CHURCH FAMILY

Members of the Church family on the Eastern Shore of Virginia were

i. Susanna, born say 1674, a "Molatto" presented by the Accomack County court on 16 November 1692 for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1690-7, 81a].

1        ii. Samuel1, born say 1677.

iii. Stephen1, a tithable in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1720, a "negro" tithable in the household of Tamer Mapp in 1737, a tithable in John Haggoman's household in 1738, and a tithable in Adam Fisher's household in 1739 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 26, 79, 259, 281, 287]. He was sued on 12 February 1724/5 for assault by John Coffin and put in the stocks for an hour for misbehavior towards the court [Orders 1722-9, 164, 174]. He was sued by Godfrey Pole for a 4 pounds debt which was executed against his security Elizabeth Church on 9 October 1728 [Orders 1722-9, 354]. On 10 November 1730 he was presented for incontinent living with Elizabeth Church but was discharged because the case was insufficiently proved. However, the case against Elizabeth was proved and she was fined 50 pounds of tobacco and ordered to give security of 10 pounds not to cohabit with him. Stephen was presented again on 9 November 1731 for incontinent living with Elizabeth Church and the case was again discharged for insufficient evidence at his costs [Orders 1729-32, 50, 57, 66, 74, 116-7, 124]. Elias Roberts sued him for debt on 13 February 1733/4 [Orders 1732-42, 94].

 

1.    Samuel1 Church, born say 1677, was tithable in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1720 and tithable with his wife Elizabeth from 1725 to 1742. John Lunn, probably a white man, was a tithable in his household from 1724 to 1728 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 22, 39, 63, 77, 106, 128, 144, 193, 226, 247, 249, 264, 278, 283, 310, 322, 339]. Elizabeth, or perhaps a sister-in-law by the same name, was presented for bastard bearing on 17 November 1719. Samuel and his wife Elizabeth were sued in Northampton County in December 1722 for verbally abusing Josiah Cowdrey. Samuel sued John Drighouse, "Negro," for assault and battery, but the case was dismissed on 13 March 1722/3 when neither party appeared. Elizabeth brought an action upon the case against John Haggoman on 12 March 1724/5 and a case of assault and battery against Elias Roberts in July 1725. On 15 June 1726 Samuel and his wife Elizabeth acknowledged a deed for land to John Marshall. He and his wife Elizabeth were granted levy-free status due to their old age and poor circumstances on 13 November 1742 [Orders 1719-21, 44; 1722-9, 41, 58, 175, 194, 245; 1742-8, 31]. They may have been the parents of

i. Thomas, born say 1710, a 10-16 year old tithable in the household of Ezekiel Church in 1724 and tithable in Samuel Church's household from 1728 to 1731. He was sued for trespass on 10 August 1731, and on 13 March 1733/4 he was presented for living incontinently with Elizabeth Monk, wife of William Monk. Elizabeth Church, wife of Samuel Church, was summoned as a witness. the court ruled that there was too great a familiarity between them and Thomas was ordered to post bond of 20 pounds not to cohabit with Elizabeth Monk [Orders 1732-42, 99, 103, 109, 113]. He and his wife Susannah Church were tithables from 1739 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 56, 283, 310, 322, 338, 356, 357]. On 12 May 1747 Susannah was called Susannah Johnson alias Church when she was presented for "intermarrying or cohabiting with Thomas Church, a mulato." However, the following month on 10 June the King's attorney discontinued the suit, and Thomas was granted his wife tax-free status, "it appearing to the Court that the said Thomas is a white person." He was sued for swearing on 12 April 1749 [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 422; 1748-51, 53, 95].

ii. Samuel2, Jr., born say 1712, a 10-16 year old tithable in Ezekiel Church's household in 1724, a 12-16 year old tithable in Samuel Church's household in 1728.

 

Their descendants on the Eastern Shore of Virginia were

i. James, born say 1750, head of a Machipingo, St. George's Parish, Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:131] and 8 in 1810 [VA:15].

ii. Stephen2, head of an Accomack County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:88].

iii. Charity, head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:88].

iv. Stephen3, head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:15].

v. Abram, born in 1769, registered in Accomack County: yellow complexion, 5 feet 8 inches high, Emancipated by Zororbabel Ames's last will & Testament of record in Accomack County court [Register of Free Negroes, no. 48], head of a Northampton County household of "free colored" in 1820 [VA:216A].

vi. Solomon, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:217A].

 

Other members of the Church family were

i. Sarah, born say 1722, presented by the Amelia County court on 21 November 1740 for having a "Mulatto Child" [Orders 1:132].

 

CHURCHWELL FAMILY

1.    Mary Churchwell, born say 1742, was head of a Buxton's District, Nansemond County household of 4 whites (free persons) in 1783 [VA:57]. She was probably the mother of

i. Charles, born say 1760, a "Mulatto" head of a household of no whites and one dwelling in Buxton's District of Nansemond County in 1784 [VA:74].

2        ii. Samuel, born say 1762.

iii. Liddy, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 11 July 1805: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, bushy brown, rather fine, rather thin long hair, thirty six years old, born free in Nansemond County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 337]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:118a].

 

2.    Samuel Churchwell, born say 1762, was a "Mulatto" head of a household of no whites, 1 dwelling, and 2 other dwellings in Buxton's District of Nansemond County in 1784 [VA:74] and a "Free Negro" living in Nansemond County in 1815 [Yantis, A Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia, S-14]. He may have been the father of

i. Polly, born about 1787, twenty-five years of age on 20 July 1812 when she registered as a "free Negro" in Norfolk County: 5 feet 4 In. of a Yellowish Complexion. Born free as appears by the Oath of John Price [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, #75].

 

CHURTON FAMILY

1.    Joseph Churton, born say 1750, was called "Negroe Joe late the property of Mr. William Churton of this County deceased and sett free by the last Will and Testament of the said William Churton for meritorious services" on 17 March 1768 when the Chowan County court approved the manumission [Minutes 1766-72, 366]. He was a "black" taxable in William Boyd's list for the town of Edenton in 1769 [CR 024.701.2]. He was head of a Chowan County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:19] and was still living in Chowan County in 1800 [NC:114]. He was probably the father of

i. Alfred, born before 1776, a Chowan County taxable in the town of Edenton in an undated list, taxed on one free poll and 1-1/2 town lots [CR 024.701.2]. He was taxable on one free poll in a 1797 list of Edenton tithables and taxed on one free and one slave poll in 1799 [NCGSJ XVI:219; XVII:225]. He was head of a Chowan County household of 1 "other free" and two slaves in 1800 [NC:114], 2 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [NC:528], and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:130].

ii. Mariann, taxable on one poll and 1-1/2 town lots in Edenton in an undated Chowan County tax list [CR 24.701.2].

 

CLARK FAMILY

1.    Judith Clarke, the servant of Joshua Slade of York Parish, York County, Virginia, confessed in court on 24 August 1694 that she committed the "sinn of fornication with a Negro" [DOW 10:3, 28]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. ____, husband of Mary who was named in the 19 September 1749 York County will of her mother Mary Roberts [W&I 20:163]. They may have been the parents of John Clarke, a "free Mulatto" who was living in York County on 19 May 1760 when the court ordered him bound by the churchwardens of Charles Parish to Merritt Moore [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 143].

ii. James1, born say 1740, taxable with his wife in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1768 ("Mulatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:5], head of a Marlboro County, South Carolina household 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:59].

iii. Cooper, born say 1743, taxable with his wife in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1768 ("Mulatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:5], head of a Marlboro County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [SC:59].

iv. Joseph, a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County in 1770 and 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:44, 94].

v. James2, head of Sumter County, South Carolina household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [SC:935], probably related to Azana Clark, head a Sumter County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [SC:215a], and Mary Clark, head of a Sumter household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:215a]. He may have been identical to James Clark, Sr., who purchased 300 acres on the mouth of Cow Branch of Drowning Creek, Bladen County, North Carolina, jointly with John Stack on 30 September 1755. He assigned all his rights to the plantation he was living on to John Stack on 26 April 1757 [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, no. 1058; Campbell, Bladen County Wills, 2].

2        vi. William1, born say 1755.

3        vii. William2, born about 1760.

viii. George1, born say 1762, married Levisay Evans, daughter of Hannah Evans, 13 May 1795 Amherst County bond, Leonard Clark security. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1783 to 1801. His estate was taxable on a horse in 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 23, 44, 97, 102, 166, 195, 225, 326, 393, 449, 515; 1804-23, frame 21]. He and William Clark purchased land on Mill and Porridge Creeks in Amherst County from Rawley Pinn on 18 March 1800 [DB I:161]. His widow Loisa Clark married Charles Johns of Bedford County by 10 October 1805 Amherst County bond, Lewis Martin security, Susannah Clark witness. Charles Johns was a "Blackman" taxable in Bedford County in 1800 and a "Negr." taxable on 2 tithes in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1800A, p.13].

4        ix. Fanny, born say 1763.

5        x. James3, born say 1764.

6        xi. John1, born say 1765.

xii. William3, born say 1770, a "Mulatto Boy" bound apprentice in Surry County on 28 June 1774 [Orders 1764-74, 451].

xiii. Thomas, born say 1773, married Hannah Ash, 30 June 1794 Southampton County bond, John Clark surety. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:431] and head of an Anson County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:12].

xiv. Lemuel, born say 1774, taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, in 1797, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1799, a "free Negro" taxable on a horse from 1800 to 1812, taxable on 2 free male tithables in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 241, 343, 443, 478, 586, 658, 723, 762, 872; 1807-21, frames 11, 94, 132, 250], head of a Southampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:75]. He married Mary Williams, 29 January 1795 Isle of Wight bond, David Jones surety. In 1814 he brought a Southampton County chancery suit against Aaron Byrd and his wife over his wife Mary's part of the estate of her father John Williams [LVA Chancery file 1814-017].

xv. Wilson, taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, called a "Mulatto" in 1796, a "f.n." from 1804 to 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 218, 724, 873; 1807-21, frames 11, 94, 133, 250].

xvi. John/ Jack, born about 1772, registered in Southampton County on 18 September 1798: age 26, yellow man, 5 feet 9 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 123]. He was called John Clark, Jr., a "Mulatto" taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, in 1796, perhaps the John Clark, "free Negro," who was taxable there in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 218, 443].

xvii. Nancy, born say 1775, head of a Southampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:78].

xviiii. Edmond, a "Mulatto" ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. Ann's Parish in Essex County on 20 January 1772 [Orders 1770-2, 226].

