BEVERLY FAMILY

Mixed-race members of the Beverly family, probably born before 1750, were

1        i. Barsheba, born say 1740.

2        ii. Sylvester, born about 1742.

 

1.    Barsheba Beverly, born say 1740, was a "Mulato" taxable in Pittsylvania County in John Wilson's list for 1767. She may have been the mother of

i. Priscilla, taxable in Buckingham County on a horse and 3 cattle from 1782 to 1794: a "Mulatto" taxable from 1783 to 1785, a "Mulatto" taxable on a slave in 1787 and 1788 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-97]. She was head of a Buckingham County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:823]. She was listed in the Land Tax Summaries for Buckingham County between 1788 and 1814, called a "mulatto" from 1788 to 1791, living on land on Hatcher's Creek [Ward, Buckingham County Land Tax Summaries, 32].

ii. Jean, taxable in Buckingham County on a horse and 3 cattle from 1782 to 1786: a Mulatto taxable from 1783 to 1785 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-97]. She was head of a Buckingham County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:776].

iii. Betty, head of a Buckingham County household of 14 "other free" in 1810 [VA:775a], perhaps the Betty Beverly who sued Thomas Gibson for false imprisonment in Culpeper County on 23 July 1763 [Minutes 1763-4, 404, 423].

iv. William, taxable in Buckingham County in 1782, a "Mulo" taxable in 1789, taxable on a horse from 1797 to 1803, a "Mulo" taxable in 1798, [Personal Property Tax List 1782-97; 1798-1803]. He was head of a Buckingham County household of 15 "other free" in 1810 [VA:775a]. He married Edy Pinn in Amherst County in November 1800 [Sweeny, Marriage Records of Amherst County].

 

2.    Sylvester Beverly, born about 1742, was a Revolutionary War soldier from Franklin County, Virginia, who enlisted in 1776 and served until the end of the War. He was eighty years old and owned 126 acres of land in 1822 when he petitioned the Legislature for a state pension [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 30; LVA petition dated 25 February 1823, reel 235, box 296, folder 103]. Perhaps he was the Silvanus Beverly who was taxable in Buckingham County on a horse and 4 cattle in 1782, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1783 and 1784 [PPTL 1782-97]. Sill Beverly was taxable in Franklin County in 1799, head of a Fluvanna County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:493] and listed as a "free negro" in Franklin County from 1804 to 1821 [PPTL, 1786-1803; 1804-21, frames 3, 41, 159, 195, 231, 269, 297, 306, 361, 399, 466, 745, 781]. He was probably the father of

i. Anna, married Benjamin Chavers, 24 August 1801 Franklin County bond, Silvester Beverly surety.

ii. Herod, married Lucy Freeman, "Negro, freed slave of John Early, dec'd," 23 February 1808 Franklin County bond. He was head of a Fluvanna County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:480] and taxable in Franklin County from 1809 to 1818 [PPTL 1804-21, frames 159, 195, 231, 269, 306, 361, 369, 399, 466, 534, 622].

iii. Rebecca, married Jesse Shavers, 16 December 1805 Franklin County bond, Harod Beverly surety.

iv. Elizabeth, married George Marrs, 23 February 1808 Franklin County bond, Harod Beverly surety.

v. Polly, married Martin Couzens, 31 March 1814 Franklin County bond, Benjamin Chavis surety.

 

Other members of the Beverly family were

i. Reuben, taxable in Buckingham County in 1787, taxable on a horse in 1791, taxable with George Beverly in 1798 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-97; 1798-1803].

ii. Jonathan, a "Mulo" taxable in Buckingham County in 1798 and from 1804 to 1809, taxable on a horse from 1799 to 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1798-1803; 1804-9], head of a Buckingham County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:820]. He registered as a free Negro in Amherst County in July 1847: aged about 62 years, 5 feet 10 inches high, dark complexion [McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 72].

iii. Susannah, charged with the Buckingham County tax of William and F. Beverly in 1798 [Personal Property Tax List 1798-1803].

iv. Francis, a "bachelor," married Mary Williams, a "spinster," 29 November 1792 Amherst County bond with the consent of her mother Nancy Williams, Rolley Penn surety. He received a grant for 10 acres in Buckingham County on both sides of Booring Bridge on 1 May 1818 [Grants 67:242].

v. Charles, taxable in Buckingham County in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List 1798-1803], head of a Buckingham County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:775a], perhaps the Charles Beverly who married Mary Johns, 29 March 1827 Amherst County bond, James Johns security.

vi. Major, taxable in Rockbridge County from 1792 to 1819: called a "Free Negroe" or "F. Mulatto" starting in 1801, a farmer on Moore's plantation adjoining Berrhill's with wife Patsy Beverly, daughter Matilda and son Cornelius living near Emma Beverly in 1813; above the age of 45 in 1815 [PPTL 1787-1810, frames 134, 161, 188, 213, 238, 270, 303, 360, 388, 421, 448, 475, 502, 529, 561, 578, 622; 1811-1821, frames 4, 72, 125, 219, 260, 260, 326, 368, 478, 529], head of a Rockbridge County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:290]. Patsy, born before 1776, was head of a Rockbridge County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

vii. Lucy, head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:111a].

viii. Samuel, born about 1797, married Rhoda Terry on 12 March 1819 in Amherst County, William Terry witness [Sweeny, Marriage Records of Amherst County]. Samuel and Rhoda registered as free Negroes in Amherst County on 19 December 1850: Samuel Beverly Bright mulatto - Strait hair, somewhat grey - Five feet, Six Inches & Half - Fifty three years old; Rhoda Beverly wife of Saml Beverly - Bright mulatto - Strait hair - Five feet three & half Inches high - Fifty three years of age [McLeRoy, Strangers in their Midst, 73]. William Terry was head of an Amherst County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:287].

ix. James, married Polly Redcross, in Amherst County in 1820.

 

BIBBENS/ BEAVENS FAMILY

1.    Mary Bibens, born say 1700, was presented by the grand jury of Accomack County on 4 November 1718 for having a "Mallatto" bastard child in Accomack Parish [Orders 1717-19, 23, 28]. She was called a white Christian woman on 1 September 1719 when she was ordered to be put in prison for the same offense, but the order was reversed when Captain Edward Scarborough agreed to pay her fine. At first she refused to name the father, then named "one Hille an Indian" on 2 September 1719, and later that same day admitted that the father was "one Negro Slave named Jack belonging to Mr. Edmd. Scarburgh." She was presented again for having a bastard child on 4 October 1721 and on 7 May 1723 when she was called Mary Bivens [Orders 1719-24, 5, 5b, 6, 36, 59]. And on 2 September 1729 she was accused of having two more "Mullato" bastard children. On 8 December 1730 her two-year-old "Mullattoe Boy" Talflett Bibbens was ordered bound to Edmund Scarborough [Orders 1724-31, 168, 201]. She was called Mary Bibbins, otherwise Bevins, in adjoining Northampton County on 12 March 1733/4 when she was presented for having another "Mulatto" bastard child. She was sold for five years [Orders 1732-42, 97, 102]. She died before 8 August 1749 possessed of so small an estate that the Northampton County court ordered the sheriff to dispose of it [Orders 1748-51, 115, 135]. She was the mother of

2        i. Taflett, born about 1728.

3        ii. ?Elizabeth, born say February 1733/4.

 

2.    Taflett Bibbens, born about 1728, was a two-year-old "Mullattoe" boy bound apprentice in Accomack County on 8 December 1730. He was called Taffley Beavans when he was a "Mullatto" taxable in Accomack County from 1783 to 1788: taxable on 2 tithables and 2 horses in 1784, taxable on a free male tithable but free from taxation on his own tithe in 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frames 39, 129, 262]. The Accomack County court exempted him from taxation due to age and infirmity on 29 May 1792 [Orders 1790-6, 379]. Perhaps his widow was Ann Beavans who was a "fn" taxable on 2 free males and 3 horses in Accomack County in 1798 and 1799 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 356, 394], perhaps identical to Nancy Bibbens, sister of George Beckett, a Revolutionary War veteran from Accomack County. Nancy was head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist, v.2, no.3, 129]. Taffley may have been the father of

i. Solomon Bevans, a "fn" taxable in Accomack County from 1799 to 1810 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frames 395, 592, 723], head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:9].

ii. Peter Bevans, head of an Accomack County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:9]. He registered in Accomack County: born about 1767, a light yellow, 5'4", born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 738].

iii. Thomas Bibbins, born about 1770, married Arena Becket, 2 August 1800 Accomack County bond, Peter Bibbins surety. Thomas Bevans was head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:10]. Tom Beavan registered in Accomack County: born about 1770, yellow complexioned, 5'6-1/2", born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 729]. His wife was called Tinney Beavans when she was counted in his household in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frame 833].

iv. Lot Bevans, head of a Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist, v.1, no.3, 103].

v. Catherine Beavans, head of an Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:12].

vi. Mary, married Edmund Nutts, 18 June 1800 Northampton County bond, Southy Collins surety, with the consent of Nanny Bibbins.

 

3.    Elizabeth Bibbens, born say February 1733/4, was probably the illegitimate "Mulatto" child born to Mary Bibbins in Northampton County before 12 March 1733/4. On 14 May 1751 she was presented for bastard bearing. She was the mother of Thomas Bibbins, a "Mulatto" who was bound to Holloway Bunting in Northampton County on 12 March 1750/1 [Orders 1732-42, 97, 102; 1748-51, 345, 376, 398]. She was the mother of

i. Thomas, born before 12 March 1750/1, bound to Holloway Bunting. He was called "Thomas Bevans free Negro" on 12 April 1774 when the court ruled that he should serve his master Edmund Scarbrough until the age of thirty-one [Minutes 1771-7, 225, 240].

4        ii. Mary, born about 1754.

 

4.    Mary Bibbens, born about 1754, "child of Betty Beavans Negro," was ten years old when she was bound to Robinson Savage, Jr., in Northampton County on 11 September 1764 [Minutes 1761-5, 132]. She was called Mary Beavans when she registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 10 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354]. She was a "Negro" taxable on a free male in Northampton County in 1802 and 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 325, 345]. She was the mother of

i. Samuel, born in December 1764, son of Mary Bibbins, bound to Thomas Bullock on 12 November 1783 [Orders 1783-7, 51]. He was called Samuel Beavans when he registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County in 1796 and 1797 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 206]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:218].

ii. ?Moses Beavans, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. He married Nancy West, ____ 1807 Northampton County bond and was a "free negro" man living with a "free negro" woman on Harrison's land in Northampton County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1823, frame 529]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:218].

iii. ?Reavel, head of a Northampton County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:217A].

iv. John Bevans, a "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County in 1797 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 224].

 

BIBBY FAMILY

1.    Mary Bibby was a "Mulatto" born before 24 July 1727 when the churchwardens of Bristol Parish, Virginia, ordered her bound to William Matt [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 36]. On 22 March 1759 she was in Granville County where she successfully sued William Laneer for release from her servitude [Owen, Granville County Notes, Vol I]. In 1761 Mary was a taxable "free black" in the Granville County household of Jesse Ingram in the list of Gideon Macon for Goodwin's District:

Jesse Ingram

Richd Ingram

moll Beb 1 free black

Charles 1 male slave over 16 years [CR 44.701.19].

 

She was called Mary Bibbey in Jesse Ingram's household in 1762 [NCGSJ XIII:26]. In 1771 she was taxable in Joshua Ingram's household in William Person's list for Bute County:

Joshua Ingram List Edmond Biby Mary biby Negr. Chales [CR 015.70001].

 

She was the wife of Ingram's slave Charles [28 June 1893 letter from Narcissa Rattley]. In November 1771 the Bute County court ordered her "base born" children bound as apprentices [Minutes 1767-76, 194; WB A:218, 226, 227, 232, 233]. Perhaps they were ordered indentured because Joshua Ingram had become infirm. His will was presented in February 1772 Bute County court [Minutes 1767-76, 211]. Her children were

i. Edmund, born about 1758, taxable in 1771. He was ordered bound to John Pinnion in November 1771. He was listed among the Continental soldiers from Bute County who enlisted for nine months on 3 September 1778: Edmon Bibby, Place of Abode Bute County, born N.C., 5'4", 20 years old, Dark Fair, Dark Eyes [NCAr:Troop Returns, Box 4, by NCGSJ XV:109].

ii. Fanny, born about 1759, twelve years old when she was bound an apprentice in November 1771 [WB A:232]. She married William Dunstan, 11 July 1778 Bute County bond.

2        iii. ?Thomas, born perhaps 1761.

iv. Solomon, born about 1764, seven years old in November 1771 when the Bute County court ordered him bound an apprentice planter to Peter Goodwin [WB A:233]. He received a pension for his Revolutionary War service as a private in the Tenth Regiment, Yarborough's Company, of the North Carolina Continental Line in 1781. He was living near Sandy Creek in the part of Franklin County which was formed from Bute County when he volunteered. He was called a "free person of Color" on 18 June 1841 when he applied for a pension while living in Franklin County [M805-85, frame 0047]. He married Charity Young, 25 December 1789 Franklin County bond. He was head of a Franklin County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:58] and 7 in 1810 [NC:825].

v. Absolem, born about 1764, seven years old in November 1771 when the Bute County court ordered him bound an apprentice planter to John Pinnion [WB A:227]. He enlisted in the Tenth Regiment, Dixon's Company, of the N.C. Continental Line on 18 May 1781 for one year and was discharged on 21 May 1782 [N.C. Historical & Genealogical Register II:185]. He was head of a Franklin County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:58] and 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:825].

vi. William, born about 1766, five years old in November 1771 when the Bute County court ordered him bound an apprentice planter to John Pinnion [WB A:226].

 

2.    Thomas1 Bibby, born say 1761, enlisted as a private in Ballard's Company in the Tenth Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line on 29 June 1779 for nine months and was discharged 1 December 1779. He was living in Burke County when he made a declaration in the county court to obtain a pension [T&C, Box 14 by The North Carolinian VI:753]. He may have been the Thomas Bibby who was taxable in Petersburg in 1803 and 1804 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 74, 111], "F.N.," who married Phebe Ligon, 22 September 1806 Chesterfield County, Virginia bond with John Ligon bondsman. His children were

i. ?Betsy, head of a Petersburg household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:118b].

ii. Polly (F.N.), born perhaps 1788, "daughter of Thomas Bibby (F.N.), married Embry Tomkins, 30 December 1806 Chesterfield County bond. Embry was head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" and six slaves in 1810 [VA:329].

iii. ?Ned, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 September 1813: twenty three years old, bright yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 191]. He married Elizabeth Ligon, born about 1789 ("24 years old") 13 September 1813 Chesterfield County, Virginia bond.

iv. ?Thomas2, born about 1813, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 11 June 1827 (and on 13 June 1836): fourteen years old, Mulatto complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 572, 1117].

 

There were also members of the Bibby family who were apprenticed in Cumberland County, North Carolina, no parent named:

i. Hannah, born about 1746, twelve-year-old "Malatoe girl late in possession of Mary Jones," bound to Stephen Phillips on 21 January 1758 [Minutes 1755-9, 33].

ii. Edward, born about 1753, a "Malatoe Child late in the possession of Mary Jones Decd," bound apprentice to Colonel Thomas Armstrong in Cumberland County on 21 January 1758 [Minutes 1755-9, 33]. He was head of a Cumberland County household of one "other free" in 1810, called Ned Beebe [NC:565].

 

BIDDIE FAMILY

Members of the Biddie family living in Lunenburg County, Virginia, about 1760-1770 were

1        i. Thomas, born say 1740.

ii. Edward, born say 1742, taxable in Lunenburg County on 4 tithes and 300 acres in 1764 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 247]. This may have been the land which Thomas Biddie purchased in 1761. He sued Edward Ragsdale in Lunenburg County court on 11 April 1771. The case was discontinued because Biddy failed to prosecute it further [Orders 1769-77, 109]. He was head of a Ninety-Six District, Union County, South Carolina household of one white male over 16 years of age, two under 16, and four females in 1790 [SC:92] and a Union District household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [SC:229].

iii. Peter, born say 1750, successfully petitioned the Lunenburg County court on 14 March 1771 for his freedom from his master, Edward Ragsdale [Orders 1769-77, 108, 122]. He was head of a Ninety-Six District, Union County, South Carolina household of one white male over 16 years of age, one under 16, and two females in 1790 [SC:92].

 

1.    Thomas Biddie, born say 1740, purchased for 60 pounds 400 acres on the head branches of Flat Rock Creek in Lunenburg County jointly with John Evans (alias Epps) on 6 October 1761 [DB 6:473]. He and his wife Susannah Biddie sold their half of this land to Evans on 10 January 1771 [DB 11:434]. He was taxable on two tithes and 200 acres in Lunenburg County in 1769 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 282]. He purchased 400 acres on Flat Rock Creek jointly with John Epps, and he and his wife Susannah sold their half to Epps on 8 January 1771 [DB 11:433]. A number of suits against him were dismissed by the Lunenburg County court: Isaac Reeves' on 11 June 1767, John Ross' on 10 December 1767, John Milleson's on 14 February 1771, and John Tabb's on 12 March 1772. He sued Joseph Williams, the former sheriff, on 13 April 1769 and Jonathan Patteson, one of the justices, on 16 Nov 1771 [Orders 1766-69, fol. 67, 120, p. 140; 1769-77, 93, 166, 177, 178, fol. 206]. On 17 December 1771 a plat for 100 acres on the Tiger River, Craven County, South Carolina was surveyed for him, and on 22 May 1772 David Hopkins recorded a plat for land adjoining his in Berkeley County [S.C. Archives series S213197, item 72; S213184, vol. 17:66]. He was head of a Ninety-Six District, Union County, South Carolina household of four white males over 16 years of age, two under 16, and three females in 1790 [SC:92] and 9 "other free" in Union District in 1800 [SC:229]. He may have been the father of

i. Edmon, head of a Union District, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [SC:232A].

ii. Mary, head of a Union District, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:231].

iii. John, born 17 July 1762, head of a Union District household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [SC:230]. He made a declaration in Union District court on 30 October 1832 to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Lunenburg County on 17 July 1762 and lived in Union District when he volunteered. He moved to Marshall County, Alabama, by 26 December 1837 when he applied to have his pension paid there. His widow Sarah applied for a survivor's pension on 5 November 1842. Elizabeth Lee testified for her, stating that they were married in Union District at the house of Presley Williams, Esq., and that John died on 14 October 1841 [M805-85, frame 0372].

 

BILBERRY FAMILY

Members of the Bilberry family were

i. Benjamin, residing in Richmond City in 1780 when he petitioned the legislature for permission to free his wife Kate, a slave of Abraham Crowley, that he had paid for with land [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 229]. He was a "free" taxable in Richmond City in 1792, taxable on a slave in 1793 and 1795, a "fn" taxable in 1796. Kate was taxable in Richmond City on 2 horses in 1788 and on a slave 12-16 years old in 1794 [PPTL 1787-99; 1799-1834].

ii. James, taxable in Richmond City in 1788, a "free" taxable in 1791, a "FB" taxable in 1796.

iii. Aggy, head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:324], a Free Negro" taxable on 2 pictures above 12 inches in 1815 and a "Free Colored" person taxable on a slave in 1819.

 

BING FAMILY

Members of the Bing family were

i. Matthew, head of a Beaufort District, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 8 in 1800 [SC:104].

ii. John, head of a Beaufort District, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:11].

iii. Isaac, head of a Barnwell District, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:65] and 6 "free colored" in 1830 in John Dungee's household.

iv. William, a "free Negro" taxable in Winton County, South Carolina, in 1800 [Tax Returns 1787-1800, S.C. Archives Microfilm AD 942, frame 313].

v. Nancy, born before 1776, head of a Barnwell District, South Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Celah, born before 1776, head of a Barnwell District, South Carolina household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

 

BINGHAM FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Bingham, born say 1718, was presented by the Northampton County, Virginia court on 13 November 1739 for bastard bearing, but the court ordered the presentment dismissed on 11 December 1739 because she was an "Indian" [Orders 1732-42, 372, 378]. She was the mother of

i. ?Mary, born about 1738, a six-year-old orphan bound by the Northampton County court to Richard Parrimore on 12 June 1744 [Orders 1742-8, 163].

ii. ?Southy1, born about 1742, a two-year-old orphan bound by the Northampton County court to Richard Parrimore on 12 June 1744 [Orders 1742-8, 163]. He was sued by John Evans in Northampton County court for 1 pound, 10 shillings on 13 December 1785. Ephraim Stevens was his security [Orders 1783-7, 370, 421, 542]. The court dismissed his suit against the administrator of Harmonson Joyne, deceased, on 17 August 1787, ruling that the plaintiff had not suffered any damages. On 11 November 1788 and 14 March 1792 he was presented for tending crops on the Indians' lands [Orders 1787-9, 20; 1789-95, 193]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1785 to 1797, called a "free Negro" in 1797 and 1802 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 44, 171, 224, 325, 387].

iii. Daniel, born in December 1743, child of Elizabeth Bingham, seven years old on 12 March 1750/1 when the Northampton County court ordered the churchwardens to bind him to Thomas Grice [Orders 1748-51, 348].

iv. Elishe, born in August 1746, four-year-old orphan bound to Jacob Abdell on 12 March 1750/1 [Orders 1748-51, 349].

v. ?Lucretia, born say 1748, complained against her master John Waterfield, Sr., and Honour Mapp for ill usage on 15 May 1765. The case was dismissed in August when the parties agreed [Minutes 1761-5, 172; 1765-71, 6]. She was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:218].

