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:604] and was also counted in Bath County in 1810, head of a household of 8 "other free" and a white woman [VA:446]. He was a ninety-four-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 Rockbridge County census with forty-seven-year-old "Mulatto" Nancy in District 51-1/2 [family no. 285]. His children were

i. ?Jenny, born say 1780, married Jesse Going, 2 December 1799 Albemarle County bond.

ii. Rebecca, born say 1782, a "Labourer & Spinster" in 1802, perhaps the Becky Ailstock who James Going was supposed to marry by 2 December 1799 Albemarle County bond, Michael Ailstock bondsman.

iii. Caty, born say 1783, a "Labourer & Spinster" in 1802.

iv. Polly, born say 1785, counted in 1803 but not in 1802.

v. Elizabeth2/ Betsy, born say 1787, a "labourer & Spinster" in 1802.

vi. William2, born say 1792, a "Small" boy in 1802.

vii. Absalom3, born say 1794, a "Small" boy in 1802, called "Absolom Aylstock, Jr" when he was taxable in Botetourt County in 1817 [PPTL 1811-1822, frame 299].

viii. Thomas, born say 1798, a "Small" boy in 1802.

ix. James, born 1802-03.

 

4.    Susanna Ailstock, born say 1768, was counted in a List of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" with her children Salley, Ursula, Betsey, Lewis, William and Kitty near Trinity Church in Louisa County in the district of Peter Crawford (no date but probably about 1801-3) [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 20]. She sued (her brother) Michael Ailstock, Jr., for trespass, assault and battery in Louisa County court on 14 November 1792 and was awarded 50 pounds on 13 August 1793 [Orders 1790-3, 469; 1792-7, 1, 21]. She and (her children) Sarah, Ursley, Kitty and Elizabeth L. Ailstock were included in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" above the age of sixteen in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1814]. She was the mother of

i. Sally, born say 1785.

ii. Ursula, born say 1787.

iii. Betsey, born say 1789.

iv. Lewis2, born say 1791

v. William3, born say 1793, taxable on a horse in Louisa County in 1814.

vi. Kitty, born say 1795.

 

Other members of the family in Virginia were

i. Reuben Halestock, born say 1752, living in Caroline County on 12 August 1756 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Mary's Parish to bind him to Thomas Roy, Gentleman. He sued William True for debt in Caroline County court on 15 August 1783, and the administrator of James Conduit's estate sued Reuben on 13 May 1785. On 7 May 1785 the court presented him for keeping a tippling house [Orders 1755-8, 191; 1781-5, part 2, 248, 397; 1785-7, part 1, 4, 23, 94, 165]. He was a "Free Negro & Mulatto" above the age of sixteen in Essex County in the same list with Francis and John Halestock in 1814, listed with Frank and Kitt Halestock in 1816 and 1819 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 541, 629, 630, 776].

ii. Lewis1, born say 1754, living in Caroline County on 12 August 1756 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Mary's Parish to bind him to Thomas Roy, Gentleman [Orders 1755-8, 191].

5        iii. Kezor, born say 1760.

iv. Michael3, born say 1765, taxable in Richmond City on his own tithe in 1789 and taxable on a horse in 1791 [PPTL 1787-1799].

v. Charles, born say 1770, indicted in King George County on 4 August 1796 for retailing liquor without a license [Orders 1790-9, 473]. He was head of a King George County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:203].

vi. Robert Hailstock, taxable in Caroline County in 1796 and 1798 [PPTL 1783-99].

vii. Christopher, taxable in Caroline County in 1812 and in the list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 [PPTL 1800-25].

viii. Elce, an illegitimate child bound by the Amherst County court to William Leigh on 15 October 1792 [Orders 1790-4, 455].

ix. Michael4, born about 1792, registered as a free Negro in Augusta County on 28 June 1819: a man of colour, aged about twenty seven years, five feet eight inches and a quarter high, black complexion, long black whiskers...declared to be a free man, as appears from a certificate of the Clerk of Albemarle County [Register of Free Negroes, no.25].

x. Patsey, born about 1801, registered as a free Negro in Augusta County on 27 March 1827: a woman of colour aged 26 years of dark complexion 4 feet 11 inches high...entitled to her freedom as appears from the Clerk of Albemarle County [Register of Free Negroes, no.89].

 

5.    Kezor Ailstock/ Hailstock, born say 1760, was taxable on 2 horses in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, in 1784 and taxable in the lower district of the county from 1787 to 1795, called Dekezer Ailstocks in 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 69, 195, 242, 420, 475, 495, 575]. He may have been the husband of Martha Hailstock who was counted in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes in the lower District of Lunenburg County" in 1802 and 1803 with her children Milly, Betsy and Sally, living near Harper's Bridge [Lunenburg County Free Negro and Slave Records, 1802-3, LVA]. She was counted as a free "Mulatto" in Mecklenburg County in 1813 [PPTL, 1806-28, frame 341]. She was the mother of

i. ?Mary Hailestock, born say 1787, married William Thompson, 19 February 1808 Mecklenburg County bond, Abel Stewart security.

ii. Milly, born say 1793.

iii. Sally, born say 1795.

iv. Betsy, born say 1797, called Betsy Haystack when she was counted as a free "Mulatto" over the age of 16 years in Mecklenburg County in 1813 [PPTL, 1806-28, frame 345].

v. ?Nancy, born say 1800, bound by the Mecklenburg County court to John Bradley on 12 April 1802 (no parent named) [Orders 1801-3, 193].

vi. ?William4, born say 1802, bound by the Mecklenburg County court to John Bradley on 12 April 1802 (no parent named) [Orders 1801-3, 201], registered in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 17 December 1827: a man of yellow complexion about twenty three years of age, Six feet and one half inch high...born of a free woman in this County [Free Person of Color, no. 50, p.39].

 

A member of the Ailstock family probably had a child by a slave:

i. Amey Halestock, a "mulatto woman slave" paid 55 pounds currency for her freedom from David Lambert of Richmond City on 14 December 1795 [Hustings DB 2:213].

 

ALFORD FAMILY

1.   Rachel Alford, born say 1745, was a "free Christian white woman" living in Hamilton Parish, Fauquier County, Virginia, on 28 August 1769 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her "last child" to Armistead Churchill and to bind her "Mulatto" son George to George Crump. On 28 June 1779 the court ordered her to appear to show cause why her children should not be bound out, and the court ordered that George Crump, Jr., be summoned to answer the complaint of George Alford [Minutes 1768-73, 130, 133; 1773-80, 383]. She was taxable in Fauquier County from 1787 to 1797: taxable on 2 horses in 1787; taxable on a slave over the age of sixteen and a horse from 1789 to 1791; taxable on Joseph Alford's tithe and a slave over the age of sixteen in 1792; taxable on David and Elijah Alford and a slave in 1793; taxable on Jesse, David and Eliza Alford and a slave in 1794; taxable on George, David and Elijah Alford, William Ashby and a slave in 1795; taxable on George, David and Elijah Alford and William Ashby in 1796; taxable on William Ashby, Elijah Alford and 2 horses in 1797. William Ashby was taxable on Elijah Alford's tithe and a horse in 1799 and 1800 and was a "Negroe" tithable on a horse in 1804. Perhaps he was the emancipated slave of the Ashby family who were taxable slaveowners in the same district as Rachel [PPTL 1782-96, frames 140, 269, 347, 498, 585, 669; 1797-1807, frames 51, 181, 266, 860]. Rachel was the mother of

i. George, born say 1766, "Mulattoe" son of Rachel Alford ordered bound by the churchwardens of Hamilton Parish to George Crump on 28 August 1769 [Minutes 1768-73, 130], a "F. Negro" or "Mulattoe" taxable in Mason County from 1812 to 1830 [PPTL 1805-1846, frames 90, 96, 114, 160, 185, 206, 253, 275, 299, 347, 378, 405, 468, 495, 521].

ii. ?James, ordered bound by the churchwardens of Hamilton Parish to Jeremiah Darnall on 23 March 1772, no parent named [Minutes 1768-73, 371], married Sarah Williams, 5 January 1792 Fauquier County bond. He was listed in Fauquier County as Jeremiah Darnall's tithable from 1788 to 1790, charged with his own tax and a horse from 1792 to 1803 [PPTL 1782-96, frames 175, 231, 325, 498, 553, 827; 1797-1807, frames 266, 373, 537, 560, 826].

iii. Jesse, ordered bound by the churchwardens of Hamilton Parish on 23 March 1772, no parent named [Minutes 1768-73, 371], listed in Fauquier County as Jeremiah Darnall's tithable in 1788 and 1789, charged with his own tax from 1790 to 1793 [PPTL 1782-96, frames 175, 325, 585].

iv. ?Sally, born about 1780, "Free Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:358]. She registered in Fauquier County on 26 June 1820: light eyes, age 47, 5'2", very bright Mulatto, born free. She was probably the mother of Eli, Matilda, and Eliza Olfred who registered the same day [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, nos. 22-25].

v. Elijah, charged with his own tax in Fauquier County in 1802 and 1804 [PPTL 1797-1807, frames 373, 537, 560].

vi. David, a "Black" taxable in Stafford County in 1811 [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 767].

 

ALLEN FAMILY

The Allen family of Virginia may have originated in Northampton or York County, Virginia, because several members were living in those counties in the early eighteenth century. They were

1        i. Jane, born say 1690.

ii. John1, born say 1703, a "negro" taxable in Edward Miflin's Northampton County, Virginia household in Ralph Pigot's list for 1721 [L.P. 1721-31].

iii. Elizabeth, born say 1706, a "Mulatto" tithable in William Stakes' Northampton County, Virginia household from 1724 to 1731 [L.P. 1721-31].

iv. Sarah, born say 1708, a tithable in Nathaniel Andress's Northampton County, Virginia household in 1725 [L.P. 1721-31]. Sarah was a "Mullattoe" who was charged in Accomack County court on 1 December 1730 with having a bastard child [Orders 1724-31, 217].