 

2.    William1 Clark, born say 1755, was granted 72 acres on the head branches of Pedlar River in Amherst County on 20 July 1780 [Patents E, 1780-1, 282]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 7 whites (free persons) in 1783 [VA:48] and 8 in 1785 [VA:85]. On 3 May 1785 the Amherst County court ordered that he, George Clark and William Ampey work on the road from Irish Creek Gap to Mill Creek, and on 6 October 1789 he, Peter Hartless, George Clarke, Leonard Clark, James Clark and Joseph Ailstock were ordered to work on the road from Blue Ridge at Irish Creek Gap to the three forks of Pedlar River [Orders 1784-7, 131; 1787-90, 590]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1782 to 1820: with "CM" after his name in 1800, "Blue Ridge" from 1801-3, a "man of color" in 1811, 1812, and 1815, a "Mulatto" in 1813, a planter over the age of 45 in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1816 and 1818. He was taxable on 2 tithes in 1794, 3 from 1795-1798, 4 from 1799-1803, 3 from 1804-7, 4 from 1809-10, and 5 from 1811-12 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 9, 23, 44, 54, 70, 97, 136, 195, 225, 257, 326, 347, 370, 393, 419, 450, 479; 1804-23, frames 21, 62, 103, 144, 165, 188, 209, 230, 253, 326, 403, 537, 551, 584]. He married (second?) Nancy Williams, spinster, 3 September 1794 Amherst County bond, Leonard Clark surety. He and George Clark purchased land in Amherst County on Mill and Porridge Creeks from Rawley Pinn for 100 pounds on 18 March 1800 [DB I:161]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:258]. He may have been the father of

i. ?Leonard, born say 1772, taxable in Amherst County from 1791 to 1807 [PPTL 1782-1803, frames 225, 347, 370, 419, 450; 1804-23, frames 21, 63, 144]. He married Sally Williams, 12 March 1796 Amherst County bond, William Clarke Surety. He was head of a Rockingham County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:290] and a Rockbridge County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. ?Jane, born say 1780, married Henry Heartless, 25 June 1798 Amherst County bond, William Clarke surety.

iii. ?John2, born say 1780, taxable in Amherst County from 1805 to 1815: called a "man of color" in 1811, 1812, 1815, a "Mulatto" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frames 62, 208, 230, 253, 326] and head of an Amherst County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:299]. He married Mary Hartless, and he and Mary Clark were among members of the Hartless family who sold land on Pedlar River on 8 August 1818. They were living in Ohio on 8 April 1823 when they sold an additional 141 acres on Pedlar River to Reuben Peters [DB R:39].

iv. Nancy, daughter of William Clark, married James Clark in Amherst County on 20 September 1809 [Marriage Register, 217].

v. ?William4, Jr., born say 1795, a "Mulatto" taxable in Amherst County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frame 253].

vi. ?George2, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1813, a "man of color" taxable in Amherst County in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frame 326].

vii. ?Henry, a "man of color" taxable in Amherst County in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frame 326].

 

3.    William2 Clark, born about 1760, married Hannah Peters, 19 March 1785 Stafford County bond, William Peters surety [Madden, We Were Always Free, 195]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1797 to 1801 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 640, 684, 818] and a "Free Mulatto" head of a Culpeper County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:18]. On 7 December 1816 he obtained "free papers" in Culpeper County which were recorded later in Ross County, Ohio: William Clerke, a Mulatto man, 50 or 60, 5'7", served in the Revolutionary War in 1780 and 1781...is a free man, who has a wife and several children, and wishes to visit his mother in law in Frederick Co., at Charles Carter's place. On 12 December 1816 Sally Peters, "a free woman of color," made oath in Rockingham County, Virginia, that Coleman, eighteen years old, and Nicholas, thirteen years old, were the sons of William and Hannah Clerk and were free born in Culpeper County [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto and Poor Persons, 20-21]. William (Sr.) was sixty-four years old on 22 August 1820 when he appeared in Culpeper County court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. According to his pension records, he died on 8 December 1827 and his children were Willis Clark, William Clark, Kitty Madden (wife of Willis Madden), and Nicholas Clark [Madden, We Were Always Free, 191-199]. William and Hannah's children were 

i. Coleman, born about 1798 (perhaps the same person as Willis Clark).

ii. Kitty, born about 1800, registered as a "free Negro" in Culpeper County on 23 September 1822: a bright Mulatto Woman above the age of twenty one years five feet two inches high. She married Willis Madden [Madden, We Were Always Free, 64].

iii. William5, born about 1803.

iv. Nicholas.

 

4.    Fanny Clark, born say 1760, was living in Cumberland County, Virginia, on 22 May 1780 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Littleton Parish to bind her "mulattoe" son Harry Clark to Tucker Baughan [Orders 1779-84, 118]. She was the mother of

i. Harry, born say 1779, a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1803 to 1814, probably married in 1813 when he was listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattos" over the age of 16 in 1813 [PPTL 1787-1825, frames 254, 293, 397, 437, 456].

ii. Peter, born say 1782, "mulatto" son of Fanny ordered bound to Tucker Baughan on 24 May 1784 [Orders 1784-6, 22].

 

5.    James3 Clark, born say 1764, was head of an Amherst County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:298]. He and his wife Anny sold land to Henry Hartless by deed proved in Amherst County on 19 July 1802 [Orders 1801-2, 217]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1789 to 1820: taxable on 2 tithables from 1803 to 1806, 1810 and 1811, 3 in 1812, called a "man of color" in 1811, 1812, and 1815, a "Mulatto" in 1813, in a list of "Free Mulattoes & Negroes with his unnamed son in 1814 and in 1816 when he was over the age of 45, living on his own plantation, and taxable on 3 tithables [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1803, frames 166, 225, 348, 419, 584; 1804-23, frames 21, 62, 103, 144, 165, 187, 209, 230, 252, 284, 326, 403, 503, 537, 549]. He married (second) Nancy Clark in Amherst County on 20 September 1809 [Marriage Register, 217]. He was the father of

i. Micajah, born say 1785, taxable in Amherst County from 1809 (called son of Jas.) a "man of color" in 1811, a "Mulatto" in 1813, in a list of "Free Mulattoes & Negroes in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1804-23, frames 209, 252, 284, 328, 403]. He married Sally Duncan, on 15 November 1809 in Amherst County with the consent of Sally's parents, Ambrose and Jane Ambrose [Marriage Register, 218, 240]. Ambrose was called Ambrose Evans when he was head of an Amherst County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:302]. Micajah was head of an Amherst County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:302]. He and Charles Evans were witnesses to the 7 May 1817 Amherst County marriage of Lydia Evans, daughter of Ambrose Evans, to John Gulliver [Marriage Register, 247].

ii. ?Nelson, born about 1793, applied to the Amherst County court in April 1851 for a certificate that he was a white man but registered as a "Free Negro" in Amherst County on 12 July 1860: brown complexion, 67 years of age, 5 feet 11 1/2 inches high, born in Bedford [Register of Free Negroes, no.339; McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 101, 136].

iii. ?Benjamin H., born about 1800, registered in Amherst County on 22 August 1822: a free man of colour aged twenty two years five feet eight inches high of a bright yellow complection grey eyes with a natural mark on his right cheek and was born free & by occupation a waterman [Register of Free Negroes, no. 10].

iv. ?James4, born about 1801, registered on 12 July 1860: dark brown complexion, 59 years of age ... born in Amherst [Register of Free Negroes, no.338].

 

6.    John1 Clark, born say 1765, was a "Mulatto" taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, in 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frame 218]. He was surety for the Southampton County marriage bond of (his brother?) Thomas Clark and Hannah Ash on 30 June 1794. He was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:12]. Perhaps his children were

i. Anthony, born about 1790, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:143] and 10 in 1830. He may have been the Anthony Clark who was head of a Richmond City, Wayne County, Indiana, household of 12 "free colored" in 1840.

ii. Reuben, born about 1809, described as a "child of color" when he was ordered bound out by the 20 May 1822 Halifax County court.

 

Another Clark family:

1.    Rachel Clark, born say 1730, was a "Widow Woman" who was summoned by the Craven County, North Carolina court on 10 May 1759 to bring her children to the next court to have them bound apprentices [Minutes 1758-61, 28a]. She died before 10 October 1767 when Edward Franck of Craven County was ordered by the court to receive her "Molatto Orphans" in his care until they could be indentured by the next court [Minutes 1767-75, 52a]. Her children named in the court order were

i. Joseph, born say 1755.

ii. Moses, born say 1758.

iii. ?Mariah, head of a Craven County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:77].

 

COBB FAMILY

1.    John Cobb, born about 1690, was not yet fourteen on 29 December 1702 when he asked the Northampton County, Virginia court to appoint someone to take care of him and his estate until he was of age to choose a guardian. He chose his guardian on 28 November 1704 [OW 1698-1710, 165, 212]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1720 to 1744, called a "mul" in 1726 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 11, 22, 31, 45, 63, 113, 175, 220, 242, 245, 274, 289, 312, 347, 364]. On 12 February 1729/30 a Northampton County jury awarded him 17 shillings in his case against Isaac Mu___ for assault, and on 11 August 1730 he sued Daniel Eshon for assault and battery but the case was dismissed on agreement of the parties [Orders 1729-32, 8, 36, 43]. On 11 October 1748 he sued Henry Stott for damaging his ability to prove his debts or give evidence in a hearing by declaring, "you are a mulatto and I will prove it." John argued that he could not have been a "mulatto" because he collected debts, gave evidence in controversies "between other white persons and free subjects," and possessed the good will and esteem of his neighbors [John Cobb v. Henry Stott, Northampton County Loose Papers, 1748, cited by Deal, A Constricted World]. The case was discontinued when both parties agreed [Orders 1748-51, 24, 37]. John's wife was apparently white since she was never tithable in his household. He sold land by deed proved in Northampton County on 12 September 1758 [Minutes 1754-61, 166]. He left a 20 August 1766 Northampton County will, proved 12 November 1766, by which he left three slaves to his son Joshua, a slave to his son Southy, and divided the remainder among his wife Rachel and daughters Susanna, Elishe, Sarah and Rachel Cobb. He left a shilling to his grandson John Cobb, son of Stratton Cobb [Wills & Inventories 24:42-3]. He was the father of

i. Stratton, born say 1714, taxable in John Cobb's Northampton County household in 1731, 1738 and 1743 and listed as a taxable adjoining John Cobb in 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 220, 274, 347, 364]. He was probably deceased in 1766 when his son John Cobb received a shilling by his grandfather's Northampton County will. A John Cobb was a Continental soldier who died before 8 December 1778 when the Northampton County court authorized the vestry of Hungar's Parish to support his widow [Minutes 1777-83, 125].

ii. ?Southy1, born say 1720, taxable in John Cobb's Northampton County household in 1737, 1739, 1740 and 1743 and taxable in Richard Brazer's household in 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 263, 289, 347, 364].

iii. Susanna.

iv. Elishe.

v. Sarah.

vi. Rachel.

vii. Joshua, born in May 1755, eleven years and four months old on 20 August 1766 when his father made his will.

viii. Southy2, born about June 1761, an orphan bound by the Northampton County court to Thomas Rose on 9 May 1770 [Minutes 1765-71, 370].

 

They were probably the ancestors of  John Cobb of Bertie County, North Carolina:

1.    John Cobb, born say 1733, was a "molattor" Bertie County, North Carolina taxable in Edward Wilson's household in the list of Jonathan Standley in 1764 and a "free Mulattor" taxable in Wilson's household in 1767 [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. He was the father of

i. Lewis, born about 1754, fifteen-year-old "orphan of John Cobb," bound to John Barnes to be a shoemaker on 27 September 1769 in Bertie County.

2        ii. Nathan, born about 1754.

iii. ?Becky, head of a Sampson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:53].