2        vi. ?Scarburgh, born 1 January 1750.

vii. ?Elizabeth2, born in August 1751, bound to William Scott, Sr., on 9 September 1766 [Minutes 1765-71, 64]. She married Nathan Drighouse, 23 January 1794 Northampton County bond.

 

2.    Scarburgh Bingham, born 1 January 1750, was an orphan bound by the Northampton County court to Rev. Henry Barlow on 12 August 1760 and a twelve-year-old "Indian" bound to Savage Cowdry 12 January 1762. Abraham Collins won a case against him for 10 pounds on 8 June 1779, and Mary Jeffery won a case against him for 30 pounds on 11 July 1780 [Minutes 1754-61, 230; 1761-1765, 4; 1777-83, 167, 252]. His suit against William Dixon abated on 14 August 1793 by his death [Orders 1789-95, 302]. Scarbrough was the parent of

i. Southy2, born in November 1774, son of Scarbrough bound by the Northampton County court to John Elliott on 13 September 1780 [Minutes 1777-83, 278].

ii. ?Henry, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 10 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354]. He married Ritter Collins, 13 June 1794 Northampton County bond, Ralph Collins surety. He was taxable in Northampton County in 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 171].

iii. ?Littleton, born about 1782, a thirteen-year-old bound to Hillary Stringer on 11 February 1795 [Orders 1789-95, 412]. He married Rosey Beckett, 18 September Northampton County bond, Moses Bingham security. He was taxable in Northampton County in 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 345].

iv. ?Moses, born 28 December 1773, bound to Spencer Wilson on 8 September 1778 [Minutes 1777-83, 102]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1795 to 1805: called a "Negro" in 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 189, 386]. He married Esther Collins, twenty-five-year-old daughter of Rafe Collins, 24 November 1819 Northampton County bond.

 

They were the ancestors of

i. Tinsey, born say 1776, married William Gardner, 25 November 1797 Northampton County bond, Isaac Stevens security. William was taxable in Northampton County in 1800 and Tinsey was a "N"(egro) listed there in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1823, frames 286, 536].

ii. Tamar, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358], married Ralph Collins, 20 December 1799 Northampton County bond, John Simkins security.

iii. Jenny, married Isaac Gustin, 13 November 1804 Northampton County bond, Jacob Floyd security.

iv. Betsy, married Thomas Baker, 5 December 1805 Northampton County bond, Nathan Drighouse security.

v. Lucy, married Abraham Nedab, 29 December 1813 Northampton County bond, with consent of Tinsey Weeks, mother of Lucy.

vi. Polly, married William Jeffery, 26 January 1803 Northampton County bond, Samuel Beavans security.

 

BINNS FAMILY

1.    Jeremiah1 Binns, born say 1750, was head of a New Kent County household of 7 whites (free persons) in 1785 [VA:92]. He was taxable in the lower end of Saint Peter's Parish in New Kent County from 1782 to 1811: taxable on a horse and 3 cattle from 1782 to 1800; taxable on Jeremiah Binns, Jr.'s tithe in 1789 and 1790; taxable on Jeremiah, Jr., and Reuben Binns' tithe in 1792; 2 horses in 1802; 2 tithes and a horse in 1803; listed as a "M"(ulatto) in 1807, 1810, and 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frame 9, 19, 48, 81, 93, 109, 125, 144, 159, 180, 237a; 1791-1828, frames 225, 264, 279, 293, 304, 316, 328, 353, 367, 379, 417, 429, 441, 452, 462]. He was head of a New Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:744]. He was probably the father of

i. Jeremiah2, Jr., born say 1772, taxable in New Kent County from 1789 to 1820: 16-21 years of age when he was listed as Jeremiah Binns' tithable in 1789, 1791 and 1792; taxable on a horse from 1801 to 1803; taxable on a slave and a horse in 1806 and 1809; listed as a "M"(ulatto) in 1807 and thereafter [Personal Property Tax List 1791-1828, frames 353, 367, 379, 417, 429, 441, 462, 473, 484, 491, 496, 509, 573], head of a New Kent County household of 6 "other free" and a white woman aged 26-45 in 1810 [VA:746] and a "F.c.p." head of a household of 10 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Reuben, born say 1775, taxable in New Kent County from 1792 to 1807: 16-21 years of age when he was listed as Jeremiah Binn's tithable in 1792; taxable on a horse in 1802; taxed on 2 free tithables in 1806; listed as a "M"(ulatto) in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1791-1828, frames 353, 367].

iii. John, a "M" taxable in New Kent County in 1801, 1802 and 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1791-1828, frames 353, 367, 392].

 

BIZZELL FAMILY

Members of the Bizzell family of North Carolina were

i. David, born say 1735, taxable in Hertford County on two persons from 1768 to 1770, taxable on a horse and two cattle in District 4 of Hertford County in 1779, and taxable on 60 acres and one poll in Nathan Harrel's List for 1784 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 15; GA 30.1; LP 64.1]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 3 "other free" in 1800.

1        ii. Solomon1, born say 1740.

 

1.    Solomon1 Bizzell, born say 1740, was taxed on 40 acres, 20 cattle, and 30 pounds cash in District 3 of Hertford County in 1779 and was taxed on 260 acres and one poll in Nathan Harrel's List for 1784 [G.A. 30.1, 64.1]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:26] and 11 in 1800. The eighteenth and early nineteenth-century records for Hertford County were destroyed in courthouse fires, so we can only guess that his children may have been

i. John, born before 1776, head of a Hertford County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 and 13 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:188]. He was one of the "Sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in November- December 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free African Americans [NCGSJ XI:252].

ii. Noah, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:98].

iii. Solomon2, head of a Hertford County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:188].

iv. William Bussell, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:48]. He was probably related to John Buzzel, a "Mulatto," whose son Willie Abel Hammond had a guardian, William Vines, appointed for him in Beaufort County court in September 1809 on a bond of one thousand pounds. In December 1810 Vines was permitted to sell the perishable part of the estate of Margaret Hammond [Beaufort County Court Minutes, 1809-14, n.p.].

 

BLACK FAMILY

James Black and Peter Black were in Craven County, North Carolina, on 21 June 1745 when they complained to the County court that

they were free born person[s] of the County of Essex in Virginia, & brought into this Province by Jno. Heath & by sd. Jno. Heath sold to Wm. Handcock as Slaves ...

The court ruled that they were free men [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, III:465]. Perhaps they were brothers:

1        i. James, born say 1715.

2        ii. Peter, born say 1720.

 

1.    James Black, born say 1715, was called "James Black free Negro" in the muster roll of Abner Neale's Craven County Company in 1754 and 1755 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 708]. His probable descendants were

3        i. Martin1, born in 1751.

4        ii. Lettice1, born about 1752.

 

2.    Peter Black, born perhaps 1720, complained to the 21 June 1745 Craven County court that he was held as a slave [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, III:365]. Perhaps his widow was Betty Black, born say 1730, taxable on one female "Black" tithe in Craven County in 1769 [SS 837]. She was called Elizabeth Black by the 14 September 1770 Craven County court when it ordered the clerk to issue her a certificate that she was insolvent and no longer liable to be taxed [Minutes 1767-75, 158b]. Her children were probably those who were bound out six months after this court order:

5        i. Lettice2, born 15 September 1761.

ii. James2, born 15 March 1764, bound to Thomas Heath to be taught farming by the 12 September 1771 Craven County court.

iii. David, born 10 March 1766, ordered bound to Thomas Heath to be taught farming by the 12 September 1771 Craven County court, married Peggy Clear, 7 January 1806 Craven County bond.

iv. Dozey, born 2 August 1768, bound to Thomas Heath to be taught farming by the 12 September 1771 Craven County court.

v. Martin2, born 1 January 1770, bound to Thomas Heath to be taught farming by the 12 September 1771 Craven County court. He complained to the March 1811 Craven County court that his children, who were born "in lawful wedlock," were bound out by the court without his knowledge or consent [Franklin, Free Negro in North Carolina, 127].

 

3.    Martin1 Black, born in 1751, sold 90 acres on the east side of Hancock's Creek on Cahoque Creek in Craven County to William Dove on 6 February 1775 [DB 22:73]. He enlisted for three years in Stevenson's Company of the North Carolina Continental Line on 16 May 1777. He was in Valley Forge and West Point and reenlisted for eighteen months in Evans Company in 1782 [M805-92, frame 0147]. He was head of a Carteret County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:128] and an Onslow County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:143]. He married Ann Moore, 12 April 1784 Craven County bond with George Perkins bondsman. His 16 September 1821 Carteret County will was proved in November 1821 and executed by his son-in-law, Samuel Martin. He gave his Revolutionary War pension to Samuel Martin and $10 to his son William. His children were

i. Keziah, married Samuel Martin, 4 June 1819 Carteret County bond.

ii. William.

 

4.    Lettice1 Black, born about 1752, was an eleven-year-old "free Negro" bound apprentice to Samuel Griffith in Craven County in July 1763. William Herritage applied to the court on her behalf to have her bound instead to Patrick Gordon [Minutes 1762-4, 27d]. She was head of a Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130]. Perhaps her children were

i. Dinah, born about 1771, "a free Negroe Girl aged 13," bound apprentice until the age of eighteen to Ann Banks by the 16 Sept 1784 Craven County court [Minutes 1772-84, 2:79a].

ii. Edward, born about 1777, a six-year-old "free negroe" bound apprentice to Thomas Heath on 12 September 1783 to be a shoemaker [Minutes 1772-84, 2:59c].

 

5.    Lettice2 Black, born 15 September 1761, was a ten-year-old "Free Born Negroe Girl" who was bound apprentice to Mary Heath on 12 September 1771 [Minutes 1766-75, 179a]. She was head of a Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. Perhaps she was the mother of

i. Hagar, born in May 1781, a "free Negroe Child" bound to Mary Heath until the age of eighteen by the 17 September 1784 Craven County court [Minutes 1784-86, 5c].

ii. Sally, born say 1792, married Kelsey Braddock, 7 February 1810 Craven County bond, Elijah George bondsman. Kelsey was probably the son of Peter Braddock, head of a Carteret County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:129].

 

Other members of the family in North Carolina were

i. Sary, born say 1753, a "molatto" taxable in the 1766 Bertie County list of John Crickett [CR 10.702.1].

ii. Caroline, head of a Carteret County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:450].

iii. Jacob, head of an Orange County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:513].

iv. Sarah, head of a Rutherford County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:397].

 

BLAKE FAMILY

The Blake family of Virginia may have descended from Faith Blake whose orphan Sarah Blake was bound by the Amelia County court to John Roberts on 27 September 1759. She was sued by the churchwardens for debt (for having an illegitimate child?) on 27 March 1760 [Orders 1757-60, 240, 279]. Members of the family were

i. Martin, born say 1770, a "free Mulatto" living in Amelia County on 24 September 1772 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Raleigh Parish to bind him to Will Jones [Minutes 1769-72, n. p.].

ii. Betsy, born about 1781, registered in Bedford County on 29 November 1831: a mulatto, aged 50, 5 feet 1 inch high, free born. She may have been the mother of Polly, Harbert, Betsy and Sally Blake who registered the same day [Register of Free Negroes 1820-60, p.17].

 

BLANGO FAMILY

1.    Tom1 Blanco, born say 1673, a "Negroe" belonging to Madam Porter of Bristol, petitioned the Kent County, Maryland court for his freedom on 11 December 1694. His Excellency the Governor informed the Justices about the case, but they ruled that "the said Negro offered several false suggestions to the Court" and ordered that he receive twelve lashes [Court Record 1694-8, 493]. And a Thomas Blangoe was a servant belonging to Captain Thomas Jones/ Nicholas Thomas Jones of James City County, Virginia, on 28 November 1701 when his attorney made an agreement with William Tomson, bricklayer, and his wife Ann to oversee his four servants in Beaufort County, North Carolina [DB 1:12, 33, dititally reproduced at www.ncgenweb.us/bath/Beaufort-Bath/00012.pdf]. He may have been the father or grandfather of Thomas, Rachel, and Sarah Blango who were taxables in Beaufort County, North Carolina, in 1755 [SS 837]:

2        i. Thomas2, born say 1710.

3        ii. Rachel, born say 1720.

4        iii. Sarah1, born say 1730.

 

2.    Thomas2 Blango, born say 1710, was a "free Negro" head of a Beaufort County household with Sarah and Betty Blango in 1755:

Blango, Tom Sar. Blango Betty Blango (Free Negroes) 3 [SS 837].

He was called "Thomas Blango free negro" in June 1757 Beaufort County court when he was a defendant in a case brought by Thomas Pearce [Minutes 1756-61, 1:32a (docket no.22)]. He was one of the superannuated and invalid members of the Beaufort County Militia under the command of Colonel William Brown prior to 1765 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 781]. His children may have been

5        i. Thomas3, born say 1730.

ii. Betty, born say 1735, taxable in Tom Blango's Beaufort County household in 1755 [SS 837].

 

3.    Rachel Blango, born say 1720, was a "free Negro" head of a Beaufort County household in 1755:

Blango, Rachel Sar. Blango Sarah Blango Junr

Dinah Blango (Free Negroes) 4 [SS 837].

In June 1758 the Beaufort County court ordered that:

a free Negroe Woman named Rachel Blango, another named Sarah Blango the younger, another named Dinah Blango and a Man named Gabe, and another Negroe Woman named Bett Moore, another Mary Moore ____, and Keziah Moore be Summoned to appear at next court to produce a Master for their Children in order they may be bound out as the law directs [Minutes 1756-61, 2:46c].

Perhaps she was identical to Rachel, "Free Negro," taxable in the household of John, "Free Negro," (no family name mentioned) in the Beaufort County Tax List in 1764 [SS 837]. John may have been John Punch Moore, and she may have been the Rachel Moore who was head of a Beaufort County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:15]. See further the Moore history. Rachel's children may have been

6        i. Sarah2, Jr., born say 1738.

7        ii. Dinah1, born say 1740.

 

4.    Sarah1 Blango, born say 1730, was taxable in Rachel Blango's Beaufort County household in 1755 [SS 837]. She was sued for debt by James Calef in the June 1756 Beaufort County court, and the June 1761 court ordered her to pay him 16 pounds [Minutes 1756-61, 1:9c (Docket no.23); 2:41d]. She was taxed in Beaufort County on an assessment of 240 pounds in 1779 [NCGSJ XV:142]. She purchased 200 acres on the east side of Nevill's Creek from Thomas Blango (Jr.?) on 9 June 1789 [DB 6:125] and swapped 100 acres of this land with John Gray Blount for land nearby by deed of 4 March 1801 [DB 1:457, 459]. She was head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:125]. She may have been the mother of

i. Benjamin, born say 1758, a deceased soldier of Beaufort County whose estate was administered before June 1792 by Sarah Blango.

ii. Moses1, born say 1760, a deceased soldier of Beaufort County whose estate was administered before June 1792 by Sarah Blango [NCGSJ XVIII:72].

 

5.    Thomas3 Blango, born say 1730, was called Thomas Blango, Jr., when he was sued for debt by James Calef in the June 1756 Beaufort County court in a case which was declared a non-suit in the June 1761 court [Minutes 1756-61, 1:9c (docket no.23); 2:44a]. He purchased 640 acres in Beaufort on the east side of Nevill's Creek at the mouth of Bridge Branch from John Benston by an unrecorded deed and sold this land by deeds of 2 April 1774, 10 April 1777, 20 January 1788 by the sheriff for debt, 5 June 1788 by the sheriff for debt, and 9 June 1789 to Sarah Blango [DB 5:20, 307; 6:125, 324, 341]. He was called "Nasowman" in the 10 April 1777 deed, perhaps claiming that his family was from Nassau. In 1779 he was taxed in Beaufort County on an assessment of 320 pounds [LP 30.1, by NCGSJ XV:142]. He was head of a Beaufort County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:125]. His children may have been

i. Isaac, born before 1776, head of a Beaufort County household 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:2], 10 in 1810 [NC:114], and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:7]. He was called Isaac Blango Moore in the March 1814 session of Beaufort County court when Solomon Blango was bound to him as an apprentice cooper [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.]. By his 2 January 1836 Beaufort County will, proved June 1842, he lent his plantation and land to his sister Nancy, then to Patsy Moore, wife of Charles Moore, and lent 20 acres to his brother's child Hannah, wife of John Moore [WB D:281].

8        ii. Margaret, born say 1773.

9        iii. Solomon1, born say 1775.

10      iv. Sarah3, born 1776-94.

v. Patsy Moore.

vi. Nancy.

 

6.    Sarah2 Blango, born say 1738, was a "Free Negro" taxable in Rachel Blango's household in 1755 (called Sarah Blango, Jr.) [SS 837]. In June 1758 she was called "Sarah Blango the younger" when she was ordered to produce a master for her child to be bound apprentice to [Minutes 1756-61, 1:46d]. Perhaps she was the "Sarah Blango Moore (free negro)" whose plight was advertised in the 9 October 1778 issue of the North Carolina Gazette of New Bern:

...that she was last night robbed of two of her own children, by three men in disguise; one a boy about six years old named Ambrose, the other a girl named Rose, of the same age, they being twins... [Fouts, NC Gazette of New Bern, I:80-1].

The Moore family was the largest free African American family in Beaufort and Craven Counties. She may have been the Sall Blango who was head of a Beaufort County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [NC:2] and 8 in 1810 [NC:115]. She was the mother of

i. John/ Jack, born about 1797, the seventeen-year-old son of Sally Blango, bound by the Beaufort County court to James Meredith to be a cooper in March 1814 [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.].

ii. ?Dorcas Blango, born about 1757, successfully petitioned the 9 June 1778 Craven County court for freedom from her indenture to Isaac Patridge [Minutes 1772-84, 1:61c].

iii. Ambrose Moore, born 1772, married Polly Carter, 29 December 1804 Craven County bond, Jacob Moore bondsman. He was head of a Craven County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67]. On 4 November 1821 he and his wife Polly sold land in Craven County which she inherited from her father George Carter [DB 43:82].

iv. Rose, born 1772, perhaps the Rose Carter, born 1776-94, who was head of a Carteret County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:123].

 

7.    Dinah1 Blango, born say 1743, was a "Free Negro" taxable in Rachel Blango's Beaufort County household in 1755 [SS 837]. The June 1758 Beaufort County court called her a "free Negroe Woman" when it ordered her to produce a master in court for her children to be bound to. Perhaps she was the wife of Gabe, a "free Negroe Man," who was listed after her in the court order [Minutes 1756-61, 2:46c]. She was head of a Beaufort County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:125]. One of her children may have been

i. Gabriel, born before 1776, head of a Beaufort County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:2], 9 in 1810 [NC:113], and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:7].

 

8.    Margaret Blango, born say 1773, was head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:2]. She was called Margaret M. Blango in the March 1814 session of the Beaufort County court when her son Willie Moore Blango was bound as an apprentice [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.]. She was the mother of

i. Willie Moore Blango, born about 1800, a fourteen-year-old "free person of Color, son of Margaret M. Blango," bound an apprentice shoemaker to William Orell in March 1814.

ii. Winnie M. Blango, born about October 1802, eleven years and six months old in March 1814 when she was bound to William Orell in Beaufort County court.

 

9.    Solomon1 Blango, born say 1775, was head of a Beaufort County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:126]. He may have been deceased by March 1814 when the Beaufort County court bound his fourteen-year-old son Moses Blango to Joseph Trippe [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.]. He was the father of

i. Moses2, born about 1800, bound an apprentice cooper to Joseph Trippe in March 1814.

ii. ?Isaac2, born about 1802, a twelve-year-old free Boy of Color, no parent named, bound an apprentice cooper to Nathan Archibell by the March 1814 Beaufort County court.

iii. ?Dinah2, born about 1805, a nine-year-old free girl of Color, no parent named, bound apprentice to Nathan Archibell by the March 1814 Beaufort County court.

iv. ?Solomon2, born about 1806, an eight-year-old free Boy of Color, no parent named, bound as an apprentice cooper to Isaac Blango Moore by the March 1814 Beaufort County court [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.].

