BROOKS FAMILY

1.    Richard1 Brooks, born about February 1661/2, was the white servant of Madam Elizabeth Reade on 10 February 1677/8 when the York County court adjudged him to be sixteen years of age and ordered him to serve his mistress until the age of twenty-four. He was probably the father of a "Mollatto boy named Dick" the son of "Black Betty" who were slaves which Madam Reade left to her son Robert Reade by her 10 February 1685/6 York County will [DOW 6:35; 7:257]. Richard was probably the father of

2        i. ?James1, born say 1679.

ii. Richard2, born say 1682, a "Malatto Man named Dick Brookes" who was willed by Robert Reade to his son Thomas Reade in 1712. His two free children by a white woman named Mary Hanson were listed in the 7 April inventory of Robert Reade's estate: "James & Richard Hanson indented Mulattoes" [DOW 14:241, 251-3]. Mary identified "Dick Broo_ a Malatto slave belonging to Robert Read" as the father of her illegitimate child when she appeared in court on 2 July 1706 [DOW 12:414, 424]. Richard Hanson may have been identical to the Richard Hanson whose suit for debt against John Cooper was dismissed by the Southampton County court at the defendant's costs on 13 August 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 233].

 

2.    James1 Brooks, born say 1679, had property of (his son?) William Brooks valued at 3 pounds currency on 17 January 1731/2 when the York County court ordered an attachment on the property to pay a debt William owed John Byrd. The court called James the "slave" of John Buckner when Buckner was ordered to bring him into court [OW 17:256, 262]. On 13 June 1754 he (called James Brooks, Sr.) was one of fourteen heads of household who were sued in Southampton County court by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American and Indian women. Francis Locus(t) was his security. He died before 8 March 1759 when a writing purporting to be his last will was presented to the Southampton County court for proof but was ordered to be lodged in the office because James Brooks (Jr.) entered a caveat against it. On 13 March 1760 the court ruled that the will was not valid because at the time he made it, he was the slave of his son James Brooks, Jr. The court based its ruling on the York County bill of sale by which James Brooks, Jr., purchased his father from John Buckner on 9 March 1733/4; the deposition of Young Moreland who testified that James Brooks, Sr., "mullattoe," was once a slave of Major John Buckner of York County but was purchased by his son James Brooks in exchange for a "negroe" slave named David; and the deposition of Charles Hansford, Sr., of York County who testified that he knew a "mullattoe called Jemmy Brookes" who lived as a servant or slave with Mr. John Buckner of Yorktown but left those parts and was said to have been freed by his son [Orders 1749-54, 500, 512; 1754-9, 24-5, 34-5, 502; Judgment Papers 1752-5, frames 842-4; 1759-63, 24]. James was the father of

3        i. ?William1, born say 1705.

4        ii. James2, born say 1707.

5        iii. Mary, born say 1709.

 

3.    William1 Brooks, born say 1705, was presented by the York County court on 20 November 1727 for failing to list his "Mulatto" sister Mary as a tithable. On 17 January 1731/2 John Byrd sued him in York County court for a three pound currency debt for which the sheriff attached his estate in the hands of (his father?) James Brooks [OW 16:489; 17:256, 262]. He received a patent for 190 acres on the south side of the Nottoway River in Isle of Wight County adjoining land of William Killygrew on 20 May 1742 [Patents 20:280]. He sued William Bittle in Isle of Wight County on 11 June 1747 [Orders 1746-52, 23, 24]. He was living in Southampton County on 13 June 1754 when he was one of fourteen heads of household who were sued by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on women. The court dismissed the suit against him on 13 February 1755, perhaps due to his wife's illness. In May 1763 he was sued by the churchwardens of Suffolk Parish for 2 pounds, 10 shillings for sending his wife Elizabeth Brooks from Suffolk Parish to Southampton and for boarding her during her sickness [Southampton County Judgment Papers, 1763-4, frames 247-52]. On 11 August 1757 he was among the freeholders who were ordered to work on a road in Southampton County for which Joseph Delk was surveyor [Orders 1754-9, 25, 38, 372]. In Isle of Wight County he was sued by Charles Jones on 3 September 1761 and sued for 22 pounds, 19 shillings by Archibald Dunlop and David Ralston on 4 March 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 257, 283, 328, 330, 347]. He was witness to the Southampton County will of John Byrd, proved 12 April 1781 [WB 3:322]. On 14 October 1784 the court presented him for failing to list a tithable and exempted him from paying taxes on 12 May 1785 [Orders 1778-84, 513; 1784-9, 67]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1782 to 1788: taxable on 4 horses and 16 cattle in 1782 [PPTL 1782-92, frames 504, 515, 544, 559, 638, 656]. He was living in St. Luke's Parish when he made his 9 May 1788 Southampton County will, proved 9 October 1788. He gave ten pounds to his daughter Ann Dunkin, five pounds and half his plantation to his wife Hannah Swett during her lifetime, and the remainder to his son William Swett "begotten of the body of Hannah Swett" [WB 4:276]. Hannah Brooks was taxable on a horse from 1799 to 1812. Bill Hunt and his wife Lucy were living on her land in 1813 [PPTL 1792-1806, frames 373, 407, 838; 1807-21, 47, 68, 166, 187, 287, 319]. Hannah's will was proved in Southampton County on 21 July 1817 [Minutes 1816-9, unpaged]. William was the father of

i. Ann Dunkin (Duncan), perhaps identical to Ann Brooks who was granted a patent in Isle of Wight County for 150 acres on the north side of the Meherrin River adjoining James Brooks' land near Brook's Branch on 1 April 1749 [Patents 28:543]. She was fined 500 pounds of tobacco in Southampton County on 13 February 1755 for failing to list herself as a tithable. She pled not guilty at first but changed her plea when both James Brooks, Jr., and James Brooks, Sr., were found guilty [Orders 1749-54, 501, 513; 1754-9, 25, 39]. She and William Brooks paid 5 shillings to the Southampton County estate of James Powell on 9 December 1773 [WB 3:88].

ii. ?Jesse1, born say 1740, sued in Southampton County for a debt of 7 pounds, 14 shillings which he owed Joseph Delk from 9 April 1767. Joseph Delk had been his bail in the case of John Powell against Jesse and James Brooks. Jesse had left the county or was avoiding a summons on 8 March 1770 when the court attached his goods that were said to have been in the hands of (his father?) William Brooks [Orders 1768-72, 257, 276; Judgment Papers 1766-7, frame 834]. He was a "Mix Blood" taxable on himself and Daniel Dolvin in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1774 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:123, 134].

iii. William Swett, probably identical to William S. Brooks who was taxable in Southampton County in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-9, frames 704, 754].

 

4.    James2 Brooks, born say 1707, purchased his father from Major John Buckner by a 9 March 1733/4 York County bill of sale [Southampton County Orders 1759-63, 24]. He was called James Brooks, Jr., when he was granted 200 acres in Isle of Wight County on the north side of the Meherrin River by the side of Pine Pole Branch on 12 January 1746 [Patents 24:620]. He sued Richard Taylor, Jr., in Southampton County on 8 March 1753 for a 6 pound, 9 shilling debt. And on 11 January 1754 Richard Taylor, Jr., sued him for trespass, assault and battery. The case was dismissed on agreement of the parties. On 13 June 1754 he (called James Brooks, Jr.) was one of fourteen heads of household who were sued in Southampton County court by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American and Indian women. Samuel Kindred testified against him. On 14 July 1757 he was ordered to pay William and Thomas Francis as witnesses for him in his suit against Hollowell Denson. He sued William Banks for 5 pounds, 5 shillings on 10 July 1761, sued Ann Banks on 11 September 1761, and on 10 December 1762 was fined 5 shillings for assaulting Ann Banks. He was sued by Thomas Tabor for trespass, assault and battery on 13 May 1762 and ordered to pay Tabor 20 shillings. His suit against James Byrd was dismissed on agreement between the parties on 9 September 1762 [Orders 1749-54, 333, 355, 500, 512; 1754-9, 24-5, 34-5, 40, 370; 1759-63, 128, 151, 219, 221, 234, 238, 272, 284]. He (signing) and his wife Martha sold 200 acres adjoining Brooks Branch and Sweathouse Swamp in Southampton County on 12 November 1761 [DB 3:98]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, on a horse in 1786 and 2 horses from 1787 to 1797, taxable on John Brooks' tithe and 3 horses in 1794 and 1795 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 586, 632, 655, 705, 755, 870; 1792-1806, frames 47, 74, 156, 184, 261]. By his 5 February 1798 Southampton County will he lent half his land on the east side of the county road to his wife Hannah during her lifetime, and gave the other half on the same side of the road to his grandson John Chavos, "commonly called John Brocks, son of Elizabeth Brocks." His land on the east side of the county road was to be sold by his daughter Sarah Reed who was executor of the will [WB 5:58]. Hannah Brooks was taxable in Southampton County on a horse from 1798 to 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 261, 312, 373, 407]. She was head of a Southampton County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:88]. James was the father of

6        i. Elizabeth, born say 1730.

ii. Sarah, married John Reed and was mentioned in his 23 August 1790 Southampton County will [WB 4:395].

 

5.    Mary Brooks, born say 1709, was a "Mulatto" tithable in York County on 20 November 1727. On 16 March 1740/1 she was presented by the court for having a bastard child on the information of Ellyson Armistead, one of the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish, and she confessed to the offense on 18 May 1741. John Cornelius was security for payment of her fine. She may have been the mother of John Brookes who was ordered bound apprentice to Thomas Dulaney of Charles Parish on 19 January 1746/7. The court made the indenture official when Richard Limas complained that Dulaney was harboring John Brookes. Limas had been presented for not listing his wife as a tithable, but when he appeared in that same session of the court he was ordered to pay the taxes for his sons [OW 16:489; W&I 19:12, 486-7]. Mary was probably the mother of

i. John1, born before 16 March 1740/1, living in Southampton County on 13 May 1762 when he and Ed Heathcock (Haithcock) were sued by Samuel Sands for debt. The sheriff reported that he was no longer an inhabitant of the county when he and John Reed were sued by John Wilkinson for 9 pounds, 17 shillings on 9 September 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 219, 239].

 

6.    Elizabeth Brooks, born say 1730, sued John Brooks in a Southampton County chancery case on 14 May 1773 [Orders 1772-7, 181]. She was probably the common-law wife of a member of the Chavis family since her son was called "John Chavos commonly called John Brocks" in his grandfather's 1798 Southampton County will. Elizabeth may have been the Betty Brooks who was head of a Robeson County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:48] and the Elizabeth Brooks who was head of a Duplin County household of 2 "other free" in 1800. Her children were

i. John Brooks, born say 1752, called John Brooks when he was taxable in Southampton County in 1789 and 1790, taxable on a horse in 1799 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 707, 756; 1792-1806, frame 370].

 

They were probably the ancestors of the Brooks family of North Carolina:

i. John2, born about 1758, a Revolutionary War pensioner [Clark, State Records of North Carolina, XXII:571], head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:367] and 7 in 1810 [NC:147]. He claimed to be ninety-five or ninety-six years old on 30 May 1853 when he applied for a pension for service in the Revolution and was still living in Robeson County on 22 March 1858 when he applied for (and received) bounty land [Pension File S-6732].

ii. John3/ Jack, born about 1772, a twelve-year-old "Mulatto boy" apprenticed to George Logan in New Hanover County on 9 January 1784.

iii. Solomon, born about 1774, a ten-year-old "Mulatto boy" bound apprentice to William Ewans in New Hanover County on 9 January 1784 [Minutes 1779-92, 116].

iv. James3, head of an Edgecombe County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:715] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:117].

v. Major, born before 1776, head of an Orange County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:831] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:352].

vi. Mary2, born before 1776, head of a Hyde County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:114] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:244].

vii. Jesse2, born before 1776, charged with begetting a bastard child by Polly Archer in Halifax County, North Carolina, on 20 February 1800 [Minutes 1799-1802, 96]. He was head of a Washington County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:790] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:405].

viii. Bartley, head of a Bertie County household of 2 "other free" and a 26-forty-five-year-old white woman in 1810 [NC:172].

 

Essex County

1.    Elizabeth Brooks, born say 1685, appeared in Essex County court on 22 January 1712/3 to bind her daughter Frances, "a Mulato Child," to Edward Hudson until the age of thirty-one [W&D 1711-4, 103]. She was the mother of

i. Frances, born say 1712.

 

Henrico County

1.    Penelopy Brooks, born say 1702, petitioned the Henrico County court in 1741 on behalf of her son William against Henry Royall. In January 1741/2 the court ordered Royall to discharge her son James Brooks [Orders 1737-46]. Her son William may have been identical to "Moll." William who was born in Henry Royall's house and bound to him by the churchwardens of Bristol Parish on 9 October 1724 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 18-19]. Penelopy was the mother of

i. William, born say 1720.

ii. James, born say 1722.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. John, born say 1758, taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1788 and 1789: taxable on 2 tithes in 1788 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 149, 194; 1800-1813, frames].

2        ii. William, born say 1760.

 

2.    William Brooks, born say 1760, was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1788 to 1801: taxable on 2 tithes and a horse in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 149, 194, 244, 292, 343, 383, 416, 446, 478, 512, 551, 586; 1800-1813, frames 24, 68]. Perhaps his widow was Mary Brock who was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1802 to 1813: taxable on her unnamed son and a horse in 1803; called a "Mulatto" starting in 1805; taxable on a free male tithable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 113, 155, 246, 291, 427, 472, 518, 560]. She was head of an Albemarle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:186]. They may have been the parents of

i. William Brocks, born say 1786, taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1804 to 1810; called a "Mulatto" from 1806 to 1808 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 201, 292, 339, 382, 429]. He married Milly Tyree 5 January 1807 Albemarle County bond, with the consent of Jonathan Tyree. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:187].

ii. John Brocks, born say 1789, a Mulatto" taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1807 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 340, 382, 428, 472, 518]. He married Nancy Tyree, 6 January 1807 Albemarle County bond, William Brock bondsman. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:186].

iii. Olly Brock, a "Mulatto" taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames; 1800-1813, frame 560].

 

Other members of the Brooks family in Virginia were

i. William, "marriner," counted in the 1800 census for Alexandria, Virginia, with his wife Mary, "both Free Negroes," in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 4:55]

ii. Sam1, head of a Frederick County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:562].

iii. Sam2, head of a New Kent County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:744].

iv. William, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:119a].

 

BROWN FAMILY

1.    William1 Brown, born say 1670, was called "William Brown Negro" on 28 April 1715 when he was security for "William Brown Mulatto" and on 31 July 1718 when he admitted in Westmoreland County, Virginia court that he owed Henry Roe 225 pounds of tobacco. And he was called "William Brown Negro the next of kin to William Brown Mulatto decd." on 30 March 1726 when he testified in Westmoreland County court that (his son?) William died without leaving a will. He was appointed administrator of the estate. The appraisers, William Brown Wroe and Original Wroe, found an old chest, 6 plates and some old cooper's, joiner's and carpenter's tools at William Brown "Negroe's" (house). As administrator, William sued Richard Morton for a debt of 1,300 pounds of tobacco on 28 August 1729. The estate of William Brown (Senior) was taken by Original Brown on court order of 24 February 1740 and included 3 horses, a feather bed, cows, 11 barrels of corn, shoes, a gun and candlesticks [Orders 1705-21, 266, 353a; 1721-31, 113, 293; Estate Settlements 1723-46, 26, 243]. He was probably the father of

2        i. William2, born say 1690.

 

2.    William2 Brown, born say 1690, was called "William Brown Mulatto" when he was sued in Westmoreland County court for a debt of 1,820 pounds of tobacco on 28 April 1715. He died before 30 March 1726 when "William Brown Negro" was granted administration on his Westmoreland County estate. [Orders 1705-21, 266; 1721-31, 113, 266, 312, 341, 344a, 359a]. He was the father of

i. Abraham1, born about 1718, a "Mulato Lad (Son of Wm Brown Mulato decd.)" bound as an apprentice goldsmith to Allin Horton in Westmoreland County for the term of five years on 27 August 1729 [Orders 1721-31, 287a]. He may have been the Abraham Brown, Sr., who Abraham Brown, Jr., called his uncle in his 11 July 1789 Charles City County will. Abraham, Jr., directed that Abraham, Sr., should be maintained by his estate [WB 1:16-7].

ii. William3, born about 1719, a ten-year-old "Mulatto boy, ... Son of Wm Brown Decd.," bound as an apprentice farmer to Sarah Monroe until the age of twenty-one by the Westmoreland County court on 26 February 1728/9 [Orders 1721-31, 246].

3        iii. ?Elizabeth, born say 1722.

iv. Susanna, born about 1724, "an orphan Child of Wm Brown Malato decd. ... adjudged Six years old," who was bound as an apprentice to John Binks until the age of eighteen years by the Westmoreland County court on 25 February 1729/30 [Orders 1721-31, 307a].

 

3.    Elizabeth Brown, born say 1722, was living in Charles City County in February 1743/4 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her sons John and Abraham, no race indicated, to Jacob Danzee. She was called "a Molatto" in May 1744 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Westover Parish to bind her son Will Brown to John Jacob Danzee [Orders 1737-51, 288, 299]. She was the mother of

i. John1, born say 1739.

4        ii. Abraham2, born say 1741.

5        iii. ?Edward1, born say 1742.

iv. William4, born say 1743, son of Elizabeth, bound out in May 1744, perhaps the William Brown who was paid 1 pound on 28 June 1787 for acting as crier at the sale of the Charles City County estate of Thomas Cowles, deceased [WB 1:173].

6        v. ?Dixon1, Sr., born say 1745.

vi. ?Freeman1, born say 1748, paid 2 pounds by the Charles City County estate of John Gregory, Jr., for looking after a slave named Savery and her children during the year 1778 [WB 1:342-3]. He was taxable in Charles City County from 1784 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1783-7; 1788-1814], taxable on 40 acres in 1782 [Land Tax List, 1782-1830], and head of a household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959]. He was a man of color from Charles City County who served in the Revolution [Charles City County historical Society Newsletter 6:10-14 cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 148]. On 3 December 1811 he sold 1 acre on the cross road leading from the courthouse road to Swineyard's Road for $1 to Ishmael Carter "to have and to hold provided he leaves lawful issue." He sold 40 acres in Charles City County bounded by George Hubbard, Nancy Smith and Bowling Gills to Terrell Crew on 20 January 1831 [DB 5:560; 7:489].

7        vii. ?Benjamin, born say 1755.

8        viii. ?Isaac, born about 1760.

 

4.    Abraham2 Brown, born say 1741, purchased 156 acres in Westover Parish, Charles City County, from William Tyree and John Wayles on 27 September 1769 for 96 pounds currency. And he purchased two slaves named Sarah and Phillis for 60 pounds on 8 December 1770 [DW 1766-74, 155-6, 274]. He was taxable in Charles City County on slaves Silvey and Isaac, 5 horses and 15 cattle in 1784 and taxable on slaves Silvey, Isaac and Jane in 1785 [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7]. He was paid 12 pounds, 15 shillings by the Charles City County estate of Samuel Harwood on 15 June 1778 and 13 pounds, 11 shillings by the estate of William Merry, deceased, in 1784 [WB 1:177, 355]. He called himself Abraham Brown, Jr., in his 11 July 1789 will which was proved 17 June 1790. He left his wife Sarah Brown 25 pounds specie, son John Brown 118 acres he had purchased from Samuel Riddlehurst, left daughter Mary Brown a slave named Jany, left sons Abraham and William all his remaining land which he had purchased from William Tyree to be divided between them when they came of age, left daughter Elizabeth Brown a slave named Sall and divided the remainder of his estate equally among his wife Sarah and children John, Mary, Abraham, William and Elizabeth Brown, ordered that his uncle Abraham Brown, Sr., should be maintained out of his estate and allowed Elizabeth Syldom the use of the house and garden on his land during her lifetime [WB 1:16-17]. His wife Sarah left a 1 June 1791 Charles City County will which was proved 15 December 1791. She left a slave named Silvy and a horse to her son Abram, left a slave girl named Mary to her son William, left a feather bed to her youngest daughter Elizabeth and divided the remainder among her surviving children. Elizabeth Seldon, Benjamin Brown and Frances Harris were witnesses [WB 1:70]. Abraham was the father of

9        i. John, born say 1764.

ii. Mary, "daughter of Abram Brown deceased," married Abram Thomas (alias Cumbo) by marriage agreement of 13 April 1791 proved in Charles City County court on 15 December 1791 by which he recognized her right to slaves Isaac and Jane, two feather beds, and some stock of cattle and hogs which were in her possession [DB 4:66]. Administration on her estate was granted to Abraham Brown on 17 March 1836 with Morris Harris providing $90 security [Minutes 1830-7, 270].