 

1.    Jane Allen, born say 1690, was presented by the York County court on 16 November 1761 for failing to list herself as a tithable but discharged from paying levies at the next court on 21 December 1761 when she was described as a "poor old woman" [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 298, 313]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. Joseph1, born say 1710.

ii. Samuel1, born about 1713, a "Mulatto" bound until the age of twenty-one, eleven years old on 2 September 1724 when he was listed in the inventory of the York County estate of Joseph Walker, Esq. [DOW 16, pt. 2, 329].

3        iii. Elizabeth, born say 1724.

4        iv. Sarah, born say 1730.

 

2.    Joseph1 Allen, born say 1710, was presented by the York County court on 15 November 1735 for not listing his "Molatto" wife as a tithable [OW 18:237]. He purchased 100 acres in Isle of Wight County on the south side of the Nottoway River and east side of Whitewood Swamp on 21 January 1745/6 with William Bynum as witness [DB 7:292]. He sued Roger Brooks for trespass, assault and battery in Isle of Wight County court on 13 November 1747, but he died before the case came to trial. On 12 May 1748 Mary Allen petitioned the court for administration of his estate [Orders 1746-52, 62, 96, 97]. Purchasers at the 5 December 1751 sale of his estate included James Allen, Thomas Tabour (Taborn), Judy Tabour, late Allen, and John Byrd. The account of the estate, recorded on 15 May 1752, included slaves Ben and Kate in the possession of William Bynum who was guardian of the heirs and security for administration of the estate, and it included a payment of 2 pounds, 17 shillings to John Byrd for quitrents on 100 acres of land in 1749. Joseph Allen's daughter Mary Booth, "late Allen," signed (by mark) the estate appraisal [WB 5:391-2; 6:5]. Mary, her husband Lewis Booth, Judith Taborn, and Joseph Allen (by his guardian Lewis Booth) brought a chancery suit against William Bynum and William Allen on 11 July 1754, claiming that William had sold slaves belonging to the estate valued at 80 pounds [Orders 1749-54, 511; LVA Chancery file 1757-003]. Joseph's children were

i. Mary, born say 1728, wife of Lewis Booth.

ii. Judy1, born say 1730, married William Taborn in Northampton County, North Carolina, according to the Revolutionary War pension application of their son William [M804-2335, frame 0798]. See further the Taborn history.

iii. ?James, a buyer at the 5 December 1751 sale of the estate of Joseph Allen.

5        iv. Sarah2, born say 1733.

6        v. William1, born say 1735.

vi. Joseph2, born say 1736, an infant orphan of Joseph Allen ordered bound out as an apprentice by the court in Southampton County on 14 December 1749. On 14 July 1757 he brought a chancery suit in Southampton County against William Bynum, administrator of his father's estate. The suit was dismissed on 10 July 1761 due to Bynum's death [Orders 1749-54, 34; 1754-9, 363; 1759-63, 122]. On 6 August 1762 he was sued in Isle of Wight County by Benjamin Baker for a debt of 12 pounds which was charged to (his brother) William Allen who was his security [Orders 1759-63, 347, 505-6]. He left a 20 October 1764 Isle of Wight County will, proved 7 August 1766, leaving all his estate to his sister Sarah Allen who he named executor [WB 6:431]. When the will was proved, the court ordered the sheriff to summon Jesse Allen, brother and heir at law of Joseph Allen, to contest the will [Orders 1764-8, 267]. Perhaps the court meant William Allen.

 

3.    Sarah1 Allen, born say 1730, was presented by the York County court on 16 November 1761 for failing to list herself as a tithable. The case was dismissed on 21 December 1761 when she paid her tax [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 298, 312]. She may have been the mother of

i. Mary, born say 1748, taxable in Elizabeth River Parish, Norfolk County, in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 80].

7        ii. Judy2, born say 1750.

8        iii. John3, born say 1755.

 

4.    Elizabeth Allen, born say 1724, was living in York County on 19 August 1765 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish to bind out her children "unless she shew good cause to the contrary" [Orders 1763-5, 450]. She was taxable in James City County on a free male tithable in 1806 and 1807 and head of a household of 2 female "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-15]. She may have been the mother of

9        i. John2, born about 1744.

10      ii. Mary, born say 1750.

11      iii. Martha/ Patty, born say 1760.

 

5.    Sarah2 Allen, born say 1733, was living in Southampton County, Virginia, on 9 August 1750 when her son Arthur (no age or race mentioned) was bound apprentice [Orders 1749-54, 80]. She was the executor and only heir of her brother Joseph Allen's 20 October 1764 Southampton County will, proved 7 August 1766 [WB 6:431]. She was the mother of

12      i. Arthur1, born say 1749.

 

6.    William1 Allen, born say 1735, was an infant orphan of Joseph Allen in September 1751 when the Southampton County court allowed his guardian William Bynum additional time to make a return of his estate to court. The sheriff reported that he had removed himself from the county or was avoiding a summons on 13 October 1757 when Henry Crafford obtained an attachment against his estate for 3 pounds, 17 shillings [Orders 1749-54, 167; 1754-9, 391]. He was living in Northampton County on 13 January 1759 when he sold by Southampton County deed 100 acres on the north side of the Meherrin River and east side of Whitewood Swamp (which was the land his father Joseph Allen purchased 21 January 1745/6) [DB 2:16-17]. He sued William Bynum, the executor of his father's estate, in a chancery case in Southampton County on 14 August 1760, saying he was of age and wanted his part of his father's estate. The court ordered the defendant to make an account of the estate and ordered a commission to make a final decree [Orders 1759-63, 59; LVA, chancery case 1761-008]. He was security for a debt (his brother) Joseph Allen owed Benjamin Baker of Isle of Wight County on 6 August 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 347, 505-6]. He was one of the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Northampton County, North Carolina Company [Troop Returns, 1-3]. He was taxable in Granville County in the list of Philip Pryor for 1767 with (his wife?) Ann Allen, Joseph Allen, and Mary Allen "Mollatoes" [Tax List 1767-1809]. He was called William Allen "Mulatto" in Granville County on 5 March 1770 when he bound his daughter Nancy as an apprentice to James Knott [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol.II]. His children were

i. Joseph3, born about 1755, a "Mullatto" taxable in William Allen's household in 1767, a twenty-two-year-old "mullatto" planter listed in the 1778 Granville County Militia Returns [Mil. TR 4-40 by The North Carolinian VI:726].

ii. Mary, a "Mullatto" taxable in William Allen's household in 1767.

iii. Nancy, born 5 July 1757, twelve years old on 5 July 1769, according to her indenture in Granville County court on 5 March 1770.

 

7.    Judy2 Allen, born say 1750, was a "mulatto" living in Norfolk County on 16 July 1772 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind her daughter Jenny to Jacob Williams. She was called a "free negro" on 18 March 1774 when the court ordered her daughters Jenny and Betty bound to John Ransberg [Orders 1771-3, 92; 1773-5, 32]. She was the mother of

i. Jenny, born say 1770.

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1772.

 

8.    John3 Allen, born say 1755, was a "Mulatto" shoemaker apprenticed for two years to John Muirhead of Norfolk County when he ran away on 10 June 1769 according to the 23 November 1769 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 4]. He was called "a free man of mixed blood" in 1787 when the North Carolina General Assembly emancipated his "mulatto" wife Betty and their child Mary, who he had purchased [Clark, State Records, XXIV:930]. He died before December 1799 when (his brother?) Arthur Allen recorded the account of sales of his Northampton County, North Carolina estate [Gammon, Records of Estates, Northampton County, I:110]. His wife was probably the Betsy Allen who was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:710]. His children were

i. Mary, born say 1780.

ii. ?Arthur2, married Patience Hawley, 14 January 1813 Northampton County bond, no bondsman named.

 

9.    John2 Allen, born about 1744 in Williamsburg, registered in Petersburg on 16 July 1810: a brown Mulatto man, five feet eight 1/4 inches high, about sixty six years old, born free in Wmsburg. His wife Polly Jasper registered the same day: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet one half inches high, fifty years old, born free in Chesterfield County, wife to John Allen [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 635-6]. They were the parents of

i. ?Sally, born about 1777, registered in Petersburg on 11 July 1810: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, thirty three years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 633].

ii. Eliza, born about 1777, registered in Petersburg on 25 August 1795: (daughter of John Allen a free Mulatto) a dark brown Mulatto girl, four feet eleven inches high, eighteen years old, & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 103].

iii. Jane, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 31 December 1794: a light brown, Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, sixteen years old, daughter of John Allen, a free Mulatto, born free & raised in the neighborhood of Petersburg & by the request of her father registered [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 97]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:118b].

iv. ?Dicy, head of a Petersburg household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:118b].

v. ?Jerry, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 13 August 1806: a light brown Free Negro man, five feet six inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 392].

 

10.    Mary Allen, born say 1750, was taxable on a horse and 4 cattle in James City County in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-99]. She may have been the mother of

i. Joseph4, born say 1771, taxable in James City County from 1792 to 1814: taxable on a horse in 1792 and 1793, taxable on 2 free male tithes from 1801 to 1804, called a "mulatto" in 1810 and 1813 [PPTL, 1782-99; 1800-15].

ii. Samuel2, Sr., born about 1773, registered in York County on 19 September 1831: 5 feet 3 1/2 inches high, tawny complexion, about 58 years of age, large eyebrows, high cheek bones, bony face...Born free [Free Negroes Register 1831-50, no. 289].

iii. James, born say 1784, a "Mulatto" taxable in James City County from 1805 to 1814 [PPTL, 1800-15].