 

10.    Sarah3 Blango, born 1776-94, was head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:114] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:7]. She was the mother of

i. ?Phebe, born about 1801, a thirteen-year-old free girl of Color, no parent named, bound an apprentice housekeeper to Joseph B. Hinton by the March 1814 Beaufort County court.

ii. Patsy July Blount Blango, born about 1802, daughter of Sarah Blango, bound apprentice to Joseph Shute by the March 1814 Beaufort County court.

iii. ?Harman, born about 1804, a ten-year-old free Boy of Color, no parent named, bound an apprentice shoemaker to Isaac Smith [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.].

 

BLANKS FAMILY

1.    John Blanks, born say 1754, was a white taxable in James Ellis' Bladen County household in 1770 and a "Mixt Blood" taxable in his own household in 1774, a "Black" taxable in 1775, taxable on 100 acres, 3 horses and 5 cattle in 1779, and head of a household of two Blacks 12-50 years old and four over 50 or under 12 in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:29, 124; II:36, 142, 169, 202]. He was head of Bladen County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:188]. He was living in Robeson County on 14 January 1797 when he sold 100 acres in Bladen County in the fork of Slapass and Fryer Swamps [DB 7:210]. He may have been the father of

i. Alfred, born about 1783, a "free Mulatto boy" about twelve years old in June 1795 when he was bound as an apprentice by the New Hanover County court [Minutes 1792-8, 143]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:142].

ii. Munford, (probably named for the Mumford family), head of a New Hanover County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:221].

iii. Esther, head of a New Hanover County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:221].

 

BLIZZARD FAMILY

Members of the Blizzard family were

1        i. Charles1, born say 1730.

2        ii. Ann, born say 1736.

3        iii. Samuel1, born say 1738.

4        iv. Sarah1, born say 1739.

5        v. Edward, born say 1740.

vi. William1, born say 1745, sued by William Parham in Sussex County court for a 3 pound, 19 shilling debt on 19 March 1767 [Orders 1766-70, 65].

6        vii. Hezekiah1, born say 1749.

viii. Hezekiah2, born say 1770, taxable on a slave named Cyrus in Surry County, Virginia, in 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frame 363].

ix.Burwell, taxable on a horse in Brunswick County, Virginia, from 1785 to 1807 [PPTL, 1782-98, frames 315, 355, 391, 488, 534; 1799-1815, frames 84, 132, 251, 288, 341, 432]. As assignee of Gray Judkins, administrator of Charles Blizzard, he sued Benjamin Barham and Nathaniel Newsom in Greensville County on 23 December 1785 [Orders 1781-9, 255]. On 2 June 1787 he purchased 150 acres adjoining Chaney Williams and Henry James in Brunswick County for 30 pounds. He sold 30 acres adjoining his land for $30 on 24 June 1799 and another tract by deed proved in Brunswick County in 1807 [DB 14:289; 17:415; 20:75].

 

1.    Charles1 Blizzard, born say 1730, was listed on 6 June 1754 as providing 14 shillings credit to the account of John Kersey with Sussex County, Virginia merchants Massenburg & Harrison when they sued Kersey for 25 shillings due from purchases at their store [Court Papers, 1754-1755, frames 780-783, LVA microfilm no. 35]. He baptized his children Charles and Hannah Blizzard in Albemarle Parish, Sussex and Surry counties in 1758 and 1759 [Richards, Register of Albemarle Parish, 18, 102]. On 18 August 1758 the Sussex County court ordered him to work on the road from the High Hills to Spring Swamp Chappel. A suit brought by Charles and his wife Ann against James Bell for trespass, assault and battery was discontinued in Sussex County court on 18 March 1762 on agreement between the parties. He was tithable in Sussex County in 1762. He was sued for debt in Sussex County on 17 March 1768 [Orders 1757-9, 192; 1761-4, 63, 79; 1766-70, 219; Court Papers, 1762-3, frames 552-3, LVA microfilm reel 45; Tithables, 1753-1782, frame 650, LVA microfilm reel 90]. He and his wife Anne were Joseph Kennedy's (Cannady) godparents when he was christened in Albemarle Parish on 3 July 1768 [Richards, Register of Albemarle Parish, 145]. The inventory of his Sussex County estate totaled 38 pounds and was returned to court on 20 May 1773 [WB C:43-4]. His children were

i. Charles2, born 24 July 1756, son of Charles and Anne Blizzard, baptized in Albemarle Parish, Sussex and Surry counties on 4 February 1759. He was tithable in Sussex County in 1775 and 1777 [Tithables, 1753-1782, frame nos. 765, 817, LVA microfilm reel 90] and tithable in Surry County from 1786 to 1789. He died before 1790 when his Surry County estate was listed. Perhaps his widow Ann was the Anne Blizzard who was listed in Surry County as a "free Negro & Mulatto above the age of 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 397, 444, 469, 595; 1791-1816, frame 728].

ii. Hannah, born 19 May 1758, daughter of Charles and Anne Blizzard, baptized 19 May 1758 in Albemarle Parish, Sussex and Surry counties [Richards, Register of Albemarle Parish, 18].

iii. ?Mazy, born say 1765, married William Santee, 7 February 1786 Sussex County bond.

iv. ?Milly, born say 1766, married Thomas Edwards, 3 August 1787 Sussex County bond. Thomas Edwards was a "FN" taxable in Sussex County in 1793 and 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 369, 624].

 

2.    Ann Blizzard, born say 1736, was living in Surry County, Virginia, in October 1750 when the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish sued her for debt (for having an illegitimate child?) [Orders 1749-51, 156]. She may have been the mother of

7        i. William2, born about 1766.

ii. Mason, born say 1770, a "poor child" living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 25 June 1770 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind her and William Dungill as apprentices [Orders 1768-72, 289]. She married Jack Wooton, 19 November 1802 Sussex County bond, Abraham James surety. Jack Wooton and Abraham James were "FN" taxables in Sussex County in 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 625, 629]. Jack registered in Sussex County on 7 August 1812: brown complexion, 5 feet 7 inches, age 37, freed by deed of Edward Wooton on 5 February 1789 [Register of Free Negroes, 1800-50, no. 147].

iii. Elizabeth, born say 1774, married Armstead Peters, 26 April 1792 Surry County, Virginia bond.

 

3.    Samuel1 Blizzard, born say 1738, and his wife Sarah baptized their daughter Lucy Blizzard in Albemarle Parish, Sussex and Surry counties, on 16 May 1762. Aaron Peters, Lydia Blizzard and Selah Flood were the godparents [Richards, Register of Albemarle Parish, 214]. Samuel took the oath of allegiance in Sussex County on 11 October 1777 [Tithables, 1753-1782, frame 832, LVA microfilm no. 9]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 8 free persons in 1782 [VA:44], taxable in Sussex County from 1782 to 1795: taxable on 2 horses and 5 cattle in 1782; charged with his son Samuel's tithe in 1783; taxable on a free male 16-21 in 1792 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 71, 92, 112, 169, 194, 210, 220, 239, 272, 296, 319, 331, 367, 380]. He was the father of

i. Randolph, born 24 February 1760, son of Samuel and Sarah Blizzard, baptized 8 July 1764, godparents Aaron Peters, ___ Blizzard, and Lucy Peters [Richards, Register of Albemarle Parish, 228].

ii. Lucy, born 21 January 1761, baptized 16 May 1762 [Richards, Register of Albemarle Parish, 214]. She married Benjamin Waldin (Walden) in Southampton County, on 28 August 1782, Mr. John Meglamor minister [Judgment Papers 1777-83, frame 788].

iii. William2, born 23 December 1762, son of Samuel and Sarah Blizzard, baptized 10 June 1763 [Richards, Register of Albemarle Parish, 265].

iv. Samuel2, Jr., born say 1762, taxable in Sussex County from 1783 to 1795: called son of Samuel Blizzard in 1783; his tax charged to Robert Lamb in 1786; charged with his own tax in 1789 and 1790; listed with Joseph Canada in Mary Andrews' household in 1791; charged with his own tax from 1792 to 1795 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 92, 196, 240, 272, 296, 319, 331, 366, 380]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Prince George County from 1801 to 1809 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1811, frames 530, 549, 575, 624, 649, 698].

v. ?John, born about 1773, taxable in Surry County in 1791 and 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 26, 628] and taxable in Sussex County in 1795, 1797 and 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 380, 431, 585]. He registered in Surry County on 20 October 1800: a free born mulattoe Man a resident of Surry County aged about 27 years, 5'7-1/2" high, bushy hair, pretty well formed of a bright complexion has a large nose and by trade a planter [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, Register of Free Negroes, no.81]. He married Polly Byrd, 22 June 1803 Sussex County bond, Drewry Taylor surety, 23 June marriage.

 

4.    Sarah1 Blizzard, born say 1739, was the mother of orphans Susanna and Peter Blizzard who were ordered bound out by the churchwardens in Surry County on 17 September 1765. Peter was called a "poor Mulatto" on 21 January 1772 when the court issued the same order. On 23 February 1779 he and (his brothers?) James and Samuel Blizzard, apprentices to William Rae, complained to the Surry County court that Rae was ill treating them [Orders 1764-74, 81, 276; 1775-85, 80]. On 19 November 1779 and 21 October 1779 the Sussex County court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her orphan children Samuel, James and Sarah [Orders 1777-82, 81, 87]. She was the mother of

8        i. Susanna, born say 1759.

9        ii. Peter, born say 1761.

iii. James, born say 1768, an apprentice of William Rae on 23 February 1779.

iv. Samuel3, born say 1770, an apprentice of William Rae on 23 February 1779. He was taxable in Cabin Point district of Surry County in 1787 and 1788 and from 1806 to 1816: listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 444, 469; 1791-1816, frames 611, 648, 685, 704, 728, 849].

10      v. Sarah2, born before 1776.

 

5.    Edward Blizzard, born say 1740, was living in Sussex County in June 1764 when he was charged with breach of the peace on Barbara Emerson who confessed to the court that she had lived in adultery with Edward for the previous ten years. He was discharged because it appeared to the court that she was a person of such ill fame that they could not admit her as a witness. On 21 December 1780 the court ordered his son Armstead bound out as an apprentice, "it appearing to the court that his father neglects his education" [Orders 1764-6, 70; 1777-82, 113]. He was the father of

i. Armstead, born say 1760, son of Edward Blizzard, ordered bound out by the Sussex County court on 21 December 1780. He was taxable in Sussex County from 1790 to 1796: listed with Thomas Clary in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 273, 297, 331, 366, 380, 420].

 

6.    Hezekiah1 Blizzard, born say 1749, was taxed on an assessment of 16 pounds in the 1783 Duplin County, North Carolina List of Captains Ward, Hubbard, and Whitehead (called Ezekiel Blizzard) [N.C. Genealogy XVIII:2781]. He married Leah Cartey (Carter), 19 December 1782 Duplin County bond and was bondsman for the 15 November 1789 Duplin County marriage bond of Emmanuel Carter. He was among several light-skinned African Americans counted as white in Duplin County in 1790, head of a household of 1 male and 5 females [NC:190]. Perhaps his children were

i. John, born say 1775, head of a Duplin County household of 6 "other free" in 1800. He purchased 207 acres near Goshen Swamp in Duplin County by three deeds signed 1 October 1810 and 17 September 1812 [DB 4A:407, 408, 409]

ii. Keziah, married Jonathan Nickens, 18 January 1783 Duplin County bond.

 

7.    William3 Blizzard, born about 1766, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 20 January 1773 when he and Rebecca Dungeon (Dungee) were ordered to be let out to the lowest bidder [Hopkins, St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 92]. He was taxable in Surry County in 1786 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 397]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 6 October 1794: a mulattoe man, born free in the County aforesaid, aged about 28 years of a yellowish complexion, about 5'10" high of a thin visage and slender made [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.2]. He may have been the father of

i. Betsy, alias Betsy Blizzard, of lawful age, married James Ruff, 23 May 1823 Surry County bond, William Blizzard surety.

 

8.    Susan Blizzard, born say 1759, was head of a Surry County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:601]. She was the mother of

i. Samuel4, born about 1786, registered in Surry County on 26 August 1822: the son of Susan Blizzard aged 36 years is 5'7-3/4" high, was born free, is of bright complexion. He married Caty Williams, daughter of James Williams, 28 December 1807 Surry County bond, David Charity surety, 7 January 1808 marriage.

 

9.    Peter Blizzard, born say 1761, was called the orphan of Sarah Blizzard on 17 September 1765 when the Surry County court ordered the churchwardens to bind him out and called a "poor Mulatto" on 21 January 1772 when the court issued the same order. On 23 February 1779 he, James, and Samuel Blizzard, apprentices to William Rae, complained to the court that Rae was ill treating them [Orders 1764-74, 81, 276; 1775-85, 80]. He was called Peter Blizzard of Surry County on 29 October 1788 when he sold 100 acres in Prince George County which Edward Newell had sold to him in the year 1782 for serving as a soldier in the Continental Service for eighteen months in place of John Newell [DB 1787-92, 232]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1788 to 1816: listed with 4 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813; taxable on 2 free tithes in 1812 and 1813, 3 in 1815, and 2 in 1816 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 469, 594; 1791-1816, 105, 232, 282, 361, 439, 514, 588, 628, 666, 704, 726, 847]. Peter married Mary Charity, 30 September 1791 Surry County bond, and was head of a Surry County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830. They were the parents of

i. ?Carter, born say 1796, taxable in Surry County in 1816 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frame 847].

ii. William Evans, born about 1802, registered in Surry County on 20 November 1822: son of Peter and Mary Blizzard of this County, aged 20 years is 5'7" high, streight and well made.

iii. Sherrard, born about 1813, registered in Surry County on 20 July 1833: son of Peter Blizzard & Mary his wife ... about 20 years of age rather of a dark complexion ... and is 5'8-1/4" high and of a slender make [Hudgins, Surry County, Virginia, Register of Free Negroes, 76, 112].

 

10.    Sarah2 Blizzard, born before 1776, was head of a Surry County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830. Her Surry County estate was settled in 1839 [Wills, Etc. 7:663-5]. She was the mother of

i. Champion, born in February 1801, registered in Surry County on 20 August 1822: son of Sally Blizzard, he was born free, is of a bright complexion, has a flat Nose ... 5'6" high, pretty straight made was 21 years old last February.

ii. Willis, born about 1806, registered in Surry County on 22 March 1828: son of Sally Blizzard a free woman of Surry County ... of a dark complexion stout make, large flat nose, thick lips, is 5'5-1/4" high and about 22 years of age.

iii. Charles3, born 20 June 1807, registered in Surry County on 23 June 1828: son of Sally Blizzard a free black woman of Surry County ... of a dark complexion, flat nose, is 5'6" high, well made, and was 21 years of age the 20th day of the present month [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 75, 86].

 

BLUE FAMILY

Members of the Blue family were

i. Stepney, born say 1750, a slave who ran away from his owner, Nathan Yancy of York County, in 1774 with his wife Esther Roberts, "a free Negro woman" [Virginia Gazette of 29 September and 2 November 1774].

ii. Mary, a "free Molatto" bound to Mary Scott of Elizabeth River Parish on 20 June 1771 by order of the Norfolk County court [Orders 1771-3, 1].

iii. William1, a "Negro" jailed in Norfolk Borough according to the 12 January 1797 issue of the Norfolk Herald and Public Advertiser [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers]

iv. William2, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 14 January 1809: a light brown free Mulatto man, six feet inches high, twenty one - twenty two years old, rather thin & straight made, short hair, a black smith, born free & raised in the City of Richmond [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 453].

 

BLUFORD FAMILY

1.    Sarah Bluford, born say 1763, had been bound to Matthew Green until the age of thirty-one when she complained to the Lancaster County court on 18 January 1781 that Green sold her to Rawleigh Hazard. The court ordered that Hazard give bond not to remove her from the county [Orders 1778-83, 71]. She was a "Mo" taxable in Gloucester County in 1813 and "mulo" taxable there on 5 head of cattle 1814 [PPTL 1782-1815]. She was probably the mother of

i. Thomas Blufoot, born say 1786, a "Mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County from 1802 to 1819, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1815].

ii. Francis, a "Mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County from 1804 to 1819

iii. James, a "Mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County from 1811 [PPTL 1782-1815].

 

BOLLING FAMILY

1.   Judith Bowling, born say 1698, was the servant of Ann Hould on 18 November 1719 when she admitted in Northumberland County court that John Figrow alias John Oxendine "(Mallatto)" was the father of her illegitimate child. The court ordrered that she be sold by the churchwardens after the completion of her indenture and another year of service for her master's trouble [Orders 1713-9, 347; 1719-29, 167]. She may have been the ancestor of

2        i. Winnefred Bowling, born say 1760.

ii. William Bowlen, head of a Grainger County, Tennessee household of 8 "other free" in 1810.

iii. Edmund Bowlen, head of a Grainger County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 and husband of Fanny Goings, daughter of Shadrack Goings/ Gowen who named her in his 1805 Patrick County, Virginia will.

iv. David Bowlen, head of a Grainger County household of 5 "other free" in 1810.

v. Lisha Bowlen, head of a Grainger County household of 3 "other free" in 1810.

 

2.    Winnefred Bowling, born say 1760, was "a Mullattoe child" bound by the Lancaster County court to John Hazzard until the age of eighteen years on 13 March 1765 [Orders 1756-69, 112]. She may have been the mother of

i.  Charity Bolin, a "Mulatto" listed in Culpeper County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 175].

ii. Betty Bolin, a "Mulatto" listed in Culpeper County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 175].

 

BOLTON FAMILY

1.    Lettice Bolton, born say 1690, was the mother of Charles, a "bastard Mulatto boy...by a Negro or Mulatto man slave," who was bound out by the churchwardens of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, Virginia, to William Keene of Northumberland County on 24 October 1720 [Westmoreland Deeds & Wills 7:68-9]. She was the ancestor of

i. Charles, born about 1710, an eleven-year-old "Mullato born of an English woman" listed in the Northumberland County estate of Elizabeth Banks on 15 March 1721/2. By his 28 October 1725 Northumberland County will, proved 16 February 1725/6, William Keen set him free at the age of twenty-four [Record Book 1718-26, 167-70, 386a].

ii. ?Solomon, head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's Parish, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

iii. ?Spencer, head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's Parish, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

iv. ?Lewis, head of an Overton County, Tennessee household of 12 "free colored" in 1820.

 

BOND FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Bond, born say 1705, was "a mulatto woman" listed in the 20 February 1726/7 inventory of the Essex County estate of John Gilby with her "mulatto children" Eleanor Bond, four years old, and Sarah Bound, two years old [Dorman, Wills, Bonds, Inventories 1722-30, 52]. She was the mother of

i. Eleanor, born about 1723.

ii. Sarah, born about 1725.

iii. ?Anna, born say 1730, a "Runaway Molatto servant" belonging to John Stone of King and Queen County who was taken up by Benjamin Rhodes before 7 February 1752 when he proved his claim in Middlesex County court [Orders 1745-52, 380].

 

BOON FAMILY

Members of the Boon family in North Carolina and Virginia and were

1        i. Patt, born say 1742.

2        ii. James1, born say 1745.

3        iii. Daniel, born say 1760.

iv. Jacob, born say 1760, a "yellow" complexioned soldier from Isle of Wight County listed in the size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Court House [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 147].

v. Milly, "free negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:238].

vi. John, head of a Hyde County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:138], probably related to Hannah Boon, born 1776-1794, head of a Craven County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:72].

 

1.    Patt Boon, born say 1742, was living in Bertie County in August 1774 when the court ordered her "bastard Mulatto" children: Lewis, Katie, Judah, and Arthur bound apprentices to James Brown [Haun, Bertie County court Minutes, II:92]. Her children were

4        i. Rachel1, born say 1760.

ii. Lewis, born about 1763, "bastard Mulatto of Patt Boon," bound apprentice in 1774. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:429], 5 in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:5], and 5 "free colored" in Halifax in 1820 [NC:142]. He purchased 35 acres adjoining Jesse Richardson on Falling Creek in Halifax County from Hardy Richardson on 1 March 1822 [DB 25:590].

iii. Katie, born about 1765, the nine-year-old "bastard Mulatto of Patt" ordered bound to James Brown by the August 1774 court.

5        iv. Rebecca, born say 1768.

v. Judah/ Judith, born about 1768, six-year-old "bastard Mulatto of Patt" bound to James Brown by the August 1774 court, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:107].

vi. Arthur, born about 1773, one-year-old "bastard Mulatto of Patt" bound to James Brown by the August 1774 Bertie court, head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:25].

vii. ?Cader, born before 1776, head of a Bertie County household of one "other free" in 1810 [NC:160] and 16 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:54].

viii. ?James3, born say 1780, married Jincey Tann, 5 June 1826 Northampton County bond. On 18 August 1835 Mima Boon petitioned the Halifax County court to bind her children Lewis and Lam Boon to their uncle James because the children's father was insane. He may have been the James W. Boon, "Male Mulatto," who was eighty years old in 1860 in Halifax County, household number 1513. He owned $652 real estate and was living with Caroline who was forty-nine years old.

ix. ?Patsy, head of a Hertford County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:107] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:206].

x. ?Ruth, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of seven "free colored" females in 1820 [NC:218].