10      iii. Abraham2, born say 1769.

iv. William6, born say 1772, taxable in Charles City County in 1793 [Personal Property Tax List 1788-1814] and taxable on two tracts of land in 1790 and 1800, one of 92-1/2 acres and the other of 30 acres [Land Tax List, 1790, p.1; 1800, p.1]. On 17 July 1800 he (signing) swapped 125-1/2 acres with 115-1/2 acres which his brother Abraham Brown received by the will of their father. That same day he sold 20 acres in Westover Parish on the dividing line between his land and John Brown's to Abraham Thomas (alias Cumbo) [DB 4:514, 516, 520]. He and his wife Lucy (both signing) sold 41-1/2 acres he received by his father's will to Abraham Thomas for 65 pounds on 20 February 1806 [DB 5:118]. He was head of a household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958]. He was called William Brown, Sr., "a man of colour," on 1 August 1817 when he made a deed of trust for 80 acres to secure a debt of $38 he owed William F. Walker. He and his wife Lucy (both signing) sold 20 acres bounded by his own land, the land of John Brown, and the land of George Jones to George Jones for $150 on 8 May 1821 [DB 6:91, 458]. He may have been the William Brown, Sr., who made a deed of trust for a horse on 20 October 1830 [DB 7:472]. He was head of a head of a Charles City County household of 13 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:4].

v. Elizabeth, born before 1776, head of a Charles City County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:953] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:8]. She may have been the mother of Sally Brown who registered in Charles City County on 20 October 1836: daughter of Betsy Brown the midwife, brown complexioned, twenty-seven the 9 December last [Minutes 1830-7, 297].

 

5.    Edward1 Brown, born say 1742, was taxable in Charles City County from 1784 to 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1783-7; 1788-1814] and taxable on 200 acres from 1782 to 1793 [Land Tax List, 1782-1830]. He was the father of

i. Edward3, born say 1763, called Edward, Jr., when he was taxable in the household of Edward Brown in 1784 and called "son of Ned" in 1809 when he was taxable on two tithes [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7; 1788-1814]. He may have been the Edward Brown whose wife Rebecca was named in the 12 November 1803 Charles City County will of Frances Harris [WB 1:650]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:957] and was a man of color from Charles City County who served in the Revolution [Charles City County historical Society Newsletter 6:10-14 cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 148].

ii. William5, born say 1765, taxable in Charles City County in 1787, called "son of Ned" when he was taxable in 1804 and 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1783-7; 1788-1814].

iii. Freeman2, born say 1767, taxable on a horse in 1787 and taxable on his own tithe and a horse in 1788, called "son of Ned" when he was taxable in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7, 1788-1814].

iv. James1, born say 1771, taxable in Charles City County (called James Brown, Jr.) from 1792 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

v. John, born say 1789, called "son of Ned" when he was taxable in 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1788-1814].

 

6.    Dixon1 Brown, Sr., born say 1745, was taxable in Charles City County on his own tithe, (his son) Edward Brown, two horses and 11 cattle in 1784 [Personal Property Tax List 1783-7]. He was witness to the 29 July 1784 Charles City County will of James Harris [WB 1:55]. He purchased 50 acres on the road leading from Soans's Bridge to the Charles City courthouse joining his own land for 50 pounds on 11 September 1790 and another 72 acres in the same area for 90 pounds on 2 February 1797. He purchased 70 acres at the mouth of Lennard's Mill Run adjoining Isabella Lennard and Soans's line on 19 December 1796 for 77 pounds, and he and his wife Susannah (making their marks) sold this land on 2 February 1797 for 80 pounds [DB 4:28, 323, 331, 332]. His wife Susanna was named in the 12 November 1803 Charles City County will of her mother Frances Harris [WB 1:650]. He was taxable on 220 acres near the Charity School from 1797 to 1821 [Land Tax List 1782-1830] and head of a household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:938]. He made a 24 January 1811 Charles City County will, proved 18 January 1821. He left 40 acres to be divided between his son Dixon Brown and daughter Susannah Harris (wife of Chavis Harris) which was the land they were then living on, left his house and 75 acres to be divided among his daughter Catherine Brown, son James Brown and son Peter Brown, left 30 acres to his illegitimate children Polly Harris, Susannah Harris (wife of James Harris), and Peggy Bowman which was the land they were then living on, left 10 acres each to his daughters Elizabeth and Milly Brown, left 10 acres to his son Edward Brown's children Polly, Lucy and Rachel Brown, left 10 acres to be divided between his daughter Sally Brown's children Betsey Harris, Cornelius Brown, Polly Brown, Sabrina Brown, Lucy Brown, Reuben Brown and Elizabeth Brown, 10 acres to be divided among his daughter Lucy Brown's children Dancy, Locey, Henry, Edward and Eliza Brown, a bed and furniture to his daughter Catherine, and appointed his son Dixon Brown and Henry C. Harris his executors. James Harris, Peter Brown, Edward Bowman, James Brown, Jr., Billy Brown, Milly Brown and Dixon Brown posted 500 pounds security for Henry C. Harris's administration of the estate [WB 2:471]. He was the father of

i. Edward2, born say 1763, taxable in the Charles City County household of Dixon Brown in 1783, called "son of Dixon" in 1790 and 1793 [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7; 1788-1814]. He was probably deceased by 24 January 1811 when his children Polly, Lucy and Rachel were left 10 acres by the will of their grandfather Dixon Brown.

11      ii. Dixon2, Jr., born say 1766.

12      iii. Sally, born say 1768.

iv. James2, born say 1770, taxable in Charles City County in 1791, called James Brown, Sr., when he was taxable from 1792 to 1799, a "Mulattoe" taxable on 2 tithes and 3 horses in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:13].

v. Lucy, mother of Dancy, Locey, Henry, Edward, and Eliza Brown. Dancy was living in Albemarle County on 31 December 1821 when he sold his part of Dixon Brown's estate to Locky Goin (wife of David) for $10 [DB 6:501].

vi. Catherine, married to Edward Bowman by 13 June 1825 when he was paid $20 as her legacy of a bed and furniture [WB 3:115].

13      vii. Elizabeth, born say 1785.

viii. Milly, born say 1788, head of a Charles City County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:953]. She made a 14 September 1827 Charles City County will, proved 17 July 1834, leaving 10 acres she was living on to her brother Dixon during his lifetime and then to be divided between her niece Patsey Harris and Cyrus Brown [WB 4:80].

14      ix. Peter, born about 1797.

 

And he was the father of illegitimate children which he recognized:

i. Polly Harris.

ii. Susannah Harris, illegitimate daughter of Dixon Brown and wife of James Harris, received 10 acres of land by the 24 January 1811 Charles City County will of her father. She died intestate without a living child before October 1826 when Polly Harris, Morris Harris and Patsy his wife, Pegg Bowman, James Brown, Jr. ("son of Dixon"), and his wife Sally, and Peter Brown and his wife Susan appointed James Brown to sell the land. Edward Brown was the highest bidder at $32 [DB 7:371].

iii. Peggy Bowman.

 

7.    Benjamin Brown, born say 1755, was taxable on his own tithe and a horse in Waynoke Precinct of Charles City County in 1784 [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7]. He was paid 10 shillings for shoes he provided Elizabeth Christian in 1782 [WB 1:79]. He was witness to the 1 June 1791 Charles City County will of Sarah Brown [WB 1:70] and head of a household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958]. He was the father of

i. William7, born say 1784, called "son of Ben" when he was taxable in 1805 and 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1788-1814].

 

8.    Isaac Brown, born about 1760, was taxable in Lower Westover Precinct of Charles City County in 1786 [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7], and head of a Charles City County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:13]. He purchased 75 acres in Charles City County from Peter Ladd for $200 on 15 February 1804 [DB 5:34]. He applied for a pension in Charles City County at the age of sixty-nine on 19 May 1829 when he was living on his 70 acres of land with his unnamed wife, twenty-year-old son, twenty-one year-old daughter and her four-year-old child. He stated that he enlisted in Charles City County in 1780 and served eighteen months [M804-366]. He made a deed of trust (making his mark) for 75 acres of land adjoining Peter Ladd and the Cellar Run as well as all his personal estate for the benefit of Peter Ladd, Jr., on 22 January 1829 [DB 7:366]. He made a 10 April 1830 Charles City County will, which was proved 19 August 1830. He left one third his estate to his wife Sarah, to be divided among his children at her decease, left the remaining two thirds to son Micajah and daughter Sally Ann Brown, noted that his sons Carver and Travis were able to get their own living since they were able bodied unlike their brother Micajah, and noted that his daughters Maria and Clarissa were married and had already been provided for [WB 3:407-8]. He was the father of

i. Maria.

ii. Clarissa.

15      iii. Carver, born about 1791.

iv. Travis, born about 1793, taxable in Charles City County in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1788-1814].

v. Sally Ann, born about 1807, twenty-one years old on 29 January 1829.

vi. Micajah, born about 1809, twenty years old on 29 January 1829. His sister Sally Ann sold land to him by deed proved in Charles City County on 19 December 1833, and he sold 7 acres by deed proved on 16 April 1835 [Minutes 1830-9, 149, 230].

 

9.    John Brown, born say 1764, was taxable in the Charles City County household of (his father) Abraham Brown in 1785 [Personal Property Tax List, 1783-7], taxable on 118 acres in 1790 and 1800 [Land Tax List, 1790, p.1; 1800, p.1], and head of a household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958]. He was the father of Rebecca Brown, granddaughter of Frances Harris who left her a spinning wheel by her 12 November 1803 Charles City County will [WB 1:650]. On 6 October 1804 he (signing) made a deed of trust to Wyatt Walker for 118 acres which he received by the will of his father Abraham Brown to secure a bond which Dixon Brown had posted for him to satisfy an execution against his estate by Thomas Blanks [DB 5:65]. He was a "man of colour" who made a deed of trust (signing) on 28 May 1817 for 80 acres which was all the land he was then living on which descended to him by the will of his father Abraham. He and his wife Priscilla (both signing) sold 16 acres adjoining his land and Abraham Brown's to George Jones for $96 on 8 May 1821 [DB 6:92]. The account of his Charles City County estate was taken by Abraham Brown and had its first entry on 1 November 1825. Abraham distributed about $11 to James Brown, Sr., and Carver Brown who was also paid $1.62 for accommodations furnished the appraisers of the estate [WB 3:236]. John was the father of

i. James, born say 1785, taxable in Charles City County in 1806, called "son of John" in 1810 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

ii. Rebecca, granddaughter of Frances Harris who left her a spinning wheel in 1804.

 

10.    Abraham2 Brown, born say 1769, "son of Abraham," was taxable in Charles City County in 1790, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814], taxable on two tracts of land, one of 92-1/2 acres and the other of 30 acres in 1790 and 1800 [Land Tax List, 1790, p.1; 1800, p.1], and head of a Charles City County household of 10 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [VA:957] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:3]. He was a man of color from Charles City County who served in the Revolution [Charles City County historical Society Newsletter 6:10-14 cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 148]. On 17 July 1800 he and his wife Susannah (both signing) swapped the 115-1/2 acres he received by his father's will with 125-1/2 acres which his brother William received by the will [DB 4:514, 516]. He and his wife Susanna made a deed of gift to Cornelius Brown, John Brown, Henry C. Harris and Dixon Brown, Jr., as trustees for a tract of land adjoining John Brown upon which a meeting house known as "Elam" was to be set apart expressly for the use of the Baptist Church on 20 November 1818 ("but when unoccupied by the baptist to be free for any minister of the Gospel to preach us") [DB 6:214]. He was granted administration on the Charles City County estate of his brother John Brown, Sr., on 20 October 1825 [Minutes 1823-9, 141]. He left a 12 April 1836 Charles City County will (signing), proved 19 November 1840. He left his son Christopher the house where Christopher then lived and 20 acres of land on the north side of his plantation, left the remainder of his land to his three sons Allen, Abraham James, and Samuel Brown, and left the remainder of his estate to his children Allen, Abraham James, Christopher and Samuel Brown, Patsy Thompson, Polly Brown, Susanna Brown, and his grandson Robert Brown, son of his daughter Nancy Jones [WB 4:375]. He died in Charles City in August 1840 [Register of Free Negroes, 1835-64, no. 11]. His children were

i. Allen.

ii. Abraham James, called James A. Brown in the settlement of his father's estate [WB 4:423].

iii. Christopher.

iv. Samuel.

v. Patsy Thompson.

vi. Polly.

vii. Susanna.

viii. Nancy Jones, mother of Robert Brown.

 

11.    Dixon2 Brown, born say 1766, was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:938] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:8]. He died before 21 February 1833 when (his son?) James Brown was granted administration on his estate [Minutes 1830-7, 144]. His widow Lucy Brown sold the land she was allotted from his estate to James Brown by deed acknowledged on 19 July 1836 [Minutes 1830-7, 284]. He was the father of

16      i. ?Dixon3, born say 1792.

ii. James, born 2 July 1794, registered as a "free Negro" in Charles City County about 1810 and renewed his registration in 1842 and 1859: son of old Dixon, brown complexion, 48 the 2 July 1842 [Register of Free Negroes, 1835-64, no. 51]. He married Sally Stewart ("colored"), 11 March 1816 Charles City County bond [Wm & Mary Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 8, No.3, p.194]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:7]. He ("son of Dixon"), William T. Brown and Will Brown ware called "people of color" on 21 February 1828 when the Charles City County court allowed them to keep a gun [Minutes 1823-9, 284]. He (called James Brown, Jr.) and Edward Bowman were attorneys for Elizabeth Brown's sale of 10 acres of land she received by the will of her father Dixon Brown. She was living in Liberia on 18 December 1828 when they paid $20 to her son Richard B. Brown who was living in Petersburg. James purchased the land on the same day from the buyer for $20 [DB 7:359, 360]. He sold 7 acres adjoining his land and land of Peter Brown to Peter Brown on 15 May 1828 [DB 7:291]. He was called son of Dixon Brown on 17 July 1834 when he was granted administration on the estate of Milly Brown with Reuben Brown, Jr., as his security. He and others brought a suit in chancery against Edward Bowman's children on 19 February 1835. On 16 April 1835 he was granted administration on the estate of Thomas Harris with Abraham Brown and Edward Bowman as his securities [Minutes 1830-7, 223, 234].

 

12.    Sally Brown, born say 1768, was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:11]. She was named in the 24 January 1811 Charles City County will of her father Dixon Brown which was proved 18 January 1821 [WB 2:471]. According to the will, she was the mother of

i. Reuben, born say 1785, taxable in Charles City County in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County (no date): dark brown (at a later date): dead [Register of Free Negroes 1835-64, no.71]. He made an 11 February 1839 Charles City County will, proved 21 March 1839, leaving a walnut table to his sister Lucy's daughter Airanna Brown and dividing the remainder of his estate between his "kinsman" Mitchel Harris and friend Barnet Harris who he named executors. Ned Bowman was paid for digging the grave and Jesse Brown was paid $4 for making the coffin [WB 4:333, 363].

ii. Cornelius, born say 1787, taxable in Charles City County in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List 1788-1814], head of a household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:940]. He purchased 50 acres in Charles City County for $200 on 20 March 1819, and he and his wife Polly Brown (both making their mark) sold 3-1/3 acres in Charles City County known as "Binns" bounded by Henry Adams and Chavis Harris (devised to Cornelius by Dixon Brown) to Chavis Harris for $11 on 4 January 1825 [DB 6:246; 7:41]. He was living in Africa (Liberia) when he was taxable on 50 acres on Wilcox's Mill Road, Charles City County, from 1826 to 1830 [Land Tax List 1782-1830].

iii. Betsey Harris, born say 1788.

iv. Polly. She, Elizabeth Brown, and Edward Bowman were attorneys in fact for a deed from Cornelius Brown to Reuben Brown proved in court on 20 December 1832 [Minutes 1830-9, 136].

v. Sabrina.

vi. Lucy, mother of Arianna Brown who registered in Charles City County on 16 June 1831: daughter of Lucy S. Brown, Mulatto girl, eleven years old 3d last month [Minutes 1830-7, 59].

vii. Elizabeth.

 

13.    Elizabeth Brown, born say 1785, daughter of Dixon Brown, made James Brown, Jr., and (her brother-in-law) Edward Bowman her attorneys to sell 10 acres of land she received by the will of her father Dixon Brown. She was living in Liberia on 18 December 1828 when they paid $20 from the sale of the land to her son Richard B. Brown who was living in Petersburg [DB 1:359]. She was the mother of

i. Richard B., born say 1805, living in Petersburg on 18 December 1828. He was probably the Richard Brown whose account of sales was recorded in Charles City County on 3 March 1832 and included buyers Oliver Bowman, Molly Brown, Valentine Harris, Daniel Harris, James Brown, Peter Brown, Ed Bowman, James Brown, Jr., Burwell Harris, Mitchel Harris, Austin Brown and Reuben Brown [WB 3:467]. On 16 February 1832 the court appointed James Brown guardian to his orphans Pleasant and Cyrus Brown [Minutes 1830-7, 91]. However, Cyrus and Pleasant were called children of Dixon Brown, Jr., when they registered in Charles City County on 19 January 1832 [Minutes 1830-9, 89].

 

14.    Peter Brown, born about 1797, received one-third part of 75 acres by his father Dixon Brown's 24 January 1811 Charles City County will which was proved 18 January 1821 [WB 2:471]. In October 1826 he and his wife Susan appointed James Brown to sell their rights to 10 acres which Susannah Harris, deceased, received by Dixon's will [DB 7:371]. He purchased 7 acres adjoining his land from (his brother) James Brown on 15 May 1828 [DB 7:291]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 18 August 1814 and renewed it in August 1832: aged thirty five, born free in this county, died 1842 [Register of Free Negroes 1835-64, p.2, no.70]. He made a 1 November 1841 Charles City County will, proved 15 December 1842. He left 10 acres which he received by the will of his father Dixon Brown as well as $30 to his daughter Harriet Harris but noted that her husband Valentine Harris was to have no other control over the land than to live on it and cultivate it during her lifetime. He left a heifer to Harriet's son James Harris, left a horse and cart to his son Albert Brown, left his wife Sarah one third of the balance of the estate and the remainder to his son Albert who he named as executor [WB 4:447]. He was the father of

i. Harriet, born 17 November 1819, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: daughter of Peter Brown, yellow complexion, twelve years old 4th April last [Minutes 1830-7, 83]. She married Valentine Harris.

ii. Albert, born 22 November 1821, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: yellow complexion, son of Peter Brown, ten years old 22nd November [Minutes 1830-7, 83].

 

15.    Carver Brown, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 20 November 1817 and renewed it on 20 June 1825: bright Mulatto, aged thirty four, born free in this county [Register of Free Negroes 1835-64, no.101]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:10]. He was named in the 10 April 1830 Charles City County will of his father Isaac Brown. He was the father of

i. Walker, born 9 April 1813, registered in Charles City County on 16 March 1835: son of Carver Brown, brown complexion, aged twenty one 9 April last [Minutes 1830-9, 222].

ii. Pryor, born about 1818, registered in Charles City County on 16 March 1835: son of Carver Brown, brown complexion, aged seventeen [Minutes 1830-9, 222].

 

16.    Dixon3 Brown, born say 1792, was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 (called Dixon Brown, Jr.) [VA:8]. He was the father of

i. Cyrus, born 24 July 1816, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 19 January 1832: son of Dixon Brown, Jr., brown complexion, fifteen years old 24th July last, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 89].

ii. Pleasant, born 17 April 1821, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 19 January 1832: son of Dixon Brown, Jr., yellowish complexion, ten years old 17th April last, born free in this county [Minutes 1830-7, 89].

 

Other members of the Brown family in Charles City County were

i. Samuel, born about 1770, registered in Petersburg on 19 June 1810: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet four inches high, forty years old, born free in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 614].

ii. Cranston, born say 1782, taxable in Charles City County in 1803 and a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:11].

 

Other members of the Brown family in Virginia were

i. Sarah, born say 1725, "Mulatto" mother of Elizabeth Brown who was born 28 March 1745 in Bristol Parish [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 290].

ii. Elizabeth, born about 1752, registered in Petersburg on 21 May 1802: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, fifty years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 232]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:125a].

iii. Ann, mother of Peter Brown "a Molatto base born child" bound out to John Snath by order of the Shenandoah County court on 27 August 1776 [Minutes 1774-80, 21].

iv. Charles, born about 1764, registered in Petersburg on 30 June 1804: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, forty years old, straight and well made, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 276].

v. John, born say 1768, head of a Chesterfield County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1062]. He may have been identical to Jack Brown, husband of Nancy Brown who registered in Petersburg on 26 January 1798: a light brown Mulatto woman, short bushy hair, five feet high, twenty seven years old the 9 Dec. 1797, daughter of Elizabeth Muns of this town a free woman & now wife of Jack Brown a free man [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 128].

vi. Sally, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a brown Mulatto woman ... five feet seven inches high with bushy hair, nineteen years old, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 184].

vii. James, born about 1787, registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County, Virginia, on 1 April 1825: free born of a yellow Complexion about 38 years old 5'6-3/4 Inches high (in shoes) ... a hatter & planter, and his wife Temperance registered on 7 April 1825: (wife of James Brown) free born of yellowish Complexion, Thirty Six years old, five feet 5 Inches high in Shoes ... & her 5 children viz. Berry, Dixon, & Wm Green boys & Arrian, Delina, & Francis Ann daughters [Register of Free Persons of Colour, nos.139, 144].