 

11.    Martha Allen, born say 1760, was head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:887]. She was taxable in York County on a free tithe and a horse from 1810 to 1812, head of a household of 2 "free Negro or mulattos over 16" in 1813 and taxable on a head of cattle in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 350, 373, 384, 419]. She was probably the mother of

i. Thomas, born about 1784, registered as a free Negro in York County on 18 October 1813: black fellow abt 29 yrs. of age, 5 feet 4-1/2 Inches high, long visage...Born free in the parish of Yorkhampton [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.72].

ii. William3, born about 1790, taxable in York County on his own tithe and a horse in 1814 [PPTL, 1788-1841, frames 402, 419]. He registered as a free Negro in York County on 21 February 1814: of dark complexion abt. 23 years of age, 5 feet four Inches high...large eyebrows & short hair. Born of a free woman [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 76].

 

12.    Arthur1 Allen, born say 1749, was ordered bound apprentice in Southampton County on 9 August 1750. He was living in Southampton County when he, John Byrd, Jr., Hardy Beal, Arthur Allen, Arthur Byrd and James Byrd were sued by Jesse Watkins in a case that was dismissed at their costs on 11 February 1773 [Orders 1768-72, 83; 1772-7, 107]. Arthur was head of a household of 2 "Black" persons 12-50 years old and 4 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Captain Dupree's District of Northampton County in 1786 for the North Carolina state census. He was head of a Northampton County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74] and 10 in 1810 [NC:710]. He purchased 171 acres in Northampton County from Giles and Sarah Cook of Southampton County for 45 pounds on 24 November 1775 and purchased the same land from them eighteen years later on 26 March 1793 for the same price. Arthur and his wife Amy sold it soon afterwards to Nathaniel Edwards for 77 pounds by an undated deed proved June the same year [DB 6:100; 10:42, 48]. He died before 5 June 1815 when his estate was administered by William Hawley. His wife at that time, Esther, received one year's provisions on 8 June 1815 [Minutes 1813-21]. His children were

i. ?William2, born say 1780, married Elizabeth Booth, 12 December 1804 Nash County bond, William Pilgrim bondsman. William Allen was head of a Franklin County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:825].

ii. ?Amy, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:212]. She had a bastardy suit against Anthony Wells on 7 June 1820 and against John Chavers (Chavis) on 6 June 1822 in the Northampton County court [Minutes 1817-21, 281; 1821-25, 110].

iii. Green, son of Arthur Allen and Esther Williams, born in Northampton County on 7 February 1807 and died on 7 August 1879 in Cass County, Michigan [Cass County Death Certificate], married Angelina Wade, daughter of John Wade, 14 October 1829 Northampton County bond, Anthony Deberry bondsman. Green Allen was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

 

Three mixed-race Allen children were bound apprentices in Cumberland County, North Carolina, by order of the court in February 1764. They were

i. Rachel, born about 1754, a "Mullattoe Girl ten years old" in February 1764.

ii. Benjamin, born about 1756, an "orphan Mullattoe Boy".

iii. Juda3, born about 1760, an "Orphan Mullattoe Girl" [Minutes 1759-65, 102, 108].

 

Other members of the Allen family were

i. Richard, (a white man) presented by the Westmoreland County, Virginia court on 29 March 1733 for living in adultery with Ann, a "Mulato woman." The presentment was dismissed because they had married in Maryland [Orders 1731-9, 75a]. She may have been the Ann Allen of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, who was presented by the grand jury on 28 November 1738 for having a "Mulatto" child [Orders 1731-9, 296, 302].

ii. William, a "Mulatto" who acknowledged an indenture to Christian Allen in Henrico County court in February 1767 [Orders 1763-7, 676].

iii. William, a "milato" taxable in the household of James Hemphil in Rowan County, North Carolina, in 1768. "Jude a millata" was also taxable in Hemphil's household [NCGSJ VIII:40].

iv. Simon, head of a Frederick County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:595].

v. John, "free negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:232].

vi. Saunders, head of a Goochland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:682].

vii. Exum, born about 1781, registered in Southampton County on 21 February 1804: age 23, bright mulatto, 5 feet 8 inches high, free Born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 302].

 

ALMAN/ ALMOND FAMILY

Members of the Alman/ Almond family were

i. Sally, taxable on 2 head of cattle in Gloucester County, Virginia, in 1788 and 1789 [PPTL, 1782-99].

ii. Jenny1, head of a Gloucester County, Virginia household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:399].

iii. Edward, born say 1769, taxable in Gloucester County on a free tithe from 1790 to 1797 [PPTL, 1782-99; 1800-20], a "mulo" taxable from 1809 to 1820 [PPTL, 1800-20].

iv. James, born say 1769, taxable in Gloucester County in 1790 and 1791 [PPTL, 1782-99], a mulo taxable in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1800-20]. He was a "FN" taxable in New Kent County from 1805 to 1809 [PPTL 1791-1828, frames 404, 417, 428, 440].

v. Zachariah, born say 1775, taxable in Gloucester County in 1796 and 1797 [PPTL, 1782-99].

vi. Jenny2, "the younger," head of a Gloucester County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:399].

vii. Mildred, head of a Gloucester County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:399], taxable on a slave from 1817 to 1820 [PPTL, 1800-20].

viii. Alice, head of a Gloucester County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:399].

ix. Lewis, born say 1783, a "mulatto" taxable living in Guinea Quarter of Gloucester County in 1804 and 1805 [PPTL, 1800-20].

x. Easter, head of a Norfolk Borough, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:886], listed as a "mulo" in Gloucester County in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-20].

xi. Kitt Allmand, a "free Negro" taxable in Nansemond County on 2 cattle, 16 horses and 3 slaves in 1815 [Yantis, Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia, S-14]. He was head of a Nansemond County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:80a].

xii. Grace Almonds, head of a Washington, D.C. household of 4 "other free" in 1800.

 

Isle of Wight County

1.    Martha Allmond, born say 1760, was presented by the Isle of Wight County court on 4 May 1780 of having an illegitimate "mulato" child [Orders 1780-83, 3]. She was the mother of

i. Randall, born say 1780, son of Patty Allmond, ordered bound apprentice to John Anthony by the Isle of Wight County court on 4 January 1796 [Orders 1795-7, 269]. He was a "F.N." taxable on a horse in Isle of Wight County in 1806 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 732].

 

ALVIS FAMILY

1.    Katherine Alvis, born say 1720, was the mother of a nine-year-old "free Negro" boy named William Alvis who was bound apprentice to Robert Crawley of York County on 21 May 1750 [Deeds 1741-54, 350]. She was the mother of

2        i. William1, born about 1741.

3        ii. ?Israel1, born say 1743.

iii. ?Patience, born say 1745, paid as a witness for John Poe in his York County suit against Anthony and Jasper Peters on 18 March 1765 [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 358].

4        iv. ?Emmanuel1, born say 1747.

 

2.    William1 Alvis, born about 1741, was bound apprentice to Robert Crawley of York County on 21 May 1750. He ran away on 28 February 1751, and Crawley placed an ad in the 14 November 1751 issue of the Virginia Gazette, describing him as a twelve-year-old "Negroe" who was "said to live at Brunswick" [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements, 1:24]. He registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a dark brown free Mulatto man, five feet six and a half inches high, sixty years old, born free & raised in the County of York [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 155]. He was the father of

i. ?Ann, born say 1772, the mother of William Alvis who registered in Petersburg on 24 February 1812: a brown Mulatto man or lad, five feet five and a half inches high, seventeen years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield, son of Ann Alvis a free woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 692].

ii. Nancy, born about 1774, registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet six and a half inches high, spare made with short bushy hair, twenty six years old, daughter of Wm Alvis, born free & raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 156].

iii. Elizabeth2, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet four and a half inches high, twenty two years old, short bushy hair, daughter of Wm Alvis [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 157].

 

3.    Israel1 Alvis, born say 1743, had a child named William Always by Martha Armfield in Bruton Parish on 26 April 1765. He (called Israel Allways) and his wife Martha, "free Mulattas," were married by 13 March 1767 when their daughter Elizabeth Allways was born [Bruton Parish Register, 29, 31]. He was presented by the York County court on 19 November 1770 for selling rum without a license and was one of forty people presented by the York County court on 15 November 1773 for absenting himself from his parish church [Judgments & Orders 1770-2, 105; 1772-4, 438]. On 15 November 1779 he was presented for failing to list his tithables [Orders 1774-84, 240]. He was taxable in York County on 8 cattle in 1782, 9 cattle and 3 horses in 1784 and taxable on a slave in 1796 and 1797 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 69, 91, 106, 218, 227, 235]. He was the father of

i. William2, born 26 April 1765, a 16-21 year old tithable in the household of Israel Alvis in 1785 and taxable in his own household until 1802 [PPTL 1782-1841, frames 106, 138, 190, 253, 263, 274].

ii. Elizabeth1, born 13 March 1767 in Bruton Parish, married William Davenport, 7 July 1796 York County bond.

iii. Emmanuel2, born say 1774, taxable in York County from 1795 to 1797 (called Emmanuel, Jr.) [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 209, 218, 227] and a "free Negro" taxable in Richmond City in 1814 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

 

4.    Emmanuel1 Alvis, born say 1747, was a soldier serving in the Revolution on 15 June 1778 and 21 June 1779 when the York County court allowed his wife Mildred Alvis pay for her subsistence [Orders 1774-84, 163, 219]. He was taxable in York County on 4 cattle in 1785, taxable on 2 tithes in 1797, 1798, 1802, 1803, 1805, and a tithe in 1806 and 1807. Perhaps Mildred was the Milly Alvis who was head of a household of 1 "free Negro & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 106, 180, 199, 209, 227, 235, 274, 284, 304, 314, 325, 384]. He may have been the father of

i. Israel2, born say 1771, called Israel Alvis, Jr., when he was taxable in York County in 1792. He was head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16," one of whom was tithable in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1841, 180, 199, 384, 402] and head of a York County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:870]

ii. Nancy, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 September 1806 (and 13 September 1819): dark mulatto complexion, twenty seven years old, spare made, short bushy hair, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 35, 346].

iii. John, born about 1782, registered in York County on 15 October 1804: a dark Mulatto man about five feet seven and a quarter Inches high, 22 years of age, he has a thick nose...short woolly hair...born of free parents in the Parish of Bruton & County of York [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 27]. He was head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:870] and head of a household of 4 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16," two of whom were tithable in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 384, 402].

iv. Samuel, born about 1791, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a dark mulatto about 31 years of age 5 feet 9-3/4 inches high [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.167]. He was taxable in York County in 1809 and head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16," one of whom was tithable in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 337, 384, 402].

v. William3, born about 1795, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a dark Mulatto about 27 years of old 5 feet 10-1/2 Inches high...Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.167].