 

2.    James1 Boon, born say 1745, was a "Mixt. Blood" taxable in Hertford County in 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 31] and head of a Gates County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:23]. In February 1790 the Gates County court ordered his twelve-year-old "orphan" son Thomas Boon bound an apprentice shoemaker to Thomas Marshall. The inventory of his estate was recorded in Gates County court on 20 February 1794 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1787-93, 8, 14]. He was the father of

i. ?James3, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:142].

ii. ?Moses, born before 1776, head of a Gates County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:144].

iii. ?David, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:714] and 10 "free colored" in Hertford County in 1820 [NC:182]. He was in the Northampton County Regiment in the War of 1812.

iv. ?Elias, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:142].

v. ?Elisha, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:218]. He was in the Northampton County Regiment in the War of 1812.

vi. ?William, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:142].

vii. Thomas, born about 1778, a twelve-year-old bound apprentice in Gates County in 1790.

 

3.    Daniel Boon, born say 1760, was a "negro" head of a Nansemond County household of one black person in 1783 [VA:56]. He may have been the father of

i. Sarah, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 30 December 1808: a yellowish brown free negro woman, five feet three inches high, twenty one years old, born free in Nansemond County p. Certificate of Prince George County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 439]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:127b].

ii. James4/ Jim, born about 1792, registered in Petersburg on 1 December 1818: a free man of Colour, five feet six inches high, twenty six years old, dark complection, born free in Isle of Wight County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 940]. He may have been identical to the James Boon who was a "Free Negro" taxable in Nansemond County in 1815 [Yantis, Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia, S-14].

iii. Jesse, born about 1796, received one of the "Certificates granted to Free negroes & mulattoes from October 1800" in Sussex County on 28 February 1820: brown complexion, 5'10", free born, 24 years old [Certificate no.383].

 

4.    Rachel1 Boon, born say 1760, was a "Molatter" taxable in 1772 in James Purvis' household in the Bertie County List of Reddick Rutland [CR 10.702.1]. She was head of a Bertie County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:34]. Her children were

i. ?Sarah, born about 1776, ordered bound to Thomas Pugh, Junior, by the Bertie court in February 1789 (no parent named) [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:728]. She was head of a Bertie County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:166].

ii. ?Rachel2, born about 1779, four years old on 14 May 1783 when she was bound apprentice in Bertie County (no parent named) [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, XIV:160].

iii. Willis, born about 1782, son of Rachel, bound an apprentice shoemaker to Richard Veal on 16 May 1791 [NCGSJ XIV:165], head of a Chowan County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:118].

iv. Hill, born about 1783, son of Rachel, bound an apprentice shoemaker to Richard Veal on 16 May 1791 [NCGSJ XIV:165], head of a Bertie County household of 15 "other free" in 1820 [NC:54].

 

5.    Rebecca Boon, born say 1768, was living in Bertie County on 7 May 1792 when her seven-year-old son Cary was bound to Richard Veal to be a shoemaker [NCGSJ XIV:166]. She was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:218]. Her children were

i. Cary, born about 1784.

ii. ?Benjamin, head of a Bertie County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:166].

iii. ?Robert, born about 1795, bound an apprentice cartwheel maker to William Sowell on 13 May 1799 (no parent identified) [NCGSJ XIV:169].

 

Another member of the Boon family was

i. Isaac, born about 1775, registered in Southampton County on 26 August 1816: age 41, Mulatto, 5 feet 5-1/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1025].

 

BOOTH FAMILY

1.    James Booth, born say 1685, a "free Negro," was living in Isle of Wight County on 27 March 1709 when he was convicted of being part of a conspiracy involving "great numbers of Negro and Indian" slaves in James City, Surry and Isle of Wight counties. He was found guilty of having (prior) knowledge of the conspiracy and of entertaining several of the conspirators at his house. He received twenty-nine lashes [Colonial Papers, VSL microfilm reel 610, folder 20, nos. 11-14, cited by Brown, Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, 216]. He may have descended from Elizabeth Booth, daughter of Elizabeth Kay/ Key of Northumberland County [Northumberland County Record Book 1652-58, 66, 67, 85a, 85b; 1658-66, 27, 43, 44]. He was probably the ancestor of

2        i. Lewis1, born say 1720.

 

2.    Lewis1 Booth, born say 1720, was married to Mary Allen, daughter of Joseph Allen, on 5 December 1751 when she signed (by mark) the appraisal of her deceased father's Isle of Wight County estate. On 11 July 1754 Lewis, Mary, her sister Judith and brother Joseph Allen (by Lewis Booth his guardian) sued their brother William Allen claiming he had sold slaves belonging to their father's estate valued at 80 pounds [WB 5:391-2; Orders 1749-54, 511; LVA Chancery file 1757-003].

3        i. Priscilla, born say 1745.

4        ii. Jesse1, born say 1750.

 

3.    Priscilla Booth, born say 1745, was the mother of two "base begotten" children Jesse and Sylvia Booth who were ordered bound as apprentices by the Nash County, North Carolina court in April 1778 [Bradley, Nash County Court Minutes I:5]. She may have been identical to Priscilla Tann who was married to Benjamin Tann when he made his 11 September 1806 Nash County will. Jesse Booth was executor of the will and a neighbor of the Tann family [WB 4:42]. Her children were

i. Jesse2, born say 1762, perhaps identical to Jesse Tann.

ii. Sylvia, born say 1764.

 

4.    Jesse1 Booth, born say 1750, was granted two tracts of land in Nash County on 13 March 1780, one for 300 acres on Cooper's Creek adjoining Lammon and another for 137 acres on the south side of the Tar River adjoining Lammon [DB 3:276-7]. He purchased 10 acres of land from his neighbor, Benjamin Tann, on 10 February 1804 and was executor of Benjamin's 11 September 1806 Nash County will, proved November 1806 [DB 7:215; WB 4:42]. On 14 August 1809 the Nash County court bound Berry and Elijah Locus, orphans of James Locus, to him as apprentices [Rackley, Nash County Court Minutes VI:71]. He was head of a Nash County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:90], 6 in 1810 [NC:668], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:441]. On 20 June 1821 he made a deposition in Nash County that Hannah Tann was the daughter of Jesse Tann and rightful heir of James Tann, a soldier who died while serving in the Revolution [SS 460.2]. He may have been the father of

i. Lewis2, head of a Nash County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:90].

ii. Archel, head of a Nash County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:669].

iii. Rebecca, head of a Nash County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:442].

 

BOSMAN FAMILY

1.    James1 Bozman, born say 1745, and his wife Susannah were the parents of Susannah Bozman whose 3 February 1771 birth was registered in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County. He may have been the son of Lucy Boastman whose illegitimate daughter Sherwood's 5 January 1755 birth was recorded in St. Peter's Parish [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 148, 146]. He was head of a New Kent County household of 8 "mulattoes" in 1783 [VA:36], 8 "whites" and a dwelling in 1785 [VA:92] and 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:745]. He was taxable on 2 horses and 4 cattle in the lower end of Saint Peter's Parish, New Kent County from 1782 to 1801: taxable on a slave in 1796; taxable on 2 free tithables and 2 horses in 1801 and 1802. He apparently died about 1803 since Susannah Bosman was taxable on a free male tithable from 1803 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 9, 87, 93, 109, 142, 159, 180, 202; 1791-1828, frames 264, 279, 293, 304, 317, 328, 341, 353, 367, 380, 392, 405, 417]. And he was taxable on 40 acres in New Kent County from 1790 to 1800. He was the father of

i. ?Harman, born say 1765, taxable on a horse in New Kent County in 1787 and 1788, taxable on his own tithe from 1787 to 1796 and from 1801 to 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 93, 109, 142, 202; 1791-1828, frame 264, 279, 293, 353, 380].

ii. ?James2, Jr., born say 1766, taxable in New Kent County from 1787 to 1820: called James, Jr., from 1787 to 1802; taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1803; listed as a "M"(ulatto) in 1807 and thereafter; listed with his unnamed wife in 1813; taxable on 2 tithes and a horse in 1820 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 93, 109, 142, 159, 180, 202; 1791-1828, frames 225, 264, 279, 293, 304, 317, 328, 341, 353, 367, 380, 392, 405, 417, 428, 452, 462, 473, 491, 503, 573].

iii. Susannah, born 3 February 1771.

iv. Sarah, born 22 March 1773, "of James and Susannah Bosman" [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 148].

2        v. ?John, born say 1782.

vi. ?Benakin, a "Mulatto" taxable in New Kent County from 1809 to 1820, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1791-1828, frames 441, 452, 462, 473, 491, 503, 573], head of a New Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:746].

 

2.    John Boasman, born say 1782, was taxable in New Kent County from 1798 to 1802 [Personal Property Tax List 1791-1828, frame 317, 341, 367], called John Bowsman in 1810, head of a Richmond City household of 6 "other free" [VA:330]. He and his unnamed wife were listed as "Blacks free" in the upper district of Henrico County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 757]. They were probably the parents of

i. James, born about 1812, registered in Henrico County on 7 September 1839: about 27 years of age, a light mulatto man, 5 feet 8 inches, Born free as appears by a certificate of his register from the clerk of the Richmond Hustings Court. His wife Caroline Boasman registered the same day: formerly Caroline Ferrell, about 25 years of age, a mulatto woman, 5 feet 2 inches, wife of do [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.34, nos. 937, 938].

 

BOW FAMILY

1.    Sarah Overton, born say 1713, was a "Mallatto Woman" freed from her indenture to Edmund Chancey after being allowed by the October 1745 Pasquotank County court to "go up the river to see for her age in a Bible there." She was the mother of three "Mallatto Children," Bob, Jack Spaniard, and Spanial Bow, who were bound to Edmund Chancey until the age of twenty-one years by the Pasquotank County court on 12 July 1738 [Haun, Pasquotank County Court Minutes 1737-46, 32, 179, 186]. Chancey left a Pasquotank County will on 15 March 1753 by which he bequeathed the remainder of the service of "Jack Spanyerd boe and Spanyoll Boe" to his son Daniel Chancey and left the remainder of the service of Bob Boe, Rachel Boe, and Frank Boe, and her two children to his daughter-in-law Rachel Chancey [Grimes, Abstract of North Carolina Wills, 114-7]. Sarah's children were

2        i. Robert/Bob Bow, born 10 December 1729(?).

3        ii. ?Frank Bow, born say 1731.

iii. Rachel, born say 1733.

iv. Jack Spaniard Bow, born November 1734.

v. Spanial Bow, born May 1738.

 

2.    Robert1 Bow, born 10 December 1729(?), was the son of Sarah Overton, a "Mallatto" servant of Edmund Chancey of Pasquotank County. He was bound to Edmund Chancey until the age of twenty-one by order of the Pasquotank County court on 12 July 1738 [Haun, Pasquotank County Court Minutes 1737-46, 32]. He petitioned the Pasquotank County court for his freedom and won his case on testimony from Jonathan Reding and Lodwick Gray [Minutes 1758-60, Wednesday court, October 1760, n.p.]. In 1769 he was a "Mulatto" taxable in Pasquotank County [SS 837]. He was head of a Pasquotank County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:27]. He may have been the ancestor of

4        i. Tully, born say 1765.

ii. Ephraim L. Bough, born before 1776, head of a Pasquotank County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:285].

iii. Joshua, born say 1780, head of a Pasquotank County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:886].

iv. Henry, born say 1780, called a "free man of Colour" on 10 November 1832 when he purchased 2-1/3 acres of land which had once belonged to Mederit Nixon, a "free man of colour." Henry sold this land on 4 April 1834 [DB AA:30; CC:83].

v. Nancy, born say 1790, married James Overton, 19 January 1809 Pasquotank County bond, William Spence bondsman.

vi. Levi, born say 1805, purchased 40 acres in Pasquotank County on 25 February 1830 for $360, 33 acres by a deed recorded 13 September 1838, and 90 acres on Little River by deed recorded the same day [Z:333; CC:429, 431]. He married Mary Mitchell ("colored"), 3 August 1853 Pasquotank County bond.

vii. Ephraim Bough, head of a Pasquotank County household of 5 "free colored" and 4 slaves in 1820 [NC:285].

 

3.    Frank Bow, born say 1731, was a "Negro Serv Mullatto" servant of Edmund Chancey in July 1748 when the Pasquotank County court bound her "Mullatto" daughter Sue to her master [Haun, Pasquotank County Court Minutes 1747-53, 45]. Chancey left the remainder of her service and that of her two unnamed children to Rachel Chancey by his 15 March 1753 Pasquotank County will [Grimes, Abstract of North Carolina Wills, 114-7]. She was a "Mullatto Woman" taxable in 1769 in Pasquotank County [SS 837]. She was the mother of

i. Sue, a "Mullatto Daughter," born 1 February 1747/8, ordered bound to Edmund Chancey by the July 1748 Pasquotank County court [Minutes 1747-53, 45].

ii.?Sarah, born about 1751, a three-year-old "Mallatto" girl bound by the Pasquotank County court to Rachel Chancey in October 1754 [Minutes 1754-5, n.p.]. She was head of a Pasquotank County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:888].

 

4.    Tully1 Bowe, born say 1765, was head of a Pasquotank County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:27]. His 31 October 1827 Pasquotank County will, proved in December 1827, gave his land and oxen to his wife Elizabeth and named his children: Robert, Jemima, Timothy, David, Amos, and Tully and grandchild Lacell. His children were

i. Robert2, born say 1790. His wife Rhoda as the heir of Lemuel Hall, received one-fifth part of 29-8/10 acres on Big Flatty Creek. They sold this land on 3 July 1822 [DB W:273].

ii. Jemima.

iii. Timothy.

iv. David, married Sophia Hybert, 1 April 1818 Cumberland County, North Carolina bond, Wily Mask bondsman.

v. Amos.

vi. Abby, identified as the wife of John Overton and daughter of Tully and Betty Bowe on 26 October 1830 when she registered as a free person in Pasquotank County [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 192].

vii. Tully2.

 

BOWDEN FAMILY

1.    Mary Bowden, born say 1730, was the "Mulatto Servant" of Augustine Washington on 26 May 1752 when the Westmoreland County court ordered her to serve him an additional year after the completion of her indenture for running away for five months. She may have been living in the household of Robert Sibbalds who was sued by Augustine Washington on 21 February 1752 for detaining his "Mulatto Woman." Sibbalds was acquitted of any wrongdoing on 27 July 1752 [Orders 1750-2, 109, 124, 165a]. Mary ran away again and was called the "Mulatto" servant of Augustine Washington on 19 October 1756 when the Essex County court ordered that she be conveyed from constable to constable to her master's house in Westmoreland County [Essex County Orders 1754-7, 272]. She apparently escaped because on 29 August 1758 the Westmoreland County court ruled that she had stayed away for two years and ordered her to serve Augustine Washington an additional four years and six months [Westmoreland County Orders 1758-61, 1a]. She was apparently identical to "Mol" who was listed in the Westmoreland County estate of Augustine Washington, recorded 30 November 1762:

Mol a Woman age unknown free at 31 years old __

Pat free at 31 years old 25 pounds

Nan a Mulatto free at 31 years old and title Disputable __

[Inventories of Estates no. 4, 1756-67, 180].

Mary was the mother of

i. Martha, born say 1750, "Mulatto" daughter of Mary Bowden bound apprentice by the churchwardens of Washington Parish, Westmoreland County, to Augustine Washington on 29 January 1750/1 [Orders 1750-2, 31].

ii. ?Mary, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 8 "other free" in 1810.

 

BOWERS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Bowers, born say 1712, was a "Mulatto" whose son James Bowers was bound apprentice in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 2 August 1739 and whose unnamed daughter was bound to Thomas Powell in Brunswick County in June 1742 [Orders 1732-41, 254; 1741-83, 118]. She was the mother of

2        i. ?Sarah, born say 1733.

3        ii. ?Mary, born say 1735.

iii. James, born before 2 August 1739. He may have been identical to James Shoemaker. See the Shoemaker history. There was also a James Bowers who was head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:169].

4        iv. ?Lucy, born say 1754.

 

2.    Sarah Shoemaker, born say 1733, was living in Craven County, North Carolina, in May 1754 when the court issued a summons for her to show cause why her child John Bowers should not be bound out [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, IV:231]. She was the mother of

i. John Bowers, born before May 1754.

ii. ?Saul Bowers, born say 1760, head of a Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131], perhaps identical to Paul Bowers, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:157].

iii. ?Solomon Bowers, bondsman for the 2 April 1803 Craven County marriage of William Powers and Lucretia Lewis.

 

3.    Mary Bowers, born say 1735, was sued for a debt of 15 pounds currency in Southampton County court by the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish on 9 January 1756, probably for having an illegitimate child. On 10 September 1761 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her son Giles Bowers, a poor child [Orders 1754-9, 204, 226; 1759-63, 139]. She was the mother of

5        i. Giles, born say 1750.

 

4.    Lucy Bowers, born say 1754, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 22 December 1777 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Meherrin Parish to bind out her "natural son" Balaam [Orders 1774-82, 178]. She was called the mother Burwell Bowers on 12 September 1782 when he complained to the Southampton County court against his master Joshua Harris [Orders 1778-84, 251, 254]. Her son Benjamin registered as a "free Negro" in Southampton County in 1794. Lucy was a "Mulatto" taxable on a free male tithable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, in 1803 and 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 617, 686]. Her children were

i. Balaam, bound apprentice in Brunswick County on 22 December 1777.

ii. Burwell, born say 1770, complained to the Southampton County court against his master Joshua Harris on 12 September 1782.

iii. Benjamin, born about 1774, registered as a "free Negro" in Southampton County on 28 November 1794: reputed son of Lucy Bowers a free woman of this County abt. 20 years old 5 feet 6 inches high, a Mulattoe [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 92].

 

5.    Giles Bowers, born say 1750, was living in Southampton County in 1766 when he and William Kersey were presented by the court for failing to list themselves as tithables [Judgment Papers 1765-6, 1026]. He was taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1782 to 1809, listed as a "F.N." in 1792 and thereafter, called Jiles Bowser from 1804 to 1806 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 4, 27, 45, 60, 74, 89, 242, 271, 346, 390, 428, 473, 491, 652, 673, 715, 771, 791]. He may have been the father of

i. James2, born say 1790, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1807 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 771, 790, 846].

 

BOWLES FAMILY

1.    Amy Bowles, born say 1725, was an illegitimate "Free Mulatto" who was bound by the churchwardens of St. Martin's Parish, Hanover County, to serve John Williams and his wife Mary until the age of thirty-one. Her daughter Jane Bowles sued for her freedom in Louisa County in 1778 [Orders 1774-82, 239]. They may have been the descendants of Ann Bowles who was indicted for fornication in York County on 24 June 1687. Her case was continued, but the outcome was not recorded [DOW 7:347; 8:3]. Amy was taxable on 2 horses and 8 cattle in Albemarle County in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frame 6]. Amy was the mother of

i. Jane, born about 1750, sued for her freedom from the executors of James Michie, deceased, in Louisa County court on 11 May 1778. The court determined that she was the daughter of Amy Bowles, a "Mulatto Bastard child," who was bound by the churchwardens of St. Martin's Parish to John Williams and his wife Mary. Williams' descendants sold Jane to James Michie. Jane was about twenty-nine years old on 10 May 1779 when the court ordered her released from servitude because she had never been indentured [Orders 1774-82, 194, 197, 213, 229, 239]. She was taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1802 to 1804 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 113, 156, 202].

ii. ?Zachariah, born about 1754, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1791 to 1813: taxable on a horse in 1795; taxable on a horse and stud horse in 1810; listed as a "Mulatto" in 1812 and 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 292, 343, 382, 446, 477, 512, 550, 585; 1800-1813, frames 24, 68, 113, 156, 202, 245, 291, 339, 382, 429, 473, 517, 562]. He sold property by indenture to Samuel Carr in Albemarle County court on 1 December 1800 and Carr proved an indenture to him on the same date [Orders 1800-1, 243-4]. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:185].