 

Bertie County, North Carolina

1.    Francis Brown, born perhaps 1720, was a witness (with Benjamin Wynn) to the 1742 deed by which Gabriel Manly purchased 100 acres of land in Bertie County [DB F:339]. Francis was head of a Bertie County household in 1758 and 1759, counted with Moses Manly as two "Black" taxables in the list of John Brickell [CR 10.702.1]. In 1759 this part of Bertie County became Hertford County which lost most of its early records in courthouse fires of 1830 and 1862. However, a 1779 Tax List filed with the central government has survived, and he may have been the Francis Brown who was taxable in District 4 of this list on 140 acres and a horse [G.A.30.1, p.71]. His descendants may have been

i. John, born say 1750, perhaps the John Brown who was taxable on one poll in Hertford County in 1779 (adjacent to Francis Brown). He received a patent for 260 acres on Hardy Pace's Mill Swamp in Northampton County, North Carolina, on 29 October 1782 [DB 7:154] and purchased 30 acres adjoining this on Urahaw Swamp in October 1798 [DB 10:393]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72].

ii. Robert, born perhaps 1755, head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72] and 3 in 1800 [NC:430]. Perhaps his widow was Mary Brown, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:712] and 4 in Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1830. On 3 March 1818 the Northampton County court ordered her to show cause why (her children?) Aaron and Allen Brown should not be bound apprentices [Minutes 1813-21].

iii. Beverly, born perhaps 1760, married Hannah Parham, 15 November 1785 Greensville County, Virginia bond, William Batte security. They were married 20 November by Rev. William Andrews, a Methodist minister. Beverly was living in Greensville County on 27 March 1788 when the sheriff credited him for overcharging tax on five more horses than he owned in 1787 [Orders 1781-9, 356]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:712]. The 7 June 1812 session of the Northampton County court ordered John and Fanny Dungill, children of color, bound to him to be a blacksmith and spinster respectively. William Walden provided security of 500 pounds for the indenture. He was declared an insolvent debtor in District 6 of Halifax County on 15 August 1842 [Minutes 1832-46].

iv. William, born before 1776, head of a Hertford County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:188]. His December 1848 Hertford County will was proved in February 1849 with Daniel Valentine as executor. He named his wife Margaret and children: Isaac, Winney, Rebecca, Tyley, Armesia, Jeremiah, Allen.

v. John, born perhaps 1770, head of a Pasquotank County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:27], 3 in 1800, and 7 "other free" and 1 slave in 1810 [NC:883].

vi. James, born about 1787, registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County, Virginia, on 1 April 1825: free born of a yellow Complexion about 38 years old 5'6-3/4 Inches high (in shoes) ... a hatter & planter, and his wife Temperance registered on 7 April 1825: (wife of James Brown) free born of yellowish Complexion, Thirty Six years old, five feet 5 Inches high in Shoes ... & her 5 children viz. Berry, Dixon(?), & Wm Green boys & Arrian, Delina, & Francis Ann daughters [Register, no.139, p.144].

 

BRUCE FAMILY

1.    James1 Bruce, born say 1728, purchased 100 acres on Clay's Branch in Southwarke Parish, Surry County, Virginia, on 18 July 1749 and purchased another 50 acres adjoining this land on 1 December 1760 [DB 5:431; 8:64]. This adjoined land of the Banks family [Hopkins, Surry County Deeds, 1756-1787, 91 (DB 12:219)]. He was head of a Surry County household of 8 whites (free persons) in 1782 and 9 in 1784 [VA:43, 78]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1783 to 1802: charged with Sampson Walden's tithe, a slave named Isaac, 2 horses and 8 cattle in 1787; charged with Jacob Bruce's tithe in 1794; charged with Jacob and James Bruce, Jr.'s tithes in 1797 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 371, 402, 409, 517; 1791-1816, 76, 175, 284, 361, 440, 475]. He was taxable on 120 acres in Surry County in 1790 [1790 Land Tax List, p.3]. His will, recorded in Surry County on 25 January 1803, named his children Jemima, Lucy, Jacob, Sarah, James, and John Bruce. He left land on the east side of John Cocke's and Nathaniel Savedge's lines to his son James, left land on the west side of those lines to his son John, and left the remainder of his estate to his wife Elizabeth. His son James was executor [WB 1:583-5]. Elizabeth was taxable from 1803 to 1815: taxable on (her son) James Bruce's tithe in 1803 and 1804; listed as a "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1813; taxable on a free male and 2 cattle in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, 514, 555, 610, 648, 666, 726, 804] and head of a Surry County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:601]. They were the parents of

i. Jemima, listed as a "free Negro & Mulatto" in Surry County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frame 726].

ii. Jacob, born say 1778, taxable in Surry County from 1794 to 1816: listed with (his father) James Bruce in 1794 and 1797; charged with his own tax from 1798; listed as a "free Negro" in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 175, 284, 318, 399, 475, 555, 610, 648, 685, 807, 847].

iii. James2, born say 1780, taxable in Surry County from 1797 to 1805: listed with (his father) James Bruce from 1797 to 1802; listed with (his mother) Elizabeth Bruce in 1803 and 1804; taxable on 2 tithes in 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 284, 318, 399, 475, 514, 588]. His Surry County will was witnessed by Saeca Cypress and Edith Thompson and was proved 24 April 1806. He left ten dollars to Benjamin Bailey Bruce and the remainder of his estate to Robert Bailey Bruce [WB 2:98].

iv. Lucy, born say 1782, daughter of Elizabeth Bruce, married Benjamin Banks, 22 January 1803 Surry County bond, 19 February marriage, James Roberts surety.

v. John, born say 1790, taxable in Surry County from 1809 to 1816: listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813; taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, 648, 685, 726, 807, 848]. He married Elizabeth Cypress, 24 December 1812 Surry County bond, Benjamin Banks surety, Samuel Blizzard witness. Their son William Bruce registered in Surry County on 23 December 1842: a mullatoe boy, son of Betsy Cypress ... is a spare make, bushy hair ... aged about 24 years and is 5'8-1/4" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 106, 164].

vi. Sarah.

 

BRUMEJUM/ BRUMAGEN FAMILY

1.    Eliza Brumejum, born say 1692, was presented by the court in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, in August 1712 for having a "Mallato" bastard child. She confessed that "a Negroe man called James belonging to Stephen Warman" was the father of the child, and the court ordered that she be sold for seven years and bound her unnamed son to her master for thirty-one years [Judgment Records 1712-15, Liber TB, no. 3, p.5]. She was probably the ancestor of

2        i. James, born say 1712.

ii. R. Brumager, head of a Baltimore City household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:75].

 

2.    James Brumigem, born say 1712, was tried by the Frederick County, Virginia court on 24 January 1746/7 for breaking into the house of Captain John Hite and taking some gunpowder. He was found not guilty of felony but found guilty of petty larceny and given thirty-one lashes, made to stand in the pillory and ordered to post bond of 40 pounds currency for his good behavior. He was called a "Mulatto" on 5 March 1746/7 when the court ordered that he receive twenty-five lashes for abusing Lawrence Stevens in a very ill manner. On 6 March 1746/7 the court ordered that the sheriff sell James' goods: a horse, saddle, bridle, coat jacket, leather jacket, rifle, gun powder horn, silver buckles, silver clasps, three axes, a cross-cut saw, and a hand saw for a debt of about 8 pounds he owed Jost Hite, John Hite and Lewis Stephens. His estate was attached for debt again on 7 August 1747, 7 June 1748 and 3 August 1748. He died before 6 September 1748 when the court granted administration of his estate to Peter Tostee, his greatest creditor [Orders 1745-8, 201, 213, 224, 301-2, 435, 462, 488]. He may have been the ancestor of

3        i. Thomas Brumagen, born say 1740.

 

3.    Thomas Brumagen, born say 1740, was indicted with Jane Clark for fornication by the Frederick County, Virginia court on 7 September 1762. Jane was discharged but Thomas was ordered to pay a fine of 500 pounds of tobacco. Richard Pearis, Gent., undertook to pay his fine. He was sued by William and Jane Phillips on 5 November 1762, but the case was agreed before coming to trial. He was convicted of stealing a steer belonging to John Shearer on 2 September 1766 and chose to receive 39 lashes corporal punishment rather than be tried at the General court. Seth Dungen sued him for 3 pounds, 10 shillings on 8 October 1766 [Orders 1762-3, 156, 393; 1765-7, 172, 224]. He may have been the father of

i. George Brumagam, born say 1760, taxable in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1787 and 1788 [PPTL 1782-1802]. He enlisted as a soldier in the Revolution from Virginia: George Brumma, yellow complexioned, born in Australia [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 148].

 

BRYAN FAMILY

Joan Bryan, born say 1683, was the servant of Mary Dudley of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, on 30 June 1703 when she confessed to the court that she had a "mulatto" child. And on 25 July 1705 she confessed to having a child by a white man [Orders 1698-1705, 194, 269a, 270].

Mary Bryan, born say 1687, was the servant of John Sergenton on 24 May 1707 when she confessed to the York County court that she had a "Mulato" child. The court ordered the churchwardens of Bruton Parish to sell her for five years when she completed her service to her master [DOW 13:66].

Their descendants may have been

1        i. William1, born about 1748.

ii. Sarah, head of a Currituck County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:20].

iii. Bridgett, "Free Colored" living alone in Tyrrell County, North Carolina, in 1790 [NC:34].

 

1.    William1 Bryan, Jr., born about 1748, was a taxable "Malletor Servant" in Thomason Bass's household in the 1769 Bertie County tax list of David Standley, and in John Standley's 1770 tax list [CR 10.702.1]. He was head of a Charleston District, St. Bartholomew's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790. His children may have been

i. Kedar, perhaps named for Thomasin Bass' son Cader. He married Mary Evans, 1 May 1817 Cumberland County, North Carolina bond. He was head of a Fayetteville household of 4 "other free" in 1790 (Kedar Bryant) [NC:42], 4 in New Hanover County in 1800 (Cato Bryan) [NC:311], and 7 "free colored" in Fayetteville in 1820 (Cader Briant) [NC:189]. He and Curtis Chesnutt were found not guilty of unspecified charges in Cumberland County court on 5 September 1828. He was acquitted of petty larceny in Cumberland County court on 6 March 1829, but his codefendant, a slave named Moses, was found guilty. On 3 June 1829 he was ordered to bring his sons Jesse Parker and Luke Bryant to court and show cause why they should not be bound out [Minutes 1827-31, n.p.]

ii. Andrew, who established what would become the First African Baptist Church of Savannah [Berlin, Slaves Without Masters, 70].

 

BRYANT FAMILY

1.    Martha Bryant, born say 1730, confessed to the churchwardens of St. Stephens Parish in Northumberland County, Virginia court on 14 February 1748 that she had a bastard child which was a "Mulatto" [Orders 1743-49, 421]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Samuel, "F. Negro" head of a Culpeper County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:7].

ii. Sylvana, head of a New Hanover County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1820.

iii. Sally, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 7 in "free colored" in 1830.

 

BUGG FAMILY

1.    Betty Bugg, alias Doss, born perhaps 1726, was the daughter of a white woman and a "negro" slave according to a case heard before the Halifax County, Virginia court. Betty had a son Silvester during her term of indenture to Robert Turner. Her children were

i. Silvester, born about 1743, twenty-six years old in June 1769 when he petitioned the Halifax County, Virginia court for release from his indenture to George Hoomes Gwyn. He won his case in Halifax County court, but he lost the appeal in the General Court of Williamsburg. He had to serve five more years to complete his full thirty-one year indenture before he was released [Halifax County Pleas 6:378-9; Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning American Slavery, I:88-90].

ii. ?Frank, born perhaps 1768, "free Negro" head of a 96 District, Edgefield County, South Carolina household of one "other free" in 1790 [SC:65] and 2 in Newberry District in 1810 [SC:122a].

iii. ?Samuel, born perhaps 1770, head of a 96 District, Newberry County, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [SC:65] and 8 in Edgefield County in 1810 [SC:788].

iv. ?Benjamin, born perhaps 1784, married Tabitha Walden, 3 May 1805 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, James Noel security.

v. ?Tony, "free Negro" head of a Sussex County household in 1810.

vi. ?Pleasant, born perhaps 1785, "free Negro" head of a Brunswick County, Virginia household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:707] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:594].

vii. ?Bats, a "free Negro" head of a Newberry District, South Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [SC:122].

 

BULLARD FAMILY

1.    John Bullard, born say 1745, was taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, in the same household with Gutridge Locklear ("Molatoes") in 1770 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:33]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Jordan, born about 1791, a twelve-year-old "boy of colour" who was bound apprentice to William McNeill by the Robeson County court on 3 January 1803 [Minutes 1797-1806, 231].

 

BUNCH FAMILY

1.    John1 Bunch, born say 1632, received a patent for 450 acres on both sides of Rickahock path adjoining Richard Barnhouse's land in New Kent County on 18 March 1662 [Patents 5:152]. The DNA of his descendants is the E1b1a8a haplotype which indicates they descend from a West African man, so he was probably the son of a white woman by a slave. The DNA testing also indicates that his mixed-race descendants in Virginia and the Carolinas were related [Anastasia Harman, Ancestry.com Lead Family Historian, Natalie D. Cottrill, Paul C. Reed and Joseph Shumway, Obama Bunch Descendancy, 13 

http://c.mfcreative.com/offer/us/obama_bunch/PDF/descendancy_final.pdf. See also http://www.familytreedna.com/public/coremelungon (Y-DNA Results)]. He was apparently the ancestor of

2        i. Paul1, born say 1658.

3        ii. John2. born say 1660.

4        iii. Henry1, born say 1690.

 

2.    Paul1 Bunch, born say 1658, bought 150 acres in King William County near Sweet Hall Road from John Caliborne on 29 July 1695. He purchased a "Mulatto Servant Man" named John Russell from John West, Gentleman, of St. John's Parish, King William County, on 27 January 1700/1 and on the same day assigned his rights to Russell unto Eliza Bunch. He witnessed (making his mark "P") the St. John's Parish, King William County deed of John Claiborne on 20 May 1704. A "Mullatto" boy named Thomas Russell was valued at 5 pounds in the 17 January 1706/7 inventory of the estate of William Claiborne, Gentleman [Record Book 1, 1702-7, 129-30, 172-5, 402; Book 2, 1702-6, 109]. Paul Bunch was taxed on 150 acres in the King William County, Virginia Quit Rent Roll in 1704 [des Cognets, English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, 157]. On 11 July 1719 he was living in the part of New Kent County that later became Hanover County when Gilbert Gibson patented land adjoining his [Patents 10:437]. He received a patent for 400 acres on both sides of Black Haw Swamp in Hanover County on 9 July 1724 [Patents 12:28-9]. He patented 265 acres in North Carolina on the south side of the Roanoke River adjoining Quankey Pocosin and Gideon Gibson on 1 January 1725/6, and he bought a further 300 acres adjoining this land from Thomas Wilkins [Halifax County DB 8:283].

He left a Chowan County will (making his mark) on 16 November 1726 which was probated on 10 March 1726/7. He left his son John Bunch the land that they were both then living on as well as slave Dick; left Fortune Holdbee, apparently his common-law wife, his land (adjoining John Bunch) and slave Frank during her lifetime as long as she remained single, to descend to her daughters Keziah and Jemima after her death or marriage. And he gave "Eliza Bunch one Shilling Sterling and my Daughter Russell I give one Shilling Sterling" (apparently identical to his daughter Elizabeth Russell). He left Keziah Holdbee a "Mullatto" slave named Peg in the care of her mother until she reached age eighteen and left slave Betty to Jemima Holdbee in the care of her mother until she reached age eighteen. He gave Joseph Meacham the land on the Roanoke River (in Halifax County, North Carolina) he had purchased from Thomas Wilkins as well as slaves named Moll, Fortune and Rose. He gave 100 acres and two cows and calves to Thomas Holdbee. He divided his household goods, livestock and slave Daw between Joseph Meacham and Fortune Holdbee and appointed Fortune and Meacham as his executors [Secretary of State Record of Wills, 1722-1735, SS 876, 3:138-9]. (A Joseph and a Paul Micham were heads of "other free" Halifax County, North Carolina households. She the Micham/ Mitcham family history).

The May 1734 Bertie court minutes referred to Keziah as "an orphan Child Entitled to a considerable Estate...(by the will of Paul Bunch) bound to Capt. Thos. Bryant till the age of Thirty one contrary to law," and the August 1735 Bertie County court Minutes referred to the estate of "a Mulatto woman, Keziah Holdebee, and three children [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, I:135, 154]. Paul1 Bunch had the following children:

5        i. John4, born say 1692.

ii. Elizabeth Russell, a daughter, received 1 shilling by her father's will.

iii. ?Keziah Holdebee.

iv. ?Jemima Holdebee.

 

3.    John2 Bunch, born say 1660, was taxed on 100 acres in New Kent County in 1704 [des Cognets, English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records, 164]. A runaway "Mallatto Man Slave" named Jack, who belonged to Samuel Harwood, Jr., of Charles City County, apparently knew of John Bunch since he went by his name when he was living in South Carolina. George Rives, who had lived on Harwood's plantation, stated in a deposition recorded in Prince George County court on 8 September 1719 that he had met Jack while trading in South Carolina in April 1719 and that Jack had been in the company of a trader from Prince George County named Robert Hix [Deeds, Wills, Etc. 1713-28, 350]. John was probably the father of

6        i. John3, born say 1684.

 

4.    Henry1 Bunch Sr., probably born about 1690, was a resident of Chowan County on 18 December 1727 when he purchased 200 acres in Bertie County on Reedy Branch. On 30 May 1729 he purchased 640 acres in Bertie on Conaritsat Swamp from Thomas Pollock [DB C:21, 266]. He was taxed on himself and 2 slaves in the 1750 Bertie County summary tax list and was a "Free Mulatto" taxable on 2 slaves in John Hill's 1763 Bertie tax list. Henry made a will in Bertie on 21 April 1775, proved in August 1775. He had already deeded 840 acres of land on Conaritsat and Mulberry to his grandson Jeremiah Bunch, Jr., in 1765, and in his will left most of the remainder of his land to his grandson Cader Bass [WB B:34-7]. He named as heirs the following children:

7        i. Jeremiah1, Sr., born say 1715.

ii. Tamerson, married Thomas Bass.

iii. Susannah, married Lazarus Summerlin.

iv. Rachel, married Joseph Collins.

v. Nancy, married Isaac Bass.

8        vi. Embrey, born say 1730/35.

 

5.    John4 Bunch, born say 1692, owned land adjoining Gideon Gibson's land, and he probably named his son Gideon for him. He sold the land that "my father Paul Bunch bought of James Kelly on Occaneche" on 28 August 1728 and purchased 100 acres in Bertie County on the south side of the Roanoke River near Tuckahoe Marsh on 12 May 1729. He purchased 270 acres in Bertie on the south side of the river on 8 February 1728/9, and another 50 acres on the south side of the river, and sold these two plots as one parcel of 320 acres on 4 November 1732 [Bertie DB C:21, 142, 146, 288; Edgecombe DB 1:19]. Like the Gibsons he moved to Berkeley County, South Carolina, where he recorded a Plat for 350 acres northeast of the Santee River and lot 177 in Amelia Township on 15 November 1735 [Colonial Plats 13:425]. He recorded a plat for a further 100 acres on the Santee River and a half-acre town lot in Amelia Township a month later on 13 December 1735 [Colonial Plats 2:461]. On 15 December 1755 he and his wife Mary made a deed of gift of half this land to their son John, Junior [Charleston DB Q-Q:193-4]. Their children were

9        i. Gideon, born say 1713.

ii. John6, Jr., received half his father's land on 15 December 1755.

iii. ?Jacob, who recorded a plat for 200 acres in St. Matthew's Parish on 2 June 1772 which was land adjoining Gideon and John Bunch [Colonial Plats 13:425].

iv. ?James, who lived on land adjoining John Bunch in St. Matthew's Parish, Berkeley County [Colonial Plats 13:425].

v. ?Naomy, married John Joyner, Junr., 23 December 1754 (both of Amelia Township) [History of Orangeburg, S.C., 137].