 

Other members of the family were

i. William3, born about 1778, called William Alvis, Jr., when he was taxable in York County in 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 243, 253, 263, 274], registered in York County on 15 October 1804: yellowish complexion about 26 years of age 5 feet 8 Inches high...born free in the parish of Bruton [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.25].

ii. John, born about 1782, registered in York County on 20 October 1817: a black fellow about 35 years of age 5 feet 9 1/2 inches high...appears to be pitted with the small pox, long visage. Born of free parents in York County [Guardians' Accounts, 1780-1823, following the index, No. 101].

ii. Adam, born about 1786, taxable in York County in 1807 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frame 325], head of a York County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:870]. He registered in York County on 21 June 1819: a free person born of free parents in the County of York is a small black fellow about 32 or 33 years of age 5 feet 7 inches high, short knotty hair, small black eyes. Born free [Guardians' Accounts, 1780-1823, following the index, No. 110].

iii. James, head of a York County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:887].

iv. Fanny, born about 1789, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a very fat Mulatto about 33 years of age...she has long hair...fierce eyes...born free [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 191].

v. Sally, born about 1793, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: about 29 years of age...short curly hair...born free [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 158].

vi. Elizabeth3, born about 1806, registered as a free Negro in York County on 1 November 1831: tawny complexion about 25 years of age, 3 feet 5-1/4 inches high...long face, large nose, thick pouting lips & long hair which she wears plaited [Free Negroes Register 1831-50, no. 331].

vii. Mariah, born about 1810, registered in York County on 17 October 1831: a mulatto woman about 21 or 22 years old, 5 feet 4-1/4 inches high...straight black hair [Register, no. 310].

 

AMPEY FAMILY

The Ampey family may have been related to the Impey family of Maryland who descended from a white woman in Anne Arundel County. Members of the Ampey family in Virginia were

i. William1, born say 1755, born a "free" taxable head of household with William Ampy, Jr., and 2 horses in Dinwiddie County in the list of Braddock Goodwin in 1797, 1798 and 1799 [PPTL, 1791-99 (1797 B, p.1), (1798 A, p.1), (1799 A, p.1)].

1        ii. William2, born say 1757.

iii. Hannah, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on 15 July 1805: dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet two and a half inches high, twenty four years old, born free in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 340].

iv. Nancy, born about 1784, registered in Petersburg on 9 July 1805: a light Mulatto woman, five feet five inches high, twenty one years old, little freckles under her eyes, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 312]. She was head of a Richmond City household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:370].

v. Betty, born before 1776, "Persons of Color" head of a Cumberland County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:103] and 5 "free colored" in 1830.

 

1.    William1 Ampey, born say 1757, was head of an Amherst County household of 5 persons in 1783 [VA:48]. In October 1782 John Redcross sued him in Amherst County court for slander, and William countersued Redcross for trespass. Both cases were dismissed because they failed to appear. He and John Redcross were sued for a debt of 40 pounds on 3 May 1786 [Orders 1782-4, 49-50; 1784-7, 510]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1782 to 1786 [PPTL 1782-1803, 9, 43, 70] and taxable in Rockbridge County from 1788 to 1795: called William Empy in 1788, William Aimpty (Negroe) in 1790, William Ampey in 1791 and 1792, William Ampy (Negro) in 1793 and taxable in 1800, 1803, 1805, 1806 and from 1809 to 1818 [PPTL 1787-1810, frames 33, 87, 100, 120, 147, 178, 202, 347, 437, 464, 491, 515, 593, 606; 1811-1822, frames 22, 46, 183, 332, 375, 486, 535]. He was the father of

i. William Empey, born about 1786, registered in Rockbridge County on 4 September 1809: a bright mulatto man, about 23 years of age, six feet one inch high, reputed son of Wm Empy of said county [Free Negro Register 1803-28, no. 7]. He was taxable in Shenandoah County from 1809 to 1813 ("Free Black") [PPTL 1800-18, frames 381, 441, 561] and head of a Shenandoah County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:17].

ii. ?Nancy Empty, living at the "forks" in Rockbridge County when she was in a list of "Persons of Colour" in 1813 [PPTL 1811-1822, frame 125].

iii. John Empey, a "F.N." taxable in Rockbridge County in 1819 [PPTL 1811-1822, frame 535].

 

ANCEL/ HANSEL FAMILY

1.    Mary Ancell, born say 1695, was the servant of William Livingston on 20 February 1720 when the York County court ordered that she serve him additional time for having a bastard child and running away for seven weeks. She was probably the mother of a "mulatto boy" named James Hancell who was listed in the York County inventory of the estate of James Goodwin which was recorded in court on 15 February 1719/20 [OW 15:554; 16:10]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. James, born say 1713, a "mulatto boy" on 15 February 1719/20.

ii. Henry, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810, called Henry Ansel [NC:710] and 14 "free colored" in Halifax County in 1820, called Henry Hansel [NC:139].

 

ANDERSON FAMILY

The Anderson family was freed by the 29 October 1712 will of John Fulcher in Norfolk County, Virginia. He appointed Lewis Conner executor and granted his

Negroes men and women and Children there freedom...

And he left them 640 acres of land on Sewall's Point in Norfolk County [WB 9:223]. The freeing of these fifteen slaves prompted the Council on 5 March 1712/3 to recommend that the General Assembly

provide by a law against such manumission of slaves, which may in time by their increase and correspondence with other slaves may endanger the peace of this Colony [McIlwaine, Executive Journals of the Council, III:332].

On 20 March 1712/3 the Andersons exchanged with Lewis Conner the 640 acres left to them by Fulcher's will with 300 acres of land by a deed of confirmation which identified them by name:

Robert Richards, Maria Richards, Kate Anderson, Hester Anderson, Betty Anderson, Lewis Anderson, Sarah Anderson...and our Children to witt -Peter Anderson, George Anderson, Dinah Anderson, Nedd Anderson, Rachell Anderson, Mingo: Anderson, Tony Anderson, and Susan Anderson Infants [Norfolk DB 9:240, 249].

In response to Conner's petition of that same day the Norfolk County court ordered him to transport "the negroes lately set free by the said Fulcher's will" out of the colony and ordered the sheriff to assist him.

On 11 August 1714 Robert Richards was called "a free Negro man" when the Norfolk County court ordered him to stand trial at the General Court in Williamsburg for receiving stolen cloth from John Chichester's slave. Kate Anderson, who was not charged, was found making a shirt for Richards from three yards of the material [Orders 1710-17, 90-2].

The Norfolk County grand jury issued a presentment against "the free Negroes," but the case was dismissed on 21 January 1714/5 without explanation [Orders 1711-7, 51, 103, 105].

Probably in an effort to "prevent their correspondence with other slaves" Fulcher's executor, Lewis Conner, by a deed dated 20 October 1715, swapped their land in Norfolk County with 640 acres of land on Welshes Creek in the part of Chowan County, North Carolina, which later became Martin and Washington Counties [Chowan DB B#1:109].

Although the deed of exchange for the land was acknowledged and recorded in Chowan County, North Carolina, in September 1715, it appears that the Andersons never took possession of the land. And there is no record of the Andersons ever selling the land in North Carolina. There was also a Norfolk County deed of 15 July 1715 from James, a free Negro of Princess Ann County, whereby he sold to Lewis Conner for 50 pounds "land lying and being between Tanner's Creek and Sowell's Point in Norfolk County being an equal part and all that share of land which was given the said James by his deceased master Mr. John Fulcher" [Norfolk County DB 9].

On 18 December 1715 Lewis Conner charged George, a slave of Margaret Willoughby, with attacking him when he met Kate Anderson and George on the "King's Road" [Orders 1710-7, 103, 105, 137].

On 20 May 1715 Lewis Conner sued the Anderson family to get the Chowan County deed admitted into the Norfolk County record and thus reclaim his bond as administrator of Fulcher's estate, but the Anderson family refused. The case was postponed, alternately at the request of plaintiff and defendants for two years, until 21 June 1717 when a Norfolk County jury found in favor of the Andersons that Conner had not fulfilled his obligations [Orders 1710-17, 118-9, 134, 137, 138, 141, 145, 150, 155, 158, 171, 191]. Lewis Conner appealed to the court at Williamsburg which ruled in his favor on 22 October 1717 [Orders 1710-17, 119, 191; The Williamsburg court ruling is referred to in Norfolk Orders 1734-36, 1, 10-11].