2      iii. ?Susanna, born say 1758.

iv. ?Bartlett, born say 1762, taxable in Louisa County in 1782 and 1785 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1814] and taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1793 to 1813: taxable on 2 horses in 1793, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1812 and 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 382, 446, 477, 512, 550, 585; 1800-1813, frames 24, 68, 113, 156, 202, 245, 291, 339, 382, 429, 473, 517, 562]. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820

v. ?Stephen, say 1763, served in the Revolution from Albemarle County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 31].

vi. ?Lucy1, born say 1764, married Charles Barnett, 7 September 1785 Albemarle County bond, George Mann bondsman.

vii. ?John, born say 1767, said to have eloped with a "mulatto" woman named Ursula and her nine-year-old daughter Rachel "or more probably were married off from Benjamin D. Willis by a black freeman" according to the 8 November 1797 issue of the Virginia Gazette & General Advertiser. The ad went on to say that John had been a waterman and they were presumed to be in the neighborhood of Milton or Charlottesville as it was said Bowles' mother lived near Charlottesville. John was a "free Negro" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, from 1799 to 1813: called a "Mulatto" from 1810 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frame 585; 1800-1813, frames 4, 46, 93, 136, 178, 227, 269, 363, 410, 456, 499, 541] and head of an Albemarle County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:182].

viii. ?Martha, born say 1768, spinster, married Griffin Butler, 24 October 1790 Albemarle County bond, Zachariah Bowles bondsman. Griffin was head of an Albemarle County household of 10 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:186].

ix. ?Nancy, born say 1772, married Robert Battles, 12 December 1793 Albemarle County bond, Charles Barnett bondsman.

 

2.    Susanna Bowles, born say 1758, was taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1791 to 1813: taxable on 1 free male tithe from 1801 to 1803, 2 in 1805 and 1806, 3 in 1813; called a "Mulatto" from 1805 to 1807 and in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 68, 113, 156, 202, 245, 291, 339, 382, 429, 473, 517, 562]. She was the mother of

i. ?Francis, born say 1776, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1802 to 1813: called a "Mulatto" from 1810 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 113, 155, 382, 456, 473, 518, 541].

ii. ?David, born say 1782, a "free Negro" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, from 1801 to 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 46, 93, 136].

iii. Jacob, born say 1785, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1806 and 1813: called "Suca son" in 1806; called a "Mulatto from 1810 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 291, 381, 428, 472, 517].

iv. ?James, born about 1787, a "Mulatto" taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1809 to 1813 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frames 381, 428, 456, 472]. He registered in Albemarle County on 6 June 1808: a free man...his couler Black about twenty one years of age [Orders 1808-10, 7].

v. ?Peter, born say 1790, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1809, 1812, and 1813: called a "Mulatto" in 1812 and 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 382, 518, 561]. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820.

 

Other members of the Bowles family were

i. William Bolls, born say 1753, a "Negro shoemaker" who was jailed in Middlesex County according to the 21 September 1775 issue of the Virginia Gazette.

ii. Lucy2, head of an Albemarle County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:185].

iii. Caty, head of an Albemarle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:185].

iv. Sophia, born about 1796, registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 18 January 1819: about 23d year, of light yellow Complexion, about 5 feet four inches high ... free born [Register of Free Negroes, no.228].

v. Thomas, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frame 69], a "free Negro" living in Dumfries on 15 August 1806 when he was listed among a group of whites and free African Americans who were accused of uniting for the purpose of stealing, plundering, etc. [Johnston, Race Relations, 57].

 

BOWMAN FAMILY

Members of the Bowman family were

i. Thomas, born say 1730, living in North Carolina on 13 March 1752 when Robert West, Sr., placed a notice in the North Carolina Gazette of New Bern:

Ran away from the subscribers, on Roanoke River, a Negro fellow, named Thomas Boman, a very good blacksmith, near 6 feet high, he can read, write and cyper, Whoever will apprehend him shall be paid 12 Pistoles, besides what the law allows [Fouts, NC Gazette of New Bern, I:3].

About twenty years later Thomas Boman was a taxable "free Molatto" in John Moore's household in the Bertie County tax list of 1771, 1772, and 1774 [CR 10.702.1, Box 13].

ii. Robert, born say 1735, "a molato" taxable in Andrew Duche's household in Colonel William Craford's 1756 list of tithables in Norfolk County, Virginia [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 100].

1        iii. William, born say 1740.

iv. James1, a soldier in the Virginia Line who died before 6 October 1783 when an affidavit by Betty Morris, a "free Mulatto woman," that William Bowman was his brother and only surviving and heir was certified by the Henrico County court [Orders 1781-4, 439].

v. Charles1, born say 1762, taxable in Henrico County on a horse and 2 cattle in 1783 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 21], taxable in Chesterfield County on a horse in 1786 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frame 3], taxable in Henrico County in 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 315] and taxable in Chesterfield County on 3 tithes in a list of "Mulattoes and free Negroes" in 1809 and 1810 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 753, 799].

2        viii. Edward1, born say 1764.

3        ix. Francis1, born say 1767.

x. James3, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County in 1790 [Personal Property Tax List B, p.2]. He was taxable in adjoining Surry County from 1794 to 1816: called a "free Negro" in 1794, 1796 and 1811; listed with 4 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 177, 253, 397, 438, 518, 610, 647, 685, 725, 848].

xi. Polly, head of a Henrico County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1008].

 

1.    William1 Bowman, born say 1740, a "Mulatto," was charged with felony in Chesterfield County on 10 October 1767. His case was referred to the General Court [Orders 4:146]. Betty Morris, a "free Mulatto woman," appeared before the mayor of Richmond, John Beckley, and made oath that William Bowman was the only surviving brother and heir at law of James Bowman, deceased, late a soldier in the Virginia Line. The affidavit was certified in Henrico County court on 6 October 1783 [Orders 1781-4, 439]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. James2, born say 1760, taxable in Henrico County on a horse and 6 cattle from 1783 to 1785 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 21, 43, 69], taxable in Charles City County on a tithe, a horse and 6 cattle from 1786 to 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He was living in Henrico County on 20 June 1804 when he sold 30 acres in Charles City County where William Day was then living for 31 pounds [DB 5:56].

ii. John, born say 1764, taxable in Charles City County in 1785, taxable on two tithes in 1798 and 1799 and one in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He may have been the husband of Peggy Bowman, illegitimate daughter of Dixon Brown who gave her 10 acres of land where she was then living by his 24 January 1811 Charles City County will which was proved 18 January 1821 [WB 2:471]. In October 1826 she and other heirs of her sister Susannah Harris appointed James Brown to sell Susannah's land [DB 7:371].

4        iii. William2, born say 1768.

iv. Nelson, born say 1775, taxable in Charles City County in 1799, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:10].

5        v. Wiley, born say 1778.

6        vi. Richard, born say 1780.

vii. William3, born say 1781, taxable in Charles City County from 1805 to 1810 (called William Bowman, Jr.) [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

7        viii. Samuel, born say 1785.

ix. Oliver, born say 1787, a "free mulatto" declared exempt from taxes by the Charles City County court on 15 June 1837 [Minutes 1830-7, 322].

8       x. Edward2, born say 1792.

 

2.    Edward1 Bowman, born say 1764, was presented by the Henrico County court on 3 May 1785 for failing to list his tithables [Orders 1784-7, 170]. He married Catherine Scott, "daughter of Robert and Catherine Scott," 28 December 1786 Henrico County, Virginia bond, John and Andrew Scott surety. He was taxable on a horse in the lower district of Henrico County from 1787 to 1814: called a "free Negro" starting in 1806, a "Mulatto" in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 100, 158, 174, 231, 249, 289, 302, 315, 327, 340, 351, 387, 420, 431, 460, 509, 550, 571, 611, 679, 765, 783]. He and Francis Bowman were taxed jointly on 55 acres in the lower district of Henrico County from 1802 to 1816, called "free Mulattos" in 1803 and 1805 [Land Tax List 1799-1816]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1008]. His children were

i. John, born about October 1790, bound as an apprentice gentleman's servant and hairdresser by 14 January 1801 indenture of his father Edward Bowman of Henrico County to John Adams of Richmond City [Hustings DB 3:234].

ii. ?Martin, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 February 1813: twenty one years old, bright yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 182].

iii. ?Samuel, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 12 September 1814: twenty one years old, bright mulatto complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 228].

iv. ?Edward3/ Ned, born say 1794, married Betsey Otter, "free persons of colour," 7 March 1815 Chesterfield County bond, Martin Bowman security.

 

3.    Francis1 Bowman, born say 1767, was taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1785 to 1807: called a "free Negro" starting in 1806 when he was listed with son Charles [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 77, 82, 100, 158, 174, 249, 289, 302, 315, 327, 340, 351, 387, 420, 431, 460, 509, 551]. On 7 August 1790 the Henrico County court dismissed his suit against Johnson Smith because his attorney had not been instructed on the premises, and the same court ordered that he receive 25 lashes for hog stealing [Orders 1789-91, 368]. He and Francis Bowman were taxed jointly on 55 acres in the lower district of Henrico County from 1802 to 1816, called "free Mulattos" in 1803 and 1805 [Land Tax List 1782-1816]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:98] and a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. On 17 June 1824 his son Champion Bowman chose him as his guardian in Charles City County court [Minutes 1823-9, 60]. He was the father of

i. Charles, born say 1790, taxable in his father's Henrico County household in 1806.

ii. Champion, chose his father Francis Bowman as his guardian in 1824.

 

4.    William2 Bowman, born say 1768, was taxable in Charles City County in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7] and taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 315]. He was taxable in Charles City County on 3 tithes in 1798, 2 in 1799 and 1800, 3 in 1801 (called William Bowman, Sr.), and was a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:4]. His wife Eliza registered in Charles City County on 20 October 1831: wife of Wm Bowman, of bright complexion, 45 years old, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 80], He was the father of

i. Catherine, born about 1805, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 19 July 1827: daughter of Wm Bowman, now Catherine Green, a mulatto woman, about twenty two years of age, 5 feet 2-1/2 inches, born free in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 239; Register of Free Negroes 1835-64, p.6, no. 202].

ii. Archer2, born about 1811, registered in Charles City County on 20 October 1831: son of William Bowman, a bright mulatto lad, 20 years old, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 80].

 

5.    Wiley Bowman, born say 1778, was taxable in Charles City County in 1799, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814] and head of a Charles City County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:957]. He was the father of

i. Edward4, born about 1810, registered in Charles City County on 16 August 1832: son of Wilie Bowman, a mulatto man, twenty two years old, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 117].

ii. Fanny, born 8 March 1815, registered in Charles City County on 16 August 1832: daughter of said Wilie, seventeen years old 8 March 1832, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 117].

iii. Nancy, born 28 May 1817, registered in Charles City County on 16 August 1832: daughter of said Wilie, fifteen years old 28 May 1832, mulatto girl, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 117].

iv. Maria, born 18 March 1819, registered in Charles City County on 16 August 1832: son of said Wilie, thirteen years old 18 March 1832, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 117].

v. Charles2, born 18 March 1819, registered in Charles City County on 16 August 1832: son of said Wilie, thirteen years old 18 March 1832, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 117].

vi. Christiana, born 18 October 1823, registered in Charles City County on 16 August 1832: daughter of said Wilie, eight years old 18 October 1831, mulatto girl, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 117].

 

6.    Richard1 Bowman, born say 1780, was taxable in Charles City County in 1802, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814] and head of a Charles City County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:5]. He was paid 4 shillings on 18 June 1807 for digging the grave of John Blanks of Charles City County [WB 2:59]. He was the father of

i. Susanna, born 28 October 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 19 July 1832: daughter of Richard Bowman, Sr., bright mulatto woman, 28 years old 28 October last [Minutes 1830-7, 43].

ii. Francis2/ Frank, born 15 June 1806, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 July 1825: son of Richard Bowman, of bright complexion, nineteen years old 15th of last month, 5 feet 5-1/8 inches, born free in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 127].

iii. Richard2, born in September 1811, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 July 1831: son of Dick Bowman, 19 years of age last September, bright mulatto [Minutes 1830-7, 69].

iv. Frances T., born in April 1815, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 20 October 1831: daughter of Richard Bowman, Sr., a bright mulatto girl, sixteen years of age last April [Minutes 1830-7, 79].

 

7.    Samuel Bowman, born say 1784, was taxable in Charles City County in 1805 and a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He was the father of

i. John, born about 1806, registered in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: son of Sam Bowman, a mulatto man about 25 years old, born free in this county. His wife Nancy registered on 20 September 1832 [Minutes 1830-7, 80, 123].

 

8.    Edward2 Bowman, born say 1792, was a "Mulattoe" taxable in Charles City County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814] and head of a Charles City County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:4]. He was married to Catherine Brown by 13 June 1825 when he was paid $20 as her legacy of a bed and furniture [WB 3:115]. He was granted administration on the estate of Mary Harris, deceased, on 17 May 1832 [Minutes 1830-7, 107]. He, John Bowman, and Abraham Brown were buyers at the sale of the estate [WB 4:29-30]. James Brown (son of Dixon) and others brought a chancery suit against Edward's children Erasmus, Susan, Rebecca, and Elizabeth on 19 February 1835 [Minutes 1830-7, 223]. He was the father of

i. Erasmus, born February 1815, registered in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: son of Edward Bowman, yellowish complexion, 16 years old February last [Minutes 1830-9, 83].

ii. Susan M., born 28 December 1817, registered in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: daughter of Edward Bowman, a mulato girl, 13 years old 28 December last [Minutes 1830-9, 84].

iii. Rebecca M., born 20 July 1820, registered in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: daughter of Edward Bowman, a mulato girl, 11 years old 20 July last [Minutes 1830-9, 84].

iv. Delly F., born 5 April 1823, registered in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: daughter of Edward Bowman, yellowish complexion, 8 years old 5 April last [Minutes 1830-9, 84].

v. Betty Byrd, born 7 August 1827, registered in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: daughter of Edward Bowman, yellowish complexion, 4 years old 7 August last [Minutes 1830-9, 84].

 

BOWMER FAMILY

1.    An unnamed Indian woman, born say 1730, was the mother of three children living in Antrim parish in September 1765 when the Halifax County, Virginia court ordered them bound to William Thompson [Orders 1764-6, 226]. She was the mother of

2        i.  Fanny, born about 1756.

ii. Veice, born say 1760.

3        iii. Archer, born about 1763.

 

2.    Fanny Bomar, born about 1756, was living in Halifax County, Virginia, in June 1787 when the court bound out her illegitimate children Philip, Abram, William and Samuel Bomar to Colonel William Thompson [Pleas 1786-8, 171]. Fanny Bowman was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. Her children were

i. ?Pat, born say 1772, mother of Herbert Bomar who was bound to William Thompson in Halifax County in December 1807 [Pleas 1806-7, 478]. He registered in Halifax County on 26 June 1824: Herbert Bowman, aged about 34 years, five feet six and a half inches high, of a yellow complexion...born of a free woman of Colour [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 74].

ii. Mary, born say 1774, "Bastard child of Fanny Bomar," bound by the Halifax County court to Elizabeth Moody on 21 June 1787 [Pleas 1786-8, 172], perhaps identical to Massey Bowman, who registered in Halifax County in 1834. Her son Phil Bomar was bound by the court to John W. Scott in August 1816. He registered in Halifax County on 27 January 1823: aged about 23 years six feet two inches high, of a yellow complexion [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 67].

iii. Philip1 Bomer, an "Indian" taxable in the northern district of Halifax County, Virginia, in 1798 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frame 765].

iv. Samuel, born about 1786, registered in Halifax County on 1 October 1814: Samuel Bowman, aged twenty eight years, about six feet and six eighths of an inch high, yellow complexion and was born of a free woman...registered as a free Mulatto [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 50].

v. ?Elijah, born about 1786, registered in Halifax County on 32 February 1822: Elijah Bowman, aged 36 years five feet 11 inches high of a yellow complexion... born of a free woman [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, no. 64].

 

3.    Archer Bowmer, born about 1763, was taxable in the northern district of Halifax County, Virginia, from 1791 to 1799, called a "FN" in 1795 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 368, 391, 557]. He married Nancy Bird, 17 August 1804 Halifax County bond. Archer Bowman, Sr., was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830. He registered in Halifax County on 20 May 1827: Archer Boman, Sr., a dark mulatto man about 64 years of age, five feet 6-1/2 inches high, grey wooly hair, was born free. Nancy registered the same day: a dark mulatto woman about 40 years of age, five feet 3 inches high, black bushy hair, born free. They were probably the parents of Drunilla and Cinderrilla Boman who registered the same day:

i. Drunilla, born about 1804, registered on 20 May 1827: light mulatto woman, five feet one inch high, black wooly hair [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, nos. 114-117].

ii. Cinderella, born about 1804, registered on 20 May 1827: light mulatto woman, five feet one inch high, black wooly hair [Registers of Free Negroes, 1802-1831, nos. 114-117].

 

BOWSER FAMILY

1.    Anthony1 Bowser, born say 1650, was called "Tony Bowze Negro late Servt to Major Gennll Bennett Deceased" when he petitioned the Virginia General Court in March 1676 for his freedom which was granted on his payment of 800 pounds of tobacco yearly [Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning American Slavery I:81]. He was probably the ancestor of

i. Anthony2, petitioned the Isle of Wight County court on 11 August 1748 for his freedom from Martha Parker. His petition was rejected on hearing the arguments of both parties [Orders 1746-52, 120].

2        ii. Mary, born say 1731.

3        iii. Sarah, born say 1740.

iv. Richard1, born say 1742, living in Southampton County before 10 December 1762 when John Byrd charged John Little 2 shillings, 6 pence for his hire for two days [Judgment Papers 1763-4, frame 140].

4        v. Thomas1, born say 1745.

5        vi. Pat, born say 1747.

6        vii. James1, born say 1750.

viiii. James2, born say 1763, head of a Fayette District, Moore County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free," 1 white female, and 1 white male under sixteen years of age in 1790 [NC:44].

 

2.    Mary Bowzer, born say 1731, had been the servant of Henry Best prior to 25 January 1762 according to the Vestry minutes of Suffolk Parish, Nansemond County [Hopkins, Suffolk Parish Vestry Book 1749-84, 24]. She may have been the mother of

7        i. Olive, born say 1760.

ii. Nelson, born about 1773, son of Mary Bowser, a "free black woman," bound apprentice by the Hustings Court of Petersburg on 7 February 1791 to Simon Fraser as a waterman for three years until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1784-91, 348].

 

3.    Sarah Bowser, born say 1740, was living in Isle of Wight County on 7 February 1760 when her child Betty Tale (no race mentioned) was bound apprentice, perhaps the same "Betty a Negro Girl, a child of Sarah a Free Negro," who was ordered bound out two months earlier on 6 December 1759 [Orders 1759-63, 114, 98]. Her children were

i. ?Richard2, born say 1757, listed in the 1778 tax list for Isle of Wight as a recusant who declined or neglected to take the oath of allegiance to the state and was thus subject to double taxation [WMQ 25:170]. He was taxable on 2 horses in Southampton County in 1782 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frame 507] and taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1782 to 1806: taxable on a horse in 1782 when he was listed as a "free Mulatto;" listed as a "F.N." in 1790 and thereafter; taxable on a horse and 2 cattle in 1785; taxable on a horse from 1786 to 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 4, 56, 61, 75, 89, 135, 146, 181, 226, 242, 271, 331, 346, 390, 418, 429, 473, 491, 523, 576, 652, 673, 715].

ii. Betty Tale, born say 1759, daughter of Sarah Bowzer.

8        iii. ?Philip, born say 1760.

iv. ?Dorothy, born say 1768, a "poor Mulato," no parent named, ordered bound out in Isle of Wight County on 1 May 1783. She was called Dolly Bowzer when she married Sampson Bones, 1 June 1787 Isle of Wight County bond, Scott Hollowell surety, 2 June marriage. Sampson Bones was head of an Isle of Wight County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:36].

v. ?Charity, a "poor Mulato," no parent named, ordered bound out in Isle of Wight County on 1 May 1783 [Orders 1780-3, 178].

vi. ?Martha, a "poor Mulato," no parent named, ordered bound out in Isle of Wight County on 1 May 1783 [Orders 1780-3, 178].

vii. ?Ann, a "poor Mulato," no parent named, ordered bound out in Isle of Wight County on 1 May 1783 [Orders 1780-3, 178].

viii. Jeremiah, orphan of Sarah Bowzer ordered bound out in Isle of Wight County on 6 August 1778 [Orders 1772-1780, 431].

ix. Willis, born say 1785, a "poor Mulatto child of Sarah Bowzer," ordered bound apprentice to Anthony Holladay in Isle of Wight County on 6 January 1795 [Orders 1795-97, 15].

 

4.    Thomas1 Bowser, born say 1745, was taxable in Hertford County on two persons in 1768, three in 1769, and taxed on a mare and a cow in District 3 of Hertford County in 1779 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 58; GA 30.1]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:26]. On 11 December 1792 Peter Bird placed a notice in the North Carolina Central and Fayetteville Gazette accusing Thomas of stealing his horse:

Stolen from the subscriber at Wake Court House a bright bay horse by a free mulatto man of the name Thomas Bowser, a blacksmith [Fouts, Newspapers of Edenton, Fayetteville, and Hillsborough, 64].