 

6.    John3 Bunch, born say 1684, "a Mulatto," and Sarah Slayden, a white woman, petitioned the Council of Virginia on 16 August 1705 to allow them to marry because the Minister of Blisland Parish (in New Kent and James City counties) had refused to marry them. The Attorney General was undecided whether the petition came within the intent of the Law to prevent Negros and White Persons intermarrying" because he could not resolve "Whether the issue begotten on a White woman by a Mulatto man can properly be called a Mulatto, that name as I conceive being only appropriated to the Child of a Negro man begotten upon a white woman or a white man upon a negro woman, and as I am told the issue of a Mulatto by or upon a white person has another name viz. that of Mustee; wch if so, I conceive it wholly out of the Letter (tho it may be conjectured to be within ye intent) of the sd act, to which (as abovesd being Penal) is, as I conceive, not to be construed beyond ye letter thereof." The matter was referred to the court to decide [McIlwaine, Executive Journals of the Council, III:28, 31]. He was called John Bunch, Jr., when he received a patent for 400 acres in Hanover County on the upper side of Taylor's Creek on 18 February 1722 and called John Bunch on 2 July 1724 when he received a patent for another 400 acres adjoining his land. He patented another 400 acres adjoining his land on 17 August 1725 and another 400 acres on both sides of the Southana River on 28 September 1728 [Patents 11:162; 343; 12:244; 14:3]. His land on the Southana River became part of Louisa County in 1742. He was the father of the members of the Bunch family who received his land by a will which did not survive:

i. John5, born say 1710, purchased 100 acres of land in Fredericksville Parish, Louisa County, from William and Henry Bunch on 14 March 1742/3, explaining in the deed that it was part of 400 acres which John Bunch, deceased, had left by his last will to his sons. John Bunch, the purchaser, received 100 acres by the will and the remaining was divided among the decedent's sons William, Henry, David and James Bunch [DB A:48]. He left a 8 August 1774 Louisa County will (signing), proved 13 January 1777, by which he left 15 pounds currency to his sister Lucretia Meredith, ten pounds to William Bunch's daughter Winnie Bunch and divided the remainder of his estate between his three brothers and executors Samuel, David and James Bunch [WB 2:243].

ii. William, born say 1715, received a patent for 400 acres in Hanover County adjoining land of George Webb on 1 February 1738/9 [Patents 18:175]. He was taxable in Orange County, Virginia, on 2 tithes in 1739 [Little, Orange County, Virginia Tithables, 1734-1782, 15]. He was sued for a debt of 2,335 pounds of tobacco in Orange County by Joseph Morton, Gentleman, on 24 June 1741. Morton called him "Mr. William Bunch" on his account for items purchased at his store which included a silk handkerchief. Merchant Charles Dick also called him "Mr. William Bunch" on his account from 1743-1744 for items which included paper and ink, a tea kettle and an ivory knife and fork. He was security for (his brother) Henry Bunch when he was sued by George Taylor, Gentleman, for 7 pounds currency on 23 May 1742. William's handwriting on his promissory notes was excellent, indicating he was probably well educated [Judgments, February-March 1742, LVA microfilm reel no. 84, frames 644-9; July 1742-February 1742, reel no. 86, frames 427-32; September 1742-March 1743, reel no. 88, frames 369-371; June-December 1743, reel no. 90, frames 532-5; Judgments May (K-Z)-July 1744, frames 283-6]. He and his brother Henry sold 100 acres the land they received by their father's will in Louisa County to their brother John Bunch on 14 March 1742/3 [DB A:48].

iii. Henry3, born say 1717.

iv. Samuel, born say 1720, living in Louisa County on 28 May 1745 when he, Thomas Collins, Samuel Collins, William Collins, George Gibson, Thomas Gibson, William Donathan, and Benjamin Branham were presented by the court for failing to list a tithable (probably their wives). They pled not guilty the following month and the case was continued until 28 May 1746 when their attorney objected to the evidence of Joseph Fox and Andrew Rea because they were their fellow parishioners and would gain from their conviction. Richmond Terrell was also an evidence against them and was paid for travelling 80 miles round-trip to his home. Samuel Bunch and Thomas Collins were also called as witnesses and were fined for failing to appear in May 1746, but their fine was remitted the following month because they had not been summoned. The final ruling was not recorded [Orders 1742-8, 152, 157, 172, 175, 179, 183, 194, 195, 212]. He received a patent for 400 acres in Louisa County on the Newfound Branch of Camp Creek on 8 April 1767 [Patents 36:1037]. John Payne, Gent., sued him for 7 pounds on 13 February 1768, and on 11 February 1771 he was one of the freeholders ordered to work on the "Three Chopt Road" [Judgments, 1769-1770, frames 861-3, 867; Orders 1766-72, 437]. He left a 30 January 1782 Louisa County will (signing), proved 9 June 1783, by which he left 675 acres and currency to his children: Samuel, George, Charles, Judith, Mary, James, John and Ann Bunch and Rebecca Meredith [WB 2:474].

v. David, presented by the Louisa County court on 12 November 1770 for failing to list his land as taxable. On 8 March 1773 the court appointed him surveyor of a road in place of Charles Moreman, and the court added James and Pouncey Bunch's tithables to the list of freeholders who were to work on the road [Orders 1766-72, 418; 1773, 11]. He and his wife Mary (making her mark) sold 100 acres on both sides of Sycamore Fork Creek to Charles Moorman, Sr., for 80 pounds on 16 April 1774 [DB D:201-3]. He left a 3 January 1776 Louisa County will (signing), proved 14 October 1776, by which he named his wife Mary and left 376 acres of land and 40 pounds currency to his children: Jane, Mary, Lucretia, Winney, Joseph, David, Thomas, Nathaniel, and Anthony Bunch [WB 2:272-5].

vi. James, born say 1725. Agnes Going bound her son Joseph and daughter Sarah Going to him by 28 November 1759 Fredericksville Parish, Louisa County indenture [Davis, Fredericksville Parish Vestry Book, 29]. He was called "Mr. James Bunch" by a Louisa County merchant in 1773 [Judgments 1773-April 1774, LVA microfilm no. 72, frame 501]. He and his wife Mary (both signing), sold 14-1/2 acres between the Southanna River and Hudson's Creek adjoining land of Pouncey Bunch to Joseph Bunch for 12 pounds on 11 July 1774 [DB D:207-8]. He (signing), James Meredith (making his mark), Sarah Bunch (signing), Joseph and Pouncey Bunch witnessed the 7 September 1776 Louisa County will of John T. Taylor [WB 2:270].

 

7.    Jeremiah1 Bunch, Sr., born say 1715, made a will in Bertie on 8 Mar. 1797, proved a few days later. It did not identify his wife, who predeceased him, but named his children:

i. William, probably born about 1740, but did not marry until middle age, bond 23 December 1785 Mary Bunch, with Frederick Bunch bondsman. He left a will in Bertie in 1816.

10        ii. Henry3, born say 1743.

iii. Jeremiah2, born about 1745, married, bond 14 January 1765 Judah Hill, Micajah Bunch bondsman. He died intestate in Bertie in 1809.

iv. Nehemiah, left a will in Bertie County in 1815.

v. Frederick, born about 1745/8, left a will in Bertie County in 1810.

vi. Nanny, married Collins.

 

8.    Embrey Bunch, born say 1730/35, made a will in Bertie County on 20 July 1780, proved May 1789. He left a wife Elizabeth and children:

i. Micajah2 Sr., born circa 1760/65, married bond 8 April 1791 Levinia Holder, with Elisha Holder bondsman, and secondly, bond 17 November 1801 Teletha Smith, with Micajah Bunch Jr. bondsman. He moved to Christian County, Kentucky about 1803.

ii. Mary, married _____ Williams.

iii. Zadock, born before 1775. Unmarried, made his will 30 January 1801, proved May 1801.

iv. Nanny, married Rigdon Pritchard, 29 February 1792 Bertie County bond.

v. Milley, unmarried in 1801.

 

9.    Gideon Bunch, born say 1713, was probably John Bunch's son since he sold the land John inherited. He was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1740 [Orders 1732-41, 253; 1737-44, 41, 64]. He was a defendant in a June 1747 Lunenburg County, Virginia court case [Orders 1746-48, 209] and was taxable in Lunenburg County on himself and Cage Bunch (his son Micajah?) in 1749 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 114]. He was taxed as "Gibion" Bunch on 2 polls in the 1750 Granville County, North Carolina tax list of Samuel Henderson [CR 44.701.19]. He was taxable on 1 black poll in 1755 in Orange County, North Carolina:

Bunch, Gideon a Molata 0/1 [T&C Box 1, p.4].

Members of the Gibson family were also taxed as "Molatas" in Orange County in 1755. He was indebted to Samuel Benton of Orange County for 3 pounds, 11 shillings in June 1756 [Haun, Orange County Court Minutes, I:171]. He recorded a plat for 100 acres on the northeast side of Four Hole Swamp in Berkeley County, South Carolina on 5 December 1758 [Colonial Plats 8:30], and he was listed with (son?) Ephraim Bunch in the Berkeley County Detachment under command of Captain Benjamin Elliot: drafted 8 November 1759 and discharged 8 January 1760 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 938]. He and his son William were "Black" taxables in Fishing Creek District, Granville County, in 1761 and in 1762 with the notation, "Ref(use)s. to list his wife &c.

On 15 March 1763 while a resident of Berkeley County he sold 565 acres in Halifax County, North Carolina, of which 265 acres had been patented to Paul Bunch on 1 Jan 1725/6, the remaining acreage having been purchased by Paul Bunch from Thomas Wilkins on the south side of the Roanoke River joining Quankey Pocoson, Sims, and Gideon Gibson. William and Temperance Bunch were witnesses to the deed [DB 8:283].

On 26 June 1765 he recorded a memorial for 100 acres on Four Hole Swamp in Berkeley County [S.C. Archives series S111001, vol. 6:455]. He was the plaintiff in a suit in Granville County, North Carolina, on 11 August 1765 in which he accused William Bowling of trespass, but Gideon did not appear [Minutes 1754-70, 138]. On 2 March 1773 he recorded a plat for 200 acres in St. Matthew's Parish, Berkeley County on a branch of Four Holes called Target, adjoining Jacob and John Bunch [Colonial Plats, 13:424]. Perhaps he was the Gidian Bunch whose 17 March 1804 St. James, Goose Creek, Charleston County, South Carolina will was proved 7 May the same year [WB 29:629]. His children were

11       i. Micajah1, born say 1733.

ii. ?Ephraim, born say 1738, in the Berkeley County, South Carolina detachment under command of Captain Benjamin Elliot: drafted 8 November 1759, discharged 8 January 1760 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 938]. He married Lydia Crier, daughter of Thomas Crier/ Cryer and Elizabeth Powell. Ephraim and Lydia had three children according to testimony in Charleston District on 26 August 1813: Elizabeth Powell married Thomas Crier and they Begat a Daughter by name Lydia Crier who married Ephraim Bunch and they begat two daughters and a son, that is now living by name Martha, Deborah and Elisha Bunch, the deponents say that Elizabeth Powell before mentioned and all their family were white people clear of any mixt blood and that neither of them ever heard any reflections Cast on their Colour or Blood, William (X) Kennedy, Jesse Joyner [South Carolina Archives, Miscellaneous Records (Main Series), Volume 4-G, p. 207, cited by The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research XVI:27].

iii. William, born say 1740, an over sixteen-year-old taxable in his father's household in the 1762 list for Fishing Creek District: "Son William." A 7 November 1763 Granville County deed of sale for land from Henry Fuller to William Chavers refers to land on the north side of Tar River adjoining Chavis and William Bunch, and in 1764 he was a "Black" taxable in Henry Fuller's household in the Granville County list of Samuel Benton. He may have been the William Bunch who witnessed Gideon Bunch's sale of land in Halifax County on 15 March 1763 and owned land in St. Matthew's, Berkeley County, South Carolina, on 2 June 1772 [Colonial Plats, 13:425].

iv. ?Liddy, born before 1743, taxable in the 1754 Granville County tax list of Gideon Macon with (her brother?) Micajah Bunch in John Stroud's household.

v. ?Fanny, born about 1745-49, a 12-16 year-old taxable in the Fishing Creek District, Granville County household of John Griffin and his wife Miles Griffin in 1761.

 

Gideon's children named in the South Carolina will were

i. Jeremiah, who purchased land from John Bunch by deed recorded in Charleston District between 1800 and 1801 [Lucas, Index to Deeds of South Carolina, D-7:224].

ii. Hester Chern.

iii. Mary Chamberlain.

iv. Daniel, head of a white Charleston County household of 10 persons in 1800 [SC:60].

v. David.

 

10.    Henry3 Bunch, born say 1743, was taxed as a "Free Mulatto" in his father's Bertie County household in the 1763 list of John Hill. He married Eleanor Bayson, 29 February 1764 Bertie County bond with Thomas Bass bondsman. In 1764 he was taxed on himself in his own household in Jonathan Standley's list, in 1767 on a slave, and he was taxed for the last time in Bertie County in 1769 in the household of Abraham Moses. He moved to Orange County by 1780 when he was taxable on a 2,179 pounds assessment in St. Mary's District [CR 073.701.1 by NCGSJ XI:155]. He was head of an Orange County household of 3 "other free," 1 white woman, and 3 slaves in 1800 [NC:550] and 5 "other free" and 1 slave in 1810 [NC:953]. He may have been the father of

i. Thomas, head of an Orange County household of 3 "other free" and 1 white woman in 1800 [NC:550].

ii. Eleanor, married John Perry on 2 March 1797, (her brother?) Thomas Bunch bondsman. She obtained a divorce from the General Assembly in December 1798. In her petition she claimed that John Perry took to card playing, wasting his property, and abusing her soon after they married. She and her child moved to her father's house [NCGSJ XVII:206].

 

11.    Micajah1 Bunch, born say 1733, was probably identical to Cage Bunch who was taxable in Gideon Bunch's Lunenburg County household in 1749 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 114]. He was taxable in 1754 in the Granville County list of Gideon Macon in John Stroud's household [CR 44.702.19]. He was called "Micager Bunch Molata" when he was taxed on 1 "Black" tithe in Orange County in 1755 [T&C Box, p.19]. He was a defendant for debt in Halifax County, Virginia, in June 1764, and in June 1769 the Halifax County court ordered that an attachment against his estate be dismissed [Pleas 4:312; 6:341]. He may have been the Micajah Bunch who was a delinquent taxpayer on "Indian Land" in Fincastle County, Virginia, in 1773. This meant that he was living in present-day Tennessee [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 34:10]. He was taxable on an estate of 42 pounds in present-day Ashe County in 1778 [NCGSJ X:15-18]. He may have been the father of

i. Clement, born say 1770, an orphan boy bound to Anthony Cozart by the Orange County court on 25 November 1777. He was surrendered to the Granville County court by his bondsman, John Wilburn, on 1 November 1790 [Minutes 1789-91]. In December 1798 he posted a bastardy bond in Granville County for a child he had by Mildred Bass [Camin, N.C. Bastardy Bonds, 87].

 

Others in South Carolina

i. Lovet, head of a South Orangeburg District household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [SC:99]. He lived for a while in Robeson County, North Carolina, since "Lovec Bunches old field" was mentioned in the 1 March 1811 will of John Hammons [WB 1:125].

ii. Gib., a taxable "free negro" in the District between Broad and Catawba River, South Carolina, in 1784 [South Carolina Tax List 1783-1800, frame 37].

iii. Paul2, head of a Union District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:241].

iv. Henry4, head of a Newberry District, South Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [SC:66].

v. Ralph J., Nobel Peace Prize winner in 1950, probably descended from the South Carolina branch of the family, but this has not been proved. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on 7 August 1904, son of Fred and Olive Bunche. The 1900 and 1910 census for Detroit lists several members of the Bunch family who were born in South Carolina, but Fred Bunch was not among them.

 

Members of the family in Indiana were

i. Julius, born before 1776, head of a Greene County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Clayborn, head of a Greene County household of 10 "free colored" in 1830.

 

Endnotes:

1.    Fortune Holdebee sold her land, "plantation where I now live ... formerly Paul Bunches," on 5 July 1727 [Bertie DB B:276] and received a patent for 640 acres in New Hanover County in August 1735 [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, III:52].

 

BUNDAY FAMILY

1.    Ann1 Bunday, born say 1703, was the servant of John Perry of Essex County on 18 July 1721 when she was ordered to serve her master an additional year for having a "Mulatto Child" [Orders 1716-23, 104]. She was apparently the ancestor of the members of the Bunday family listed in the inventory of the Essex County estate of Robert Brooke, Gent., which was proved in court on 16 April 1745:

Elleanor Bunday a Molatto 11 pounds

Nanny Bunday Ditto 9 pounds

John Bunday 7 pounds

James Bunday 6 pounds

Sarah Bunday 3 pounds

Robert Brooke gave an unnamed "Mollato Girl During her Indentured time" to his son Robert Brooke by his 25 April 1736 Essex County will [WB 7:265-6, 303-13]. Ann was probably the mother or grandmother of

2        i. Eleanor, born say 1730.

ii. Nanny, born say 1740.

iii. Thomas1, born about October 1734, a "Mulatto Man" with between twelve and thirteen years to serve on 18 March 1763 when he was listed in the Culpeper County estate of Humphrey Brooke, decd [WB A:394]. Thomas Bunda was a "Free Negro" head of a Culpeper County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:14].

3        iv. James, born about 1744.

v. Sarah, born say 1745, head of an Essex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202].

vi. Francis, born about 1758, living in Essex County on 16 January 1786 when he and Henry Cook, "free Mulattoes," were accused of entering the lumber house of Lott and Higby Merchants in the City of Richmond on 21 December 1785 and stealing a large quantity of cloth valued at over 200 pounds currency. James Higbee testified that he had found part of the goods in the possession of the defendants, and Richard Covington testified that he had purchased about five yards of material from Francis Bunday. Other remnants were found on or purchased from Mary Bunday, Lucy Bunday and Cenn Bunday; and Sukey Bunday purchased a remnant from Mary Bunday. The defendants were sent to Richmond for further trial [Orders 1784-7, 177-8]. He was taxable in King and Queen County in 1791 and 1792 [PPTL, 1782-1803] and taxable in Essex County from 1794 to 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 256, 260, 272, 285, 297, 308, 357] and a "Free Negro" head of a Culpeper County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:7]. He was a sixty-year-old resident of Culpeper County on 21 April 1818 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution. According to his deposition of 17 October 1820 he was a sixty-seven or sixty-eight-year-old painter whose only family was a boy of about twelve or thirteen years, and he had mortgaged all his property to Isaac Bundy to satisfy his rent of $43.80 due to his landlord [M805-139, frames 554-7]. He sold property to Isaac Bundy by Culpeper County bill of sale on 25 September 1820 [DB LL:450].

 

2.    Eleanor Bunday, born say 1730, was a "Molatto" valued at 11 pounds in the inventory of the Essex County estate of Robert Brooke on 16 April 1745 [WB 7:303-13]. She was paid 7 shillings by the Essex County estate of William Thomas on 18 May 1772 [WB 7:303-13; 12:535]. She may have been the mother of

i. Harry1, born say 1748, a "Molatto man" valued at 6 pence in the inventory of the Essex County estate of William Thomas on 27 July 1771 [DB 12:429-4]. He was a "Mulatto" bound by one of the churchwardens of St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, to William Thomas. On 20 January 1772 the court ruled that he and (his sister?) Cate should not be detained as servants by the executors of Thomas' estate because the indenture was illegal [Orders 1770-3, 224]. Henry was taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, in 1802, 1811 and 1812 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 357, 460, 480]. Harry was called Harry Bunday, Sr., in 1810, head of an Essex County household of 3 "other free" [VA:202].

ii. Catherine1/ Cate, born say 1750, a "Molatto woman" listed with her child Betty in the 27 July 1771 Essex County estate of William Thomas, valued at 1 shilling. She was paid 1 shilling for beans by the estate of William Thomas in December 1771. She was a "Mulatto" indentured to William Thomas on 20 January 1772 when the Essex County court ruled that the indenture was illegal [DB 12:492-4, 535; Orders 1770-3, 224]. She may have been the Catherine Bunday who was head of an Essex County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202]. And her daughter Betty may have been the Betty Bundy who was head of a Spotsylvania County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:113a].

iii. Susan, born say 1752, deceased by 18 July 1796 when the Essex County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind her daughter Fanny to Humphrey B. Brooke [Orders 1795-7, 330].

iv. Ursula, born say 1766, a "free Mulatto" whose sons Ryburn, Achillis, Jerdon and Alexander were ordered bound to Humphrey B. Brooke in Essex County on 18 July 1796 [Orders 1795-7, 330].

 

3.    James Bunday, born about 1744, was a "mulatto man" with about twelve or thirteen more years to serve when he was listed in the 18 March 1763 Essex County estate of Humphrey Brooke [Dorman, Culpeper County Will Books. Will Book A: 1749-1770, 102]. On 17 May 1784 the Essex County court presented him for failing to list his tithables, and on 16 May 1785 the court presented him for failing to list (his sons?) Henry and David as tithables [Orders 1784-7, 9, 85]. He was head of an Essex County household of 7 "Black" persons in 1783 [VA:52] and was taxable in Essex County from 1783 to 1803: taxable on 2 free persons, 2 horses and 2 cattle in 1783 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 40, 74, 155, 210, 234, 246, 297, 308, 343, 357]. He may have been the father of

i. William, born say 1761, taxable on a tithe and a horse in Essex County in 1787 (called Willm. Bond) and taxable in Essex County from 1809 to 1816 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 155, 425, 510, 528, 616].

ii. John, born say 1763, head of an Essex County household of 1 "Black" person in 1783 [VA:52]. The Essex County court presented him on 17 May 1784 for failing to list his tithables, and the court ordered that he be listed on the tax list of Muscoe Livingston, Gent., on 18 October 1785 [Orders 1784-7, 9, 56]. He was taxable in Essex County from 1783 to 1803: his tax charged to Abner Cox in 1787, taxable on a horse in 1790 and taxable in Essex County from 1809 to 1813: called "John Bunday Senr." in 1811, "John Bunday Yellow" in 1812, listed with a male and female "free Negro" over the age of sixteen in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 40, 74, 195, 210, 234, 246, 273, 285, 297, 308, 343, 425, 439, 510]. He was head of an Essex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202].

iii. David, born say 1764, taxable in Essex County from 1785 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 75, 210, 234, 246, 260, 273, 285, 297, 308].

iv. Henry2, born after 1775, head of an Essex County houeshold of 12 "free colored" in 1830.

v. James, Jr., taxable in Essex County in 1802 and 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 343, 357].