On 16 May 1718 the Richards and Anderson families brought suit against Lewis Conners for debt, but the case, "not being prosecuted," was dismissed, and on 20 June 1718 the court presented Robin Richards for "harboring negroes." A 19 August 1718 Norfolk County deed referred to land on the east side of the path that leaves the road to Sowell's Point to where Black Robin and the rest of the free Negroes now lives" [DB 10:2a, 42b].

On 20 December 1734 Edward/ Ned Anderson, one of the children freed by Fulcher's will, sued Lewis Conner's heirs over "Whether there be deed or no deed relating to the land in Bath County in Carolina." The court ruled against Edward, referring to the 22 October 1717 suit at Williamsburg [Orders 1734-36, 1, 10-11].

 

1.    Kate1 Anderson, born say 1670, may have been the mother of Hester, Betty, Lewis, and Sarah Anderson, the other adults listed after her in the above mentioned Norfolk County deed [Norfolk DB 9:240] since the 17 March 1717/8 Norfolk County court case referred to the family as "Kate Anderson and all the free Negroes" [DB 1710-17, 191]. Her son Edward was called "son Born of the Body of Kate a Negro woman set free by the will of said Fulcher" on 20 December 1734 in Norfolk County court [Orders 1734-36, 10-11]. Her children were

i. ?Hester1 Anderson Artis, born say 1687, ancestor of the Artis family of North Carolina and Southampton County, Virginia.

2        ii. ?Elizabeth1/ Betty Anderson, born say 1688.

iii. ?Lewis1, born say 1690 since he was an adult when John Fulcher wrote his 1712 will. He was tithable in his own household in the 1730 Norfolk County List of Tithables, adjacent to Peter Anderson [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1730-50, 47]. Perhaps they were identical to "Lewis" and "Peter" (no last name) who were presented by the Norfolk County court on 16 November 1744 for not listing their wives as tithables [Orders 1742-6, 108]. He married Katherine Bass before 25 July 1748 when her father Edward Bass made his Northampton County, North Carolina will [Original at N.C. Archives]. By this will Katherine received 50 acres near Urahaw Swamp in Northampton County which she and Lewis sold on 12 November 1757 [DB 2:424].

3        iv. ?Sarah1, born say 1691.

4        v. Edward/Ned, born say 1702.

vi. ?Abraham, born say 1703, a "free negro" sued in Princess Anne County court on 2 December 1729 by Alexander Jameson for killing his mare. The court found Abraham guilty and ordered that he pay Jameson two pounds. The same court fined him 2,000 pounds of tobacco for concealing two tithables (one of whom was probably his wife) [Minutes 1728-37, 43, 44].

 

According to the 20 March 1712/3 release for the land in Norfolk County the children of Kate, Hester, Betty, Lewis, and Sarah were

5        i. Peter1, born say 1694.

6        ii. George1, born say 1696.

iii. Dinah, born say 1698.

iv. Rachel, born say 1700.

v. Mingo, born say 1705.

vi. Tony, born say 1707.

vii. Susan, born say 1710.

 

2.    Elizabeth1 Anderson was probably born about 1688 since she was an adult when John Fulcher wrote his 1712 will. She may have been the "Betty Anderson (Free)" who was taxable in Norfolk County in Tanners Creek District in 1735 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1730-50, 144]. She was a "Free Negro" who sued Susannah Flurry on 21 January 1743/4 and William Mansfield on 18 April 1746 in Norfolk County court [Orders 1742-46, 65, 70, 112, 115, 119]. She may have been protesting the treatment of her children bound apprentices to them. She was awarded 40 shillings in her suit of trespass, assault and battery against Susannah Flurry on 16 November 1746 and the same court presented her for not listing her tithables [Orders 1742-46, 108]. Her children may have been

7        i. Lewis2, born say 1713.

8        ii. Margaret1, born say 1730.

 

3.    Sarah1 Anderson, born say 1691, was living in Norfolk County on 19 July 1753 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind her daughter Cate to John Standhope. She was deceased by 18 April 1754 when the Norfolk County court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind out her daughter Nanny to Mereck Meech [Orders 1753-55, 40, 183]. Her children were

i. Kate2, born say 1738, bound apprentice to John Standhope in July 1753. She was called a "free Negro" on 17 October 1755 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind her son Charles Anderson to James Ashley [Orders 1755-9, 18].

ii. Ann, born say 1740, bound apprentice in 1754, taxable on the west side of Church Street in Norfolk Borough in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 32]. She may have been the mother of Samuel Anderson, a "free negro" living in Elizabeth River Parish on 15 December 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him to Francis Jordan (who also lived in Norfolk Borough) [Orders 1773-5, 65].

 

4.    Edward/ Ned Anderson was probably born about 1702 since he was still a child in 1712 when he was freed by Fulcher's will. He was bound as an apprentice tanner to John Jameson on 3 February 1720 in Princess Anne County, the county adjoining Norfolk [Minutes 1717-28, 64] and taxable in Tanners Creek district of Norfolk County in 1733 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1730-50, 105]. He was called the "son Born of the Body of Kate a Negro woman set free by the will of said Fulcher" when he sued Lewis Conner's heirs in Norfolk County court on 20 December 1734 [Orders 1734-36, 10-11]. He may have been the father of

9        i. Martha, born say 1733.

10      ii. Marshall, born say 1740.

11      iii. Dempsey/ Demce, born say 1752.

 

5.    Peter1 Anderson, born say 1694, was a minor when John Fulcher made his will in 1712. He sued James Chapman in Princess Anne County court for trespass on 3 February 1724/5. Henry Holmes and William Easter were his witnesses [Minutes 1717-28, 219, 220]. He was a taxable in Tanners Creek District of Norfolk County in 1731 adjacent to Lewis Anderson and taxable a second time in the same list: "Peter Anderson & 2 more" [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1730-50, 47, 49]. He may have been the father of

i. Joyce, born before 1746, taxable in Town Bridge District of Norfolk County in 1761 and 1765 and in the district of the Town of Portsmouth and the Southern Branch in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 182, 216; 1766-80, 44]. She was awarded 2 pounds currency by the City of Norfolk Hustings Court on 21 February 1763 in her suit against John Stanton for trespass, assault and battery [Orders 1761-9, 33b, 34b].

ii. Juda, born before 1746, taxable in the June 1761 list for Town Bridge District of Norfolk County, perhaps the Judith Anderson whose "Mulatto" daughter, Sally Anderson, was bound apprentice to John Coones in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, in April 1763 [Minutes 1759-64, 59].

iii. Effia/ Affiar, born say 1748, a taxable "free negro" in Western Branch District of Norfolk County in 1765 and in the east division of the Borough of Norfolk in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 211; 1766-80, 37].

 

6.    George1 Anderson, born say 1696, was the ancestor of the North Carolina branch of the Anderson family. On 13 January 1738 he bought 260 acres of land on the south side of Bear Swamp where he was then living in Bertie County, North Carolina, for "2 pounds silver money" from John Bass [DB E:530]. This land became part of Northampton County when it was formed in 1741. In February 1738 he appeared in Bertie court to apprentice a child to Daniel Oquin. This child was identified in the minutes of the 10 November 1741 Bertie court as "Laurance Anderson a Negro servant" [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, I:217, 255, II:341]. George sold his 260 acres in Northampton County on 1 March 1745, and about 1746-48 he was taxed on two tithes in Granville County, North Carolina, in the list of Jonathan White adjacent to Lewis Anderson. He was listed with his wife and children in the 1752 list of Robert Harris:

Anderson, George his wife and sons George, Jermiah and Daughter Kate 5 black tithes [CR 044.701.19]

On 3 June 1755 he bought 240 acres in Granville from Jonathan White. He sold 200 acres of this land to his son Jeremiah on 22 December 1762 and on the same day sold 100 acres adjoining this land to Edward Bass [DB B:458; F:280-1]. On 3 August 1768 Nathan Bass, the illegitimate son of Love Bass, was bound to him as an apprentice. However, Nathan was already living in George's house, taxable in his household in the 1767 list of Stephen Jett [CR 44.701.19]. George's will was proved in Granville County in May 1771. Lovey Bass was probably his mistress since he gave his plantation to her son Nathan Bass and gave her two cows and calves. He gave only one shilling to his wife Mary and children: Jerry Anderson, Kate Harris, and Betty Smith [Original in Granville County, not recorded]. At his death he owed 17 pounds, 8 shillings to Young, Miller & Company of Granville County, British merchants, who listed him in their claims after the Revolutionary War. The claim mentioned George Anderson's executor, John Whicker [NCGSJ XVIII:41]. His children were

12      i. ?Lawrence, born say 1730.

ii. Betty Smith, mentioned in her father's 1771 will, perhaps related to "Sarah Smith (Malato) 1 Black tithe" who was head of her own household in the 1768 Granville Tax List of Len Henley Bullock and the free African American Smith family of Norfolk County, Virginia.

iii. George2, born circa 1735, listed as George's son in the 1751 list of Jonathan White. He was in his own household in 1753, taxable on a "Black" tithe in the list of Robert Harris adjacent to his father.

13      iv. Jeremiah, born before 1740.

v. Katherine, born say 1737, taxable in her parents household in 1751. She was listed in her parents household in 1757 but was not listed with them in 1761. She was probably the "Wife Cathrine" in George Harris' Oxford District household in 1761.

vi. ?Ruth, born say 1738, never taxable in George's household. She was a "Mulatto Servant woman" belonging to Colonel William Eaton, on 5 September 1755 when her two-year-old "Mulatto Girl," Priscilla, born December 1752, was bound to Eaton and his wife Mary [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. II].

vii. Nehemiah, born before 1746 since he was over sixteen years old in 1761 when he was a "black" male taxable in his father's household in the list for Oxford District. He was taxable in his father's household in the 1767 list of Stephen Jett but not in his 1768 list, and he was not mentioned in his father's 1771 will.