 

2.    Nathan Cobb, born about 1754, the sixteen-year-old "orphan of John Cobb," was bound to James Prichard to be a cooper on 29 March 1770 [CR 10.101.7 by NCGSJ XIV:34, 35]. He was a "Malletor" taxable in James Prichard's household in 1770. He married Winney Mitchell, 9 August 1779 Bertie County bond, Jesse Prichard bondsman. He gave security in Bertie County court in May 1787 for a bastard child he had by Christian Kale [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:646]. She was probably the daughter of Mary Cales, a "Mulatto" taxable head of a Bertie County household with (her son?) Moses Cale in the 1761 list of John Hill. Nathan was counted as white in Bertie County, head of a household of 4 females, 4 males, and a slave in 1790 [NC:12]. His 27 April 1812 Bertie County will named his wife Cateth and his children Elisha, Thomas, William, Christian Mires, Mary Hogard, Winnifred Hogard, Elisabeth, Peneth, and John [C.R. 10.801.2, p.56 by Journal of N. C. Genealogy (1965) 11:1516]. He was the father of

i. Elisha, married Sarah Lucas, 1 April 1801 Bertie County bond.

ii. Thomas.

iii. William.

iv. Christian Mires.

v. Mary Hogard.

vi. Winnifred, married Elisha Hogard, 3 September 1804 Bertie County bond.

vii. Elisabeth.

viii. Peneth.

ix. John.

 

COCKRAN FAMILY

1.    Molly Cockran, born say 1745, was a "free Indian" living in Goochland County in August 1765 when her children John and Henry were ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish [Orders 1765-67, 51]. Her daughter Betsy, by "Negroe Ben," was born on 31 October 1765 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 348]. Their children married free African Americans and became part of the free African American community of Goochland County. Molly was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County on a free male tithable and a horse in 1793 and taxable on a horse in 1794 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 339, 357]. She sued Charles Turner for trespass, assault and battery in Goochland County on 17 May 1790. The suit was dismissed at the defendant's costs. And she sued John Shelvin for the same on 19 August 1790 [Orders 1788-91, 410, 486, 494]. Her children were

i. John, born say 1761, married Sally Johns, 30 April 1790 Goochland County bond, 2 May marriage [DB 15:386]. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1787 to 1803 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 164, 175, 339, 464, 525, 666]. He was head of a Campbell County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:853].

2        ii. Henry, born say 1763.

iii. Elizabeth, born 31 October 1765, baptized 19 January 1766 in Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 72]. She married Benjamin Farrar, 10 March 1784 Goochland County bond, (her mother) Mary Cockran surety. Perhaps she was the Betsy Farrar who was head of a Nelson County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:691].

 

2.    Henry Cockran, born say 1763, son of Mary Cockran, was ordered bound apprentice in Goochland County in August 1765 [Orders 1765-67, 51]. He was taxable in Goochland County from 1787 to 1816: a "Mulatto" living near Duval Carroll's in 1804, charged with James Cockran's tithe in 1807, listed in 1813 on William Richardson's land with wife Polly and Ruth Cockran (whose name was partially erased), charged with Henry Cockran, Jr.'s tithe in 1816 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 163, 175, 279, 357, 479, 616, 686, 738, 821; 1810-32, frames 5, 71, 97, 158, 281]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:689]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Goochland County on 12 August 1815: a free man of color of Yellow complexion about five feet eight inches high, about fifty three years old, short black curled hair...free born [Register of Free Negroes, p.89, no.171]. His children were

i. ?James, born say 1788, who had "resided on the plantation of Jo. Woodson for 20 years," married Elizabeth Wood (of age), 13 August 1811 Goochland County bond, Joseph Scott surety. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1807 to 1815: a "Mulatto" ditcher with wife Eliza on Joseph Woodson's land in 1813 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1810-32, frames 159, 189]. James was surety for the 5 June 1815 Goochland County marriage of Nancey George, alias Cooper, "an orphan," and Benjamin McDonald, a "free man of color."

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1795, "daughter of Henry Cockran," married Bartlet Hoomes, 4 August 1812 Goochland County bond, Jacob Martin surety, 6 August marriage.

iii. Polly, born say 1797, "daughter of Henry Cockran," married Randolph Cooper, 13 December 1813 Goochland County bond, 16 December marriage.

iv. Ruth, born say 1798, "daughter of Henry Cockran," married Roger Cooper, Jr., 31 October 1814 Goochland County bond, 3 November marriage.

 

COLE FAMILY

1.    Benedict Cole, born say 1665, was the "Negro (baptized)" slave of Richard Cole. Thomas Kirton married Richard Cole's widow and declared in Westmoreland County court on 28 August 1678 that "the Negro boy called Benedict Cole" was to be free at Kirton's death or departure from the country and to serve "but till the adge of twenty and no more." Kirton died before 27 July 1692 when Benedict successfully sued for his freedom in Westmoreland County court [Orders 1675-1689, 130; 1698-1705, 68a]. He may have been the ancestor of the Cole family of Fairfax and Prince William Counties, Virginia. They were probably related to the Cole family of St. Mary's County, Maryland. Members of the family in Virginia were

2        i. Elizabeth, born say 1730.

3        ii. Phebe, born say 1732.

iii. Robert1, born say 1735, a "free Negro" of Truro Parish, Fairfax County, presented by the grand jury on 22 May 1760 for living in fornication with ___wood (probably a white woman) by the information of William Moler [Orders 1756-63, pt. 1, 463].

 

2.    Elizabeth Cole, born say 1730, was living in Fairfax County, Virginia, on 29 March 1751 when she (no race indicated) petitioned the court setting forth that she was unjustly detained as a servant by Francis Summers. The court ruled that she was free and ordered her discharged from his service [Orders 1749-54, 143]. She was the mother of

i. ?William, born say 1755, a "Molato" living in George Dent's household on 21 November 1771 when the Fairfax County court presented Dent for failing to list him as a tithable [Orders 1770-2, 319]. He was taxable in the lower district of Prince William County in 1787, 1792, from 1794 to 1797, and from 1803 to 1810, called "Black" in 1804, 1806 and 1809 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 95, 203, 254, 309, 385, 523, 571, 704, 732], head of a Prince William County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].

ii. Betty Handless, born about 1756, registered in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria on 31 August 1809: Tawny colour ... about fifty three years old ... Know her mother Betty Cole, both born free in Fairfax County, Virginia, Wm. Rhodes [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, pp. 19-20].

 

3.    Phebe Cole, born say 1732, was living Fairfax County on 20 December 1752 when she was presented by the churchwardens of Truro Parish. The presentment was dismissed on 22 February 1755 [Orders 1749-54, 269; 1754-6, 183, 266]. She was a "free negro" living in Dettingen Parish, Prince William County, on 7 August 1767 when her children Robert, Catherine, Thomas, Joseph, Eleanor, and Sarah were bound apprentices [Orders 1766-69, 56]. Thomas and Robert were bound to William Bennett on 10 June 1768, and Catherine and Joseph were bound to him on 7 September the same year [Historic Dumfries, Records of Dettingen Parish, 56-59]. She was taxable in Prince William County on a free male in 1795 and taxable on a horse in 1796 and 1797 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 267, 309, 335]. Her children were

4        i. Robert2, born say 1753.

5        ii. Catherine, born about 1755.

iii. Thomas, born say 1757, bound an apprentice carpenter to William Bennett on 10 June 1768. He was listed among seven deserters from Thomas W. Ewell's Company of State Troops in a 20 June 1777 advertisement in the Virginia Gazette, described as: a dark mulatto, about 5 feet 7 inches high living in Prince William County [Purdie edition, p.1, col. 3]. He was taxable in the lower district of Prince William County in 1786, 1787, 1792, and from 1794 to 1798, called a "free Black" in 1798 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 71, 95, 203, 254, 309, 362].

iv. Joseph, born say 1760, bound an apprentice carpenter to William Bennett on 7 September 1768. He was taxable in Prince William County in 1787 and 1796 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 95, 309].

v. Eleanor/ Nelly, born about 1765, a "free Black" taxable in the lower district of Prince William County on a horse in 1798, a free male tithe in 1803, 2 free tithes in 1804, a "B" taxable on a free male and a horse in 1806, a "Black" taxable on a horse in 1809 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 362, 523, 638, 732], head of a Prince William County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508]. She registered in Prince William County on 5 June 1815 and produced her papers in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria on 11 June 1815: a free black woman about fifty years of age ... was born free [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, pp. 19-20].

vi. Sarah, a "B" taxable on a horse in the lower district of Prince William County in 1806 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frame 639], head of a Prince William County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].

vii. ?Henry, taxable in Prince William County from 1794 to 1798 and from 1803 to 1810, listed as a "free Black" in 1798 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 254, 266, 309, 362, 523, 638, 704], head of a Prince William County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].

 

4.    Robert2 Cole, born say 1753, was bound an apprentice shoemaker to William Bennett in Dettingen Parish on 10 June 1768 [Historic Dumfries, Records of Dettingen Parish, 56]. He married Lucy Chavers/ Chavis, "both black persons" according to the Charlotte County deposition of Mary Belcher [N.C. Stack File C.R. 099.928.11 by NCGSJ III:21]. Robert apparently died before 9 February 1784 when the Mecklenburg County court ordered the churchwardens to bind out Lucy's orphan son Robert Cole [Orders 1779-84, 515]. Lucy's nephew John Jackson Chavis, son of her sister Betty Chavis, was bound as an apprentice to William Stewart in Mecklenburg County; Stewart moved to Wake County, North Carolina, about 1790; and John Jackson went with him and died there about 1808 when Stewart tried to prove his nuncupative Wake County will. Lucy challenged the will by presenting a deposition taken on 27 April 1808 from Mary Belcher of Charlotte County that John Jackson Chavis was christened in her home and that Lucy was his only living relative [N.C. Stack File C.R. 099.928.11 by NCGSJ III:21; Haun, Wake County Court Minutes VII:67-8, 151]. Lucy recorded the inventory of John Jackson Chavis's estate in Wake County in February 1809 [Wynne, Record of Wills, Inventories, II:107]. She was head of a Mecklenburg County household of two "free Negro" or "Mulatto" females over the age of sixteen in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1806-21, frame 307], a "free colored" woman with a "free colored" boy under the age of fourteen in 1820 [VA:144a], and was counted in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census as a 100-year-old Black woman who was blind, listed with Susan and Peter Brandom in the household next to Israel Cole, a forty-five-year-old Black carpenter [VA:104b]. Robert and Lucy were the parents of

i. Robert3, born about 1774, taxable in William Stewart's Mecklenburg County household in 1792 and was responsible for his own tithe in 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1805, frames 451, 516]. He married Mary Stewart, 31 December 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Martin Cousins security. Robert was security for the Mecklenburg County marriage of Martin Cousins and Elizabeth Brandon of the same date. On 10 October 1803 he was ordered to work on a road in Mecklenburg County with Robert Brannum, Thomas Spence, William Stewart, Humphrey Wilson, Joseph Stewart, Frederick Ivey, Pompey Mayo, and Richard Dunston [Orders 1803-5, 45]. He registered in Mecklenburg County on 14 November 1803: Ordered that it be certified that Robert Cole, planter, is a free man, that he is the age of twenty nine years, about five feet ten Inches high and of dark complexion [Orders 1803-5, 52].

ii. Jincey, married Martin Cousins, 31 December 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Robert Cole security.

 

Lucy's children were

i. Burwell, son of Lucy Cole, bound by the Mecklenburg County court to Ellyson Crew to be a planter on 8 October 1798 [Orders 1798-1801, 39].

ii. ?Caty, bound by the Mecklenburg County court to Ellyson Crew on 9 December 1799, no parent named [Orders 1798-1801, 280].

iii. ?Thomas, a "Malatto" bound by the Mecklenburg County court as an apprentice to Jacob Garrot, wheelwright, on 9 September 1805 [Orders 1803-5, 461].