 

Other members of the Bunday family were

i. Thomas1, taxable in Shenandoah County from 1793 to 1813: taxable on a slave from 1794 to 1809, taxable on 2 tithes in 1811 when he was called a "free man," taxable on a young slave in 1813 when he was listed as a "Free Black" [PPTL 1782-1799, frames 590, 617, 647, 691, 733, 778, 816; 1800-18, frames 146, 216, 258, 299, 381, 423, 442, 563].

ii. Violet, taxable in Essex County on a slave above the age of 16 and 2 horses in 1809 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 425].

iii. Qisler, head of an Essex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202].

iv. Harry3, Jr., taxable in Essex County from 1811 to 1819, listed with a "free Negro" male and female over the age of sixteen and a horse in St. Ann's Parish in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 460, 480, 528, 616, 769], head of an Essex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202].

v. Polly, head of an Essex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202].

vi. Christian, born about 1780, registered in Petersburg on 5 August 1812: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, thirty two years old, born free in the County of Essex [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 716].

vii. Catherine2, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on 10 August 1805: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty four years old, holes in her ears, born free per certificate of Registry from the County of Essex [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 352]. And she registered in Chesterfield County on 8 September 1806 [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, 36].

viii. Nelson, taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, from 1811 to 1819: taxable on a male and female "free Negro" over the age of sixteen in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 460, 480, 510, 528, 617, 769], head of an Essex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202].

ix. Lewis, taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, from 1811 to 1814: taxable on a male and female "free Negro" over the age of sixteen and a horse in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 460, 480, 510, 528], head of an Essex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202].

x. Ann2, head of an Essex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:202].

xi. Sylvia, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:113a].

xii. Nancy Bunda, "Free Negro" head of Culpeper County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:8].

xiii. Sally Bunda, "Free Molatto" head of a Culpeper County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:8].

xiv. Thomas2 Bunda, "Free Negro" head of a Culpeper County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:14].

xv. Isaac, purchased property from Francis Bundy by Culpeper County bill of sale on 25 September 1820 [DB LL:450]. He was a "colored man" who died intestate in Page County on 10 May 1849, possessed of about 14 acres of land which are described in deed books A (1831-3) & F (1844-7) according to a Page County chancery suit between his heirs and his wife Frances. The suit identified Isaac's "free negro" sisters Nancy (deceased before 1850 and mother of Fielding Bundy), Elizabeth Bundy (deceased before 1850), and brother Warner Bundy. It also identified Elizabeth's children William, Addison, Mariah/ Polly (deceased mother of Adaline), Warner, Nancy and Rosanna Bundy (mother of William, John, Isaac, Henry (under 21 in 1850), Mary & Elizabeth Richardson). Frances stated in her response that since Isaac and the plaintiffs were "free negroes," they were not citizens of the commonwealth and had no right to inherit real estate [LVA, Chancery suit 1850-006, digitized].

xvi. William, taxable in Culpeper County in Reuben Zimmerman's household in 1787, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1793, 1796 and 1797 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 200, 490, 598, 640]. He was a Revolutionary soldier who lived in Culpeper County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 32]. He was a "Free Mulatto" head of a Culpeper County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 (called William Bunda) [VA:8].

xvii. Samuel2, born 1776-94, head of a Guilford County, North Carolina household of 11 "free colored" in 1830.

 

BURDEN/ BURDINE FAMILY

1.    Priscilla Timbers, born 19 March 1757, a "mollato girl," was the daughter of Sarah Timbers of Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia [Overwharton Parish Register, 1724-1774, 189]. On 3 July 1805 a Mrs. Mary McCalanahan appeared in Greenville County, South Carolina court and testified that Sarah Timbers and her daughter Priscilla had lived with her in Virginia and that Priscilla was the mother of David, Thomas, Lewis, James, John, Patsy, and Charlotte Burden/ Burdin [DB R:162]. Priscilla was the mother of

i. David, counted as a "free colored" head of a Pendleton District, South Carolina household with a slave in 1820.

ii. Thomas.

iii. Lewis. His biography was published in Randolph County, Indiana, in 1882 [Tucker, History of Randolph County].

iv. James.

v. John, born 1785-1804, head of a Wayne Township, Wayne County, Indiana household of 11 "free colored" in 1840.

vi. Patsy.

vii. Charlotte.

 

Another member of the family was

i. Mary Peggy Berden, married James Nickens, 17 July 1793 Culpeper County bond.

 

BURKE FAMILY

Members of the Burke family in Virginia and Maryland were

i. John, born about 1686, a "Mollatto" servant of Mrs. Elizabeth Hawkins, who was twenty-one years old on 10 June 1707 when the Charles County, Maryland court ordered that he be set free. Mary Elliott, wife of William Elliott, testified that he had been sold to Henry Hawkins by her former husband Henry Brawner [Court Record 1704-10, 326].

1        ii. Ann1, born say 1688.

 

1.    Ann1 Burk, born say 1688, a "Mulatto" servant of Burditt Ashton, Gent., petitioned the Westmoreland County, Virginia court for her freedom on 28 October 1709. The court ruled that she should serve until the age of thirty-one, but it reconsidered the case on 28 June 1711 and decided that she should be free because she was born before the law was passed which bound mixed-race children until the age of thirty-one [Orders 1705-21, 132a, 143a, 162a]. She may have been the mother of

i. Ann2, born say 1713, indicted by the Westmoreland County court on 28 May 1734 for having an illegitimate child (no race indicated) [Orders 1731-9, 137a, 146].

 

Other members of the Burke family were

2        i. Judah, born say 1734.

3        ii. Betty, born say 1750.

iii. Enoch, head of a Loudoun County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:308].

iv. Polly, head of a Prince William County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:507].

 

2.    Judah Burke, born say 1734, was called "Juda a Molatta woman" and was the servant of Joseph Herron, Esq., in January 1756 when the Chowan County court bound her "Mollatta" son Frank to serve her master until the age of thirty-one. In January 1764 Frank and (his brother) Jacob and (sister) Lucy were called "Mulatto" children of " ____ a free wench" when they were bound to Lydia Herron. She was called "Mulatto" Judy on 29 January when the court bound her "Free Mulatto" daughter Lucy to Richard Brownrigg, Esq., until the age of twenty-one. And she was called "Judah Burke a Mulattoe Woman" on 21 March 1771 when she petitioned the court to be discharged from the service of William Boyd, Esq. The court granted her petition but ordered her to bring her children into court to be bound out, and the court bound her "Negroe" sons Frank and Jacob to Samuel and William Topping to be house carpenters and joiners [Minutes 1755-61, 26; 1761-6, 193; 1766-72, 318; 591, 594, 605]. She was head of an Edenton, Chowan County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:116]. She was the mother of

i. Frank, born 5 July 1755, bound apprentice in Chowan County in January 1756 and bound to Lydia Herron to be a sawyer in January 1764. He was sixteen years old on 29 January 1771 when the court bound him to Samuel Topping to be a house carpenter and joiner [Minutes 1755-61, 26; 1761-6, 193; 1766-72, 605].

ii. Jacob, born about 1759, a four-year-old "Free Mulatto" boy bound by the Chowan County court to Lydia Herron to be a sawyer in January 1764. He was twelve years old on 29 January 1771 when the court bound him to William Topping to be a house carpenter and joiner [Minutes 1755-61, 26; 1761-6, 193; 1766-72, 605].

iii. Lucy, born about July 1763, a one-year-old "Free Mulatto" bound by the Chowan County court to Lydia Herron to learn to spin and weave in January 1764. She was called "Lucy a Free Mulatto child born of the body of Mulatto Judy" on 29 January 1767 when the court bound her to Richard Brownrigg, Esq., until the age of twenty-one, "now three years & six months of age" [Minutes 1761-6, 193; 1766-72, 318]. She was head of an Edenton, Chowan County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:130].

iv. Patrick, born about 1765, one year and six months old on 29 January 1767 when the Chowan County court bound him to Richard Brownrigg to be a planter [Minutes 1766-72, 318].

 

3.    Betty Burk, born say 1750, was a "Mulatto" woman given by George Neavil to his wife Mary by his 26 February 1774 Fauquier County will, proved 27 June 1774. She was valued at 15 pounds in the 24 October 1774 inventory of Neavil's estate [WB 1:250-3, 264]. She was probably the mother of

i. Rachel, born say 1767, a "mulatto" living in Hamilton Parish, Fauquier County, on 25 May 1767 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her to George Neavil [Orders 1764-8, 268].

ii. Ben, born about January 1774, a "Mulatto of six months" living in Hamilton Parish, Fauquier County, on 27 June 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him to Lucy Jones [Minutes 1773-80, 198].

 

Their descendants were

i. Thomas, born 1776-1794, head of an Edenton household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:130].

ii. Nancy, head of a Chowan County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:534].

iii. Ephy Birk, born about 1784, a five-year-old "base born mulatto" daughter of Catherine Bush, who was bound apprentice to Neill Leech in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on 31 January 1789 [Minutes 1787-91, Friday minutes].

iv. Henry, born 1794-1806, head of an Edenton, Chowan County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 with one woman over forty-five years of age [NC:130].

v. Hager, born 1794-1806, head of a Chowan County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:129].

 

BURKETT FAMILY

1.    Joan Burkett, born say 1684, was the servant of John Jones on 7 May 1702 when she confessed in Richmond County, Virginia court that her illegitimate child "was gott by a Negro" [Orders 1702-04, 164]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Solomon, born say 1750, taxable on two "mulattos" in Bertie County in 1770 in the list of James Moore [CR 10.702.1].

2        ii. Peggy, born say 1755.

3        iii. Elizabeth, born say 1765.

 

2.    Peggy Burkett, born say 1755, was head of a Nansemond County household of 5 "black" persons in 1783 [VA:57]. She may have been the mother of

i. Jim, a "free Negro" taxable on two horses in Nansemond County in 1815.

ii. Gibson, a "free Negro" taxable in Nansemond County in 1815.

iii. Willis, a "free Negro" taxable in Nansemond County in 1815 [Yantis, Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia, S-14].

 

3.    Elizabeth Burkett, born say 1765, was the mother of Nelson Burkett, a five-year-old "Molatto Child son of Elizabeth Burkett" who was bound an apprentice shoemaker to Edward Brisco by the Gates County court in August 1790 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1787-93, 70]. She was head of a Gates County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:144]. Her children were

i. Nelson, born about 1785, bound apprentice in 1790.

ii. ?Christopher, born 1776-1794, head of a Chowan County household of 5 "free colored" (with one woman born before 1776) in 1820 [NC:114]. He purchased his wife and children who were slaves, and in October 1825 the Chowan County court gave him permission to manumit them. His wife Charity was about fifty or sixty years old at that time, his daughter Peggy about fourteen years old, and his daughter Nancy about seven years old [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 26-7].

 

BARNETT/ BURNETT FAMILY

1.    Mary Barnett, born say 1710, was the white servant woman of Edwin Hickman of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, on 5 September 1728 when she confessed to the churchwardens of St. George Parish that she had a "Mulatto bastard by a Negroe man." And she confessed to having a second child by a "Negro" man before 4 November 1730 [Orders 1724-30, 262, 270; 1730-32, 5, 9, 14]. She may have been the mother of Dinah, Cloe, Sawny and Doll Burnett, "mulatto children" ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. Margaret's Parish in Caroline County on 12 April 1751. On 12 July 1759 the court ordered that Charles Noden be arrested for removing Dinah, Peter, Sawney, Doll, Sarah and Scilla Burnetts out of the county [Orders 1746-54, 251; 1759-63, 53]. The children named in the court orders were

2        i. Dinah, born say 1738.

ii. Cloe, born say 1740.

iii. Peter1, born say 1742.

3        iv. Sawney/ Sanders1, born say 1745.

4        v. Doll, born say 1748.

vi. Sarah, born say 1751, taxable on a horse in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, from 1789 to 1792: taxable on her unnamed son in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 170, 221, 269, 319]. She may have been the Sally Barnett who was head of a Richmond City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:329].

vii. Scilla, born say 1754.

 

2.    Dinah Burnett, born say 1738, sued her master Charles Noden in Caroline County court on 12 June 1759 but Noden failed to appear. When the court moved on 10 September 1762 to attach his estate, Richard Woolfolk reported that he had nothing in his hands belonging to Noden [Orders 1759-63, 91, 369]. She may have been the mother of

i. William1, born about 1755, head of a Dobbs County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:137]. He may have been the William Barnett who was a Dobbs County taxable with Thomas Davis in 1769 [SS 837 by NCGSJ XV:74]. He was twenty-three years old in 1778 when he was listed in the Militia Returns for Dobbs County [The North Carolinian VI:730]. He was a "Mulatto" who enlisted with the 10th Regiment in 1780 and was said to have died without heirs [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 98].

5        ii. Frankly, born say 1756.

6        iii. Charles, born about 1764.

7        iv. Angela, born say 1765.

v. Edith, no age mentioned when she registered as a "Free Negro" in Campbell County on 20 January 1802: 5 Feet 2-1/2 Inches, darkish Colour, born free [A Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, p.2].

vi. Jenny, born about 1776, registered in Campbell County on 20 January 1802: Age: 25; 5 Feet 4-1/2 Inches; Colour: darkish; Where set Free: Albemarle; by Whom set free: blank.

vii. David2, taxable in Albemarle County from 1796 to 1803: called a "Free Negro" in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99, frames 477, 585; 1800-1813, frames 23, 68, 93, 136, 156]. He married Judy Brown, 14 November 1807 Henrico County bond, Jacob Brown surety. Jacob Brown was head of a Henrico County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:978]. David was a "free Negro" taxable in Henrico County in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 482]. Perhaps Judy was the Judah Barnett who was head of a Henrico County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:978] and 8 "free colored" in Albemarle County in 1820.

 

3.    Sawney/ Sanders1 Burnett, born say 1745, was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. Margaret's Parish in Caroline County on 12 April 1751. He purchased 150 acres from Joseph Boon on the north side of the Neuse River in Johnston County, North Carolina, on 10 December 1770 [Haun, Johnston County Deed Abstracts, Tr-1:116]. He sold this land about seven years later by a deed proved in the Johnston County court in 1777, and he sold another tract of land by deed proved in May 1777 Johnston County court [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, II:206, 251]. He was head of a Johnston County household of 5 free males and 7 free females in 1787 for the state census, 12 "other free" in 1790 [NC:140], 11 "other free" in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1800 [NC:544] and 10 in 1810 [NC:956]. His children may have been

i. Aaron, born before 1776, head of an Orange County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:831] and 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:354].

ii. David1, born say 1760, described as a "man of color" who served as a soldier in Blount's Company [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 98]. He enlisted on 2 April 1776 but was omitted from Blount's Company in 1778 [N.C. Historical & Genealogical Register II:181]. He died without heirs and his land warrant was escheated.

 

4.    Doll Burnett, born say 1750, was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. Margaret's Parish in Caroline County on 12 April 1751. She was living in Johnston County, North Carolina, on 28 May 1777 when her daughter Edith was brought before the county court to be bound out:

and the court taking the Conduct Character and Circumstances of the said Doll Burnet into consideration & finding no just reasons to apprehend that the said Edith would become a charge to this County, Ordered her to be returned to the care of her said Mother again [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, II:260].

In February 1786 she bound William Burnett to William Bulls by indenture proved in Johnston County court [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:306]. Doll was head of a Johnston County household of a female and 2 males in J. Boon's list in 1787 for the state census and head of a Johnston County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:140]. Her children were

i. Edith, born say 1770, bound to Jeremiah Powell in 1782 [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:213, 238]. She was head of a Wayne County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:456].

8        ii. Jesse, born say 1772.

iii. Sanders2, born about 1774, eighteen years old when he was bound an apprentice to Nathan Powell in May 1792.

iv. Lotte, born about 1776, sixteen years old when she was bound to Nathan Powell in May 1792.

9        v. William3, born say 1778.

10      vi. ?Rebecca, born about 1786.

11      vii. ?Patience perhaps 1790.

 

5.    Franky, born say 1756, a free "Negroe" woman (no last name indicated), had a child named Lucy Barnet who was born 13 June 1778 and baptized 17 June 1779 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 348]. She was called Franky Barnett in Goochland County in 1795 when her children Roger, Tarlton and Hailey Barnett were bound to David Ross [Orders 20:155 cited by Butler, Evolution of a Rural Free Black Community, 208]. She was counted in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Fluvanna County in 1813 and was taxable on a horse from to 1818 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1826, frames 503, 562, 584, 609]. Her children were

i. Lucy, counted in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Fluvanna County in 1813, taxable on a horse in 1817 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1826, frames 503, 585].

ii. ?Roda, counted in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Fluvanna County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1826, frame 503].

iii. Roger.

iv. Tarlton, taxable in Fluvanna County in 1817 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1826, frames 585].

v. Hailey.

 

6.    Charles Barnett was born about 1764 in Albemarle County, Virginia, and lived there until 1800. According to his Revolutionary War Pension application he was a "mulatto" who enlisted in Charlottesville in the 7th Virginia Regiment. Sharod Going testified that he was with him at Chesterfield Courthouse. In 1800 he moved to Carter County, Tennessee, then to Georgia, and to Granville County, North Carolina, about 1808 [Dorman, Virginia Revolutionary Pension Applications, IV:87]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Albemarle County on 2 August 1796: a Dark mullatto man aged about thirty years, of a yellow complexion, five feet seven and three quarter inches high, having proved to the satisfaction of this Court that he was born a free man within this County [Orders 1795-8, 137]. He married Lucy Bowles, 7 September 1785 Albemarle County bond. He was bondsman for the 12 December 1793 Albemarle County marriage of Robert Battles and Nancy Bowles. He and his wife Lucy sued Robert Battles for trespass, assault and battery on 5 May 1796, and he and his wife Lucy sold property by deed proved in Albemarle County on 6 June 1796 [Orders 1795-8, 86, 108, 144]. He was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1787 to 1791. His tax was charged to William Clarkson in 1798. (His wife) Lucy was head of an Albemarle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:185], a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse in 1812 and 2 free male tithables and a horse in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 110, 149, 244, 291, 342, 382, 415, 445, 478, 530; 1800-1813, frames 518, 562]. Lucy Barnett registered in Albemarle County on 9 March 1810: a woman of Colour...aged about forty five years, five feet three and a half inches high, a Mulatto [Orders 1810-11, 58]. Charles was head of a "free colored" household in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1830. According to his pension application, he was back in Albemarle County on 28 December 1840 and received his last pension payment on 4 September 1848. His pension application file includes a 31 July 1849 letter from Thomas Peace of Granville County who wrote to the Albemarle County Clerk that Charles Barnett, "a man of color...left a widow and a parcel of children in a very distressed condition." He may have been the father of

i. James, a "Mulatto" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, in 1812 and 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frame 499, 541].

ii. Peter2, born about 1790, indicted in Albemarle County on 4 November 1811 for stealing $200 in silver and cash notes from Vest & Watson and sent for trial in the Superior Court [Orders 1811-13, 59-60]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Albemarle County, in 1809, 1812 and 1813 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frames 363, 518, 541], registered in Albemarle County on 9 August 1815 and in Augusta County on 28 October 1823: a free man of dark mulatto complexion [Register of Augusta County, no. 56, http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/vshadow2/].

iii. Elizabeth, head of an Albemarle County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:151].

iv. Elizabeth, head of an Albemarle County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:150].

v. Ally, born say 1790, the mother of Mary Barnett who registered in Fluvanna County on January 1857: a Renewal of her Register granted by the County Court of said County on the 24th Day of February 1834 ... about Forty years of age, about five feet high, yellow Complexion [Order Book p.7, no. 94].