 

7.    Lewis2 Anderson was probably born about 1713 since he was not mentioned in John Fulcher's 1712 Norfolk County will. There is no indication of who his parents were, but he may have been the son of Elizabeth1 Anderson. He married Sarah Bass, the daughter of John2 Bass, before 18 January 1732 when Bass made his 18 January 1732 Bertie County will. Lewis was taxable in all the extant colonial Granville County, North Carolina Tax Lists, on himself in the first list circa 1746-48 by Jonathan White adjacent to George1 Anderson, and with his wife and children in the remaining lists [CR 44.701.19]. On 1 August 1750 he paid George Morris 50 pounds for 200 acres on both sides of Fishing Creek in Granville [DB A:320]. He was number 87 in the 8 October 1754 Muster Roll of the regiment of Colonel William Eaton, Granville County, Captain John Sallis's Company [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 723]. On 10 November 1755 Lewis Anderson (signing), his wife Sarah and son Shadrack, all of Granville County, sold (for 31 gallons of brandy to Jethra Bass of Northampton County) 100 acres in Northampton County on the north side of Urahaw Swamp "being all the land bequeathed the sd Sarah Anderson by the will of her father John Bass dec'd" [DB 2:233]. Jethra (Jethro) Bass was the son of Sarah's brother John3 Bass. On 3 April 1762 Lewis bought a further 96 acres on the north side of Fishing Creek in Granville County [DB E:361]. In 1782 he was taxable in Oxford District on 296 acres, a horse, and 5 cattle. His 20 January 1783 Granville County will was proved in May 1785 [WB 1:439]. On 10 March 1784 in confirmation of this will he made a deed of gift to his son Lewis Anderson, Jr., for 200 acres on both sides of Fishing Creek [DB O:299]. We can determine Lewis and Sarah's children from the early Granville County tax lists and Lewis' 1783 will:

i. Shadrack, born before 1739, taxable in his father's Granville household in 1751. His father left him 100 acres but appointed his brother Lewis Jr., as his guardian, so perhaps he was disabled.

14      ii. Leshea/ Lisha, born before 1739.

iii. Mary, born about 1739, taxable in her father's Granville household in 1751 in the tax list of Jonathan White. In 1762 she was taxable with her parents in the list of Saml. Benton for Oxford District & Fishing Creek but not with them in Samuel Benton's 1764 list, so she was probably the "wife Mary" with Reuben Bass who was also in Samuel Benton's 1764 list. She was the daughter, "Mary Bass," mentioned in her father's 1783 will.

iv. Tamer, born about 1742, taxable in 1754 with her parents in John Sallis' tax list. She was also taxable with them in 1755 but not in the next extant list of 1757. She was probably the "wife Tamer" listed with Edward Bass in the Oxford District Tax List of 1761. She was the daughter, Tamer Bass, named in her father's will.

v. Sarah Tyler, born about 1745, first taxable in the 1757 list of Richard Harris. She was listed in her father's household in the 1765 list of Samuel Benton but was not listed with him in Stephen Jett's 1767 list. She may have married Bartlett Tyler who was taxed with "his Wife and Sister Jane" in Robert Harris' 1768 list.

15      vi. Lewis3, born about 1745.

 

8.    Margaret1 Anderson, born say 1730, petitioned the Norfolk County court against Nathaniel Adams on 18 October 1753 [Orders 1750-53, 205]. She, called "Peg Anderson free negro," was tithable in Tanners Creek district of Norfolk County in 1759 and a "free negro" tithable in the Southern Branch District in 1766 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1751-65, 141; 1766-80, 6]. Sarah Spicer sued her in the City of Norfolk Hustings Court on 25 January 1762 [Orders 1761-9, 20b, 22a]. Her children may have been

i. Harry, born say 1750, son of "free Pegg" (no family name mentioned), bound to Nathaniel Adams on 22 May 1752 [Orders 1750-53, 87]. And he was called "Harry Son of Pegg a free Negro" on 19 July 1754 when Richard Scott petitioned the court on his behalf against Nathaniel Adams [Orders 1753-5, 69].

ii. Isaac1, born say 1752, called "Son of free Peg" on 20 March 1755 when the Norfolk County court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind him to Richard Lewelling [Orders 1753-5, 122] and called a "free negro" on 15 November 1757 when the Princess Anne County court ordered him bound until the age of twenty-one to Abigail Lewling to be a wheelwright. On 26 April 1782 the Princess Anne County court paid him 12 shillings for fodder he had provided to the Revolution [Minutes 1753-62, 310; 1773-82, 546]. He married Hester Jordan, 11 December 1781 Princess Anne County bond, Marshall Anderson surety.

iii. Nathaniel1, born say 1754, a "free negro" ordered bound by the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to John Dennis in Norfolk County on 16 January 1755 [Orders 1753-5, 105]. He was a "free Negro" head of a household of 3 "Black" persons in Blackwater Precinct, Princess Anne County, in 1783 [VA:60], taxable on a tithe and a horse in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 1156]. He served as a seaman in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 29]. He was a "N"(egro) taxable in Portsmouth and Elizabeth River Parishes in Norfolk County in 1804 and 1805 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 478, 554].

iv. Margaret2, a "Mullatto" bound by the Princess Anne County court to Amy Burford to read, sew and knit on 19 December 1758 [Minutes 1753-62, 339].

 

9.    Martha Anderson, born say 1733, was living in Lynhaven Parish, Princess Anne County, on 18 May 1762 when the court ordered her sons Joseph and Peter Anderson bound as apprentices to Talbert Thompson [Minutes 1753-62, 488]. Her children were

i. ?Sarah, born say 1750, called "Sarah a free Negro daughter of _____" when the Princess Anne County court bound her to Benjamin Jenkins to learn to read and sew. The court called her a "free Mullatto" when it bound her to Mary Jenkins to read, sew, and knit on 18 March 1760 [Minutes 1753-62, 367, 376]. She was a "free negro" taxable in her own household on the north side of Tanners Creek in Norfolk County in 1766, taxable in the household of her husband William1 Fuller in 1767 and 1768 in the same district [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 5, 49, 73].

ii. Joseph, born 17 April 1751, son of Martha Anderson (no race mentioned), bound to Talbert Thompson to be a sailmaker in Princess Anne County on 18 May 1762 [Minutes 1753-62, 488]. He was called a "free Negro" when he was bound by the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to John Wilson in Norfolk County on 21 October 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 210] and a "Mulatto" when he was bound as an apprentice shoemaker to William Stephenson in Norfolk County on 18 June 1772 [DB 25:fol.247].

iii.Peter2, son of Martha, born 24 May 1754, bound to Talbert Thompson to be a sailmaker in Princess Anne County on 18 May 1762 [Minutes 1753-62, 488]. He defected to the British in January 1776, about the same time Talbot Thompson defected.  He was captured at Great Bridge but escaped and hid out in the woods until 1777 when he joined the British fleet on its way to the siege of Charleston. He was taken to England where he submitted a claim to the Loyalist Claims Commission in which he said that he still had a wife and three children who were enslaved in Norfolk and had lost four chests of clothes, 20 hogs and four beds and furniture [Loyalist Claims Commission, file AO 12/99/354 and AO 13/27/230, cited by Professor Cassandra Pybus, University of Sydney, Australia].

iv. ?Easter2, a "Free Mulatto" bound to Tamer Griffin by the Princess Anne County court on 14 April 1774 [Minutes 1773-82, 39].

v. James, born in September 1768, a nine-year-old "free Negro" bound as an apprentice ropemaker to Lemuel Roberts by the Norfolk County court on 19 December 1777 [Orders 1776-9, n.p.].

 

10.    Marshall Anderson, born say 1740, was sued for a debt of three pounds, nineteen shillings in Princess Anne County court on 4 December 1767, and he was sued for a debt of four pounds by James Whitehurst on 10 May 1782. Isaac Anderson testified against him. On 15 August 1783 the court fined him 1,000 pounds of tobacco for committing adultery with Susanna Pebworth (a white woman) [Minutes 1762-9, 429; 1782-4, 67, 135, 157]. He was a "free negro" head of a household of 8 "Blacs" in Blackwater Precinct, Princess Anne County in 1783 [VA:60], a "free Negro" taxable on himself, Jacob Mills and (his son?) Marvel Anderson in 1784 [Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly 27:267], and taxable on himself and one other person, 2 horses, and 10 cattle in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 1156]. He may have been the father of

i. Marvel, born say 1762, taxable in Marshall Anderson's household in 1784. He married Nancy Whitehurst, 7 January 1791 Princess Anne County bond, Charles Whitehurst surety.

ii. Sally, born say 1767, married Charles Whitehurst 8 February 1788 Princess Anne County bond, Joseph Whitehurst surety.

iii. Betsy, born say 1770, married John Sparrow, 26 March 1791 Princess Anne County bond, Marshall Anderson surety.

iv. Demce, Jr., married Betsy Weaver, 4 January 1796 Princess Anne County bond, Thomas Weaver surety, 5 January marriage.

 

11.    Dempsey/ Demce Anderson, born say 1752, was paid one pound by the Princess Anne County court on 26 April 1782 for corn he had provided to the Revolution [Minutes 1773-82, 546]. He was a "free Negro" head of a household of 6 "Black" persons in Blackwater Precinct, Princess Anne County, in 1783 [VA:60], a "free Negro" taxable on himself and "Negro Jack" (a slave) in 1784 [Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly 27:267], and taxable on 2 horses and 6 cattle in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 1156]. His 11 May 1807 Princess Anne County will, proved 5 October the same year, named his wife Rose and daughter Elizabeth Carter and son Joshua Anderson who was living away from home when his father made his will. His estate included a slave who belonged to Jacomine N. Thorogood [WB 2:319]. Dempsey and Rose were the parents of

i. Elizabeth2, married Stephen Carter, 1 January 1796 Princess Anne County bond, Dempsey Anderson surety.

ii. Joshua.