 

5.    Catherine Cole, born about 1755, was bound apprentice to William Bennett in Prince William County on 7 September 1768. She was taxable on a horse in the lower district of Prince William County in 1797 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frame 336]. She registered in Prince William County on 22 May 1810 and produced her papers in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria on 8 June 1815: was at that time fifty five years of age, born free in the County aforesaid [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, p.28]. She was the mother of

i. John, born about 1773, taxable in Prince William County from 1794 to 1798, listed as "Black" in 1795 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 254, 267, 309, 362], registered in Prince William County on 24 March 1806 and produced his papers in the District of Columbia court in Alexandria: a free black man, son of Katy Cole, a free black woman ... thirty three years of age [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, no. 25, p.24]. He was a "free negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 3 in 1810 [VA:243].

ii. ?Samuel, head of a Prince William County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].

iii. ?David, taxable in Prince William County from 1795 to 1797 and from 1803 to 1810, called a "Blackman" in 1795 and 1803 and 1809 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 267, 523, 638, 703], head of a head of a Prince William County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].

iv. ?Frances, a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse in Prince William County in 1802 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frame 503].

 

Prince Edward County

1.    Mary Cole, born say 1745, was the mother of an "orphan" Abigail Cole who was bound apprentice to John Owen until the age of thirty-one in Prince Edward County in November 1757 [Orders 1754-8, 133]. She was the mother of

i. Abigail, born say 1755.

ii. ?Sally, born say 1770, a "free negro" listed in Pittsylvania County with her two unnamed daughters over the age of sixteen in 1813 and (her son?) William Cole in 1814 [PPTL 1813-23, frames 6, 81, 198].

iii. ?Robin, born about 1784, registered in Halifax County, Virginia, on 26 October 1812: aged 28 years about five feet eight inches high of a dark colour and who it appears was born of a free Woman is hereby registered as a free negroe [Register, no.36].

 

South Carolina

1.    Jonathan Cole, born say 1705, was living in Wadmalaw, South Carolina, when the birth of his "Mulatto" son Thomas was recorded in the register of St. Philip's Parish, Charleston, South Carolina. He was the father of

2        i. Thomas, born 14 April 1729.

ii. Susanna, married William Raper [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 15].

 

2.    Thomas1 Cole, born 14 April 1729, was the "Mulatto" son of Jonathan Cole of Charleston, South Carolina. He was called "an Adult mulatto" on 5 June 1754 when he was baptized in St. Philip's Parish [Salley, Register of St. Philip's Parish, 1720-58, 100, 145]. He called himself a bricklayer in his 21 October 1771 Charleston will, proved 8 November the same year. He directed his executors to sell his house in Beresford's Alley and slaves Prince, Will, and Carolina and to divide the proceeds among his children: Thomas, Barbara, William, Elizabeth, and John Cole, and to sell his house and land on Meeting Street and divide the proceeds among his wife Ruth and children when his youngest child came of age. He named his friend Thomas Lotan Smith, Esq., and brother-in-law William Raper executors [WB 14:109-10]. His wife Ruth was a "Free" head of a St. Philips & Michaels Parish, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1790 and head of a Newberry District household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:68] and a "free Negro" head of a Newberry District household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:117a]. She called herself the sister of William Raper on 12 October 1788 when she and her daughter Barbara petitioned the legislature to be appointed administrators of his widow Susanna Raper, "a free woman of color" [Schweninger, Race, Slavery and Free Black Petitions, no. 11378801]. She was the sponsor for the baptism of her granddaughter Ruth Raper Garden at St. Philip's Parish on 13 March 1812 [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 166]. Her 31 January 1817 Charleston will was proved on 15 August the same year. She left her house and lot in Federal Street, a slave named Amey (daughter of Flora), and her pew in St. Philip's Church to her daughter Barbara Maria Bampfield, wife of George Bampfield, and after her death to her four grandchildren: Thomas Cole, John Cole, Eliza Cole, and Eliza Maria Jones. She left the house where she was residing in Guignard Street to her grandchildren John and Eliza Cole and directed that her slave Flora with her daughters Lucinda and Belinda be sold and the proceeds divided among her four grandchildren. And she left the lot and premises adjoining her house in Guignard Street to her daughter Magdalen Brown. She appointed her nephew-in-law John Garden executor [WB 33:1276-7]. Thomas and Ruth were the parents of

i. Thomas2, "free" head of a St. Philip's and Michael's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and a "free colored" head of a Charleston household with one slave in 1840.

ii. Barbara Maria Bampfield, died about 1832 when her executor, Jehu Jones, Jr., sold her slave Fatima for $200 and divided the proceeds among Sarah Cole and Elizabeth Maria Jones.

iii. William.

iv. Elizabeth.

v. Magdalen Brown.

vi. John, married Sarah.

 

Other members of the Cole family in South Carolina were

i. John, head of a Union District household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:241].

ii. Sarah, head of a Newberry District household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:68].

iii. Mary, head of a Newberry District household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:69].

iv. Joseph, head of a Kershaw District household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [SC:410].

 

COLEMAN FAMILY

1.    Judith, born say 1700, was an Indian or the descendant of an Indian brought into Virginia by Francis Coleman sometime after the year 1705 and held as a slave for her lifetime. Her descendants Dick and Pat, who were held as slaves by Coleman's descendants, sued for and won their freedom in a case which was affirmed on appeal in the Fall of the year 1793 [Catterall, Judicial Cases, I:101-2]. The case was apparently identical to that of Robin, Hannah, Daniel, Cuffie, Isham, Moses, Peter, Judy, Archy, Silvia, Davy & Ned who won a suit of Trespass, Assault, Battery and false Imprisonment against John Hardaway in the General Court in Williamsburg on 2 May 1772 [LVA, Exhibitions, Judgemnt in the case of Robin et al v. Hardaway, 2 May 1772, Manusrcipt, RG 104, Virginia General Court (Colonial), State Government Records Collection, Accession 33700]. Other descendants won their freedom from Robert Hall of Dinwiddie County before 1 July 1789, from John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County before 16 August 1794, from Joseph Hardaway of Dinwiddie County in November 1797 and from John Wyche of Brunswick County in 1819. Judith was the ancestor of

2        i. Sarah, born say 1740.

ii. David1, born about 1744, registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a dark brown stout, well made Mulatto Man, five feet eight inches high, fifty six years old, with short bushy hair, formerly held as a slave by Joseph Hardaway but obtained his freedom by a Judgment of the Gen'l Court in November 1797 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 170].

iii. Cuffee, born about 1748, sued James Ware and James Bromly in Petersburg Hustings Court on 5 October 1785 for trespass, assault and battery. His suit against Ware was dismissed on 3 November 1785. And the court dismissed his suit against Bromly on 3 January 1786 when his witnesses Samuel Davis and Alexander Gordon failed to appear. On 6 September 1791 the court ordered him to give security of 40 shillings for his good behavior on complaint of George Morrison [Orders 1785-91, 68, 71, 72, 80, 90; Minutes 1791-7, 129]. He was taxable in Petersburg in 1803 [PPTL 1800-33, frame 75]. He registered in Southampton County on 30 March 1805: age 57, blk., 5 feet 10 inches high, Sued his freedom, Dinwidy [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 322].

iv. Daniel, born about 1752, registered in Petersburg on 10 February 1798: a dark Brown Free Negro, or Indian, six feet two inches high, about forty six years old, short bushy hair, a little grey, formerly held as a slave by Joseph Hardaway but obtained his freedom by a judgment of the Gen'l Court in Nov. 1797 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 132]. He was a ditcher living near George May when he was counted as a "free Negro and Mulatto" taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1801 [PPTL, 1800-9, B list, p.25]. He may have been the Daniel Coleman who was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:143].

v. Dick, orphan of Judy Coleman, deceased, ordered bound out by William Foushee, overseer of the poor for the third district of Henrico County, to William Waddell on 3 September 1787 [Orders 1787-9, 131]. He was head of a Richmond County, Virginia household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:401].

vi. Pat, won her freedom from the Coleman family in 1793.

vii. Betty1, born about 1767, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown woman, five feet six & a half inches height, twenty seven years old, liberated by a judgment of Gen'l Court from John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County being a descendant of an Indian woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 32].

viii. Nancy, born about 1767, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown, well made Mulatto woman, five feet one and a half inches high, twenty seven years old, freed by Judgment of the Gen'l Court of John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County being a descendant of an Indian [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 37].

ix. Tempe, born about 1768, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark brown, well made woman, five feet two inches high, twenty six years old, liberated by a Judgment of the Gen'l Court of John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County as being a descendant of an Indian. Renewed 25 Sept. 1799, 14 Oct. 1800, 20 Sept. 1803 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 33].

x. Charles, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a dark Mulatto man, near five feet eight inches high, about twenty five years old, was born in the Possession of John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County from whom he obtained his freedom by judgment of the Gen'l Court being the descendant of an Indian & served as an apprentice with Robert Armstead in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 11].

xi. Betty2, born about 1777, bound to Margaret Gordon by the Petersburg Hustings Court on 9 November 1791 [Orders 1791-7, 15]. She registered in Petersburg on 27 May 1805: a dark brown negro woman, five feet four and a half inches high, twenty eight years old, formerly held as a slave by John Hardaway of Dinwiddie County & liberated by a Judgment of the Gen'l Court as descended of an Indian [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 290].

3        xii. Caty, born about 1779.

xiii. Jemima, born about 1780, registered in Petersburg on 11 July 1805: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 333].

xiv. Hannah, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on 17 September 1802: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 240].

xv. Betty3, born about 1782, registered in Petersburg on 18 September 1803: a free Negro woman, dark brown, five feet two and a half inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 260].

xvi. Rachel, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 9 July 1805: a dark brown Negro woman, four feet eleven inches high, twenty years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 310]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:124a].

xvii. Lucy, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 31 December 1808: a dark brown free Negro woman, five feet three and a half inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 443]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:118a].

xviii. Bob, head of a Prince George County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:550], perhaps identical to Bob who ran away from John Hardaway according to an ad placed in the 31 May 1770 edition of the Virginia Gazette: Run away from the subscriber, the first day of November last, (under pretence of suing for his freedom) a likely young fellow, named Bob, of a yellow complexion, slim made, near six feet high, has a remarkable down look, is a very good blacksmith, and, as supposed, is harboured by some white man of that trade. Whoever will bring the said fellow to my house in Dinwiddie county, near the court-house, shall receive a reward of five pounds [Virginia Gazette (Rind) 31 May 1770].

xix. Aggy, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:120a].

 

2.    Sarah Coleman, born say 1740, won her freedom from Robert Hall of Dinwiddie County. She was free before 19 August 1794 when her daughter Susannah registered in Petersburg and she was probably free before 1 July 1789 when her son David Coleman was bound as an apprentice in Petersburg. She was the mother of

i. Susannah, born about 1768, registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a dark brown woman, five feet three and a half inches high, about twenty six years old, stout made, the daughter of Sarah Coleman who obtained her freedom of Robert Hall by a suit in the Gen'l Court & the said Susannah has been allowed to pass as free by the sd Robert Hall of Dinwiddie County to whom she belonged by her mother's obtaining her freedom [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 58].

ii. David2, born about 1779, a "free Mulatto Boy" (no age or parent named), bound by the Hustings Court of Petersburg as an apprentice cabin maker to John McCloud on 1 July 1789 [Orders 1784-91, 286]. He registered in Petersburg on 25 April 1801: a stout, well-made dark brown Negro man, five feet five inches high, nineteen years old, short knotty hair, a son of Sally Coleman who formerly was held by Robert Hall of the County of Dinwiddie & obtained her freedom by a Judgment of the Gen'l Court [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 215].

iii. Disey, orphan of Sarah Coleman, ordered bound out by William Foushee, overseer of the poor for the third district of Henrico County, to William Waddell on 3 September 1787 [Orders 1787-9, 131].

iv. ?Keziah, bound by the Hustings Court of Petersburg to Judith Moriarity on 6 August 1789 [Orders 1784-91, 286].