 

7.    Angela Barnett, born day 1765, was in the Henrico County jail with Nathan Fry and William Anthony on 7 February 1791 for a breach of the peace and were ordered to remain there until they gave security of 40 pounds each for their good behavior for a year. While she was in jail, the court ordered that her child be restored to her and supported at the expense of the county [Orders 1789-91, 428]. On 29 September 1792 Angela was charged in Henrico County court with murdering a white man named Peter Franklin. Jesse Carpenter testified that

in the night of the third instant he accompanied the deceased to the House of a certain William Anthony in this County (with whom the prisoner lived) in search of some runaway negroes which they suspected were harboured at the said House, and for the taking of whom a reward was offered in the Virginia Gazette. That in their search they apprehended a small boy at the said House, whom they carried away as a runaway, he answering the description of one of the runaways described in the said Advertisement. That in consequence of information received from the said Boy, they went to the same house the following evening about eleven O'clock at night to apprehend two other runaways, and upon knocking at the door, it was opened by the said Will Anthony, to whom they communicated their suspicions and went in (There being very little light in the house). That upon their entering the house, they were abused by the prisoner in the most indecent manner, in Consequence of which the decedent threatened the prisoner that if she persisted in her abuse, he would correct her. That in a few minutes afterwards the prisoner was discovered by the deceased searching behind a trunk upon which the decedent made a seeming disposition to strike the prisoner with a small cowhide which he held in his hand. That the deponent did not see any stroke given by the deceased to the prisoner, but at the same instant the prisoner struck the deceased and knocked him down, upon which the deponent caught hold of the Weapon with which the blow was given, and it seemed to him to be a square piece of Wood, but did not get it out of the hands of the prisoner. That in the Scuffle the deponent was pushed out of the door and as he went out, he got hold of the deceased and dragged him out also, who appeared to be much hurt, he complaining of being badly cut. That the deponent so soon as he could get the deceased upon his horse conveyed him home the distance being about four miles, in effecting which he was obliged to hold him on his horse the greater part of the way, during which the decedent appeared out of his senses. That the said Franklin after lingering a few days departed this life and this deponent believes died of the said Wound given him by the prisoner [Orders 1791-4, 278-9].

The court ordered that she be sent to Richmond for trial. Angelina Barnett was taxable in the upper district of Henrico County on the tithe of (her son?) Allen Barnett, a slave and a horse in 1804 and taxable on Allen Barnett and a horse in 1805. Angelina was taxable on 2 lots in 1811 [Land Tax List 1799-1816 (includes Personal Property Tax lists)]. She may have been the mother of

i. Allen, born say 1786, married Lucretia Wood, "free people of color," 7 December 1807 Henrico County bond, Elijah Wood surety. He was a "free Negro" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1806 to 1811; taxable on 30 acres in Henrico County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 482, 528, 657; Land Tax List 1799-1816]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996].

 

8.    Jesse Burnett, born say 1772, was bound an apprentice to Jeremiah Powell in Johnston County in 1782 [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:238]. He was head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:208]. On 23 January 1830 he purchased 50 acres in Cumberland County on Middle Creek between Bones Creek and Little Rockfish Creek from Absalom Hammons [DB 39:459]. He and his wife Elizabeth were mentioned in their son Needham's free papers on 5 September 1842 in Cumberland County [Minutes 1842-44]. Their children were

12        i. ?Betsy, born say 1807.

ii. Needham, born 20 September 1812, according to Daniel Baker, Esq., and Duncan Gillie Rae who testified on his behalf in Cumberland County court on 5 September 1842. They stated that he was a "free man of colour" born in Cumberland County of free parents, Jesse and Elizabeth Burnett. The 6 June 1842 Cumberland County court permitted him to take the oath of insolvency when he was sued by Thomas B. Wooten [Minutes 1842-44, n.p.].

iii. ?Peter3, born 6 December 1815. James Bowden testified in Cumberland County court that Peter Burnett, born of a free mother in Duplin County, was bound apprentice to him and completed his indenture on 6 December 1836 at the age of twenty-one years. The 10 December 1836 court described him as being: of Slender Frame about six feet high of a dark mulatto complexion bushy hair [Minutes 1836-8, n.p.].

iv. David3, born say 1816, received a deed of gift from (his father?) Jesse Burnett which was proved in Cumberland County on 8 December 1837. The 8 December 1841 Cumberland County court issued him a license to carry a gun in the county.

v. ?Calvin, born about 1825, nineteen years old on 8 March 1844 when he was bound to John McLowin.

vi. ?Margaret, born about 1826, a sixteen-year-old "free girl of colour" bound to George McMillan in Cumberland County on 5 December 1842.

vii. ?Sarah A., born about 1832, ten years old when she was bound to Amos Jessup on 7 December 1842.

 

9.    William3 Burnett, born say 1778, was indentured to William Bulls by Doll Burnett in Johnston County in February 1786 [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, IV:200; III:306]. He was head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:608] and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:152]. He may have been the father of

i. Nathan, born about 1800, obtained free papers in Cumberland County in 1819: a bright mulatto, born about 1800, 5'10-3/8"... and registered them in Perry County, Mississippi in 1822 [Probate Records A:316-7].

 

10.    Rebecca Burnett, born about 1786, was a two-year-old "mulatoe" when she and (her younger sister?) Lid Burnet were bound apprentices to James Campbell by the Cumberland County, North Carolina court on 31 July 1788 [Minutes 1787-91]. Rebecca was the mother of

i. ?James, born about 1802, five-year-old "boy of Colour," bound to Michael Blocker by the 16 September 1807 Cumberland County court [Minutes 1805-08]. He may have been the James Burnett who owed tax on an improved lot in Fayetteville in 1821 [5 June 1822 Minutes].

ii. ?Rachel, born about 1802, a five-year-old "Mullatto" girl bound to Richard Dudley by the 16 September 1807 Cumberland County court [Minutes 1805-08].

iii. ?Rose, a two-year-old "Mullatto" girl bound to Richard Dudley by the 16 September 1807 Cumberland County court.

iv. Jane, born about 1809. On 10 March 1838 in Cumberland County court she produced a copy of her November 1815 Moore County indenture to Cornelius Dowd which stated that she was about six years old. She also had a record of the completion of her indenture in November 1829. She appeared in Cumberland County court again on 4 March 1841 when she proved to the court that she was the daughter of Rebecca Burnett and was a free born resident of the town of Fayetteville. She was described as being: of a dark Mulatto complexion, five feet four and a half inches high stout in person her uper fore teeth nearly all decayed [Minutes 1835-44].

 

11.    Patience Burnett, born say 1790, was head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:216]. She was the mother of two "Coloured" children bound to Duncan Campbell of Cumberland County until the age of eighteen. They were

i. Sarah, born about 1814, eleven years old on 11 March 1825 [Minutes 1823-27].

ii. Eliza, born about 1818, seven years old on 11 March 1825.

 

12.    Betsy Burnett, born say 1807, was living in Cumberland County, North Carolina, in December 1837 when her children were apprenticed. They were

i. William Henry, born in December 1825, twelve years old when he was bound to Anson Bailey of Cumberland County to be a farmer on 8 September 1837 [Minutes 1836-38].

ii. ?Louisa, born about 1827, no parent named on 8 September 1837 when she was a ten-year-old "free girl of colour" bound to Stephen Hollingsworth. She was bound to Alfred Jackson on 7 December 1840 [Minutes 1838-40].

iii. ?George, born about 1828, no parent named, a nine-year-old "free boy of colour" bound to Stephen Hollingsworth to be a farmer on 8 September 1837. He was bound to Alfred Jackson on 7 December 1837.

iv. Candie, born about 1833, a four-year-old "free girl of colour" bound to Alfred Jackson on 7 December 1837.

v. ?Nancy, born about 1836, no parent named, bound to Alfred Jackson on 7 December 1837 [Minutes 1836-38].

 

Other members of the family in Virginia were

i. Susanna Burnett, born say 1743, added to Thomas John's list of tithables for Loudoun County, Virginia, on 13 November 1759 [Orders 1757-62, 298].

ii. Michael Barnet, a "Mulatto" ordered bound by the churchwardens of Augusta County to Peter Hog, Gentleman, on 23 August 1766, perhaps the child of Pat Barnett whose son Thomas was ordered bound to Jacob Miller on 22 March 1768, no race indicated [Orders 1765-7, 240; 1768, 127].

iii. William2, born say 1772, married Judith Thomason, 10 January 1793 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:151].

 

BURRELL FAMILY

1.    Susannah1 Burrell, born say 1719, a "free Molatto," was the mother of several "free Negro" children born in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Virginia. She was probably a sister of Barbara Burrell, "a free Molatto," whose daughter Winifred was born 7 December 1740 [King, The Register of North Farnham Parish 1663-1814, 28]. Susannah's children were

i. ?Winey Burwell, born say 1735, a "mulatto Servant Girl" who complained to the Orange County, Virginia court on 28 June 1753 that her master, Andrew Mannon, was misusing her [Orders 5:456].

ii. Lucy, born 25 March 1737, daughter of Susanna Burrell."

iii. Sam1, born 25 May 1739, "a free Negro son of Susanna Burrel."

iv. Sam2, born 15 August 1742, "son of Sue a free Molatto."

v. Susanna2, born 26 January 1753, "daughter of Susanna Burrell, a free Negro."

 

Their descendants may have been

i. Winnie Charity Burwell, born about 1772, registered in Middlesex County on 15 March 1802: born free; 30 years of age; 5'0"; yellow complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1800-60, p.15].

ii. Elisa Burrell, head of a Westmoreland County household of 12 "other free" in 1810.

iii. Clarissa Burwell, head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121b].

iv. Hanna Burwell, head of a Prince George County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:549].

v. Patty Burwell, head of a Henrico County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996].

 

BUSBY/ BUZBY FAMILY

1.    Thomas Busby, born about 1674, was an "Indyan boy" servant to Mr. Robert Caufield of Surry County, Virginia, in July 1684 when his age was adjudged at ten years (in order to know when he was tithable) [Haun, Surry County Court Records, 1682-91, 444]. His descendants may have been related to the Hawley/ Holly and Scott families of North and South Carolina. On 12 March 1754 a "mulatto boy Busby alias John Scott" was recovered in Orange County, North Carolina, after being stolen from his mother. He was the son of Amy Hawley and grandson of John Scott of South Carolina. The Orange County court appointed Thomas Chavis to return the child to his family in South Carolina [Haun, Orange County Court Minutes, I:70, 71]. White members of the Busby family were taxables in Bladen County, North Carolina, from 1768 to 1789 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:2, 68; II:44, 45, 72, 206].

Members of the family in South Carolina were

i. Mary Buzby, head of a Beaufort District household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [SC:11] and 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:104]. In 1790 Mary was living in the same district as Moses Scott, head of a Beaufort District household of 8 "other free" [SC:11].

ii. John Busby, born before 1776, head of a Barnwell District household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [SC:62] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [SC:3a]. He was a man of color who served in the Revolution [Moss, Roster of South Carolina Patriots, 127; NSDAR, African American Patriots, 181].

 

BUSS/ BUSH FAMILY

1.    Edward Buss, born say 1671, was called a "Mulatto slave or servt. to Mr. James Vaulx" when the Westmoreland County court ordered Vaulx to appear in court to answer his complaint. On 30 September 1702 Edward testified that he was the son of an "English or white woman." He was free by 24 February 1708/9 when he brought a successful suit for 402 pounds of tobacco against the estate of Philip Brown in Westmoreland County court. On 28 June 1710 he was presented by the court for failing to attend his parish church, and on 24 June 1713 he and Margaret Redley were convicted of fornication and cohabiting together [Orders 1698-1705, 169a, 172a; 1705-21, 116, 145a, 217]. On 29 June 1721 he won a suit for 1,600 pounds of tobacco against the estate of Nathaniel Pope [Orders 1721-31, 4]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Edward Bush, born say 1713, called "Edward Bush alias Ridly, carpenter, born on the Body of Margaret Ridly" on 25 October 1742 when he sold (signing) 80 acres in Westmoreland County at the head of Pope's Creek while residing in St. Mark's Parish, Orange County [Westmoreland D&W 1738-44, 256].

ii. Ann Relee, alias Bush, a "Mulatto" woman who was whipped by the King George County court in early 1738 or late 1737 and  ran away from Westmoreland County with an Irish servant man named Edward Ormsby according to the 27 January to 3 February 1737/8 issues of the Virginia Gazette [Virginia Gazette (Parks)].

iii. William Bush, born say 1731, a "Melato" with two years to serve on 28 August 1750 when he was listed in the inventory of the Westmoreland County estate of William Strother [Records & Inventories 1746-52, 134b].

 

Other members of the Bush family were

i. Catherine, born say 1763, mother of Ephy Birk, a five-year-old "base born mulatto child" bound apprentice to Neil Leech on 31 January 1789 by order of the Cumberland County, North Carolina court [Minutes 1787-1791, no page].

2        ii. Jane, born about 1777.

iii. Sally, head of an Augusta County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:398].

iv. Charlotte, head of a Richmond City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:349].

v. William, born 1776-1794, head of Caswell County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:42].

vi. Frances, head of a Johnston County, North Carolina household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:259].

vii. Rachel, head of a Lenoir County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [NC:297].

 

2.    Jane Bush, born about 1777, registered in Essex County on 21 September 1829: born free by certificate of Bailee Spindle, Esq., bright Mulattoe, 52 years of age, 5 feet 5 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.110, no. 240]. She was the mother of

i. ?Sandy, born about 1803, registered in Essex County on 21 March 1825: born free by evidence of Richard Rowzee in open court, bright Mulattoe, 22 years of age, 5 feet 9-1/8 inches. He registered again on 21 September 1829.

ii. Nancy, born about 1806, registered in Essex County on 21 September 1829: daughter of Jane Bush, a free born woman, bright Mulattoe, 23 years of age, 5 feet 5-5/8 inches.

iii. Jane, Jr., born about 1807, registered in Essex County on 21 September 1829: daughter of Jane Bush, a free born woman, bright Mulattoe, 22 years of age, 5 feet 6-5/8 inches.

iv. Dandridge, born about 1810, registered in Essex County on 21 September 1829: son of Jane Bush, a free born woman, bright Mulattoe, 22 years of age, 5 feet 6-5/8 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, pp.48, 111, 112; nos. 118, 241-4].

 

BUTCHER FAMILY

Members of the Butcher family were

i. Samuel, "a Mulatto fellow" jailed in Prince William County on 7 June 1773 according to an ad placed in the Virginia Gazette: a Mulatto fellow who says his name is Samuel Butcher, and that he formerly belonged to Robert Evans, of Dinwiddie, but that he has heard that Mr. Mason obtained his freedom last April General Court. The owners, if any, are desired to prove their property, and pay charges [Virginia Gazette (Rind), 8 July 1773].

ii. Frank, in the list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in Dinwiddie County in 1813, living on John Butler's land, with 3 males and 2 females over the age of 16 in his household [PPTL 1800-1819].

iii. Jenny, in the list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in Dinwiddie County in 1813, living on J.Y. Tabb's land [PPTL 1800-1819].

iv. Billy, a "Mulatto" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, on 2 slaves aged 12-16 in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1803, p. 226].

v. Rachel, listed in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, in 1813 [PPTL 1804-24].

vi. James, born about 1794, registered in Petersburg on 31 March 1834: 5 feet 3-1/2 inches high, about 43 years old, of dark complection...obtained his freedom by a Judgment of the late Supr Court of Prince George County pr Certificate of Registry from the Clerk...Occupation a Farmer [Register of Free Negroes, 1819-33, no. 2277].

vii. Isham, a "FN" taxable in Nottoway County in 1816 and 1817 [PPTL 1789-1822, frames 515, 544].

viii. Viney, born about 1801, registered in Petersburg on 7 October 1830: about 29 yrs old, 5 ft 2-3/4 inches high, yellow complexion...recovered her freedom by a Judgment of the Superior Court of Prince George County as appears by a certificate from Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes, 1819-33, no. 1608].

ix. Jeff, born about 1802, registered in Petersburg on 9 September 1831: 5 feet 7 inches high, 29 yrs old...emancipated by a judgmt of Prince Geo. Supr Court pr Certificate from the Clerk of Dinwiddie [Register of Free Negroes, 1819-33, no. 1872].

x. John, born about 1805, registered in Petersburg on 9 April 1838: 5 feet 3-1/2 inches high, about thirty three years old, of a dark brown complexion...obtained his freedom by the judgment of the Superior Court of Prince George County [Register of Free Negroes, 1819-33, no. 2543].

xi. Clara, a "Free Colored" woman taxable on a slave over the age of 12 in Richmond City in 1819 [PPTL 1787-1819].

 

BUTLER FAMILY

1.    Ann Butler, born say 1670, was the servant of Samuel Hersey on 15 January 1690 when she admitted in Somerset County, Maryland court that she had a "Molatta" child by "Emanuel Negro" a slave of William Coulborne. She promised to pay Hersey 1,200 pounds of tobacco for his expenses in raising the child. Emanuel was given 39 lashes on 10 June 1690 when he was convicted of stealing a hog [Judicial Records 1689-90, 36, 57, 60a, 106, 200]. She may have been the ancestor of the members of the Butler family who were in North Carolina by 1751:

2        i. Margaret, born say 1722.

3        ii. Elizabeth, born say 1730.

4        iii. Martha, born say 1734.

iv. Robert, born say 1735, listed in the Summary List of the Bertie County Tax List for 1751 filed with the central government [CCR 190]. In 1755 he posted bastardy bonds for two unnamed children he had by Jane Mitchell [Camin, N.C. Bastardy Bonds, 8]. In 1757 he was taxable on a tithe in the list of John Hill, Esqr., and in 1763 he was a "Free Mulatto Male" taxable in his own household in John Hill's list [CR 10.702.1, box 1]. In 1764 he and (his son?) John Mitchell, "2 free molattos," were listed in the Bertie County Summary Tax List, and in 1766 he was taxed in his own household in the list of John Crickett. In 1770 he was one of the freeholders who were ordered by the September Bertie County court to work on the road to Cashie Bridge under Arthur Williams, overseer [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:375]. He purchased 100 acres on the south side of Cypress Swamp in Bertie County on 29 February 1780 and sold it on 16 February 1785 [DB M:476, 720]. He was head of a Bertie household of 4 persons for the 1787 North Carolina State census. He died before May 1790 when Amos Turner returned an inventory of his estate in Bertie County court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:813].

v. Rachel, born say 1746, taxable in Granville County in 1762 in Samuel Benton's list for Oxford District & Fishing Creek in the household of (her brother-in-law?) George Pettiford [CR 44.701.23].

 

2.    Margaret Butler, born say 1722, was head of a household of herself and "free Mulatto" Isaac Butler in the 1761 Bertie tax list of John Hill. On 15 July 1768 her brother James Currey informed the court that she (a "Singlewoman") had been delivered of a bastard child [N.C. Archives, Bertie County Bastardy Bonds 1740-1815, folder for 1766-1770 by ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/nc/bertie/court/curry.txt]. And in September 1768 she brought John Castellaw and Edward MGloghan to court as securities "for her keeping Harmless and indemnifying the Parish of this County from Charge" [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:831]. Margaret may have been the daughter of Thomas Corrie of Bertie County who named children James, David, John Margaret, Janet and Jacob in his 12 January 1750 Bertie County will which was proved in May 1754 [Gammon, Abstracts of Wills, Bertie County, p. 14, no. 53]. And she may have been the mother of

i. Isaac, born say 1738, taxable in Bertie County in 1751 [CCR 190] and a "Free Mulatto Male" taxable in the list of John Hill in Margaret Butler's household in 1761.

ii. William1, born say 1745, taxable head of a Bertie household of 2 "free molattos" in the 1763 summary list.

iii. Abigail1, born before 1750, taxable in her own Bertie household with (her brother?) William Butler in the 1761 list of John Hill.

5        iv. John, born about 1755.

 

3.    Elizabeth Butler, born say 1730, was a "Free Mulatto Female" taxed in the 1761 and 1763 Bertie County Tax List of John Hill in the household of Arthur Williams along with David James and seven slaves. Arthur Williams was a member of the North Carolina General Assembly for Bertie County in 1735 [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, IV:115]. She was Arthur William's common-law wife and the mother of his two sons Isaac and Elisha who were taxed as white servants in 1767 in his household in the list of John Crickett and as "Mollatoes" in 1768:

 

Masters: Arthur Williams

Mulattos: Isaac Williams, Elisha Williams, Wm. James, Elizth. Butler, Elizth. James, Mary James

Slaves: Gye, Grace, Sezer, Bess, Robin, Joan, Treser [CR 10.702.1]

 

Arthur left a 28 January 1775 Bertie County will, proved May 1775, leaving slaves Guy, Cesar, Grace and Joan to Elizabeth Butler "now living with me" and naming Elizabeth's children Isaac, Elisha, Ann, Cathoran, Joab, and Arthur. He also named Sarah, wife of Josiah Reddit [WB B:30-4]. In the undated Bertie County List of Humphrey Hardy, Elizabeth was head of a household of 5 taxables: slaves Gye, Cezar, Grace, Joan and herself (not identified by race). The children of Elizabeth Butler and Arthur Williams were

i. ?Sarah, born say 1746, married Josiah Redditt, 14 May 1767 Bertie County bond.

ii. Isaac Williams, born say 1748, counted as white in 1771 and thereafter. He married Nancy Bunch, 7 December 1769 Bertie County bond with Jeremiah and Henry Bunch, Jr., bondsmen.

iii. Elisha Williams, counted as white in 1771 and thereafter, married Sarah Josey, 24 March 1775 Bertie County bond.

iv. Ann, wife of Joseph Simons.

v. Catherine.

vi. Joab.

vii. Arthur.