 

12.    Lawrence Anderson, born say 1730, may have been George Anderson's son since George indentured him as an apprentice in Bertie County in 1738. Perhaps he was the Lawrence Anderson who was in the muster roll of Captain Thomas Goldsmith's Company of Independent Foot, on duty in South Carolina and Georgia from August 25, 1756 to October 24, 1756 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 979]. The free Andersons counted in the 1790 South Carolina census may have been his descendants:

i. John, head of a household of 1 "other free" in Charleston, Berkeley County, St. John's Parish.

ii. William, head of a household of 1 "other free" in Charleston District, St. James Santee Parish.

 

13.    Jeremiah Anderson was born before 1740 since he was taxable in 1751 in his father's Granville County household in Jonathan White's list. He purchased 200 acres for 5 pounds from his father on 22 December 1762 and sold this land on 10 April 1768 [DB F:280; H:415]. By 1764 he was in his own household, taxable with his wife Margaret and (his brother-in-law?) David Mitchell in Samuel Benton's list and was taxable on two tithes in the 1766 summary list. He may have been the Jeremiah Anderson who purchased 108 acres on Jacket Swamp in Halifax County, North Carolina, from Thomas Bull on 5 February 1763 and sold it on 22 August 1775 [DB 13:738]. In 1780 he was taxable in adjoining Northampton County on an assessment of 100 pounds [GA 46.1]. He was head of a Northampton County household of a "Black" person 12-50 years old and 4 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Dupree's District in 1786 for the state census (called Jerry Andrews). He purchased 100 acres in Northampton County on the road in Henry Hart's line on 3 September 1790 [DB 9:11] and was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73]. He may have been the husband of Milla Stewart who was mentioned in the 6 June 1789 Northampton County will of her mother Margaret Roberts, proved September 1794, with Jeremiah Anderson executor [WB 2:54]. Jeremiah died before 1 January 1794 when his 100 acres was released to Mille Anderson, administratrix of his estate. Milly and George Anderson sold this land on 27 August 1798 [DB 10:83, 399]. Two of his children may have been

i. George3, who sold Jeremiah's land on 27 August 1798. He may have been the George Anderson (45 years and older) who was head of a Richmond County, North Carolina household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:204].

17        ii. Charles, born about 1774.

 

14.    Leshea/ Lisha Anderson, born before 1739, was taxable in her father's Granville household in 1751. She had an illegitimate daughter Liddy, born about 1763, who was bound apprentice to Lewis Anderson, Sr., on 3 August 1768. George1 Anderson mentioned Lisha and her daughter in his May 1771 Granville County will. She later married William Tabourn. Her child was

i. Liddy, born about 1763, married Morris Evans, 8 December 1784 Granville County bond with Burwell Evans bondsman.

 

15.    Lewis3 Anderson was born about 1743 since he was first taxable in 1755 in the Granville County list of Richard Harris. He was still in his father's household in 1768 in the list of Stephen Jett. He married Winnie about 1769. She was probably Winnie Bass who was taxable in the household of her parents, Benjamin and Mary Bass, adjacent to the Andersons in the 1768 list of Stephen Jett. Her illegitimate son, Jacob, was bound to Lewis on 3 August 1768 [CR 044.101.2-7]. Lewis purchased 265 acres on Beaverdam Swamp on 4 March 1769, purchased 75 acres on the north side of Fishing Creek on 4 January 1777, and sold the 265 acres on Beaver Dam for 60 pounds on 6 February 1777 [DB H:531, L:69, 127]. In 1777 his taxable property in Oxford District was evaluated at a little over 96 pounds, and by 1782 he was taxable on 75 acres, 2 horses, and 9 cattle. As mentioned above he received a further 200 acres by deed of gift from his father on 10 March 1784. He was taxed on 371 acres in 1785 and 571 acres in 1791. He sold 100 acres adjoining Bass to his son Peter on 8 May 1798 and another 7-1/2 acres to Peter on 14 June 1804 [DB Q:159; R:378]. He was head of a Granville County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:542]. His 29 June 1804 will was proved in May 1805, and his wife Winny made a nuncupative will in Granville County on 31 December 1809 [WB 7:108]. A full list of Lewis' children is given in a refunding bond dated 2 July 1814 in the Granville County estate papers:

i. Jacob, born about 1765, three years old on 3 August 1768 when he was bound to Lewis Anderson, Junior. He was taxed on 100 acres in Oxford District from 1788 to 1803, 386 acres in 1806, and 150 acres on Cattail Creek from 1817-27. He was head of a Granville County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:543], 6 in 1810 [NC:904], 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:3], and 4 in 1830 [NC:28].

ii. Peter3, born prior to 1775, purchased 100 acres from his father on 8 May 1798. On 20 August 1814 Peter sold 43 acres on Fishing Creek to his younger brother Thomas Anderson, and on 31 March 1820 he sold 64 acres to Thomas Hunt [DB Q:159; Y:155; Z:35]. He was head of a Granville County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:582], 10 in 1810 [NC:904], 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:3], and 4 in 1830 [NC:19].

iii. Abel, born before 1775, taxable on a free poll in Granville County from 1796 to 1809, listed in Tabbs Creek District in 1806, in Raglands District in 1809 [Tax List 1796-1802, 8, 61, 151, 346]. He married Susannah Evans, 23 May 1804 Granville County bond, Benjamin Mitchell bondsman. He was head of a Granville County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:914]. He and Jeremiah Anderson owned 240 acres in Vigo County, Indiana [Wright, "Negro Rural Communities," Southern Workman 37:165-66].

iv. George4, born about 1775/6, married Sarah Evans, 14 October 1800 Granville County bond, William Pettiford bondsman. He was taxed on 93-1/2 acres in Oxford District in 1808 [Tax List 1803-09, 289], and was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:904], 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:3], and 3 in 1830 [NC:19].

v. Isaac2, born about 1775, married Melethan Hines, 28 September 1800 Granville County bond, Peter Chaves bondsman. Isaac was taxed on 220 acres in Oxford District in 1796. He made a deed of trust for 220 acres to Randal Minor on 10 November 1815 [DB X:201]. He sold 50 acres on Cattail on 14 March 1818 [DB Y:4] and made further sales between 1821 and 1835 [DB 1:84, 6:555, 6:556]. He was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:545], 4 in 1810 [NC:904], 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:3], and 3 in 1830 [NC:29]. His wife Melethan was living at the age of seventy-five in the household of William Evans in 1850 [NC:104].

vi. Augustine, born about 1776, married Patient Reaves, 19 December 1796 Granville County bond, Abel Anderson bondsman. He was taxed on a free poll in 1797 in Epping Forest District and on 131 acres in Tabbs Creek District from 1798 to 1806. He sold this land on 30 January 1808 [DB T:425]. He was head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:561], 2 in 1810 [NC:908], and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:11]. His estate was administered in 1827 by Lewis Parham. His wife made a 12 September 1842 will.

vii. Rhody, married Darling Bass, 31 January 1796 Granville County bond, Wm. Mitchell bondsman. His 10 November 1839 Granville County will mentioned Henry Anderson who was Rhody's son by Jesse Chavis before her marriage to Darling [WB 16:334].

viii. Rebecca, head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:583]. She married Edward Going, 31 October 1807 Granville County bond, her brother George Anderson bondsman.

ix. Joyce, married Zachariah Mitchell.

x. Winnifred, married Benjamin Mitchell, 19 December 1803 Granville County bond with her brother George Anderson bondsman.

xi. Abraham, born about 1789, head of a Granville household of 6 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:77] and living in Granville in 1850 [NC:126]. He sold 3 acres on the east side of Fishing Creek on 2 April 1816 and later that year on 31 August traded the land he was left by his father to William M. Sneed [DB X:59, 267]. He made a deed of trust to Isaiah M. Paschal about 1840 [DB 9:513].

xii. Benjamin, born about 1790, sold 75 acres on the east side of Harris' Creek and Fishing Creek, bequeathed "by my father Lewis Anderson dec.," on 3 August 1816 [DB X:90]. He was living in Granville County in 1850 [NC:126].

xiii. Wright, born after 1793.

xiv. Lewis4, born about 1799-1800, living in Granville County in 1850 [NC:109]. He married Mary Houze (House), 1 January 1822 Granville County, George Anderson bondsman.

xv. John, born after 1793, taxable on a free poll in 1806 and on 60 acres on Hatcher's Run in Oxford District in 1817-27. He sold this land to Lithy and Eliza Anderson on 16 May 1835 [DB 6:506]. He was head of a Granville household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:898] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:3].

xvi. Thomas, born after 1793, purchased 43 acres from his older brother Peter Anderson on 20 August 1814 [DB Y:155]. He was head of a Granville household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:898], 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:3], and 6 in 1830 [NC:31].

xvii. Sarah, born after 1793, married John Chavis, 8 June 1815 Granville County bond, Abraham Anderson bondsman, W.M. Sneed witness.