He married (second?) Ann Milton, 28 December 1792 Southampton County, Virginia bond, Randolph Milton surety. Ann was the daughter of Elisha Milton who mentioned her in his 1 December 1788 Southampton County will, proved 21 August 1797 [WB 5:2]. She was called "Ann Milton, alias Ann Bowser," in a codicil to the 20 February 1791 Southampton County will of Ethelred Taylor, recorded 14 July 1791. The will also mentioned Patsey Milton, "so called daughter of Ann Milton, Jr." [WB 5:437]. Thomas was appointed guardian of Patsey Milton, orphan of Ann Milton, by the Southampton County court on 15 January 1798 [Minutes 1793-9, 321]. He was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 in 1800 [NC:288], 7 in 1810 [NC:7], and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:142]. His children may have been

i. Randal, head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in Moore's District in 1800 [NC:133].

9        ii. James3, born say 1775.

iii. Charles, born say 1780, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:7].

iv. Patsey, mentioned in the 1788 Southampton County will of her grandfather Elisha Milton [WB 5:2].

v. Isaac, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:142].

 

5.    Pat Bowser, born say 1748, was living in Isle of Wight County on 4 December 1777 and 6 June 1782 when her son Adam Bowzer was bound apprentice. On 7 February 1782 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her "poor mulatto" children Jack, Bett, Fan, Harrison, Patt, Wilson and Eady Bowzer [Orders 1772-80, 417; 1780-3, 42, 62]. Her children were

i. Adam, born say 1767, "a poor Mulattoe" (no parent named) bound apprentice in Isle of Wight County on 5 March 1778 and called "son of Pat" when he was again ordered bound out on 6 June 1782 [Orders 1772-80, 417; 1780-83, 62]. He was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1788 to 1802 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 114, 195, 212, 257, 286, 310, 361, 404, 455, 508, 558], and a "free Negro" taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton, from 1803 to 1812, listed his wife Tricy and taxable on 2 horses in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 648; 1807-21, frames 9, 90, 130, 248, 337]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:74]. On 16 February 1818 the Southampton County court rescinded the order of the previous court to bind out his son Merix Bowser [Minutes 1816-9, unpaged].

ii. Jack, born say 1769, bound to Samuel Holloway, Sr., of Isle of Wight County on 4 April 1782 [Indentures 1782-1833, frame 160].

iii. Bett, born say 1771, ordered bound out on 7 February 1782.

iv. Fan, born say 1773, ordered bound out on 7 February 1782.

v. Harrison, born say 1775, ordered bound out on 7 February 1782.

vi. Patt, born say 1777, bound to John Hawkins of Newport Parish on 4 April 1782 [Indentures 1782-1833, frame 162].

vii. Wilson, born say 1779, ordered bound out on 7 February 1782.

viii. Eady, born say 1780, a "poor mulatto" child of Pat ordered bound apprentice on 7 February 1782.

 

6.    James1 Bowser, born say 1750, a Norfolk County, Virginia tithable in 1767 and was listed as a tithable by Benjamin Hodges in Great Bridge District of Norfolk County in 1770 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 3, 100]. He was listed in the 1778 tax list for Isle of Wight as a recusant who declined or neglected to take the oath of allegiance to the state and was thus subject to double taxation [WMQ 25:170]. He was head of his own household, living alone in Isle of Wight County in 1782 [VA:32] and taxable there from 1782 to 1800: a "free Mulatto" taxable on 2 horses in 1782; taxable on slaves Bridget (over the age of 16), Judith and Nan (age 12-16) in 1785; taxable on Bridget, Judith, Nancy and Hannah in 1786; taxable on a slave over the age of 16 and 3 slaves aged 12-16 in 1787 (called James Bowers); a "F.N." taxable on a slave above aged 16 and a slave aged 12-16 in 1793 and 1794; a "F.N." taxable on a slave over the age of 16 in 1795; taxable on 2 slaves above the age 16 and a slave aged 12-16 in 1798 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 4, 61, 89, 135, 181, 241, 331, 346, 418, 428, 491]. On 5 September 1800 by Isle of Wight County deed he freed "Negro Bridget," aged about fifty-seven, whom he had bought from Priscilla West, stating in the deed that "freedom is a natural right" [DB 18:492]. He was a "yellow" complexioned soldier born in Charles City County who was living in Nansemond County when he was listed in the size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Courthouse [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 148]. He made a nuncupative Isle of Wight County will on 5 September 1800 leaving his whole estate to his wife Bridget Bowzer [WB 11:284]. Bridget was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1801 to 1813: taxable on 2 slaves in 1801; 3 in 1802; 2 in 1803; 3 in 1804, 2 in 1805 and 1806, listed with Philip Bowser in 1809 when they were taxable on a slave [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 523, 577, 595, 652, 673, 715, 791]. Nathaniel Bowser, Sr., and Thomas Bowser, heir at law of James Bowser, testified on 17 October 1833 that Nathaniel Bowser, Thomas Bowser, and Betsy Bowser, Moses Ash, Caroline Ash, Lydia Ash, Thomas Ash, and Curtis Ash were the only heirs of James Bowser who had served in the Revolution in 1782. In 1835 they received bounty land scrip for his service [M804-306, frame 0123]. His children may have been

i. Nathaniel, born say 1768, a plaintiff with (his brother?) Thomas Bowser against James Buxton, executor of Edward A. Best, in Nansemond County court in 1798 [Watson, Nansemond County Clerks' Fee Books, 28], taxable on a lot with $20 annual rent in Nansemond County in 1802 [1802 Personal Property Tax List B, p.3]. He was head of a Nansemond County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:73b].

ii. James3, born before 1771, a "Free Negro" over the age of 45 in 1815 when he was taxable on a slave over the age of 16, 2 cattle, and 17 horses in "S. Hole" in Nansemond County in 1815 and 1816 [PPTL 1815-1837, frames 10, 51].

iii. Thomas2, born say 1771, recorded a deed of emancipation for (his wife?) Nancy in Nansemond County in 1792 [Watson, Nansemond County Clerks' Fee Books, 29], taxable on a lot with $20 annual rent in Nansemond County in 1802 [1802 Land Tax List B, p.2], a "Free Negro" taxable on a head of cattle and 3 horses at "P.P." in Nansemond County in 1815 [Yantis, A Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia, S-14]. He may have been the Thomas Bowser who was found not guilty of felony by the Richmond City court on 10 November 1791 [Hustings Court Orders 1787-92, 651].

iv. Betsy, born before 1776, head of a Nansemond County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:89].

v. perhaps a daughter, the mother of Moses, Caroline, Lydia, Thomas, and Curtis Ash, heirs of James Bowser. Perhaps Moses Ash was identical to Moses Ash Bowser, born about 1771, a nine-year-old boy called Moses Ash when the court ordered him bound to Jethro Sumner in Warren County, North Carolina, in September 1780 to learn to read and write and husbandry [Minutes 1780-3, 51]. He was called Moses Ash Bowser on his Warren County indenture [WB 3:155].

 

7.    Olive Bowser, born say 1760, was living in Isle of Wight County on 6 February 1783 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her daughter Louisa [Orders 1780-3, 124]. She was a resident of Surry County, Virginia, by 3 October 1801 when her daughter Nancy registered as a "free Negro" [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no. 135]. Her children were

10      i. Nancy, born Christmas 1780.

ii. Louisa, ordered bound out in Isle of Wight County on 6 February 1783.

 

8.    Philip Bowzer, born say 1760, was head of an Isle of Wight County household of 1 white (free) person in 1782 [VA:29]. He was taxable on a horse in Isle of Wight County from 1782 to 1810: listed as a "F.N." in 1790 and thereafter; taxable on slaves Sarah, Rose and Olive, and 2 cattle in 1784; taxable on slaves Sarah, Olive, Rose and Davey in 1785; taxable on a slave in 1786; taxable on 4 slaves and 2 cattle in 1787; a slave in 1788 and 1789; a slave in 1790; 2 slaves in 1791 and 1792; 3 slaves in 1793; taxable on his own tithe, Dick Bowzer, Jr.'s tithe and 2 slaves in 1794; a free tithable aged 16-21 and 4 slaves in 1795; taxable on a slave in 1802, 1805 and 1807. Bridget Bowser and her taxables were listed with him in 1809 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 4, 45, 60, 74, 89, 134, 181, 226, 242, 271, 331, 346, 418, 429, 491, 521, 575, 595, 652, 673, 715, 771, 791, 846]. In September 1797 he manumitted "Negro woman Sarah," aged fifty, by Isle of Wight County deed, stating that "freedom is a natural right" [DB 18:304]. He was a "free Negro" head of an Isle of Wight household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:15]. He may have been the father of

i. Richard3, born say 1773, taxable in Philip Bowzer's Isle of Wight County household in 1794 [PPTL 1782-1810, frame 331]. He was aged 16-45 when he was listed in Nansemond County in 1815 and 1816 [PPTL 1815-1837, frame 10, 51].

 

9.    James3 Bowser, born say 1775, was an insolvent taxpayer in Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1799. He may have been the father of

i. Drury, born Christmas 1795, ordered bound an apprentice to James Cooley by the 19 August 1800 Halifax County court [Minutes 1799-1802, 125].

ii. Susanna, born about 1799, two years old when she was ordered bound an apprentice by the 19 August 1801 Halifax County court.

iii. Macon, born about 1800, ten months old when he was ordered bound an apprentice to James Wright by the 19 August 1801 Halifax County court.

 

10.    Nancy Bowser, born Christmas 1780, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County, Virginia, on 3 October 1801: a negro woman of a bright complexion, aged 21 yrs next Christmas, 5'2" high, has bushy hair daughter of Olive alias Olive Bowser a free negro late a resident of this county [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no. 135]. She was living in York County on 17 October 1831 when her daughter Sally Roberts registered. Her children were

i. ?Lucy, born about 1810, registered in York County on 18 November 1833: a bright Mulatto about 23 years of age, 5 feet 3 Inches high ... broad flat face, very Black Eyes and long hair [Free Negroes Register, 1831-50, no.356].

ii. Sally Roberts, born about 1816, registered in York County on 17 October 1831: daughter of Nancy Bowser, a bright mulatto girl about 15 years of age, 5 feet 4-3/4 inches high ... full head of hair, large nose [Register, no.314].

 

Other members of the Bowser family were

i. Esther, born say 1785, mother of William Ash (bound out to Edmund Godwin, Jr., in Isle of Wight County in July 1805) and Nearer Ash (bound out to Edwmund Godwin on 21 April 1806) [Indentures 1782-1833, frames 380-2, 385].

ii. Kinchen, born about 1791, registered as a "free Negro" in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 26 June 1826: a free man of yellow Complexion about five feet three Inches high thirty years of age was born free as appears from the Evidence of John D Wilkins and has no scars or marks perceivable and by Occupation a Ditcher [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 85].

iii. James, a "F.N." taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frame 337].

 

BOYD FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Boyd, born say 1742, the servant of Charles Chaddock of Dettingen Parish, Prince William County, was free from her indenture by 2 August 1773 when her "mulatto bastard" Hannah Boyd was bound to Chaddock [Historic Dumfries Virginia, Records of Dettingen Parish, 118]. Her children were

2        i. ?Augustine, born say 1760.

ii. Hannah, born 17 February 1768 according to her indenture.

iii. ?Anthony, born before 1776, head of a Botetourt County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:49].

 

2.    Augustine Boyd, born say 1760, was among a group of Revolutionary seamen who deserted and for whom a reward was offered in the 11 September 1779 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 31]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1785 to 1813: listed with 2 tithables in 1809, listed as a "Blk" tithable from 1809 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 280, 319, 327, 363, 378, 392, 421, 436, 443, 458, 475, 490, 504, 513, 535, 549, 572, 599, 621, 632, 652, 681]. He married Grace Sorrell, 24 July 1795 Northumberland County bond, Thomas Pollard security, and was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:973]. He was the father of

i. Frances, "daughter of Augustine Boyd," married James Sorrell, 4 March 1811 Northumberland County bond, William Boyd security.

ii. Sally, married William Toulson, 22 February 1802 Northumberland County bond, Joseph Toulson security, with the consent of Augustine Boyd for Sally.

iii. ?William2, born about 1787, married Polly Toulson, 13 March 1809 Northumberland bond, Jerry Toulson security. That same day William and Polly registered as "free Negroes" in Northumberland County: Wm Boyd, bright mulatto, 22 yrs, 5 feet 11 inches high. Polly Toulson, bright mulatto, about 18, 5 feet 2 Inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, nos. 40-1].

iv. ?Lewis, a "mulatto man" residing in Northumberland County on 9 May 1796 when the court certified that the was born free [Orders 1796-7, 32]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1797 to 1802, listed as a "Blk" tithable in 1812 and 1813 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 458, 490, 514, 535, 681]. He married Patty Evans, 9 February 1802 Northumberland County bond, John Evans security.

v. ?Peggy, married Hancock Carpenter, 12 December 1811 Northumberland County bond, Presly Coleman security.

vi. ?James, born about 1787, registered in Northumberland County on 10 March 1806: bright mulatto, about 19 years old, 5 feet 5 Inches high, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 21].

 

BRADBY FAMILY

1.    Richard1 Bragby, born say 1710, and his wife Elizabeth were living in Charles City County in April 1738 when the court ordered that they appear at the next court to show cause why their children should not be bound out because Benjamin Harrison, Gentleman, informed the court that they were "not bringing up their children in an honest way of Liveing as well as in ye fear of God" [Orders 1737-51, 39]. They were probably the parents of

i. James Bradberry, born say 1746, taxable in St. David's Parish, King William County, from 1782 to 1787: taxable on 2 horses in 1782 and 1783 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1811]. He may have been identical to James Bradby, an Indian who attended William and Mary College in 1754 [Rountree, Pocahantas's People, 172].

2        ii. Edward1, born say 1748.

3        iii. Richard1, born say 1750.

 

2.    Edward1 Bradby, born say 1748, was called Edward Bragby when he was bound to Jonathan V____ (Vaughan?) in Charles City County on 6 July 1757 [Orders 1751-7]. He was called Edward Bradby when he was taxable in Charles City County on his own tithe and two horses in 1784, taxable on two to three tithes from 1787 to 1801 (called Edward Bradby, Sr.) [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7; 1788-1814], and taxable on 100 acres from 1782 to 1802 [Land Tax List, 1782-1830]. He died before 1802 when his widow Susannah Bradby administered his Charles City County estate. She allotted 9 pounds each to Mary Bradby, John Fields, Eliza Atkins, Susannah Bradby and Edward Bradby, and allotted herself 51 pounds as her one-third share. The remainder of the estate was appraised at about 88 pounds and included beds, furniture, three guns, three plows, farm animals, a looking glass, two spinning wheels, a pair of spectacles and a parcel of books [WB 1:591, 601]. Edward was probably the father of

i. Edward2, born say 1771, taxable in Charles City County from 1792 to 1796 (called Edward Bradby, Jr.) and taxable from 1803 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He was probably identical to Edward Bradberry who was taxable in New Kent County from 1798 to 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800]. He was head of a James City County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:118].

ii. Mary, born say 1775.

iii. John1, born say 1777, taxable in Charles City County in 1798 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

iv. ____, wife of John Fields.

v. Eliza Atkins, born say 1780.

vi. Susannah.

 

3.    Richard2 Bradby, born say 1750, was taxable in Charles City County in 1797 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814] and taxable in King William County from 1798 to 1813: taxable on his own tithe and a horse while residing in the Pamunkey Indian town in 1798, taxable on a slave over the age of sixteen in the Indian town in 1800 and 1802 (but not subject to tax on his own tithe), taxable on a free male tithable and a horse in 1803 (called "Richard Bradberry UP" to differentiate him from another Richard Bradberry who was taxable on his own tithe, a slave, and a horse), taxable on a horse but not taxable on his own tithe in 1804, taxable on a free male tithable in 1805, taxable on a horse but not on his own tithe in 1807, 1809, 1811 and 1812, listed as a "Mulatto" taxable on 2 horses in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1811; 1812-50]. He may have been the father of

i. Patrick, taxable in the Pamunkey Indian town in King William County from 1797 to 1799: taxable on his own tithe and a slave in 1797, taxable on his own tithe and a horse in 1797 and 1798, called Patrick Bradberry when he was taxable in King William County on his own tithe and a horse in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1811]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 823].

 

Other members of the Bradby family were

i. Edward3, born say 1773, taxable in Chesterfield County from 1794 to 1796, 1803 to 1805, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1810, and a "free Negro" with a male and four females over the age of sixteen in his household in 1813 (called Edward Bradbery) [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 213, 246, 280, 538, 577, 614, 799]. He was a "free Negro" taxable on 2 horses in the lower district of Henrico County in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 697].

4        ii. John2, born say 1779.

5        iii. Smallwood1, born say 1782.

iv. Bolling, born say 1784, taxable in Charles City County in 1805, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

v. Burwell, born say 1800, purchased 50 acres from Peter Crew by deed acknowledged in Charles City County court on 17 January 1833. He complained to the Charles City County court on 20 July 1837 for a breach of the peace against him by a "man of color" named Lot Griffin [Minutes 1830-7, 141, 327].

vi. Alexander, born about 1805, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 20 January 1825: a man of bright complexion, twenty years of age, 5 feet 7 inches, born free in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 91].

vii. John3, born 2 February 1809, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 15 July 1830 on testimony of Peter Crew: a mulatto man, twenty one years old on 2 February 1830 [Minutes 1830-7, 23].

 

4.    Smallwood1 Bradby, born say 1782, was taxable in Charles City County in 1805, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 [PPTL, 1788-1814] and head of a Charles City County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830. He renewed his certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831 explaining that his former certificate had been destroyed by the burning of his house [Minutes 1823-9, 86]. His wife Rebecca (born about 1786) registered on 15 September 1831: wife of Smallwood Bradby, a very bright mulatto woman about forty five years old, born free in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 188; 1830-7, 75-6]. He may have been the father of

i. Smallwood2, Jr., born about 1806, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 September 1826 on testimony of John Folkes: a bright mulatto born free in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 188]

 

5.    John2 Bradby, born say 1779, was taxable in Charles City County in 1800 (called John Bradby, Jr.) and taxable from 1802 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He died before March 1832 when the administrator of his Charles City County estate paid John Adkins his bill of 88 cents [WB 4:57]. He was the father of

i. Littleberry, born about 1811, registered on 15 December 1831: son of John Bradby, deced., a mulatto man, about 20 years old, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 105].

ii. Sally, born 18 January 1817, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 16 August 1832: (testimony of W. Christian) daughter of John Bradby, a mulatto girl, aged fifteen the 18 January last [Minutes 1830-7, 117].

 

BRANCH FAMILY

1.    Randall Branch was listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster of Captain James Fason's Northampton County, North Carolina Militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. In 1769 he was taxable in Dobbs County [SS 837 by NCGSJ XV:74], and in 1790 he was head of a Robeson County household of 11 "other free" [NC:49]. He sold land in Robeson County by deed proved on 7 April 1801 [Minutes 1797-1806, 144]. His children were most likely

i. Moses, head of a Robeson County household of one "other free" in 1800 [NC:363] and one "free colored" in 1820 [NC:297].

ii. Mary, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:316].

iii. William, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:142].

 

Members of the family in Virginia were

i. Peter, "F.N.," head of an Isle of Wight County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:40].

ii. Jesse, head of a Southampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:75].

 

BRANDICAN FAMILY

1.    Reuben, born about 1755, registered in King George County in 1801: Reuben Brannican, alias Gammon, a mulatto man aged about forty six years, about six feet high, long curley hair and at this time large & muscular...was born in this County of free parents [Register of Free Negroes, no.39]. He was head of a King George County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:192]. He was taxable in King George County from 1788 to 1815: called Reuben Gammon in 1788, listed as a "mulatto" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 55, 125, 143, 262, 302, 367].

i. Henry, taxable in King George County from 1789 to 1815: called Henry Gammon in 1788, listed as a "mulatto" from 1813 to 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 59, 64, 104, 153, 237, 338, 367].

ii. Aden, a "mulatto" taxable in King George County from 1797 to 1813: listed as a "mulatto" in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 153, 176, 276, 338, 367].

 

BRANDOM/ BRANNUM FAMILY

Mixed-race members of the Brannum/ Branham family, born about 1720, were probably the children of a servant of Godfrey and Elizabeth Ragsdale since several mixed-race Brannum/ Brandon children were born in their household between 1720 and 1730: Margaret "a Mollatto belonging to Godfry & Eliz: Ragsdale" (called Margaret Brannum when she was bound to Ragsdale in 1722), and Ned (no last name) "a Mulatto" born in Godfrey Ragsdale's household in Bristol Parish [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 11, 50, 305]. They may have been related to Jemmy Brandon who was listed among the "Negros &c At the Home House" in the 15 July 1728 Surry County estate of Nathaniel Harrison, Esq. [DW 1715-30, 843]. Mixed-race members of the Brandon family were

1        i. Peter1, born say 1715.

2        ii. Mary1, born say 1718.

3        iii. Margaret1, born 7 November 1720.

4        iv. Benjamin1 Branham, born say 1721.