 

3.    Caty, born about 1779, registered in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 27 September 1819: Caty, a woman about Forty years of age, light complexion, Five feet one & a half Inches high...recovered her freedom in Brunswick Superior Court at September term 1819 of John Wyche. She was the mother of

i. Fanny Coleman, born about 1807, registered in Brunswick County on 28 September 1829: a free woman of light complexion, five feet four inches high, about twenty two years of age...is one of the children of Caty who recovered her freedom from John Wyche in...1819 [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 29, 104].

ii. Green Coleman, born about 1809, registered in Brunswick County on 26 September 1831: of dark complexion, about twenty one years old, five feet seven inches and a quarter high...one of the children of Caty who recovered her freedom from John Wyche...in 1819 [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 119].

 

Other members of a Coleman family were

i. Thomas, born about 1703, a "small negro man, aged about fifty years," who presented the deposition of John Binum to the Halifax County, Virginia court on 14 June 1753. Binum stated that Coleman was free born and that his family lived in Surry County, Virginia. The court ruled that he should be freed [Pleas 1752-5, pt.1, 162].

ii. Ned, a "Free Negro" living with (his wife?) Rose Coleman on a lot in Leedstown, Westmoreland County, where he sold bread [Virginia Genealogist 31:46]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

 

COLLINS FAMILY

The Collins and Bunch families were taxable "Molatas" in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1755 [T&C, box 1]. They were also associated with the Gibson family. Lucrecy Collins witnessed the 1775 Orange County, North Carolina will of George Gibson [WB A:195]. They probably came to Orange County from Louisa County, Virginia. George Gibson, Thomas Gibson, William Hall, Thomas Collins, Samuel Collins, William Collins, William Donathan, Benjamin Branham, and Samuel Bunch were living in Louisa County on 28 May 1745 when they were presented by the court for failing to list a tithable (probably their wives) [Orders 1742-8, 152, 157, 172]. Some members of the family moved to Wilkes County with the Gibsons and like the Gibsons, they were counted there as white in 1790. This part of Wilkes County became Ashe County in 1799, and both families were counted there as "other free" in 1800.

Mixed-race members of the Collins family were

i. Catherine, born say 1705, a "free mulatto woman" of North Farnham Parish presented by the Richmond County, Virginia court in November 1725 for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1721-32, 248, 267].

2        ii. Thomas, born say 1708.

 

2.    Thomas1 Collins, born say 1708, was presented by the Louisa County court on 28 May 1745 for failing to list a tithable who was probably his wife and on 26 November 1745 he was presented for profane swearing [Orders 1742-8, 152, 157, 172, 174, 179]. He was a taxable in the 1750 Granville County list of John Wade [CR 44.701.23]. This part of Granville County became Orange County in 1752, and Thomas was a "Molata" taxable there on 3 "Black" tithes in 1755 [T&C, box 1, p.19]. He owned land on Flat River adjoining George Gibson and Moses Ridley [Orange County Loose Papers, vol. V, no. 131; vol.VI, no. 579]. He may have been the father of

3        i. George1, born about 1728.

ii. Thomas2, Jr., born say 1734, an Orange County taxable listed nearby Thomas Collins in 1755 [T&C, box 1, p.19]. He may have been the Thomas Collins, Sr., who was head of a white Moore County household of one male over 16, two females, and one slave in 1790 [NC:44], and there was a Thomas Collins, Jr., head of a white Moore County household of two males under 16, three over 16, and four females in 1790 [NC:43]. He was head of an Ashe County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:74].

iii. John, born say 1736, a "Molata" taxable in Orange County, taxed on one Black tithe in 1755 [T&C, box 1, p.15].

 

3.    George1 Collins, born about 1728, purchased 100 acres in Anson County, North Carolina, on 14 June 1764 [DB 3:268]. This part of Anson County became Richmond County in 1779, and his land was mentioned in a 2 February 1780 Richmond County land entry [Pruitt, Richmond County Land Entries, 10, 58]. He sold land by deed proved in the March 1783 session of Richmond County court. In December 1783 he and Arthur Dees were security for (his sons?) Thomas and George Collins, Jr., in a Richmond County court case [Minutes 1780-95, 33, 47]. The Richmond County court excused him from paying poll tax in 1788 because he was sixty years old. He was head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's Parish, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [SC:54]. He, or his son George, recorded a plat for 100 acres on Hurricane Branch of the Little Pee Dee River on 5 February 1787 [South Carolina Archives, series S13190, vol. 22, p. 16]. He, David Collins, and Thomas Collins were among the "free persons of Colour" of present-day Liberty and Marlborough counties, South Carolina, who petitioned the legislature to repeal the discriminatory tax against "free Negroes" on 20 April 1794. Others who petitioned included the Evans, Gibson, Huelin, Oxendine, Shoemaker, Turner and Sweat families [South Carolina Department of Archives and History, General Assessment Petition, 1794, no. 216, frames 370-374, Free People of Color ST 1368, series no. 165015, item 216]. He may have been the father of

i. Thomas3, born say 1760, a defendant in Richmond County, North Carolina court in December 1783 [Minutes 1780-95, 47].

ii. Charles2, born say 1765, ordered by the January 1787 Richmond County, North Carolina court to receive twenty lashes for larceny committed in 1783 [Minutes 1780-95, 50, 111].

iii. George3, Jr., born say 1767, head of a Richmond County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:45]. He entered 50 acres in Richmond County on Mayners Creek of Hitchcock Creek on 12 June 1794 [Pruitt, Richmond County Land Entries, nos. 169, 1013] and was taxed on 160 acres in 1795. He purchased 100 acres by deed proved in the January 1796 session of the Richmond County court and sold 50 acres to (his brother?) Elisha Collins by deed proved in the same session [Minutes 1793-1804, 312-3].

iv. Elisha, born say 1770, one of the freeholders ordered by the October 1794 session of the Richmond County court to work on the road to Catfish Road [Minutes 1793-1804, 282]. He was taxable on 250 acres in 1795. He purchased 50 acres from (his father?) George Collins by deed proved in Richmond County in January 1796 [Minutes 1793-1804, 313]. He was head of a Wilson County, Tennessee household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

v. David2, head of an Anson County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:203].

 

4.    Samuel Collins, born say 1724, was presented by the Louisa County court on 28 May 1745 for failing to list a tithable who was probably his wife. On 25 November 1746 Richard Vernon sued him for 16 pounds, 9 shillings and fourteen pounds of deer skins, and on 24 February 1746/7 he and William Collins were presented for fishing and hunting on the Sabbath [Orders 1742-8, 152, 157, 172, 215, 227, 233]. He was a "Molata" taxable in Orange County on 2 Black tithes in 1755 [T&C, box 1, p.19]. He may have been the Samuel Collins who was head of a Wilkes County household of one male 21-60 and one female in the 1787 state census.

 

Wilkes and Ashe County, North Carolina descendants were

i. George2, one of the hunters who had a cabin in present-day Ashe County when the first land grants were issued in the 1780s. He was taxable there on a 26 pound estate in 1778 [NCGSJ X:11, 14]. He was head of a Wilkes County household of 1 male 21-60, 3 males under 21 or over 60, and 3 free females for the 1787 state census and o1 white male over 16, 3 white males under 16, and 4 females [NC:123], perhaps the George Collins who was head of a Wilson County, Tennessee household of 14 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. David1, taxable on an estate of 41 pounds in present-day Ashe County in 1778 [NCGSJ X:17]. He was head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of three males over 16, two under 16, and six females in 1790 [NC:123].

iii. Martin, head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of one male over 16, 3 under 16, and four females in 1790 [NC:123].

iv. Valentine, head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of one male over 16 and two females in 1790 (abstracted as Vol) [NC:123] and head of an Ashe County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:75].

v. Vadery, perhaps the "Hardy" Collins who was head of a Wilkes County household of 1 male over 16, 2 under 16, and 4 females in 1790 [NC:123]. He was called Vadery in 1800, head of an Ashe County household of 4 "other free" in 1800. The 26 January 1791 Wilkes County court referred to a road near Sandy Island Ford and Vardie Collens [Absher, Wilkes County Court Minutes 1789-97, 20]. Vardy was head of a Hawkins County, Tennessee household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Ambrose, taxable on an estate of 20 pounds in present-day Ashe County in 1778 [NCGSJ X:17]. He was head of a Tenth Company, Wilkes County household of one male over 16, one under 16, and two females in 1790 [NC:123]. He was head of an Ashe County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:76].

vii. Charles1, taxable in present-day Ashe County on an estate of 44 pounds in 1778 [NCGSJ X:17].

 

Members of the family counted in Graison County, Tennessee census for 1810 were

i. Griffin, head of a household of 11 "other free."

ii. Lewis, head of a household of 10 "other free."

iii. Joseph, head of a household of 9 "other free."

 

Northampton County, Virginia

1.    Susan Collins, born say 1707, consented to the indenture of her "Mulatto" daughter Rebecca to Thomas Jenkins in Northampton County court on 12 February 1729/30. She was presented for bastardy on 14 May 1734, 9 November 1736 and on 14 February 1737/8. On 12 August 1740 she agreed to serve Elishe Stringer for twenty years on condition that she be allowed to marry Stringer's "Negroe fellow" Caesar and "live with him until she shall be parted by death" [Orders 1729-32, 10; 1732-42, 107, 114, 255, 260, 296, 301, 408]. She was a "Negro" taxable in Digby Semore's Northampton County household in 1737, called "Sue, negro" in 1738, taxable in Elishe Stringer's household in 1740 and 1741 but was not listed in Stringer's household in 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 260, 281]. She was the mother of

2        i. Rebecca1, born 17 August 1729.

ii. Rachel, born say 1734, "Negroe" daughter of Susanna Collins, bound to Michael Christian on 10 December 1734 [Orders 1732-42, 142].

3        iii. Ann, born say 1737.

 

2.    Rebecca1 Collins, born 17 August ___ (left blank in the record, say 1729), was bound to Thomas Jenkins on 12 February 1729/30. She was a "Negroe girl" listed in the inventory of the Northampton County estate of Thomas Jenkins in 1735 [W&I 18, part 2, 208]. She sued Alderton Gilding for her freedom on 10 September 1751, but the court ordered her to serve until 1 August 1752 according to the indenture produced in court [Orders 1729-32, 10; Orders 1751-3, 7, 35]. She was the mother of

i. Susanna2, born 31 July 1758, daughter of Rebecca Collins, bound to Robert Warren on 13 January 1772 [Minutes 1771-7, 27]. Sue's son Thomas, born in May 1785, was bound by the Northampton County court to John Evans on 9 January 1793 [Orders 1789-95, 271].

 

3.    Ann Collins, born say 1737, was living in Northampton County on 13 February 1771 when her nine-year-old daughter Jane Collins was bound out. She may have been the A. Collins who won a suit for ten pounds against Scarburgh Bingham on 8 June 1779. Peter Beckett and Mary Jeffery were witnesses for the plaintiff [Minutes 1765-71, 433; 1777-83, 167]. She was the mother of

i. Jane, born 15 March 1762, bound to Eyre Stockley on 13 February 1771. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358].

ii. ?Rebecca2, born say 1764, mother of Sue Collins who was seven years old when she was bound to John Evans by the Northampton County court on 14 May 1788 [Minutes 1787-9, 144]. Rebecca registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 364].

iii. ?Ritter, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 364].