 

16.       Charles Anderson, born about 1774, was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:424]. He may have been the Charles Anderson who registered in Norfolk County on 20 May 1811: 5 feet 8 In., 47 years of age of a Dark Complexion blind in the right Eye pitted with the Small pox with a Sink in the right cheek, Born free. His wife Mary Anderson, wife of Chas. Anderson registered on the 2 May 1811: 36 years of age light complexion 5 feet 4 1/2 Inches high, Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, nos. 54, 50]. Their children may have been

i. William, born about 1791, registered in Norfolk County on 20 May 1811: 5 feet 10 In., 20 years of age of a yellowish Complexion, Born free [Register, no. 52]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 26 September 1836: Age 45, 5'10", a Mulatto man...bushy hair, born free in Princess Anne County. His wife registered the same day: Henny Cuffee, now wife of Wm Anderson, age 51, 4'11-1/2", a woman of light complexion, registered in Norfolk County 22 November 1831, born free in Norfolk County. They registered the same day as Charles Anderson who was born about 1812 [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, nos. 377-9].

ii. Nisum (Newsom?), born about 1794, registered on 20 May 1811: 5 feet 8 In., 17 years of age of a Yellow Complexion freckled on the face, Born free [Register, no. 53].

iii. Richard, born say 1800, married Mary Newton (free blacks), 4 December 1824 Norfolk County bond, Isaac Fuller security.

 

17.     Effia/ Affiar Anderson, born say 1748, was a taxable "free negro" in Western Branch District of Norfolk County in 1765 and in the east division of the Borough of Norfolk in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 211; 1766-80, 37]. She may have been the mother of

i. Sally, born about 1774, registered in Petersburg on 27 February 1806: Sally Scott alias Anderson, a dark negro woman, four feet ten inches high, thirty two years old, born free in Norfolk County & raised in the City of Richmond [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 372]. She may have been the Sally Anderson who was head of a Petersburg household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:334b].

ii. Wilson, born say 1778, head of a Norfolk Borough, Norfolk County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:887], perhaps the Wilson Anderson who was head of a Richmond City household of 5 "other free" the same year [VA:343]. He may have been named for John Wilson to whom Joseph Anderson was bound an apprentice in Norfolk County in October 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 210].

iii. Nathaniel2, born say 1780, "a free mulatto man," married Mourning Reid, "a mulatto woman," 5 February 1803 Norfolk County bond, Pliny Skipwith surety.

iv. Hetty, born say 1790, head of a Norfolk Borough, Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:886].

 

Northampton County, Virginia:

1.    Catherine Anderson, born say 1720, was a "Negro" tithable head of her own household in John Savage's list for Northampton County in 1742, 1743, and 1744 (adjacent to Ann McKinnie) [L.P. 1742-44]. Her children bound apprentice in Northampton County were

i. Patience, born about 1738, "daughter of Katherine," bound apprentice in October 1742 [Orders 1732-42, 484].

ii. James, born about 1740, "free Negro" orphan of Catherine Anderson, nine years old in February 1748/9 when he was bound apprentice with his mother's approval [Orders 1748-51, 34; L.P. #34, Catherine Anderson's petition].

iii. ?Sarah, born about 1742, a six-year-old "Negro" bound apprentice on 14 October 1748 [Orders 1748-51, 26].

iv. Solomon, born about 1748, twelve-year-old son of "free Negro Catherine Anderson," bound apprentice on 14 May 1760 [Minutes 1754-61, 230].

 

Another Anderson family not related to the Norfolk County family

1.    Jane1 Anderson, born say 1715, was a white indentured servant living in Prince George County on 14 November 1738 when she sued William Eaton for her freedom dues. On 13 March 1738/9 the churchwardens of Bristol Parish bound out her "Mulatto" daughter Jane Anderson to William Eaton [Orders 1737-40, 209, 241]. She was the mother of

2        i. ?Sarah, born say 1737.

3        ii. Jane2, born say 1738.

iii. ?John, born say 1742, petitioned the Augusta County court against Rev. John Craig on 22 June 1763 for detaining him as a slave. The court ordered him released on the deposition of Joel Barker that he was the son of a free white woman and was bound out by the churchwardens of Brunswick County, Virginia, until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1763-4, 122].

 

2.    Sarah Anderson, born say 1737, was the mother of an unnamed "Mulatto" child ordered bound out by the Southampton County court on 10 February 1757. On 10 November 1757 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her "mulatto" children Amos and Fanny [Orders 1754-9, 333, 395]. On 23 January 1764 the Cumberland County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind her "Mulattoe" child Jane to Edward Mosby and on 23 November 1772 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her "mulattoe" children Jane, Jeffrey and Fan to Peter Bondur [Orders 1762-4, 375; 1772-4, 49]. On 20 April 1780 the Powhatan County court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind out her children Frank and Hannah. On 18 May 1780 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her daughter Fanny, and on her complaint, ordered her son Jeffrey's master John P. Bonderant to post bond of 10,000 pounds currency to bring him back to the county, "it appearing to the court the said Bonderant has conveyed the child to Kentucky and sold him there." On 20 December 1781 she complained to the court that George Breckin was mistreating her children Frank and Hannah who were bound to him as apprentices, but she did not appear in court to prosecute the case. On 15 August 1782 the court bound her son Jeffrey to Peter Pollock [Orders 1777-84, 146-8, 165, 183, 240]. She was the mother of

i. Amos, born say 1755.

4        ii. Fanny, born say 1757.

iii. Jane3, born say 1762.

iv. Jeffrey, born say 1765, a "mulattoe orphan" living in Cumberland County, Virginia, on 28 August 1769 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind him to Thomas Walton. He was bound to Peter Bondur on 23 November 1772 [Orders 1767-70, 414]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Buckingham County from 1795 to 1801 [PPTL 1782-97; 1797-1803].

v. Frank.

vi. Hannah.

vii. Diana, orphan of Sarah Anderson living in Cumberland County on 28 February 1785 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Littleton Parish to bind her to John Lipsford [Orders 1774-8, 204].

 

3.    Jane2 Anderson, born say 1738, the "Mulatto" daughter of Jane Anderson, was living in Prince George County on 13 March 1738/9 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Bristol Parish to bind her to William Eaton [Orders 1737-40, 209, 241]. She may have been the mother of

i. John, born about 1757, registered in Petersburg on 20 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet three inches high, thirty seven years old, born free & brought up as a Turner in the City of Richmond [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 78]. He was head of a Petersburg household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:331].

ii. Clay, head of a Prince George County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:545].

iii. Hall, head of a Charles City County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:942].

iv. Maria, head of a Henrico County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996].

 

4.    Fanny Anderson, born say 1757, was living in Cumberland County, Virginia, on 27 January 1777 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind out her daughter Anne Anderson (no race indicated) to John Jude [Orders 1774-8, 392]. She was the mother of

i. Anne, born say 1775, bound out on 27 January 1777.

ii. ?Dicy, a "Mulatto" bound to Thomas Walton in Littleton Parish, Cumberland County on 26 April 1785 [Orders 1774-8, 321].

 

Indiana

Obadiah Anderson was one of the first "colored families" to settle in Randolph County, Indiana, soon after 1825 [Historical & Genealogical Society of Randolph County, History of Randolph County, 134].

 

ANDREWS FAMILY

1.    Tom1, born say 1700, a "negro" slave, was freed by the 28 November 1720 Surry County, Virginia will of Bartholomew Andrews after the death of Andrews' wife Elizabeth. The will was proved on 18 May 1726 [DW 8:637]. Tom may have been the ancestor of the free Andrews family:

2        i. Thomas2, born say 1770.

ii. Charles, born about 1771, listed as William Cypress's tithable in Surry County in 1794 [PPTL, 1782-90, frame 548]. He registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a light yellow Mulatto man, five feet five and a half inches high, twenty three years old, born free & raised in the county of Chesterfield. He registered again on 19 January 1798: a light yellow Mulatto man, five feet five and a half inches high, twenty six years old, short bushy hair, square well made [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 44, 125]. And he registered in Surry County on 24 July 1799: a bright mulatto man about 5'6" high, 26 years, has curled hair, by profession a Shoe-maker [Hudgins, Register of Free Negroes, 51, 88].

iii. Hannah, head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:362].

 

2.    Thomas2 Andrews, born say 1770, married Rebecca Charity, 26 April 1791 Surry County, Virginia bond, Joseph Byrd surety, 11 May marriage by Rev. Samuel Butler, rector of Southwark Parish Episcopal Church. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Cabin Point district of Surry County in 1793 and 1794. Becky was taxable on a male "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1814 [PPTL, 1791-1816, frames 103, 154, 768]. He may have been the father of

i. Patsy, born say 1791, "dau of Beckey Andrews," married Grayham Scott, 20 April 1810 Surry County bond, David Charity, surety, 22 April marriage by Rev. James Hill.

ii. Archer, born about 1793, registered in Surry County on 25 January 1814: Archer Anders, a very bright Mulattoe man, born of free parents, has long straight hair, very well made, about 21 years of age, and is 5'8-1/2" high. He registered as Archer Andrews on 22 February 1830 [Hudgins, Register of Free Negroes, 51, 88].

iii. Thomas3, born about 1794, registered in Surry County on 25 January 1814: a very bright Mulattoe man born of free parents...about 20 years of age, well made, and is 5'7-1/2" high [Hudgins, Register of Free Negroes, 51]. He married Faithy Walden, daughter of Drewry Walden, 20 February 1815 Surry County bond, Nicholas Scott surety, 22 February marriage by Rev James Warren, Methodist.

 

ANGUS FAMILY

1.    Isabell Angus, born say 1695, had a "mollatto" child before 4 June 1718 when John Cornick (her master?) agreed to pay the churchwardens of Princess Anne County 15 pounds out of Isabell's estate which was in his hands [Minutes 1717-28, 17]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Abigail, a "Mollatto girl" given by Solomon Jones in his 15 September 1721/2 Princess Anne County will to his daughter Susannah after his wife's decease [D&W 1714-24, 435].

ii. Abraham, head of a Petersburg Town household of 6 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [VA:334b].

 

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