5        v. Doll, born say 1723.

vi. Ann, born say 1725, listed in the 6 June 1755 inventory of the Chesterfield County estate of Godfrey Ragsdale (with her brother Ned?): Ned Mulatto to be free in three years - 18 pounds, Nan ditto - 5 pounds [WB 1:178-9]. And she was probably identical to "Nann a Mulatto" who successfully sued Mary Ragsdale for her freedom on 1 August 1755 [Orders 1749-54, 117].

vii. Frances1 Brannum, "alias Harris," born say 1726, living in Chesterfield County on 7 February 1752 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out her unnamed children [Orders 1749-54, 171].

viii. Edward1, born about 1727, a "Mulatto Child by name Ned" (no surname) born in Godfrey Ragsdale's house before 9 July 1730 when he was bound to Ragsdale [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 50]. He was called Ned Brandom in 1751 when he was taxable in Thomas Bevill's Amelia County household in the district between Flatt and Deep Creeks [1751 Tax List]. He was listed in the 6 June 1755 inventory of the Chesterfield County estate of Godfrey Ragsdale: Ned Mulatto to be free in three years [WB 1:178-9].

6        ix. Eleanor, born say 1728.

7        x. Mary2, born say 1729.

8        xi. Edward3 Branham/ Brannum, born say 1760.

 

1.    Peter1 Brannan, born say 1715, was living in Henrico County in May 1741 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out his "Mulatto" children: Sarah, George, Will, and Aggy [Orders 1737-46, 143]. His children were

i. Sarah, born say 1733.

ii. George1, born say 1735.

iii. William1, born say 1738.

iv. Aggy, born say 1740.

 

2.    Mary1 Brandom, born say 1718, was living in Bristol Parish on 12 June 1743 when her children John and Charles Brandom were baptized. She was the mother of

i. John1, son of Mary Brandom, born 22 October 1740, baptized 12 June 1743 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 293], perhaps the John Brandon whose orphans Moses and Aaron were ordered bound out in Sussex County on 19 March 1772 [Orders 1770-6, 116].

ii. Charles1, born 1 March 1742/3, baptized 12 June 1743 in Bristol Parish, son of Mary Brandom [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 293].

 

3.    Margaret1 Brannum, born 7 November 1720, baptized 28 May 1721, was called "Margaret a Mollatto belonging unto Godfrey and Elizabeth Ragsdale" when her birth and baptism were recorded in Bristol Parish (Henrico, Prince George, and Dinwiddie counties). She was two years old on 10 October 1722, called Margaret Brannum (no race mentioned), when she was bound to Godfrey Ragsdale [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 305, 11]. She was called Peg Brannum on 7 February 1752 when the Chesterfield County court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out her unnamed children [Orders 1749-54, 171]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Jinny, born about 1766, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a stout made light brown Mulatto woman, five feet six and a half inches high, twenty eight years old, born free in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 46].

ii. Mary5, born about 1768, registered in Petersburg on 30 January 1798: Mary Brondon, a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, short bushy hair, thirty years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 131]. On 3 August 1812 administration on her Petersburg estate was granted to Plato Cook on $200 pounds bond with Shadrack and Moses Brandon as security [Hustings Court Minutes 1808-12, n.p.].

iii. William3, born about 1769, sued William Linton in the Hustings Court of Petersburg, but the defendant was not found when the case came to trial on 6 December 1786 [Orders 1784-91, 165]. He registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a brown Mulatto man, five feet six and a half inches high, twenty five years old, born free in Dinwiddie County. Renewed 28 August 1816 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 51, 812].

iv. Shadrack, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 16 March 1796: a stout well made dark brown Mulatto man, five feet seven and a half inches high, short wooly hair, twenty five years old, & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 110]. He married Frances Brown, 17 March 1794 Hustings Court, Petersburg marriage. (His wife?) Frances Brandon (born about 1771) registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, twenty three born free in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 47]. He, William Smith, and Hannah Scott, "free Mulattoes," were charged on 23 December 1799 in Petersburg with stealing wheat from William Campbell. He and Hannah Scott were found not guilty, but William Smith, being "a person of bad fame," was ordered to post bond for his good behavior. Plato Cook and Aaron Brandon posted $50 each for Smith [Hustings Court Minute Book 1797-1800, n.p.]. Shadrack was taxable in Petersburg from 1800 to 1810, perhaps the Shadrack Brandon who was taxable there on 2 tithes, a male slave over 16 and 3 horses in 1832 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 3, 25, 47, 73, 279, 944] and head of a Petersburg household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121b].

v. Moses3, born about 1773, taxable in Petersburg from 1799 to 1815: a "free Black" taxable on 3 horses in 1813 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 3, 25, 73, 111, 279, 395, 452], registered in Petersburg on 14 January 1807: a brown free negro man, five feet seven inches high, thirty four years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 404]. He was head of a Petersburg household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121b]. His wife Obedience registered on 7 June 1810: wife of Moses Brandon, a dark brown free woman of Colour, five feet five and a half inches high, thirty six years old, spare & strait made, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 404, 511].

vi. Daniel, born about 1779, registered in Petersburg on 28 June 1806: a brown free negro man, five feet eleven and a half inches high, twenty seven years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 385]. He was head of a Petersburg household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121b] and taxable in Petersburg from 1801 to 1833, called Daniel, Sr., in 1832 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 25, 47, 72, 110, 138, 279, 395, 452, 912, 943]..

 

4.    Benjamin1 Branham, born say 1721, was living in Louisa County on 28 May 1745 when he, William Hall, Thomas Collins, Samuel Collins, William Collins, George Gibson, Thomas Gibson, William Donathan, and Samuel Bunch were presented by the court for failing to list a tithable (probably their wives) [Orders 1742-8, 152, 157, 172]. He and his wife Frances Gibson were lent the plantation they were then living on by the 18 December 1756 Louisa County deed of her father Gilbert Gibson. On 27 August 1772 he made a Louisa County deed of trust for 209 acres which was proved on 11 October 1773, and on 17 April 1784 he and Frances sold 4 acres of their home tract on the waters of Peters Creek [DB B:140-2; D1/2:537; H:373-4]. On 8 May 1780 the Louisa County court exempted him from paying county levies (due to old age) [Orders 1774-82, 303]. He was taxable on a horse in Louisa County from 1782 to 1794, taxable on an unnamed son in 1791 and 1794 [PPTL, 1782-1814]. He left a 24 August 1794 Louisa County will, proved 13 April 1795, naming his children Nathaniel, Benjamin, Jr., Susanna, Sally, Annis (wife of John Lemay), Mary (wife of John Dalton) and Peggy (wife of Kimbrough Sanders) [WB 3:600]. He was the father of

i. Nathaniel, married Patty Napper, 26 March 1795 Louisa County bond, John Dalton surety. He was taxable in Louisa County from 1782 to 1814, listed as a "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1814].

ii. Benjamin2, Jr., taxable in Louisa County from 1782 to 1814, listed as a "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1814].

iii. Susanna, married Gideon Gibson in November 1772 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 126]. She was the mother of Ambrose Branham and Malachia Branham. Malachia was taxable in Louisa County from 1795 to 1814, listed as a "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1814].

iv. Sally.

v. Annis, married John Lemay (stepson of Gilbert Gibson). They had a son John who was born on 4 May 1776 and baptized on 5 October [Jones, The Douglas Register, 183, 236].

vi. Mary, married John Dalton on 28 December 1777 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 126].

vii. Peggy, wife of Kimbrough Landers/ Sanders.

 

5.    Doll/ Dorothy Brandon, born say 1723, was probably the "Mullatto" Child named Dol (no surname) bound to Godfrey Ragsdale in Bristol Parish on 24 July 1727 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 36]. She was the mother of Charles and Moses Brandon (no race indicated) who were bound out by the Sussex County court in November 1756. The court repeated the order on 18 December 1767 and also included her son Andrew [Orders 1754-6, 426; 1766-70, 203]. Her children were

i. Charles2, born about 1754, bound out in Sussex County in November 1756. He may have been the Charles Brandum who was sued by Wood Lawrence for 8 pounds, 8 shillings in Brunswick County, Virginia court on 30 November 1786 [Orders 1784-8, 432, 475]. He registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a brown Mulatto man, five feet high, forty years old, born free in the County of Sussex [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 59]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County in 1791, 1792 (with Plato Brandom), 1807 and 1809 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 81, 117, 689, 738].

ii. Moses1, born say 1756, taxable in St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1787 and 1788: taxable on 2 slaves above the age of sixteen and 2 aged twelve to sixteen in 1787, two slaves above sixteen in 1788 [PPTL 1782-98, frames 184, 212].

iii. Andrew.

iv. ?Plato, born about 1768, sued Thomas Stroud for trespass, assault and battery in the Petersburg Hustings Court on 8 November 1791. Stroud was found not guilty [Orders 1791-7, 13]. Plato registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, twenty eight years old, & raised in the Town of Petersburg & born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1819, no. 15].

 

6.    Eleanor Branham/ Brandom, born say 1728, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 24 July 1753 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her children Thomas and Molly Branham. And on 29 January 1755 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her children Thomas, Molly and Vines Brannum [Orders 1753-6, 9, 340]. On 12 May 1763 the Lunenburg County court ordered the churchwardens of St. James Parish to bind out her son Thomas Brandom [Orders 1763-64, 35]. She was the mother of

9        i. Mary3/ Molly, born say 1744.

10      ii. Thomas1, born about 1746.

11      iii. Vines/ Viney, born say 1754.

iv. ?William2, born say 1755, head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 5 persons in 1782 [VA:34]. He was presented by the court on 14 October 1782 for failing to list himself as a tithable, and he was listed as a tithable in Mecklenburg County in 1783 [Orders 1779-84, 236, 257; PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 50]. He was a "melatto" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County in 1789, listed on the same day as William Brannom, Jr. [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 123].

 

7.    Mary2 Brandom, born say 1729, was the mother of orphans Edward and Ann Brandom who were living in Chesterfield County on 6 August 1750 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind them out [Orders 1749-54, 66]. She registered the birth of her children Elizabeth, John, Aaron, Judith, Peter and Gabriel in Bristol Parish [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 293]. She was the mother of

12      i. Ann2, born say 1744.

ii. Edward2, born about 1749, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet one inches high, forty five years old, born free in the County of Dinwiddie [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 28]. He was taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1787 and 1788 [PPTL, 1782-90 (1787 A, p.2), (1788 A, p.2)]. He sued James Westend for trespass, assault and battery in the Hustings Court of Petersburg on 5 March 1793 but failed to prosecute further on 4 August 1794 [Orders 1791-7, 72, 132].

iii. ?Jacob, an orphan ordered bound out in Sussex County with Ann Brandon on 17 June 1773 [Orders 1770-6, 289], taxable in Dinwiddie County from 1787 to 1789 [PPTL, 1782-90 (1787 A, p.2), (1788 A, p.2), (1789 A, p.3)]. On 4 March 1792 he and Aaron Brandon were granted letters of administration of the estate of Benjamin Scott by the Petersburg Hustings Court on 20 pounds bond [Orders 1791-7, 27]. He was taxable in Petersburg on 2 horses from 1800 to 1810 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 4, 25, 73, 111, 279].

iv. Elizabeth, born 11 April 1758 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 289], registered in Petersburg on 22 July 1799: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet and a half inches high, with short matted hair, forty years old, born free in Prince George County & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 146].

v. John2, son of Mary Brandom, born 4 October 1760. On 4 July 1796 he was ordered by the Petersburg Hustings Court to post bond to keep the peace [Orders 1791-7, 171a].

vi. Aaron, born 1 August 1762 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 293], sued for a 4 pound debt in the Hustings Court of Petersburg on 5 March 1788 [Orders 1784-91, 225]. He was taxable in Petersburg from 1800 to 1815: called a "free Black" in 1813, a "free Negro" in 1815 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 3, 25, 47, 73, 111, 279, 395, 452]. He registered in Petersburg on 2 October 1802: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet nine inches high, forty two years old, short bushy hair, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg. His wife Sylvia, born about 1756, registered on 21 December 1809: a dark brown, near black, free woman of colour (wife of Aaron Brandon) fifty three years old, born free & raised in Prince George County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, nos. 53, 244, 524]. He was called Aaron Brander in 1810, head of a Petersburg household of 7 "other free" [VA:122a].

vii. Judith, born 16 July 1764 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 293], registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark Mulatto woman, four feet eleven and a half inches high, twenty six years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 40].

viii. Peter2, born 16 January 1766 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 293], head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:126b].

ix. Gabriel, born 2 October 1767, registered in Petersburg on 30 June 1794: a dark Mulatto man about Twenty seven years old five & a half feet high, born in the county of Prince George of a free woman & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 6]. He was taxable in Petersburg from 1800 to 1803 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 3, 47, 72].

 

8.    Edward3 Branham/ Brannum, born say 1760, was head of an Amherst County household of 1 free person in 1783 [VA:48] and 3 free persons in 1785 [VA:85]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1783 to 1788 and from 1799 to 1805, a "man of color" in 1811, 1815 and 1817, in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1814, 1818, and 1819 [PPTL 1782-1803, frames 25, 39, 96, 135, 449, 478, 549, 584; 1804-23, frames 20, 61, 208, 284, 298, 436, 489, 528]. He married Nancy Evans, 6 December 1790 Amherst County bond, Charles Christian security. He was one of the freeholders ordered to work on the road from Oransby's cabin to the fork of Megginson's road in Amherst County on 17 February 1794 [Orders 1790-4, 707]. He was the father of

i. ?Creasy, born 1776-94, head of an Amherst County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Polly, born say 1793, daughter of Edward and Nancy Branham, married James Johns in Amherst County in 1810.

iii. Levi, born about 1795, registered in Amherst County in 1830: son of Edward Branham free born aged thirty five a Bright Mulatto 5 feet six inches high [Register, no. 44].

iv. Judith, born about 1808, registered on 28 December 1833: daughter of Edward and Nancey Branham born free - aged about twenty five years a bright mulatto straight hair five feet one inch high [Register, no. 69].

 

9.    Thomas1 Brandon/ Brandom, born about 1746, "Son of Elenor Brandon, was ordered bound apprentice to Hutchings Burton by the churchwardens of St. James Parish, Lunenburg County, on 12 May 1763. He may have been identical to Thomas Branham (no parent named) who was ordered bound out in Brunswick County on 22 September 1760 [Orders 1760-84, 96]. He was taxable in Burton's Lunenburg County household in the 1764 list for St. James Parish [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 247]. He complained to the court that Burton was mistreating him, and the court bound him instead to Jacob Chavis on 13 July 1764 [Orders 1763-4, 35, 91; 1764-5, 108]. He purchased 130 acres on Middle Bluestone Creek in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, for 30 pounds on 11 July 1778 [DB 5:283-4]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820. He was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 15 June 1833 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he was born in Hanover County and was about eighty-seven years old. On 19 October 1840 his widow Margaret Walden Brandom, born about 1753, made a deposition in order to obtain a survivor's pension for his services. She testified that they were married on 3 January 1771 and he died 17 December 1834. Her application included a copy of a book containing the family register which was provided by William J.B. Bedford of the Charlotte County courthouse [Dorman, Virginia Revolutionary Pension Applications, 9:74-75]. She was identified as the daughter of Thomas Evans, wife of Thomas Brandom, in a Mecklenburg County Chancery Suit in 1819 [LVA 1819-006]. Perhaps she was Thomas Evans' illegitimate child by a member of the Walden family, or perhaps Walden was his wife's maiden name. The family register identified Thomas and Margaret Brandon's children:

i. Nancy, born 2 September 1771, called Nancy Brannom in the 22 May 1787 Mecklenburg County will of her grandfather Thomas Evans [WB 2:250]. She married Frederick Graves, 20 December 1800 Mecklenburg County bond, Ephraim Drew security. They were probably the parents of Hugh Graves, head of a Mecklenburg County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820.

ii. Agnes, born 2 June 1773.

iii. Walden, born 5 July 1775, head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 6 "free colored" in 1820.

iv. Suckey, born 12 September 1777.

v. Edward4, born 10 November 1779, married Betsy Chavis, 1806 Mecklenburg County bond. He was a "f. negro" wheelwright taxable in Charlotte County in 1802, taxable with Jacob Chavis in 1803 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 533, 542, 588]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820.

vi. Elizabeth, born 3 February 1782, perhaps the Elizabeth Brandom who married Archer Stewart, 1818 Mecklenburg County bond, Ned Brandom security.

vii. Thomas2, born 30 August 1786, registered in Mecklenburg County on 19 December 1815: a man of Colour five feet seven Inches high, slender made, dark complexion, 24 years old, free born in the County [Register, no. 12, p.7]. He purchased property by indenture proved in Mecklenburg County court on 21 December 1812, and he and his wife Sally sold it by indenture of bargain and sale proved on 17 January 1814. His wife Sarah was identified as the daughter of Elizabeth Chavous (widow of Jacob Chavous) on 20 June 1814 when Thomas Evans brought a suit in chancery against Elizabeth's children [Orders 1811-13, 386; 1813-15, 86, 210].

viii. Margaret2, born 22 January 1790, married John Garnes, 8 September 1823 Warren County bond, Benjamin Durom (Durham) bondsman.

ix. John, born 30 September 1792.

x. Jesse, born 7 May 1796, married Parthena Drew, 2 July 1822 Warren County bond, William Carsey (Kersey) bondsman.

 

10.    Mary3 Brandom, born say 1744, was the mother of Rhode Brandom who was bound out in Mecklenburg County on 11 August 1766 [Orders 1765-8, 195]. She was the mother of

13      i. Rhode, born say 1762.

14      ii. ?Moses2, born say 1772.

 

11.    Viney Brandom, born say 1754, was presented by the grand jury of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 14 March 1791 for living in adultery with Thomas Dison (a white man) on the plantation of William Cleaton. They were each fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco. She purchased land from Thomas G. Taylor by deeds proved in court on 14 November 1796 and 11 June 1804 [Orders 1787-92, 565, 597; 1795-8, 165; 1803-5, 181]. She was taxable in Mecklenburg County on her son John in 1805 and taxable on a horse from 1807 to 1815: taxable on a free male tithable in 1807, called Mrs. Viney Brandom in 1811, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813. Perhaps her son was John Dyson who was a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1816 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 1049; 1806-28, frames 55, 157, 230, 326, 380, 497, 536]. He was about 70 years old when he was counted in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census [VA:62b]. Viney was taxable on 100 acres from 1804 until 1817. She left an 1818 Mecklenburg County will naming her children Sally, Mason, Frederick, David Chapman, John and Nancy. In 1818 fifty acres of her land were transferred to Mason Brandom and her estate transferred another fifty acres to Sally Brandom in 1819 [Land Tax Lists 1782-1811A, 1811B-1824A, B lists]. Viney was the mother of

i. ?Mary5, born say 1778, married Frederick Goen, 29 December 1800 Mecklenburg County bond.

ii. ?William4, born say 1785, taxable in the lower district of Mecklenburg County in 1802 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 915].

iii. Mason, born say 1786, over the age of sixteen in 1802 when he was listed in the lower district of Mecklenburg County in 1802, a "Mulatto" not yet twenty-one in 1806 when he was taxable on a horse, listed as a tithable in 1809 [PPTL, 1782-1805, 915, 1018; 1806-28, frames 27, 128, 157, 230, 326].

iv. Sally, listed as a "Mulatto" over the age of sixteen in Mecklenburg County in 1813, received 50 acres from Viney Brandom's estate in 1819 [PPTL, 1806-28, frame 327].

v. John, born say 1789, over the age of sixteen when he was listed in Viney Brandom's Mecklenburg County household in 1805, a "Mulatto" taxable from 1813 to 1820 [PPTL, 1806-28, frame 326, 700]. He may have been the John Brandum who married Mary Chavis, 20 November 1824 Granville County bond, George Anderson bondsman.

vi. David Chapman, a "Free" Mecklenburg County taxable in 1806, taxable on 2 horses in 1809 and 1810 [PPTL, 1806-28, frames 27, 128, 157].

vii. Frederick, taxable in the lower district of Mecklenburg County in 1802 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 915, 1018].

 

12.    Anne Brannum, born say 1744, daughter of Mary Brandon, was bound out with her brother Ned by the Chesterfield County court on 6 August 1750 [Orders 1749-54, 66]. She was a free "Mulatto" living in Goochland County in May 1763 when the churchwardens of St. James Northam were ordered to bind out her children: Jane, Patsy, and Siller to John Payne [Orders 1761-65, 183]. Her children were

i. Jane, born say 1758.

ii. Patsey, born say 1760.

iii. Siller, born about 1762, registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 21 October 1822: Siller Cooper formerly Siller Branam, a woman of color about sixty years old, about five feet one inch high, of yellow complexion and was free born [Register of Free Negroes, p.136, no.287].