 

4.    Martha Butler, born say 1734, was a "Free Mulatto Female" taxable in 1761 and 1763 in John Castellaw's household in the Bertie County list of John Hill and was taxable in Castellaw's household in the lists for 1766 through 1772. She was apparently John Castellaw's common-law wife since in 1771 William Castellaw was taxed in the Bertie County list of Humphrey Nichols as a "free Molattoe," and in 1771 John made a deed of gift to "William Castellaw son of Martha Butler" [DB L:283]. The deed was proved in Bertie County by the oath of Arthur Williams who was probably the common-law husband of Elizabeth Butler. Martha was head of a Gates County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:143]. Her son was

i. William Castellaw/ Custalow, born say 1755.

 

5.    John Butler, born about 1755, was a taxable "Mollato" in William Butler's household in the 1774 list of Humphrey Nichols. He married Keziah Prichard, 27 December 1797 Bertie County bond with her brother Christopher Prichard bondsman. He was living in Bertie County on 17 November 1820 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he enlisted in May 1776 at Windsor, Bertie County, in the North Carolina Line. He was sixty-six years old and owned 220 acres of poor land that he lived on with his wife Milly, fifty years old, and four children [NCGSJ XI:22]. They were

i. Temperance, born about 1802.

ii. Sucky, born about 1803.

iii. William3, born about 1804.

iv. Abigail2, born about 1812.

 

Other members of the family were

i. James, born in March 1759, a twelve-year-old "Mulatto" boy living in Loudoun County on 9 September 1771 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Cameron parish to bind him to Hardage Lane, Gentleman. He came into court on 14 September 1778 and agreed to serve Lane until 25 December 1779 to complete all his service including runaway time [Orders 1770-3, 213; 1776-83, 120]. He may have been the James Butler who was head of a Campbell County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:879].

ii. Jack Butlers, born say 1760, a "mulatto" who was listed among seven deserters, drafted out of Prince George County, Virginia, for whom a reward was offered in the 28 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Purdie edition, p.3, col. 3], perhaps the "Buttlers Jack" who was head of a Martin County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68].

iii. Christopher, head of a Stafford County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810.

iv. Lurany, born about 1788, registered in Sussex County, Virginia, on 23 September 1814: yellow complexion, 5'4", free born, 26 years old [Certificates granted to Free negroes & Mulattos, no.249].

 

BYRD FAMILY

1.    Margaret Bird, born say 1682, was the servant of Orlando Jones of York County on 24 June 1703 when he reported to the court that she had a bastard child by a "Negroe" and asked that she be punished. Later that year on 5 November he decided not to prosecute and the charges were dismissed [DOW 12:123, 157]. She was the mother of

2        i. John1, probably born 24 December 1696.

3        ii. ?Elizabeth, born say 1720.

 

2.    John1 Byrd, probably born 24 December 1696, was a "Mallatto Servant" who was listed with "Mallatto Servant man" William Cannady in the York County estate of Orlando Jones on 15 December 1719. John was valued at 20 pounds, and William was valued at 15 pounds currency, so they probably still had several years to serve. On 16 January 1726/7 he petitioned the York County court setting forth that Graves Pack, Gent., was keeping him as a servant although he was of age and free. The court ordered him discharged from Pack's service on 24 December 1727. On 21 February 1731/2 he obtained an attachment against the estate of William Brooks for three pounds currency which was in the hands of James Brooks. In December 1735 he was presented by the York County court for failing to list his "Molatto" wife as a tithable [OW 16, pt. 2, 427, 433; 17:256, 262; 18:245]. He purchased 150 acres on the north side of the Meherrin River adjoining Buckhorn Swamp and Farrows Branch in Isle of Wight County on 16 July 1744 [DB 7:3]. He was paid 2 pounds, 17 shillings by the Isle of Wight County estate of Joseph Allen for quitrents on 100 acres of land in 1749 [WB 6:5]. He and his wife Susannah sold their land adjoining Tarraran Swamp by Southampton County deed on 12 March 1755 [DB 2:62]. On 13 June 1754 he was one of fourteen heads of household who were sued in Southampton County court by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on the female members of his household. He was called John Byrd the elder when he failed to pay tax on (his wife) Susannah Bird and (daughter?) Mary Bird. Absolem Joyner testified against him. He was sued by William Bynum again on 14 August 1760, this time for trover, but he was found not guilty. He and Joshua Hunt were sued for a 2 pound debt on 11 March 1763. John paid the debt when Joshua failed to appear [Orders 1749-54, 495-6, 500-1, 512; 1754-9, 25, 36-7, 41; Judgment Papers 1752-5, frames 919-24; 1759-63, 59, 68-9, 290]. In February 1767 he confessed that he owed merchant Joseph Scott 5 pounds, 15 shillings on his account for 2 broad hoes, a rug, cloth, oznaburg (rough cloth), Irish linen, a saddle and bridle, garters, nails, 130 pounds of corn, a blanket, felt hat, man's shoes, kersey, holland cloth and a trunk [Judgment Papers, 1767-8, frames 312-315]. He purchased 286 acres in Southampton County on 11 June 1767, part of it on the north side of the Meherrin River near Jacob's Branch of Buckhorn Swamp, and the other on the north side of Dawson's Mill Pond [DB 4:19]. On 8 September 1768 he made a motion in court to have himself and his sons Arthur and Nathan added to William Persons' list of tithables. On 9 April 1772 he and (his sons) James Byrd and John Byrd were sued for a 36 pound, 12 shillings debt they owed Cordall Norfleet. On 14 May 1772 the court bound Benjamin Bartlett to him as an apprentice, and on 13 August 1772 the court exempted him from paying levies. He transferred land to Nathan Byrd by deed proved in Southampton County court by Arthur Byrd on 12 November 1778 [Orders 1768-72, 68-9, 521, 532; 1772-7, 30, 78; Orders 1778-84, 43]. His undated will was proved in Southampton County on 12 April 1781. He gave his plantation and most of his livestock to his son Arthur, a heifer to Arthur's daughter Susannah, a cow and calf to (his son-in-law?) Joshua Hunt, and gave five shillings to each of his other sons John, James, Charles, Philip, Moses and Nathan, most of whom were then living in North Carolina where they were counted as "other free" in the 1790 Northampton County census. John Wood, Elizabeth Williams, and William Brooks were witnesses [WB 3:322]. His children were

4        i. John2, born say 1727.

5        ii. Arthur, born say 1729, executor of his father's will.

6        iii. James1, born say 1732.

7        iv. Charles, born say 1735.

v.Mary, may have married Joshua Hunt.

vi. Philip, living in Northampton County before 1774 when he was listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Company [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He and (his common-law wife?) Jane Young jointly purchased 50 acres on the road leading to Halifax Town between his own land and Samuel Low's on 16 March 1778. On 29 October 1782 he was granted 11 acres near Isaac Edward's line which was near the land of his brother Charles [DB 6:262; 7:132]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 2 free males and 2 free females in Captain Winborne's District for the 1786 North Carolina State Census, 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76], and 7 in 1800 [NC:425]. His 9 January 1807 Northampton County will was proved in March of that year [WB 2:363]. He left his land to his niece Tamer Byrd and mentioned Harriet Walden. Harwood Walden was executor and William Walden was a witness.

8        vii. Moses, born say 1745.

viii. Nathan, added to William Person's list of tithables for Southampton County with his father and brother Arthur Byrd on 8 September 1768. He sued Joshua Savory, with William Bynum as security, for trespass in Southampton County on 9 January 1772. The court found Savory guilty of killing his mare. His father transferred land to him by deed proved in Southampton County court on 12 November 1778, and he and his wife Martha sold land by deed proved in court on 12 August 1779. He and Arthur were sued in Southampton County court for a debt of 65 pounds, but he was ruled to be "no inhabitant" when the case was called for trial in May 1784 [Orders 1768-72, 83, 484, 534, 536; 1772-7, 50; 1778-84, 43, 88, 429]. He probably came to Northampton County after the death of his father. He was granted a patent on 43 acres in Northampton County on 29 October 1782. He bought a further 150 acres adjoining this land on 22 February 1784 and sold all this land on 1 January 1788 [DB 7:128, 139; 8:136]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76].

ix. ?Martha, head of a household of 4 "Black" persons 12-50 years old and 4 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Dupree's District, Northampton County, for the 1786 North Carolina state census.

 

3.    Elizabeth Bird, born say 1720, was a "molatto woman" whose daughter Moll was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Bristol Parish, Virginia, on 9 December 1740 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 102]. She was a "Mulatto" living in Amelia County on 24 November 1757 when she sued Alexander Bolling for her freedom [Orders 1757-60, 36]. She was the mother of

9        i. Moll, born say 1738.

10      ii. ?Joseph1, born say 1739.

iii. ?John3, born say 1741, bound himself as an apprentice to Trustram Hex in York County on 15 January 1759 until 15 October 1762. He was sued for debt in York County on 15 August 1763 by John Pow (Poe). On 15 July 1765 the court ordered Edward Bowcock to pay him as a witness in the suit of Tristram Hix [DB 6:175; Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 7; 1763-5, 63, 429].

iv. ?Robert2, born about 1759, called a "free Mulatto" on 26 February 1767 when the Amelia County court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind him to Moses Hurt, Jr. [Orders 1766-9, 36]. He was granted a certificate of freedom in Pittsylvania County based a certificate from John Shackleford on 26 July 1794 [Orders 1791-4, 382]. He was a "Free Negro" or "Mulatto" taxable in Pittsylvania County from 1797 to 1800 and from 1805 to 1819, farming on George Adams' land in 1806 and 1811, taxable on two males in 1819 [PPTL 1797-1812, frames 5, 68, 141, 184, 520, 565, 591, 705, 731, 800; 1813-23, frames 5, 80, 252, 356]. He was head of a Pittsylvania County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:781]. He registered in Pittsylvania County on 11 September 1822: a bright Mulatto Man about sixty three years of age about five feet three inches high, he has black hair nearly straight somewhat mixed with grey hairs [Griffith, Pittsylvania County Register of Free Negroes, no. 35].

 

4.    John2 Byrd, born say 1727, was presented by the York County court on 19 January 1746/7 for not listing himself as a tithable [W&I 19:486]. He was living in Southampton County on 13 June 1754 (called John Byrd, Jr.) when he was sued by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American and Indian women [Orders 1749-54, 501, 512; 1754-9, 25, 37]. He was added to William Person's list of tithables for Southampton County on 8 September 1768. He deposed that he rented a plantation belonging to Beale for 11 pounds when he was summoned by the Southampton County court as garnishee on 12 March 1772. He, Hardy Beal, Arthur Allen, Arthur Byrd and James Byrd were sued by Jesse Watkins in a case that was dismissed at their costs on 11 February 1773 [Orders 1768-72, 83; 1772-7, 107; Minutes 1771-2]. He received 5 shillings by the 12 April 1781 Southampton County will of his father John1 Byrd. He was taxable in Southampton County from 1782 to 1786: taxable on 3 slaves, 3 horses and 11 cattle in 1782, 4 horses and 16 cattle in 1783, 3 horses and 6 cattle in 1786 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 503, 515, 544, 559, 586]. He may have been the father of

i. Sophia, born about 1756, registered in Southampton County on 28 March 1827: age 71, Mulatto, 5 feet 5-1/8 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1629].

ii. Charlotte, born say 1765, married Abraham Reid/ Reed, 27 February 1786 Southampton County bond.

iii. Aaron, born about 1781, married Aira Taylor (nee Williams), 19 February 1803 Southampton County bond, Burwell Gardner surety. He was a "free Negro" Southampton County taxable in Nottoway Parish in 1802 and 1803, taxable in St. Luke's Parish from 1807 to 1815 and living in Nottoway Parish in 1817 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 581, 648; 1807-21, frames 46, 163, 185, 313, 414, 438, 573] and head of a Southampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:60]. In 1808 Aaron and Aira sued Lemuel Clark, the executor of the estate of Aira's father John Williams, over her part of her father's estate [LVA Chancery suit 1814-017]. He registered in Southampton County on 21 July 1807: age 26, yellow, 6 feet 1/4 inch high [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 414].

iv. William, born say 1783, registered in Southampton County on 2 October 1801: no age, Black rather yellow, 5 feet 7 1/2 inches, free born, perhaps identical to Billy Byrd who registered on 17 August 1810: age 27, yellow, 5 feet 6 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 219, 838]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frame 617], head of a Southampton County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:56].

 

5.    Arthur Byrd, born say 1729, was added to William Person's list of tithables for Southampton County with his father and brother Nathan on 8 September 1768 [Orders 1768-72, 83]. He and his wife Tabitha sold property by deed proved in Southampton County on 10 July 1780. He and his brother Nathan Byrd were sued in Southampton County for a 65 pound debt in May 1784, and Arthur won a suit against Joel Newsum for 52 pounds, 10 shillings in paper money on 14 October 1784. Arthur, John and James Byrd were sued for a debt of 2,050 pounds currency of the year 1780 on 13 May 1785, but the suit abated against Arthur because he was ruled to be not an inhabitant of the county [Orders 1778-84, 339, 429, 448, 497; 1784-9, 73]. He was taxable in Southampton County in 1782 on his own tithe, a slave, a horse and 15 head of cattle, taxable in James Byrd's household in 1788, taxable in Jacob Byrd's household in 1789, taxable on a horse in his own household in 1790 and head of a household with David Byrd in 1791, and a "Negro" taxable on a horse in 1792. He had "removed" from the county when the tax list was prepared for 1793 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 507, 655, 707, 754, 811, 869; 1792-1806, frame 46]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 4 Black persons 12-50 years old and 2 Black persons less than 12 years or more than 50 years old in Dupree's District for the 1786 North Carolina state census. He was in Northampton County on 16 February 1788 when Abram Lubley and his wife Lucy gave him a bond for their one third share of land adjoining Ann Taylor and William Deloatch which he endorsed to Henry Suter on 19 March 1788 [Gammon, Record of Estates Northampton County, I:6]. He married Ann Byrd, 8 October 1789 Southampton County, Virginia bond, James Byrd surety, 10 October marriage [Minister's Returns, 62]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74]. Administration of his estate was granted to Jacob Turner on 5 March 1792 on a bond of 200 pounds in Northampton County court [Minutes 1792-76, 4]. His children were

i. Susannah1, mentioned in her grandfather's 1781 Southampton County will. She purchased 30 acres near Marsh Swamp in Halifax County, North Carolina, for 55 silver dollars on 16 August 1785 [DB 15:426] and was head of a Halifax County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:292].

11      ii. ?Richard, born say 1765.

iii. ?Peggy, born say 1768, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:66].

iv. ?Edward/ Edmund1, born say 1770, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:292], 7 in 1810 [NC:7], and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:141].

v. ?David1, born about 1773, registered in Southampton County on 20 January 1795: age 22, (blank) complexion, 5 feet 6 inches high, Free born and registered again on 31 July 1810: age 38, yellow, 5 feet 7 inches, free born. (His wife) Didah Byrd registered the same day: age 25, Mulatto, 5 feet 5 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 99, 783, 784]. He was taxable in Southampton County from 1791 to 1814: taxable in Arthur Byrd's household in 1791, in John Robertson's household in 1792 (with Shadrack Demery), called a "M"(ulatto) in 1805, living with his wife Diddy Taylor on John Drake's land from 1812 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 811, 883; 1792-1806, frame 796; 1807-21, frames 44, 284, 312, 414]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:58].

12      vi. ?Jesse, born say 1775.

 

6.    James1 Byrd, born say 1732, purchased 150 acres in Southampton County on Buckhorn Swamp from Thomas Harris on 10 January 1760. This was the land which John Byrd sold Harris five years earlier on 12 March 1755 [DB 2:62, 311]. John Green's suit against him for 2 pounds, 11 shillings was dismissed on 9 July 1761, and James Brooks' petition against him was dismissed on 9 September on agreement of the parties [Orders 1759-63, 116, 238]. He was added to William Person's list of tithables for Southampton County on 8 September 1768. He sued John Powell on 8 November 1770 in a case that was dismissed on agreement of the parties [Orders 1768-72, 83, 334, 353]. He was taxable in Southampton County from 1782 to 1789: taxable on 4 horses and 15 cattle in 1782, 3 horses and 15 cattle in 1785, 2 free males aged 16-21, taxable on Arthur Byrd in 1788, and taxable on his own tithe, another James Byrd and a slave in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 508, 539, 634, 655, 705]. The inventory of his Southampton County estate, taken on 28 October 1790, included nineteen head of cattle. The account of the estate allowed his unnamed sons 10 shillings for his coffin [WB 5:82, 88-9]. He may have been the father of

13        i. James2, born about 1763.

14        ii. Jacob, born say 1768.

iii. Asa, born about 1765, taxable in James Byrd's household in 1784 (called Else Bird), called Asea Byrd in Moses Byrd's Southampton County household in 1788, taxable in Francis Branch's household in 1794, in Henry Smith's household in 1795, charged with his own tax in 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 545, 655, 705; 1792-1806, frames 75, 170, 184]. He registered in Southampton County on 17 March 1806: age 41, yellow, 5 feet 7 3/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 342]. He was taxable on the south side of the Meherrin River in Greensville County, Virginia, on his own tithe and a slave in 1795 and from 1797 to 1814, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 300, 318, 335, 351, 370, 385, 400, 413, 445, 460]. On 19 May 1804 he was a witness in Greensville County court for the Commonwealth against Graham Bell, Jr., who was charged with forging a bond to himself for $333 from Sterling Edmond of Brunswick County. Asa gave bond to appear as a witness in the District Court in Brunswick County [Orders 1799-1806, 387-8]. On 13 August 1804 the grand jury presented him for retailing liquor without a license and for disturbing religious worship at Round Hill Meeting House, but he was found not guilty of both charges [Orders 1799-1806, 3909, 408, 410, 411, 423, 433, 452; 1806-10, 26, 27, 170]. He gave his consent for the Greensville County marriage of (his daughter?) the unnamed bride of Peyton Stewart, 12 May 1806 Greensville County bond [Marriage Bonds, 58]. On 18 September 1806 he purchased a crop of corn and peas, a bed, furniture, and two hogs in Greensville County for 16 pounds from Peyton Stewart. He married Lucretia Stewart, widow of Thomas Stewart, before 10 October 1806 when they and her children Henry Stewart and Peyton Stewart and his wife Vicey sold 114 acres which they received by Thomas Stewart's will [DB 3:511, 520]. On 16 January 1808 he was examined in court but found not guilty of his wife's murder. He made a deed of gift to (his stepdaughter) Viney G. Stewart which was proved in Greensville County court on 9 May 1808 [Orders 1806-10, 204, 231]. On 12 June 1809 the court presented Buckner Brewer for swearing two oaths at him [Orders 1806-10, 359]. He made a deed of trust for land for the use of John Hathcock proved in Northampton County court on 4 March 1822 [Minutes 1821-25, 70]. Asa was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1830 and 4 "free colored" in Rush County, Indiana, in 1840.

15      iv. Pherebe/ Phebe, born about 1765-1770.

v. Sally, born about 1776, registered in Southampton County on 17 March 1806: age 30, blk., 5 feet 4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 343]. She registered in Petersburg on 9 June 1806: a yellow brown free Negro woman, five feet four and a half inches high, thirty years old, born free in the County of Southampton p. certificate of the Register in Southampton [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 381]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:124a].

vi. Peter, born about 1779, registered in Southampton County on 29 June 1801: age 22, Black rather yellow, 5 feet 6 3/4 inches high, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 214].

vii. Susannah2, born about 1782, registered in Southampton County on 10 February 1832: age 50, yellow, 5 feet 3-1/2 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1967].

 

7.    Charles Byrd, born say 1735, purchased 150 acres on Little Swamp in Northampton County, North Carolina, on 12 July 1760 [DB 3:84]. He voted for Joseph Sikes in the Northampton County election of 1762 [SS 837 by NCGSJ XII:170]. He sold part of his land on 25 November 1771 and bought a further 100 acres for 100 pounds near his land on the north side of Little Swamp on 4 October 1778. He sold 2 acres of the land he bought in 1760 on 4 December 1779 [DB 5:133; 6:283; 7:18]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 2 free males and 2 free females in Captain Winborne's District for the 1786 state census. The inventory of his estate was proved in Northampton County by John Walden in December 1788 [Gammon, Record of Estates, Northampton County, I:58]. His widow was probably Ruth Byrd who was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76]. She was a buyer at the sale of the estate of Solomon Byrd on 12 March 1790 and was devised the residue of the estate of Alice Earp (nee Bass) by Alice's 13 October 1796 Northampton County will [WB 2:133]. Their children may have been

i. Solomon, born say 1755, bought 100 acres in Northampton County for 400 pounds on 19 February 1780 and sold 50 acres of this land on 1 December 1780 [DB 7:51, 63]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 5 Black males, 4 white females and one white male in Captain Winborne's District for the 1786 state census. The account of sales for his estate was recorded in Northampton County on 12 March 1790 by the administrator, John Walden [Gammon, Record of Estates, Northampton County, I:71].

ii. James3, born about 1780, registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County on 21 November 1811: Born free of a Yellow Complexion, aged about thirty one years ... five feet eight & 1/2 Inches high [Register, no.21].