 

Other members of the Collins family in Northampton County were

i. John, bound to Guy Grimes on 12 January 1768 [Minutes 1765-71, 154]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 364] and was a "Negro" taxable in Northampton County in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, p.6]. He married Betsy Jeffries, 3 February 1803 Northampton County bond, Samuel Beavans security. Perhaps Betsy was the Betty Collins who was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:216A].

ii. Lighty, born 30 July 1767, a "free negro" bound to John Tyler on 13 August 1771 [Minutes 1771-7, 3]. He married Lear Drighouse, 3 January 1794 Northampton County bond, Thomas Lewis security, and was a taxable "Negro" in Northampton County in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, p.5].

iii. Ralph, born say 1772, security for the 2 July 1793 Northampton County bond of Betty Stephens and Isaac Reed. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 10 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354]. He married Tamar Bingham, 20 December 1799 Northampton County bond, John Simkins security. He was a taxable "Negro" in Northampton County in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, p.4] and head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:217]. His twenty-five-year-old daughter Esther Collins married Moses Bingham, 24 November 1819 Northampton County bond.

iv. Sarah, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 11 September 1805: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet two an a half inches high, a little pitted with small pocks, twenty seven years old, born free in the County of Northampton, Virga. & Registry of that County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 359].

v. Mack, married Betsey Shepherd, 27 November 1809 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security. He was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:217].

vi. Nathaniel, married Salley Stockley, 6 October 1807 Northampton County bond; and second, Molly Sample, 16 August 1810 Northampton County bond, Isaiah Carter security.

 

Members of the Collins family in King William and King and Queen counties, Virginia, were

i. John, born say 1750, taxable in King William County on 198 acres in 1782 and 1783, taxable on 28 acres in 1787 but not subject to land tax in the following years. He was taxable in King William County on a free male tithable from 1787 to 1799 and from 1802 to 1814: listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1811; Land Tax List 1782-1832].

1        ii. Mason, born about 1758.

2        iii. William1, born say 1765

iv. Maria, born before 1776, head of a King William County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830..

 

1.   Mason1 Collins, born about 1758, was taxable in King William County from 1787 to 1796 and from 1799 to 1802: taxable on 27 acres, a horse and 4 cattle in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1811; Land Tax List 1782-1832]. He was living in King William County on 2 January 1794 when he sold two cows, a yearling and a sow to Thomas Jones for 4 pounds, 11 shillings [Record Book 3:48]. He was taxable in King and Queen County from 1804 to 1820: taxable on 2 tithables from 1807 to 1812, called a "Mulatto" in 1807, a "free Negro" from 1809 to 1812, listed with 4 "Mulattos" (male and female) over age sixteen in 1813, over the age of forty-five in 1815 [PPTL, 1804-23]. And he was taxable in King and Queen County from 1804 to 1812 on 110 acres which belonged to the estate of John Dungee in 1802 [Land Tax List 1782-1812]. He was about sixty years old on 15 May 1818 when he made a declaration in King and Queen County court to obtain a pension for his services in the 11th Virginia Regiment. He declared that he had travelled north as bowman to an officer named Holt Richeson in 1777 and enlisted while in the state of Pennsylvania. He called himself an "illiterate Mulatto" on 11 December 1820 when he stated that he had a life estate in 85 acres and that his family consisted of a twenty-year-old woman named Maneroy, seventeen-year-old Mason, fifteen-year-old Mary and eleven-year-old Eliza [M804-614, frame 373]. He was head of a King William County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830. He was probably the father of

i. Elijah, a "free Negro" or "Mulatto" taxable in King & Queen County from 1811 to 1815 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1804-23].

ii. Thomas, a "free Negro" taxable in King and Queen County from 1814 to 1816 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1804-23].

iii. Rily, a "free Negro" taxable in King and Queen County in 1816 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1804-23].

iv. Maneroy, born about 1800.

v. Mason, born about 1803.

vi. Mary, born about 1805.

vii. Eliza, born about 1809.

 

2.    William1 Collins, born say 1765, was taxable in King William County from 1787 to 1818: taxable on a horse in 1798, taxable on 2 free males in 1802 and 1810, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813. David Pannell transferred 25 acres to him in 1786 and William was taxable on the land from 1787 to 1811 [PPTL 1782-1811; Land Tax List 1782-1832]. On 24 June 1793 he purchased 25 acres in the parish of St. Johns in King William County adjoining Thomas Pollard, David Pannell and his own land for 25 pounds. On 20 May 1802 he purchased 25 acres below the lower church and lying on Bull Swamp from James and Lucy Johnson, and on the same date his wife Elizabeth Collins released her dower rights to 25 acres sold to James Johnson [Record Book 3:17; 4:119-20]. He may have been the father of

i. William2, Jr., taxable in King William County from 1811 to 1820: listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813, a "Free Negro" in the years following [PPTL 1782-1811; 1812-50]. He became a charter member of the Lower College Baptist Church with his wife Jane. Jane may have had Pamunkey Indian ancestry since in 1836 a Richard Collins was called "a descendant of the Indian Tribe" when he became a member of the same church [Colosse Baptist Church Minute Book 1814-1834; 1814-1870, 20 cited by Rountree, Pocahantas's People, 341].

 

Norfolk and Princesss Anne counties

1.   Kinner Shoecraft Collins, born say 1758, son of William Shoecraft, was taxable in the Norfolk County household of (his grandmother) Lucy Shoecraft in 1774 and head of a household as Kinner Shoecraft in 1778 and 1780 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 225, 250, 282]. He may have been the illegitimate son of William Shoecraft by a member of the Collins family. There was an Elizabeth Collins who was taxable in Princess Anne County on a horse in 1793 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frame 74]. Kinner Shoecraft was taxable in Norfolk County from 1782 to 1787: taxable on 17 cattle and 2 horses in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 392, 417, 452, 497, 597]. Kinner Collins was taxable in Princess Anne County from 1794 to 1822: taxable on his own tithe and a 16-21-year-old tithe in 1795, taxable on his son Presley in 1796, called Kinner Shoecraft and son Presly in 1799 and 1800, taxable on son William Collins in 1802 and 1803, taxable on two 16-21-year-old tithes in 1810, taxable on his son Cary from 1811 to 1814. He was listed as white until 1820 but in 1821 and 1822 he was designated as "F.B." (Free Black) in Pungo District, the same list as James Harman who had no racial designation in the earlier lists but was listed as "F.B." starting in 1813. And a ___(?) Shoecraft alias Florry Kinner was listed as a "F.B." in Pungo District in 1821 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 86, 117, 129, 154, 164, 196, 216, 223, 259, 273, 306, 319, 354, 364, 383, 404, 436, 452, 486, 499, 502, 661, 679, 699]. On 16 April 1799 he petitioned the Norfolk County court to open a road from his land to the main road through the land of Miles Wilson. The court appointed several persons to view the road who agreed to the new road. However, he repeated his request on 17 December 1805, and the group appointed to view the road stated that the previous approval for the road had been set aside "from some irregularity" and they again approved the road. He was living in Princess Anne County on 1 May 1807 when he purchased 50 acres in Norfolk County on the north side of Indian Creek adjoining John Simmons and the Princess Anne county line and Muddy Branch from Samuel Wilson for $320, and on 5 May 1807 he (signing) and his wife Martha (making her mark) of Princess Anne County sold 20 acres in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, on Deep Run near the edge of the main road adjoining Malachi Wilson's line to Samuel Wilson of Norfolk County [Orders 1797-99, 171b; 1799-1801, 32a; 1804-5, 251a; 1806, 10a-b; 1806-8, 137a; DB 43:154-6]. On 21 August 1821 he sued James Harmon his wife Lucy Harmon, and Andrew Shewcraft (a minor) in Norfolk County court to make sale of the land that formerly belonged to Moses Shewcraft. The court ordered the proceeds divided equally among them [Minutes 17:141]. Moses Shoecraft was taxable in Princess Anne County in the same list as Kinner Collins in 1802 with no racial desingation [PPTL, 1790-1822, frame 264]. He was the father of

i. Presley1, born say 1778, taxable in his father's household in 1796, listed in his own household in 1801 and 1803, but not listed again in Princess Anne County [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 117, 129, 154, 164, 196, 216, 223, 273]. He made a deed of trust to James Old which was proved in Norfolk County court on 15 May 1809 [Orders 1808-10, 215].

ii. William, born say 1785, taxable in his father's household in 1802.

iii. Cary, born about 1792, taxable in his father's Princess Anne County household from 1811 to 1814, listed in his own household in Pungo District in 1820, a "F.B." taxable there in 1821. He registered in Norfolk County on 21 November 1831: age 39, 5 ft 7-1/2, a mulatto, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 829].

 

2.    Joshua Collins, born say 1760, was taxable in Princess Anne County from 1790 to 1803 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 4, 26, 51, 74, 117, 154, 164, 191, 211, 223, 273]. He may have been the father of

i. Sarah, born about 1778, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831 (the same day as Sally Harman and Uriah Collins): 5'1", age 53, a negro woman of light complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1830-1862, nos. 262, 263, 270, 335].

ii. Uriah, born about 1787, a 16-21-year-old taxable in Princess Anne County in 1805, a "F.B." taxable there in 1821 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 319, 661, 679], his free Negro registration blank in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831 [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 270].

iii. Presley2, born about 1799, married to Ann Hall in Norfolk County by Robert Cox on 22 December 1822 [Ministers' Returns, 1787-1840, 49]. He was a "free Negro," who was ordered to be hired out by the Norfolk County court on 15 August 1825 because he failed to pay his taxes [Minutes 19:136-7]. He purchased 8 acres from Benjamin Boulton by deed recorded in Norfolk County on 15 September 1828 [Minutes 21:18] and registered on 21 November 1831: age 32, 5 ft 10-1/2, a mulatto, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 830].

 

Bertie County, North Carolina

1.    Josiah Collins, born say 1750, was a "free Molatto" taxable in his own Bertie County household in the 1771 list of Jonathan Standley [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. Perhaps he was the same Josiah Collins who was appointed a Bertie County constable in February 1777 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:212]. His family was associated with the Henry Bunch family of Bertie County. He was probably related to Lucy Collins, head of a Bertie County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:36].

 

Hyde County, North Carolina

1.    Cate Collings, born say 1744, was called an "Indian Woman" servant of William Gibbs when she was summoned by the March 1765 Hyde County court [Minutes II:113]. Perhaps her descendants were

i. Susannah, born before 1776, head of a Hyde County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:248].

ii. Charity, born 1794-1806, head of a Hyde County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:246].

iii. Horatio, a "free man of color" who had "taken up with" a slave named Winney, property of Henry Lucas, in Hyde County on 1 April 1843 [CR 053.928.2].

iv. Nancy, a "free woman of color" who had "taken up with" a slave named Ellick, property of Ananias Sadler, in Hyde County on 1 October 1842 [CR 053.928.2].

 

South Carolina

Those who were counted as "other free" in South Carolina were

i. Cary, head of a South Orangeburg District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Reason, born before 1776, head of a Fairfield District household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [SC:606] and 7 "free colored" in 1830.