 

13.    Rhode Brandom, born say 1762, was called the son of Mary Brandom when he was bound out by the churchwardens of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, to Isaac Holmes on 11 August 1766 and called a "Molotto Boy" on 12 October 1772 when the court ordered him bound to John Ballard, Jr. He was sued for debt in Mecklenburg County on 13 May 1783 [Orders 1765-8, 195; 1771-3, 329; 1779-84, 315]. He acted as the next friend of his infant daughter Elizabeth Brandom in a Mecklenburg County suit for trespass, assault and battery against Daniel Brown on 11 March 1800. The parties submitted the case to arbitration by Samuel Holmes, Jr., and John Northington [Orders 1798-1801, 310, 347, 469]. Rodnom/ Rhode was taxable in the lower district of Mecklenburg County from 1784 to 1802 and was taxable in the upper district with his son Charles in 1804 and with sons Charles and Burwell in 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 65, 95, 135, 395, 591, 793, 915, 994, 1080]. His widow may have been the Elizabeth Brandom who purchased 45 acres in Mecklenburg County adjoining William Stewart on Mill Creek from James Stewart on 10 September 1811 [DB 14:461]. She was head of a Mecklenburg County household of a tithable "free Negro and Mulatto" male and female over the age of sixteen years in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 306]. She died intestate before February 1839 leaving a 40 acre tract and children Charles, Peter, George, and Mary Brandom [LVA, chancery case 1839-012]. She was the mother of

i. Charles4, born say 1787, over the age of sixteen in 1804 when he was listed in his father's Mecklenburg County household, listed as "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 305]. He was head of an Abrams Plains, Granville County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:23].

ii. Burwell, born say 1789, over the age of sixteen in 1805 when he was listed in his father's Mecklenburg County household, head of a household of a male and female "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 306].

iii. Elizabeth, born say 1791, an infant in 1800, perhaps the Elizabeth Brandom who received fifteen lashes by order of the Mecklenburg County court for stealing clothes worth $4 from Robert Carter's house on 26 December 1803 [Orders 1803-5, 101, 121, 135].

iv. Peter3, born 30 June 1784, registered in Mecklenburg County on 19 December 1815: a man of Colour 29 years of age five feet six inches high...dark complexion inclined to be fleshy was free born in the County [Register of Free Negroes, no.13, p.7].

v. George, born 1776-1794, head of a Mecklenburg County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820.

vi. Mary, married Robert Mayo but was no longer his wife when her mother's estate was divided in February 1839. Robert was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820.

vii. Hannah.

 

14.    Moses2 Brandon, born say 1772, married Alley Jackson, 3 January 1794 Charlotte County bond, John Chavus surety. He was taxable in Charlotte County from 1794 to 1813: a "f. negro" taxable on a horse in 1799, a planter listed with his children Jimmy, Polly and Alley in 1802; a "fm" carpenter listed with wife Abby, 2 male and 2 female children in 1807; taxable on 2 free males in 1809 and 1810, a "free Negro" head of a household of 2 males and 2 females in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 288, 314, 365, 397, 431, 464, 496, 533, 542, 638, 648, 688, 707, 717, 740, 751, 772, 835, 846, 869]. His wife may have been identical to Abby Brandon whose children registered as "free Negroes" in Charlotte County. Abby Brandon was the mother of

i. James, born about 1792, a "fm" taxable on a horse in Charlotte County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 869]. He registered in Charlotte County on 11 November 1826: a dark looking man aged about 34 years, is the son of Abby Brandon a free woman, was born in the County of Charlotte where he has always resided, he is 5 feet 9-3/4 inches high...a ditcher by trade. His wife Patsey, daughter of William and Caty Brodgon registered the same day [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 50, 52].

ii.Polly, born about 1795, registered in Charlotte County on 17 June 1826: the daughter of Abby Brandon was born free in the County of Charlotte where she has resided ever since about thirty one years of age of dark complexion somewhat bright [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 53].

 

Other members of the family were

i. Mary4 Brandon, born say 1765, head of a Rowan County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:170].

ii. Bolivo(?) Branton, born before 1776, head of a Wilkes County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:494].

iii. Charles3, born say 1778, taxable in Prince George County from 1799 to 1811: called a "dark man" in 1799, a "Mulatto" in 1801 and 1802, a "free negro" in 1803 and "free" in 1810 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 505, 530, 549, 575, 599, 623, 649, 699, 719, 739].

iv. Charles5, born about 1788, registered in Petersburg on 8 June 1810: a free man of colour, nearly black, five feet five and a half inches high, born free p. certificate from clerk of Sussex County (no age). Reentered 29 December 1814, 26 years old [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 565].

 

BRAVEBOY FAMILY

1.    John1 Braveboy, born before 1700, was tithable in Beaufort Precinct, North Carolina, on 25 December 1712:

Att Mackoys Garrison Wm Read, Jno Braborn? & francis Gibson & 1 Negro of Mr. Mackoys - 5 [Haun, Old Albemarle County Miscellaneous Records, 181].

He was the slave of James Ward on 26 August 1713 according to a suit brought in the General Court of North Carolina by Patience Speller, widow of Stephen Swaine, who claimed that John failed to repay her for purchasing his freedom [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 11]. He was addressed by the Chowan County court on 17 July 1716:

Jack Braveboy, a negro, Coming into this Government with a woman and do live together as man and wife, it is ordered that the sd. Braveboy produce a Sufficient Certificate of their Marryage [Hoffman, Chowan Precinct 1696 to 1723, 224].

In March 1721 he was sued in the General Court of North Carolina by Havett and his wife, executors of the last will of Thomas Clark [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, V:231]. On 13 April 1725 he purchased 50 acres in Chowan County on the Southwest side of the Yeopim River near the mouth of Darby's Creek, and he sold this land seven years later on 14 November 1732 [DB C-1:442, 694]. His probable descendants were

2        i. David, born perhaps 1730, died about 1787.

ii. John2, born perhaps 1732, a "Black" tithable in Tyrrell County in 1755 [T.O. 105, box 1], head of a Beaufort County household of one "other free" and 6 slaves in 1790 [NC:127], one "other free" in 1800 [NC:4], and one in 1810 [NC:116]. He was probably the John Brayboy who volunteered as a soldier in Carteret County in 1778 [The North Carolinian VI:728]. He enlisted on 27 August 1778 for three years in Captain Ballard's Company in the North Carolina Continental Line but was listed as a deserter a little over a year later on 29 October 1779 [Clark, State Records, XVI:1020].

3        iii. Mary, born perhaps 1734.

4        iv. Joshua, born perhaps 1740.

v. Sukey, born say 1745, a buyer at the November 1774 sale of the Bertie County estate of James Pearce [Gammon, Record of Estates, Bertie County II, 76]

vi. Nancy, born before 1750, a "free Mulatto" taxable in the 1761 Bertie County tax list of William Gray in the household of (her sister?) Mary Braveboy [CR 10.702.1, box 1]. Perhaps she was the Ann Braveboy who was listed with Mary Braveboy as buyers at the sale of the Bertie County estate of Joseph Wimberly which was recorded on 27 February 1767 [Gammon, Record of Estates, Bertie County II, 110].

 

2.    David Braveboy, born perhaps 1730, entered 100 acres in Bladen County east of Five Mile Swamp on 10 April 1761 [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, no.1188]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 3 "white" polls in 1763, a taxable "Mulato" in 1769, taxable with his wife in 1772, a "Mixt Blood" taxable on himself, his wife and daughter in 1774, a "Molato" taxable in 1776, and taxable on 1 poll and 250 acres in 1784 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:16, 43, 71, 80, 93, 123, 134; II:67, 74; Bladen County Tax List (1763, 1784)]. In his 20 October 1787 will he mentioned his wife Lydia and his children [WB 1:10]. Lydia was head of a Robeson County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:48]. Administration of her estate was granted to her son Stephen on 5 October 1797 on a bond of 50 pounds with Thomas Ivey and Ishmael Roberts securities [Minutes 1797-1806, 17]. Their children were

i. ?Jacob2, born perhaps 1747, not mentioned in his father's will but may have been the eldest son. Perhaps he was the member of the Braveboy family taxable in Bladen County in 1763: "Jas. Blunt & Braveboy 2 "white (free) polls." He was a "Mulato" Bladen County taxable in Solomon Johnston's household in 1769 and a "Molato" taxable in Richard Wharton's household in 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:17, 45, 62]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:367] and 5 in Cumberland County, North Carolina, in 1810 [NC:575].

ii. Patience Hammons, perhaps the wife of Horatio Hammonds.

iii. Nancy Carter.

iv. Patty Braveboy, born say 1752, perhaps the Patty Braveboy who was head of a Cheraw District household of 2 femal "other free" persons in 1790, living next to Sam Braveboy, head of a Cheraw District household of 1 "other free" male over the age of 16, 1 male "other free" under 16, and 1 female "other free" [SC:380].

v. Milly Braveboy.

vi. Stephen, born about 1759. He received his father's plantation of 150 acres. He sold land by deed proved in Robeson County on 8 April 1800 and purchased land by deed proved on 6 April 1801 [Minutes 1797-1806, 104, 142]. He was head of a Robeson County household of one "other free" in 1800 [NC:366]. He was probably over fifty years old in 1809 when the Robeson County court excused him from paying poll taxes [Minutes 1806-13].

vii. Levy, who was probably the "L. Brave Boys" who was head of Cumberland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:622].

 

3.    Mary Braveboy, born say 1734, was a "free Mulatto" taxable in the 1761 Bertie tax list of William Gray. She was tithable with her son John in an untitled 1766 Bertie tax list, and she was tithed on her son only in 1771 [CR 10.702.1]. She was counted as white in the household of her son John in the 1790 census for Martin County [NC:68]. Her children were

i. John3, born about 1754, tithable in 1766. In 1770 he was a "free Mulatto" in Abraham Sullivent's household in the Bertie tax list of David Standley, and he was taxable with his mother in Standley's 1771 list [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. In 1774 he was a "Negro" head of his own household in David Standley's list. In 1779 he was taxable on an assessment of 243 pounds in District 6, Martin County [GA 30.1]. In 1790 he was head of a Martin County household of 7 "other free" and one white woman: John Braveboy & mother [NC:68].

ii. ?Jacob1, born about 1759, called a "bastard Mulattoe aged about 15" by the May 1774 Bertie County court when it ordered him bound as an apprentice bricklayer [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:74]. In 1774 he was taxable in Benjamin Stiles household in David Standley's Bertie tax list. He enlisted for two and one-half years as a private in Fifth Regiment, William's Company of the N.C. Continental Line on 9 May 1776 and was discharged 10 November 1778 [N.C. Historical & Genealogical Register, II:181]. He was head of a Martin County household of 3 free males and 3 free females in William Barden's District no. 5 for the state census in 1787 and head of a Martin County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:387].

 

4.    Joshua Braveboy, born say 1740, was called as a witness but failed to appear in the Cumberland County, North Carolina suit of the Governor and James Simpson vs. Moses Bass on 17 October 1758 [Minutes 1755-79, 39]. He held land in Cumberland County before 26 October 1767 [Patents, 12:143]. He was a taxable "Mulato" in Bladen County with his son Lewis in 1768 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:8]. He moved to Craven County, South Carolina, where he received a grant for 150 acres on Lynches Creek on 4 March 1772 [S.C. Archives series S213019, vol. 25:215]. He was taxable in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 118] and head of a Georgetown District, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790. He was the father of

i. Lewis, recorded a plat for 118 acres on Crackers Neck near the Savannah River in Orangeburgh District, South Carolina, on 9 December 1784 [S.C. Archives series S213190, vol. 2:187]. He was head of a household of 5 "other free" in South Orangeburg District, South Carolina, in 1790 [SC:99]; 1 "other free," 2 white boys under age 10, 1 age 16-21, and 3 white girls under age 10 in Barnwell District in 1800 [SC:65a]; taxable on 300 acres and a "free Negro" in Winton, South Carolina, in 1800 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 301, 313].

ii. ?Morris, taxed in South Carolina on 1,000 acres and 8 slaves on 22 April 1825 [S.C. Archives Index 0015 052 1824 03420]. His 3 June 1843 Williamsburg District will was recorded 7 August 1843 [WB vol.I, D:394]. He divided his land and slaves between his wife Drusiler and children: Morris Murphey Braveboy, Elizabeth Braveboy, Moses Murphey Braveboy, Margaret Thomas, and Annis E. Matthews.

 

BRAXTON FAMILY

Members of the Braxton family in Virginia were

i. Gilbert, born about 1769, a "Free Person of Colour" living on Dandriges' land in Berkeley County (present-day West Virginia) in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List], registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 10 August 1829: born free by cert. of Ro: Pollard, Clerk of King & Queen County, colour: black, about 60 years of age, 5 feet 9 & 3/8 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.75, no. 170].

ii. Abram, head of a New Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:744].

iii. Samson, born about 1783, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 15 December 1810: born free by statement of John P. Lee in person, dark Mulattoe, about 27 years of age, five feet 8-1/4 Inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.17, no. 40].

 

BREWINGTON FAMILY

Members of the Brewington/ Bruenton family were

i. Pilisha, born say 1755, had always passed as a white woman and was "clar of any Negro blood Indian or Mulatto" according to an affidavit that Cation Driggers swore to in Marion County, South Carolina, on 7 May 1785 [Marion County DB C:156 by Henry, Police Control of the Slave in South Carolina].

ii. Amey, head of a Sampson County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:53].

iii. Ann, head of a Sampson County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:53].

1        iv. Joshua, born about 1760.

v. Lewis, head of a New Hanover County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:311].

vi. Hannah, born before 1776, head of a Sampson County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:278].

vii. Mourning, head of a Grainger County, Tennessee household of 1 "other free" in 1810.

viii. James, born before 1776, head of a Grainger County, Tennessee household of 3 "other free" in 1810 and 7 "free colored" in Jackson County, Tennessee, in 1820.

ix.  James, born before 1776, recorded a plat for 36 acres on Cedar Creek in Camden District (present-day Kershaw County) on 16 September 1803 [SC Archives Series S213192, vol. 40, p.147]. He was head of a Kershaw District, South Carolina household of 11 "free colored" in 1830.

x. Jane, born after 1775, head of a Sampson County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:278].

xi. John, living in Williamsburg District, South Carolina, in 1848 when the sheriff petitoned the court that he be relieved from paying uncollected tax against "Free Blacks" John Bruington, Benjamin and Stephen Ard, Moses Braveboy, Eliza, Joshua, Martin and Nancy Browder, Stephen Conner, Solomon Coward, Peter B. Mouzon, Edward J. Porter, John and Sarah Stephens, and John J. Taylor [SC Archives Series S165015, item 2436].

 

1.    Joshua Brewington, born about 1760, was head of a New Hanover County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:311] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:225]. He was seventy-seven years old on 19 September 1836 when he appeared in New Hanover County court to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in 1759 or 1760 in the part of Duplin County that became Sampson County, served in a Company of 9 months raised in Duplin County in February or March 1779, lived ten to twelve years in Sampson County after the war and then moved to New Hanover County. There was a record of his enlistment but no record of service. He was a "person of Colour" who died on 22 November 1836 leaving his daughter Yernah Conner, widow of John Conner, as his only heir according to testimony of Richard Curtis [National Archives Pension file S8091, http://www.fold3.com]. He was the father of

i. Yernah, born say 1785, wife of John Conner, head of a Wilmington household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:205].

 

BRITT FAMILY

1.    Thomas1 Britt, born say 1685, had by Sue Puccum (Puckham) an illegitimate child who was baptized in St. Anne's Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, on 28 February 1719/20 [Wright, Anne Arundel County Church Records, 86]. They may have been the parents of

2        i. Frances, born say 1728.

3        ii. Amy, born say 1730.

iii. Thomas2, an "Indian" taxable in Bladen County in 1768 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:6], perhaps the father of John Britt who was married to Mary Cox on 29 June 1810 when she was left land and slaves by the 29 June 1810 Robeson County will of her father Gilbert Cox.

 

2.    Frances Britt, born say 1728, was the servant of James Parish of Brunswick County, Virginia, in March 1747 when the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish were ordered to bind her "Mulatto" son Reuben Britt to her master [Orders 1745-49, 345]. She was the mother of

i. Reuben, born say 1747.

ii. ?Amos Brite, born say 1749, a "Free Mulatto" taxable in William Sholer's household in Bertie County, North Carolina, from 1765 to 1767. He was called Amos Britt in 1800, head of a Spartanburg County, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" [SC:188].

 

3.    Amy Britt, born say 1730, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 24 September 1759 when the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish were ordered to bind out her "Mulatto" daughter Faith [Orders 1757-9, 400]. She was the mother of

i. Faith, born say 1748, perhaps the Faithy Britt whose illegitimate child Sarah was bound out by the Sussex County court on 17 March 1768 [Orders 1766-70, 214].

 

BROGDON FAMILY

Members of the Brogdon family were

1        i. _____, born say 1747.

2        ii. William, born about 1756.

3        iii. Mary, born say 1760.

 

1.    ____ Brogdon, born say 1747, may have been the first husband of Fanny Harris. Fanny was the mother of

i. ?Molly Harris Brogdon, born say 1768, married William Flood, 12 November 1785 Mecklenburg County bond, William Brogdon consenting. She was probably the Molly Flood who was a "Free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 9 "other free" [VA:1010].

ii. Nancy Braughton (Brogdon?), born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 8 July 1805: Nancy Braughton, a very light Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, thirty years old, long curled hair, holes in her ears, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield, daughter of Fanny Harris [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 294].

 

2.    William Brogdon, born about 1756, was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 4 persons in 1782 [VA:34] and was taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1782 and 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 14, 188]. He married Caty Carter (daughter of Peggy Carter), 31 August 1786 Mecklenburg County bond. His step-daughter Polly Carter married William Bird (Byrd), 19 November 1796 Charlotte County bond, John Chavus surety. Polly Carter was probably related to Henry Carter, head of a Charlotte County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:46]. William was taxable in Charlotte County from 1789 to 1813: a "free negroe" in 1799; a "f. Mulattoe" in 1801; a shoemaker listed with wife Caty and six children Henry, Harrison, Sterling, Betsy, Catey, and Patsy in 1802 and 1803; listed as a ditcher in 1805, 1807 and 1810; listed as a shoemaker from 1811 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 174, 189, 216, 240, 264, 313, 337, 381, 397, 431, 464, 496, 533, 542, 580, 648, 682, 751, 784, 814, 846, 886]. He was a "F.N." head of a Charlotte County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:44]. He registered in Charlotte County on 11 November 1826: a bright mulatto man aged about 70 years was born free in the County of Brunswick in the State of Virginia & removed in the early part of his life to the County of Lunenburg where he resided some eight or ten years & removed to the County of Mecklenburg & resided there until about the age of 30 years & finally removed to the County of Charlotte about 40 years ago, he is 5 feet 11-1/2 inches high...a ditcher by trade. Caty registered the same day: a bright mulatto woman aged about 60 years is the daughter of Peggy Carter a free woman was born in the County of Charlotte where she has always resided, was bound to Wm Redman with whom she lived until she arrived to the age of 18 years & about six years afterward was legally married to Wm Brogden her present husband...is 5 feet 2 1/2 inches high. She registered again on 7 November 1831: a free woman of colour of yellow complexion about seventy years of age was born free five feet two inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, nos. 49, 51, 129]. William and Caty were the parents of

i. Sterling, born about 1788, registered in Charlotte County on 1 December 1828: a free man of bright complexion who was born free the son of Caty Brogdon about thirty years of age five feet seven inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 71]. He was a sixty-year-old "Black" carpenter counted in the 1850 census for Charlotte County [VA:12a]

ii. Henry, born say 1789.

iii. Harrison, born about 1791, registered in Charlotte County on 6 June 1831: a man of bright complexion aged about forty six years is the son of William Brogdon and Caty Brogdon free people...five feet five inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 83].

iv. Catey, born say 1795.

v. Betsy, born about 1800, a fifty-four-year-old "Black" woman counted in the 1850 census for Charlotte County [VA:11a].

vi.Patsey Brandon, born about 1802, registered in Charlotte County on 11 November 1826: Patsey Brandon wife of James Brandon a bright mulatto woman aged about 24 years, is the daughter of Wm Brogdon & Caty his wife free people, was born in the County of Charlotte where she has always resided...5 feet 4-1/4 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 52].

vii. ?Amey, born about 1806, registered in Charlotte County on 7 November 1831: a free woman of colour of bright complexion about twenty five years of age was born free, five feet six inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 130].

 

3.    Mary Brogdon, born say 1760, was listed as a midwife in "A list of Free Negroes and Mulattoes for the Year 1802" in Lunenburg County [Clerk of Court's Office, Lunenburg County]. She may have been the mother of

i. Billy Brogden Valentine, born about 1804, registered in Mecklenburg County in 1826: a Free Mulatto about 22 years of age six feet one Inch high [Register, no.18, p.21].

 

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