 

8.    Moses Byrd, born say 1745, enlisted as a musician in Lewis' Company of the North Carolina Continental Line in Halifax County in 1776 and was omitted in January 1778 [N.C. DAR, Roster of Soldiers from N.C. in the Revolution, 112]. He was taxable in Southampton County from 1782 to 1803: taxable on a horse and 4 cattle from 1782 to 1787, taxable on Asa Byrd in 1788, taxable on Thomas Byrd in 1795, called a "Mulatto" in 1802 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92; frames 508, 544, 634, 655, 705, 755, 812, 869; 1792-1806, frames 156, 183, 261, 311, 373, 407, 509, 546, 615]. He was living in Northampton County, North Carolina, before 2 January 1807 when he made his Northampton County will, proved March 1808 [WB 2:362]. He left most of his estate to his wife (unnamed) and after her death to Willie Thomas and Mary Ash. James, Sarah, and Elisha Byrd were witnesses. He was the father of

i. ?Thomas, born say 1778, taxable in Southampton County from 1795 to 1817: taxable in Moses Byrd's household in 1795, taxable on a horse in his own household in 1801, called a "M"(ulatto) or "f.n." after 1802, living with his wife Lottie on William Vick's land in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 183, 508, 614, 684, 798; 1807-21, frames 164, 284, 413, 572]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:59].

ii. Willie, born 1776-94, executor of his father's will, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:214].

 

9.    Moll Bird, born say 1738, the daughter of a "molatto woman" named Elizabeth Bird, was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Bristol Parish, Virginia, on 9 December 1740 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 102]. She may have been the Mary Bird who was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 28 February 1780 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Meherrin Parish to bind out her illegitimate "Mulattoe" children Joe and Peter [Orders 1774-82, 331]. She was the mother of

i. ?Prissy, born 23 December 1752, registered in Petersburg on 27 January 1798: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, forty five years old the 23 Dec. 1797, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 130].

16      ii. ?Robert1, born say 1755.

iii. Joseph2, born say 1765, ordered bound apprentice in Brunswick County on 28 February 1780 [Orders 1774-82, 331]. He married Nettie Jackson, 20 August 1790 Charlotte County bond, Burwell Jackson surety.

iv. Peter, born say 1767, ordered bound apprentice in Brunswick County on 28 February 1780 [Orders 1774-82, 331].

17      v. Catherine Jackson, born about 1769.

18      vi. ?Peggy, born say 1770.

19      vii. ?William, born about 1775.

 

10.    Joseph1 Byrd, born about 1739, was living in Surry County, Virginia, on 22 June 1773 when the court ordered him to pay 3 pounds per annum support for an illegitimate child he had by Ann Charity [Orders 1764-74, 380]. He purchased 50 acres in Surry County on the east side of Washington's Road on 6 June 1780 [DB 11:363] and was head of a Surry County household of 6 persons in 1782 [VA:42]. He was taxable in Cabin Point district of Surry County from 1782 to 1807: taxable on Walden Bird's tithe in 1794 and 1795; taxable on Joseph Byrd, Jr.'s tithe from 1797 to 1799; taxable on Willis Byrd's tithe in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 351, 378, 399, 468, 594; 1791-1816, 55, 156, 250, 283, 315, 359, 473, 554, 610]. He registered as a free Negro in Surry County on 22 February 1797: a mulattoe man of a bright complexion born of free parents ... aged about 58 years, pretty square made, very bald, & 5'7" tall [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.23]. Two of his children, described as sons of Joseph and Nelly Byrd, registered as "free Negro" residents of Surry County. He may have been the Joseph Bird who was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:547]. His will was proved in Surry County, Virginia, in 1808 [Wills, Etc. 2:206-7]. Nelly was head of a Surry County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:601] and 6 "free colored" in 1830. Their children were

i. William, born about 1777, registered on 27 September 1798: son of Joseph and Nelly his Wife free persons and residents of said County, aged about 21 years old, about 5'10-1/4" high, of a bright complection short thick hair straight and well made by profession a planter.

ii. ?Cyrus, born say 1778, taxable in Surry County in 1796 and 1797 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 251, 282].

iii. Joseph3, born about 1780, registered on 8 October 1798: son of Joseph and Nelly his wife ... aged about 20 years, 5'5" high, of a bright complexion, short thick hair, straight and well made, by profession a planter [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, nos .34, 35]. He married Betsy Andrews, daughter of Thomas Jones, 23 December 1816 Surry County bond, John Charity security.

iv. ?Willis, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on February 4, 1801: a brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, twenty years of age, appears by affidavit of Benja. Bilbro & Coleman Harrison of the County of Surry have been born free & raised in the County of Surry [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 214].

v. ?Henry, born about 1783, received one of the "Certificates granted to Free negroes & mulattoes from October 1800" in Sussex County on 8 March 1813: yellow complexion, 5'10", free born, 30 years old [Register of Free Negroes, no. 203].

vi. Sally, born say 1786, "daughter of Joseph Byrd," married Wright Walden, 30 March 1804 Surry County bond, surety James Williams.

vii. ?Betsy, born say 1789, married James Ruffin, 20 January 1810 Surry County bond, Wright Walden surety. James was probably related to Thomas Ruffin, head of a Southampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:79].

viii. ?Rebecca, born say 1792, married James Cypress, 26 January 1818 Surry County bond, John Charity surety [Marriage Bonds, 107].

 

11.    Richard Byrd, born say 1765, was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:66], 10 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:9], and 12 "free colored" in 1830 (supposedly 100 years old). His 12 February 1835 Halifax County will, proved August the same year mentioned his unnamed wife and six children [WB 4:122]. His children were

i. Henry, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Susan Turner.

iii. Thomas.

iv. William.

v. Margaret.

vi. Elisha2.

 

12.    Jesse Byrd, born say 1775, was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:9]. Administration of his estate was granted to James H. Grant in Northampton County court on 3 June 1816 on a bond of 500 pounds. His children were

i. Edmund3, born say 1803, a "boy of color" bound apprentice to James H. Grant to learn to be a farmer by order of the 3 June 1816 Northampton County court. He was identified as the orphan of Jesse when Grant recorded his apprenticeship bond in Northampton County court on 8 March 1825 [Minutes 1821-25, 363].

ii. David2, born say 1805, bound apprentice to Drury Walden by order of the 2 March 1818 Northampton County court. David was identified as the son of Jesse in the 5 June 1822 session of the Northampton County court when Drury Walden renewed his $500 apprenticeship bond with Sterling Hathcock and William Walden sureties [Minutes 1821-25, 105]. David mortgaged his livestock to James Hathcock by 12 May 1837 Northampton County deed [DB 28:62].

iii. ?Angelina, a "free girl of color" bound apprentice to James C. Harrison by order of the 4 June 1822 Northampton County court.

 

13.    James2 Byrd, born about 1763, married Sarah Hathcock, 30 August 1789 Southampton County marriage [Ministers' Returns, 646]. She was called Sarah Bird on 12 October 1786 when the court bound out her "poor child" Michael Heathcock [Orders 1784-9, 215]. James was taxable in Southampton County in the household of (his father?) James Byrd in 1789, taxable in his own household from 1790 to 1804: taxable on Peter Byrd in 1794, taxable on 2 tithables in 1797, called a "Mulatto" in 1802 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 705, 755, 813, 871; 1792-1806, frames 48, 74, 156, 183, 261, 407, 509, 546, 615, 684]. He registered in Southampton County on 20 November 1810: age 47, Blk., 5 feet 10 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 852]. He was a witness to the 2 January 1807 Northampton County will of Moses Byrd and was head of a Northampton County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NC:714]. Administration on his Northampton County estate was granted to his son Elisha on 3 June 1816 on a surety of 250 pounds provided by Elias Roberts and Stephen Walden. Elisha petitioned the court on 2 March 1819 for partition of James' land among his heirs [Minutes 1813-21, 166]. His child was

i. Elisha1, born 1776-94, living with his wife Disey, "fn," on J. Bailey's land in Southampton County in 1813 [PPTL 1807-21, frame 314]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:218]. He registered in Southampton County on 23 January 1823: age 33, mulatto man, 5 feet 6-1/4 inches high, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1355].

 

14.    Jacob Byrd, born say 1768, was taxable in Southampton County from 1789 to 1807: charged with Arthur Byrd's tithe in 1789, charged with Josiah Byrd's tithe in 1805, taxable on 2 tithables aged 16-21 in 1806 and 3 in 1807, called a "Mulatto" from 1802 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 707, 756, 813, 870; 1792-1806, 156, 183, 261, 311, 373, 4-8. 509, 615, 684, 799, 835; 1807-21, frame 44]. He may have been the father of

i. Josiah, born say 1782, taxable in Jacob Byrd's Southampton County household in 1805, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:715]. He was taxable on 100 acres and one free poll in Chatham County in Captain Bynum's District in 1815, and he purchased land by deed proved in the Thursday, February 1825 session of the Chatham County court. He was head of a Chatham County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:211]. Administration of his estate was granted to Frederick Rolens in the Wednesday, May 1836 session of the court.

 

15.    Pherebe Byrd, born about 1765, registered in Southampton County on 22 June 1810: age 45, Blk rather yellow, 5 feet 5 1/2 inches high, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 484]. She may have been identical to Phebe Byrd who registered in Petersburg on 3 July 1810: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet six inches high, forty years old, born free in Southampton County p. certificate of Registry [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 634]. She was the mother of

i. ?John4, born about 1787, registered in Southampton County on 31 July 1810: age 23, Mulatto, 6 feet 1/2 inch, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 791]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, in 1812, a "f.n." laborer living on the Indian Reservation in Southampton County from 1815 to 1818 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 284, 436, 574, 784].

ii. Priscilla, born about 1794, registered in Petersburg on 9 October 1810: a light coloured Mulatto girl (daughter of Phebe Byrd) a free woman, five feet three inches high, sixteen - seventeen years old, born free & raised in the County of Southampton [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 643].

 

16.    Robert1 Bird, born say 1755, died before 16 August 1800 when his widow Patty Bird (born about 1758) registered in Petersburg: widow of Bob Bird, decd., a brown Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, forty two years old, long bushy hair, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 192]. They were the parents of

i. ?Betsy, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 3 August 1805: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, thirty years old, bushy hair, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 347].

20      ii. ?Martha, born 1 October 1780.

iii. Robert3/ Bob, born 9 September 1781, registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1800: son of Bob Bird, decd., & Patty Bird his wife who were free Mulattos, a brown Mulatto lad, eighteen years old 9 September last, near five feet high, short bushy hair [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 193].

iv. ?Peggy, born 28 June 1784, registered in Petersburg on 29 July 1803: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet eleven and a half inches high, nineteen years old the 28 June last, long Bushy hair, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 254].

 

17.   Catherine Byrd, born about 1769, married Isaac Jackson, 22 September 1797 Lunenburg County bond. She was called Catherine Jackson when she registered in Charlotte County on 16 October 1819: a mulatto woman & Laborer formerly the Wife of Isaac Jackson five feet one inch high, supposes herself to be about 50 years of age, daughter of Mary Bird a free Woman residing in the County of Charlotte...about 28 years old [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 29]. She was the mother of

i. Edmund2, "son of Caty Byrd," bound by the Charlotte County court to Thomas Jones on 2 December 1793 [Orders 1792-4, 151a]. He was a "fm" listed with a female member of his family in his household in Charlotte County in 1811 and 1812, a ditcher listed with a male and 2 females in his household in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 814, 836, 846, 869, 886].

ii. James2, born about 1797, registered in Charlotte County on 6 November 1827: James Bird Junr of bright complexion the son of Caty Bird a free woman of this County...six feet high about thirty years of age [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 62].

 

18.    Peggy Byrd, born say 1770, was a "fm" planter listed in Charlotte County with 2 female and 2 male children in 1803, listed with 4 female children, a male child and 2 horses in 1805 and 1806, listed by herself in 1810, listed with 5 females and 3 horses in her household from 1811 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 580, 641, 648, 682, 751, 783, 803, 814, 846, 886]. She was a "Free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:44]. She was the mother of

i. ?James, born say 1792, a "fm" taxable on a horse in Charlotte County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frame 868].

ii. Peyton, born about 1796, registered in Charlotte County on 24 December 1819: a mulatto man (son of Peggy Bird a free woman) five feet eight inches high, supposes himself to be about 23 years of age, was born in the County of Charlotte [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 31].

 

19.   William Byrd, born about 1775, married Polly Carter, "dau. in law" (step daughter) of William Brogdon, 19 November 1796 Charlotte County bond, John Chavus surety, 22 November marriage. He was taxable in Charlotte County from 1795 to 1813: called a "free negroe" in 1799, a ditcher listed with sons Graybird and Washington Byrd in 1802 and 1803, listed with wife Polly, 2 male children and a female child in 1805 and 1806, 3 male and 3 female children from 1811 to 1812, a total of 5 males and 3 females in his household in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 314, 352, 381, 431, 542, 580, 648, 682, 803, 814, 846, 886]. He sold 45 acres on Little Rattlesnake Creek in Charlotte County to Henry Hines for unstated property on 27 September 1797, and he purchased 25 acres from Godfrey Jones for 15 pounds on 6 February 1798. He and his wife Polly made a deed of gift of 25 acres where they were then living in Charlotte County to their son Gray Bird in June 1799, and he purchased 50 acres adjoining Godfrey Jones for 45 pounds on 20 December 1802 [DB 7: 49, 83; 8:178, 200]. He was a "F.N." head of a Charlotte County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:44]. He registered in Charlotte County on 3 February 1809: a Mulato man, about 34 years of age, five feet Eleven inches high...born in the County of Brunswick of free parents. Polly registered on 7 November 1831: a free woman of colour of yellow complexion, about fifty two years of age, was born free five feet one and a quarter inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, nos. 12, 133]. He and Polly were the parents of

i. Gray, born about 1799, registered in Charlotte County on 6 November 1827: a bright Mulatto the son of William and Polly Bird free people of the County...five feet and nine inches high about twenty eight years of age [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 59]. He married Susan, the widow of William Flood before 21 February 1828 when William's son Jefferson Flood sued for his part of his father's land [LVA, Chancery court 1832-006].

ii. Washington, born about 1801, registered in Charlotte County on 6 November 1827: a bright Mulatto the son of William & Polly Bird free people of this County...five feet five inches high about twenty six years of age [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 61].

iii. Calouri(?), born about 1815, registered in Charlotte County on 26 August 1843: born free in this County, the daughter of William Bird and Polly his wife both free persons of Colour. She is of bright yellow Complexion, five feet 7 inches high, and is 28 years old [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 198].

 

20.    Martha Bird, born 1 October 1780, registered in Petersburg on 29 July 1803: a light Mulatto woman, five feet two and a half inches high, twenty two years old the 1st of last Oct., born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 253]. She was the mother of

i. Sally, born about 1797, registered in Petersburg on 16 November 1814: a brown Mulatto girl, five feet two inches high, seventeen years old 26 October last, daughter of Martha Bird, decd., a free woman of colour, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg, Registered by desire of Patty Bird her Grandmother [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 759].

 

Essex County

1.    Molly Bird, born say 1740, was a "Mulatto" woman whose son John Bird was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. Ann's Parish in Essex County on 18 March 1771. She may have been the mother of "free Negroes" Reuben and James (no family name) who were bound out by the churchwardens of St. Ann's Parish on 20 August 1766 [Orders 1770-3, 33; 1764-7, 405]. She was taxable on a horse in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, in 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frame 308]. She was the mother of

i. ?Reuben1, born about 1764, ordered to post security for his good behavior towards James Chandler in the Hustings Court of Petersburg on 2 August 1790 [Orders 1784-91, 326]. He applied for a pension in Powhatan County on 15 June 1820 at the age of fifty-six years. He testified that he enlisted in Hillsborough, North Carolina, and served in Captain James Gunn's regiment of dragoons. Benjamin Sublett testified that he met Reuben, a sixteen or seventeen-year-old "Mulatto boy," while serving in the Revolution in May 1780. Gabriel Gray testified that Reuben served as "Boman" for his brother Lieutenant William Gray. In 1820 Reuben's family consisted of his 37 year-old wife and a seven-year-old girl [M804-243, frame 0362]. He was taxable in Petersburg from 1799 to 1805, listed as a mason from 1803 to 1805 [1799 PPTL B, p.2; 1800-33, frames 4, 25, 47, 73, 111, 280] and head of a Petersburg household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121b]. He registered in Petersburg on 9 June 1810: a brown Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, forty seven years old, born free in Essex County, a stone mason [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 576].

ii. ?James, taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, from 1796 to 1814: taxable on 2 male "Free Negroes" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frames 272, 297, 308, 332, 343, 357, 382, 393, 409, 459, 510, 528], head of an Essex County household of 6 "other free" and a white woman over 45 years old in 1810 [VA:201].

iii. ?Jesse, born about 1766, a "free" taxable in Dinwiddie County from 1793 to 1798 [PPTL, 1791-9 (1793 A, p.2), (1794 B, p.2), (1795 A, p.2), (1796 A, p.2), (1798 B, p.2)]. He registered in Petersburg on 29 August 1800: a light brown Mulatto man, thirty four years old, five feet nine inches high, born free in the County of Essex as appears from an affidavit of Walker Halls of the sd County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 199]. He was taxable in Petersburg from 1801 to 1804 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 25, 47, 73, 111] and head of a Petersburg household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:118a].

iv. John, born about 1769, taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, from 1790 to 1814: listed with a male and female "Free Negro" over the age of sixteen in 1813; not charged as a tithable in 1814 but taxable on a horse [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frames 196, 210, 223, 260, 272, 343, 357, 382, 393, 409, 425, 439, 459, 480, 510, 528], head of an Essex County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:199]. He was called John Bird, Sr., when he registered in Essex County on 15 August 1829: born free by certificate of John P. Lee, former Clerk of this Court, about 60 years of age, dark Mulattoe, 6 feet 7 eights of an inch. His wife was apparently Sally Bird, Sr., who registered the same day: born free by statement of Richard Rowzee in writing, about 56 years of age, bright Mulattoe, 5 feet 4-1/8 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, pp.85-6, nos. 189, 191]. She was named in the 29 January 1820 Essex County will of her father Humphrey Fortune's 29 January 1820 Essex County will which John Bird opposed when it was offered for proof in March court 1820 [WB 19:92].

v. ?Reuben2, born 17 May 1777, registered in Petersburg on 29 August 1800: (by a copy of the Registry from John P. Lee Clerk of County Court of Essex County) twenty two years one month & 18 days old, a shade lighter than black, 5'8-1/4" & free born 5 July 1799. The bearer thereof appears to answer to said register [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 198]. He was taxable in Petersburg from 1803 to 1805, called a carpenter [PPTL 1800-33, frames 73, 111, 280], taxable in Chesterfield County in 1806 (called Reubin Bride "Mulato"), taxable in 1807 (called Reubin Bird), taxable on 2 horses while living on Mrs. Claiborne's land in 1809, and taxable on a tithe and 3 horses in 1810 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 632, 689, 738, 782].

vi. ?Nancy, born say 1782, mother of Edward Bird who registered in Essex County on 16 June 1823: son of Nancy Bird, born free by statement of John Beazey, 24 years of age, 5 feet 6 & 3/4 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.43, no. 109], perhaps the Nancy Byrd, born before 1776, who was head of a Caroline County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

 

Other members of the Byrd family in Virginia were

i. Samuel, a "Mulato" taxable in Hanover County from 1786 to 1814: taxable on a slave named Lucy over the age of sixteen in 1786; on 2 free males, a slave over 16, and three horses in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, pp.151, 177, 207, 247; 1792-1803, pp. 10, 62, 92, 148, 249; 1804-24], taxable on a lot in Hanover Town in 1800 [Land Tax List, 28] and a "free" head of a Hanover County household of 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:893]. He was arrested on suspicion of being involved in Gabriel's slave rebellion in Richmond in 1803 but released for want of evidence because slaves could not give testimony against him. However, his son, a slave, was executed [Russell, Free Negro in Virginia, 65].

 

Endnotes:

1.    The fourteen Southampton County householders who were sued for failing to pay tax on their wives were John Porteus, John Demery, Isaac Young, Thomas Wilkins, James Brooks, Jr. and Sr., John Byrd, Jr. and Sr., Abraham Artis, Lewis Artis, William Brooks, Ann Brooks, and William Tabor.

2.    About three years after Asa Byrd's Greensville County indictment for disturbing religious worship, there was a similar case. On 11 March 1807 the Greensville County court indicted a white man named Robert Morris for disturbing religious service at Bethel [Orders 1806-10, 104].

 

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