 

An unrelated South Carolina family:

1.    Robert Collins, born say 1720, was a white plantation owner in St. Thomas and Dennis Parish, Charleston District. He left a will which left 545 acres to his African-American wife Susannah Collins and their children: Nelly, Esther, Rachel, Charlotte, Rebecca, Gasham, Elias, Robert, and Jonathan Collins [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 119-121]. His children were

i. Nelly.

ii. Esther.

iii. Rachel.

iv. Charlotte.

v. Rebecca.

vi. Gasham.

vii. Elias, married Elizabeth Holman. He was head of a Winyan County household of 5 "other free" and 68 slaves in 1800 [SC:760] and 6 "other free" and 16 slaves in Georgetown in 1810 [SC:219].

viii. Robert2, married Margaret Holman. He was head of a St. Dennis Parish, Berkeley County household of 2 "other free" and 10 slaves in 1810 [SC:442].

ix. Jonathan, head of a St. Dennis, Berkeley County household of 1 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [SC:442].

 

COMBESS/ CUMBEST FAMILY

1.    John1 Combess/ Combest, born say 1670, was taxable in Spesutia Hundred, Baltimore County, Maryland, in 1695 (present-day Harford County) [Wright, Inhabitants of Baltimore County, 7]. He was the father of

i. Sarah, born 17 January 1693, "d/o John Combest," in St. George's Parish, Baltimore County. She married William Robinson on 8 December 1713 at St. George's Parish.

2        ii. Ketturah, born 10 October 1695.

iii. Mary, born 20 April 1698, "d/o of John Combest," at Swan Creek, St. George's Parish.

3        iv. Martha, born 9 September 1700.

 

2.    Ketturah Combest was born 10 October 1695, "d/o John Combest," in St. George's Parish, Baltimore County. She was head of a household and taxable on herself and (her son?) John Combess on two tithes in Spesutia Lower Hundred, Baltimore County, in 1737. He was probably identical to John Combest, a "Mulatto," aged eleven years and six months in June 1716 when he was bound to George Wells by the Baltimore County court [Proceedings 1715-8, 12]. Ketturah was probably the mother of

i. John2, born about December 1704.

 

3.    Martha Combest was born 9 September 1700, "d/o John Combest," at the head of Collats Creek, St. George's Parish, Baltimore County [Reamy, St. George's Parish Register, 1689-1773, 1, 3, 7, 16, 21]. She was head of a household, taxable on herself and her son Jacob Combess on two tithes in Spesutia Lower Hundred, Baltimore County, in 1737 [Wright, Inhabitants of Baltimore County, 16]. She was the mother of

i. Jacob, born 10 November 1718, "son of Martha Combest" in St. George's Parish. He was taxable on 46-3/4 acres in Spesutia Hundred, Harford County, in 1783 [MSA S1161-6-10, p.124].

 

Some of their descendants were in South Carolina in 1770:

i. Josiah1 and Penelope, witnesses in a murder case against William Fust and Christopher Davis in the South Carolina Court of General Sessions on 19 January 1770 [Journal of the S.C. Court, p.41].

4        ii. Winna, born say 1752.

 

4.    Winna Combest, born say 1752, was a "Mulatto" head of a Cheraw District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790. She may have been the mother of

i. Josiah2, born about 1770, a twelve-year-old "poor Boy" bound to Joseph Booth until the age of twenty-one on 3 August 1782 in St. David's Parish, South Carolina.

ii. Mary, born about 1776, a six-year-old girl bound to Thomas Lankford in St. David's Parish on 3 August 1782.

iii. Joans, born about 1777, a five-year-old girl bound to Francis Robertson in St. David's Parish, South Carolina, on 3 August 1782 [Holcolm, Saint David's Parish Vestry, 24, 25].

iv. John3, head of an Edgefield District, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:766].

 

COMBS FAMILY

1.    John1 Combs, born say 1675, (apparently a white man) and Sarah Whiting were living in Charles Parish, York County, when their children were born. Sarah Whiting may have been identical to "Sarah, a molatto servant ... the daughter of an English woman," who sued her master Thomas Harwood in York County court for her freedom on 26 March 1694, claiming that she was twenty-one years old. She was called "Sarah Whiting a mulatto" when the 16 April 1694 birth of her daughter Mary was recorded in the Charles Parish Register. She was living in Charles Parish on 24 February 1701/2 when she was indicted by the York County court for fornication. John was sued again a year later on 24 February 1702/2 for 500 pounds due by bill for Sarah Whiting's fine [DOW 9:318; 11:554, 580; 12:94, 117]. She was probably the sister of Ann Whiting, a "mulatto," who had a daughter named Ann on 14 December 1701 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 193]. They were apparently treated as a married couple by 24 July 1705 when John Comes and his wife Sarah were paid as witnesses for Captain Thomas Cheasman in his suit against Denis Obrion. And the birth of their son John Combs was recorded in Charles Parish as if they were married. However, he was called John Combs of Charles Parish on 24 July 1707 when he confessed in court to the charge of fornication. And he was cited for fornication again on 25 February 1707/8. On 16 May 1720 he was called John Cooms when he complained to the York County court that two of his children who were bound to Edmund Sweeney were not being educated. On 16 March 1723/4 he sued James Faison in a disagreement over his account which Edward Tabb, Gent., resolved. On 21 September 1730 Francis Hayward, Gent., informed the court that John's son and granddaughter were not receiving due care [OW 12:344; 13:73, 83, 120; 15:584; 16:262, 277; 17:110]. John and Sarah registered the birth of their children in Charles Parish between 1705 and 1712, and Sarah's death on 16 January 1752 was registered in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 68, 194-5]. They were the parents of

i. ?Mary, born 16 April 1694, "daughter of Sarah Whiting a mulatto."

ii. ?Ann, born say 1703, living in Charles Parish on 20 February 1720/1 when she was presented by the York County court. She was whipped in York County on 16 February 1740/1 because she could not pay her fine for having a bastard child [OW 16:38, 76; W&I 18:677].

iii. Catherine, born 14 February 1704/5, "daughter of Sarah Whiting by John Combs."

iv. John2, son of John Combs by Sarah, born in 1707.

v. Sarah, daughter of John and Sarah, born 10 January 1712, may have married Matthew2 Cuttillo.

vi. ?William1, born about 1718, a thirty-nine-year-old James City County "Mulatto" planter, 5 feet 6 inches tall, listed in the August 1757 Size Roll of Captain Thomas Waggener's Company at Fort Holland [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 463].

2        vii. ?Thomas1, born say 1720.

 

2.    Thomas1 Combs, born say 1720, and Frances Combs were living in Charles Parish on 17 February 1742 when their son William was born (no race mentioned) [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 68]. On 17 December 1744 the York County court ordered that he pay taxes on his "Molatto" wife [W&I 19:314, 332]. On 18 May 1752 the court presented him for not listing himself as a tithable and fined him 1,000 pounds of tobacco. On 19 January 1761 the court ordered the churchwardens of Charles Parish to bind out his children because he was unable to provide for them. He was presented by the court on 21 November 1763 for not listing (his niece?) Martha Cattilla (Cuttillo) as a tithable. He had apparently established a common-law marriage with Anne Wilson by 17 November 1766 when he was presented by the York County court for not listing her as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1752-4, 18, 58; 1759-63, 90, 128, 199, 204, 246; Orders 1765-68, 161, 206]. His 29 June 1777 York County will, proved 15 September 1777, left a heifer to each of his "old" children: William, Thomas, Edmund, and George Combs and left Ann Wilson and her children "had by me" the remainder of his estate [W&I 22:374-5]. Ann died before 15 September 1777 when Mead Wood was granted administration on the estate, "Ann Wilson the executrix being dead and William Combs refusing (to be) the Executor" [Orders 1774-84, 151]. Thomas and Frances were the parents of

3        i. William2, born 17 February 1742.

4        ii. Thomas2, born 4 May 1744.

iii. James, born 19 November 1745, baptized 18 December 1745, son of Thomas and Frances.

5        iv. Edmund1, born 5 January 1747.

v. John3, baptized 16 September 1750, son of Thomas and Frances.

 

Thomas and Anne had

vi. Sally Wilson, born 24 June, baptized 28 July 1765, daughter of Thomas Combs and Anne Wilson.

vii. Anne Combs, born 22 April 1769, baptized 25 June, daughter of Thomas and Anne Combs.

viii. Martha Combs, daughter of Thomas and Anne, born 17 February, baptized 22 March 1772.

ix. Willis Combs, son of Thomas and Anne born 4 May 1774, baptized 12 June. On 15 January 1787 the York County court bound him to Abraham Francis, shoemaker, because his father's estate was insufficient to maintain him [Orders 1784-7, 402].

x. Frances1, daughter of Thomas and Anne, born 17 March 1776, baptized 14 April [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 67, 68].

 

3.    William2 Combs, born 17 February 1742, baptized 20 March, was the son of Thomas and Frances Combs. He had an account with the estate of Anthony Robinson which included his rent for 1776 and 1777 and clothes he cut for the estate in 1778 [W&I 22:483-6]. He and his wife Mary were living in Charles Parish, York County, on 15 August 1781 when their "Mulatto" daughter Elizabeth was born [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 68, 67]. He was taxable in York County from 1784 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 89, 95, 161, 181, 200, 228, 243]. William and Mary were the parents of

i. John, son of William and Mary, born 27 December 1776, baptized 16 February. He may have been the John Combs, alias John Fry, who married Alice Ware, ("free persons of color") "former servant of the late John Lear and daughter of Elzey Ware, deceased," 11 December 1816 Fredericksburg bond, surety R.S. Chew. He registered in York County on 19 March 1827: a bright mulatto 5 feet 8-1/2 inches high, about 50 years of age, he is much pitted with the small pox, quite grey has a broad thumb on his right hand occasioned by a whitlow & a large apperture between his upper foor teeth...born free [Guardians' Accounts, 1823-46, end of book, Register of Free Negroes, No. 230].

ii. Anne, daughter of William and Mary Combs, born 14 December 1778, baptized 14 February 1779 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 68].

iii. Elizabeth, born 15 August 1781, baptized 4 November. She may have been the Betsy Combs who was head of a York County household of 9 "other free" in 1810.

iv. Mary, daughter of William and Mary, born 11 July 1783, baptized 14 September.

 

4.    Thomas2 Combs, born 4 May 1744, was the son of Thomas and Frances Combs [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 67, 68]. He was a "poor orphan" ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Charles Parish on 19 March 1764 [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 176]. He was taxable in York County from 1784 to 1789 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 89, 95, 139, 149]. He and his wife Mary were living in Charles Parish, York County, on 2 March 1786 when their "Mulatto" daughter Hebe was born [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 68]. Thomas' child was

i. Hebe, born 2 March 1786, baptized 10 June.

 

5.    Edmund1 Combs, born 5 January 1747, baptized 5 January 1747, was the son of Thomas and Frances Combs. He and his wife Mary were living in Charles Parish, York County, when they registered the birth of their "Mulatto" son Gideon Pickett Combs on 5 December 1778 and their "Mulatto" son Abraham on 8 April 1782. Mary was probably related to John and Elizabeth Pickett whose "Mulatto" son William was born on 7 August 1784 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 67-68, 152]. Edmund was taxable in York County from 1784 to 1805: on 2 tithes in 1796, 1801 and 1804 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 89, 95, 161, 181, 219, 264, 295, 305]. Their children were

i. John4, son of Edmund and Mary, born 17 October 1774, baptized 28 November 1774, married Elizabeth Huson (Hewson), 22 December 1800 York County bond. He was head of a York County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:873].

ii. William3, born 14 February 1776, son of Edmund and Mary, baptized 14 April 1776, probably died young.

iii. Frances2, daughter of Edmund and Mary, born 25 July 1777, baptized 8 March 1778.

iv. Gdo. Pickett Combs, born 5 December 1778, "Mulatto" son of Edmund and Mary.

v. William4, born 27 February 1780, son of Edmund and Mary, baptized 16 April 1780. He was taxable in York County from 1809 to 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 339, 363, 374]  and head of a York County household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

vi. Abraham, born 8 March 1782, "Mulatto" son of Edmund and Mary, baptized 28 April 1782, taxable in York County in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 363].

vii. Jane, born 6 February 1784, "Mulatto daughter of Edmund and Mary," baptized 2 May.

 

Other descendants were

i. Mary, born about 1800, registered in York County on 20 January 1823: a bright mulatto about 23 years of age ... has a thin head of hair [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.197].

ii. William5, born about 1808, registered in York County on 19 September 1831: 23 years of age, 5 feet 10-1/2 inches high, light curly hair, very white and clear skin [Free Negroes Register 1831-50, no.297].

 

CONNALLY FAMILY

1.    Eleanor Connally, born day 1758, was living in Fauquier County on 22 February 1779 when the court ordered her to serve her master John Orear for having two "Mulatto" children during her servitude [Minutes 1773-80, 357]. She was apparently the mother of

i. Ann, a one-year-old "Mulatto" ordered bound by the churchwardens of Hamilton Parish, Fauquier County, to John Orear on 25 August 1777 and ordered bound to Vincent Garner on 24 November 1777. On 22 November 1779 the court ordered the churchwardens of Leeds Parish to bind her to John Dulin [Minutes 1773-80, 294, 298, 437].

ii. Catherine, bound by the churchwardens of Hamilton Parish to Vincent Garner on 24 November 1777 [Minutes 1773-80, 298].

iii. John Conly, a "free Negro" farmer living on Lark Rains' land in the southeastern district of Rockingham County, Virginia, in 1810 and on Samuel Glenn's land in 1812 [PPTL 1795-1813, frames 649, 681].

iv. Salley Collony, a "free Negro" taxable in Orange County in 1813.

v. Nelly Collony, a "free Negro" taxable in Orange County in 1813.

vi. James Colloney, a "free Negro" taxable in Orange County in 1813.

 

CONNER FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Connors, born say 1690, was a "white Christian Woman" who was bound out for five years by the churchwardens of Charles Parish, York County, on 24 November 1710 for "having a mulatto Bastard Child the sd Cunnears appeared & acknowledged the fact" [OW 14:41]. She was probably the mother of

2        i. Lewis, born say 1720.

3        ii. Mark, born say 1722.

4        iii. James, born say 1725.

 

2.    Lewis Conner, born say 1720, purchased 100 acres in Craven County, North Carolina, on the north side of the Trent River joining Edward Frank and the White Oak Pocosin near Chinquapin Creek on 10 April 1760. Fifty acres of this land was sold by (his brother?) James Conner on 4 June 1768 [DB 2:526; 15:126]. Lewis was head of a household of one "Black" male and one "Black" female taxable in Craven County in 1769 [SS 837]. Perhaps his widow was Merion Conner, head of a Beaufort County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:125]. Their children may have been

5        i. John1, born say 1757.

ii. Isaac, born about 1767, a twelve-year-old "Mulatto" ordered bound to George Parris until the age of thirty-one years in Tryon County on 18 January 1779 [Minutes of Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions].

iii. Michael, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:373] and 4 in 1810 [NC:242].

6        iv. Rachel C___er (Conner), born say 1775.

v. Edward, head of a Lenoir County household of 6 "other free" and 8 slaves in 1810 [NC:301].

 

3.    Mark Conner, born say 1722, received a patent for 100 acres joining Lewis Conner on 28 October 1765 on the north side of Chinquapin Creek in the part of Craven County which became Jones County in 1790 [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:19]. He was a head of a Craven County household of one "Black" male and one "Black" female taxable in 1769 [SS 837] and was head of a Jones County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:144]. Perhaps he was the father of

i. John2, (Senr), head of a Jones County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:256].

ii. Ephram, head of a Jones County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:256].

iii. Zilphy, head of a Greene County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:245].

4.    James Conner, born say 1725, sold fifty acres of land on the north side of the Trent River near Chinquapin Creek in Craven County on 4 June 1768. This was land purchased by (his brother?) Lewis Conner on 10 April 1760 [DB 2:526; 15:126]. James was head of a household of one "Black" male and one "Black" female taxable in Craven County in 1769 [SS 837]. He was probably the James Conner who was listed among the superannuated members of the Beaufort County Militia under the command of Colonel William Brown prior to 1765, listed after Thomas Blango [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 781]. He was taxable in Beaufort County in 1779 on an assessment of 361 pounds, in the same district as Thomas Blango (the district of Jesse Blount, Robert Williams, and Jacob Shute) [NCGSJ XV:142]. He was head of a New Hanover County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:311]. Perhaps his children were those counted in New Hanover County:

i. Moses, head of a household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:311].

ii. William, born before 1776, head of a household of 9 "free colored" in the town of Wilmington in 1820 [NC:205].

iii. Polly, born before 1776, head of a household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:224].

iv. John4, born 1776-94, head of a household of 9 "free colored" in the town of Wilmington in 1820 [NC:205].

 

5.    John1 Conner, born say 1757, was head of a Jones County household of 13 "other free" in 1790 [NC:144]. His August 1798 Jones County will named his wife Rebecca and four children. Rebecca was head of a Jones County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:256]. Their children were

i. John3, head of a Jones County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:256].

ii. Jesse, head of a Lenoir County household of 5 "other free" and one white woman in 1810 [NC:301].

iii. Silas.

iv. Daniel.

 

6.    Rachel C___er (Conner), born say 1775, was head of a Beaufort County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:5]. She was probably the mother of

i. Churchill, born about 1801, "a free Boy of Color," bound apprentice to Isaac Smith by the March 1814 Beaufort County court (no parent named).

ii. Keziah, born about 1803, a ten-year-old "free Girl of Color, ordered bound an apprentice seamstress to Joseph B. Hinton by the March 1813 Beaufort County court.

iii. Chappel, born about 1803, "a free Boy of Color" bound apprentice to W. Smaw by the March 1814 Beaufort County court (no parent named) [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.].

 

COOK FAMILY

1.    Sarah Cooke, born about 1673, was a servant who petitioned the York County court for her freedom on 26 February 1693/4 stating that she was the daughter of an English woman named Mary Cooke and that she had served her master for twenty-one years. The result of her petition was not recorded [DOW 9:297, 352]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Robert, born say 1740, a "free Negro" tithable in Bertie County, North Carolina, in the list of H. Nichols in 1774 with (his wife?) Peney Cook and tithable on 3 tithes in the 1775 summary list [CR 10.702]. Administration on his Bertie County estate was granted to Cesar Cook on 15 February 1780 [Gammon, Record of Estates, Bertie County II, 23].

2        ii. Henry, born about 1746.

3        iii. Nancy, born about 1762.

 

2.    Henry Cook, born about 1746, a "free Negro born in Gloucester County," indentured himself for five years in order to get cured of "a pox." He was about 5 feet 10 or 11 inches high and twenty-four years of age in April 1770 when he ran away from the master to whom he was indentured. He was described further as being

lusty and very well made, of a good black complexion, and thick lips; his clothing mean, being an old brown cloth waistcoat and breeches much patched with green cloth, osnabrug shirt, yarn stockings, very bad shoes, though he took leather with him ready cut for another pair. He understands a little of the carpenter business, and has likewise followed the water. He took with him a Negro fellow belonging to William Tate ... took with them a yawl of 28 feet ... [Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon's edition, p. 3, col. 2].

He was living in Essex County on 16 January 1786 when he and Francis Bunday, "free Mulattoes," were accused of entering the lumber house of Lott and Higby Merchants in the City of Richmond on 21 December 1785 and stealing a large quantity of cloth valued at over 200 pounds currency. The defendants were sent to Richmond for further trial [Orders 1784-7, 177-8]. He may have been the father of

i. Charles, born say 1768, taxable in Gloucester County in 1789, from 1797 to 1800, listed as a "Mulatto" from 1804 to 1817, over the age of forty-five in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-99; 1800-20]. He was a "free negro" head of a Gloucester County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:402A].

ii. William, a "Mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County from 1804 to 1817: [Personal Property Tax List 1800-20], a "free negro" head of a Gloucester County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:402A].

iii. John, a "Mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County from 1805 to 1815 [Personal Property Tax List 1800-20], a "free negro" head of a Gloucester County household of 1 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:402A].

iv. Richard, head of a Mathews County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:453].

 

3.    Nancy Cook, born about 1762, "mulatto" mother of Rhoda, Charlotte and John Cook who were bound out by the Charlotte County court on 6 August 1793 [Orders 1792-4, 180a]. She registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet one and a half inches high, thirty eight years old, bushy head of hair, appears from the certificate produced to have been born free in the County of King & Queen & party raised in Charlotte County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 181]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:123a]. She was the mother of

4        i. Rhoda, born about 1784.

ii. Charlotte, born about 1784, registered in Petersburg on 1 November 1802: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, eighteen years old, short knotty hair, born free & raised in Charlotte County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 245]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121a].

iii. John1.

iv. ?James, "free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:68].

 

4.    Rhoda Cook, born about 1784, registered in Petersburg on 7 June 1810: a light brown free woman of Colour, five feet five inches high, twenty six years old, born free & raised in Charlotte County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 513]. She was the mother of

i. George2, born about 1799, registered in Petersburg on 6 January 1818: a free lad of Colour, nineteen and a half years old, five feet seven 3/4 inches high, dark brown Complection, son of Rhoda Cook, a free woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 892].

ii. John2, born about 1802, registered in Petersburg on 6 January 1818: sixteen years old, five feet seven inches high, dark brown Complection, son of Rhoda Cook, a free woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 893].

 

Spotsylvania County

1.    Sarah Cook, born say 1734, was the servant of Joseph Allen on 7 March 1758 when she acknowledged in Spotsylvania County court that she had a "Molatto" child in her master's house. The court ordered that she serve her master an additional year for his trouble and that she be sold by the churchwardens for another five years when she completed her service to her master. The court issued the same order on 6 August 1759, perhaps for a second child [Orders 1755-65, 65, 142]. She may have been the ancestor of

2        i. George1, born about 1751.

iii. Winney, a "free Negro" head of a Culpeper County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:51].

iv. Alyce, head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:113b].

 

2.    George1 Cook, born about 1751, was about twenty-six years old and had five more years of his indenture to serve William Knox of Culpeper County when he ran away. Knox offered a reward for his return in the 11 April 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette, describing him as

a very dark servant mulatto man ... a likely stout made fellow ... clothed in homespun woolen and linen.

The ad also stated that he had applied to a recruiting officer to enlist as a soldier in order to free himself of his indenture [Purdie's edition, p. 3, col. 3]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1796 to 1801 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 600, 645, 684, 779]. He may have been the father of

i. Peter, a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County on a tithe and a horse from 1800 to 1802, perhaps the Peter Cook whowas taxable there in 1788 (no race indicated) [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 778, 861], called Peter Kook in 1810, a "free Negro" head of a Culpeper County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:52].

ii. Benjamin, a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 861].

 

Other Members of the family were

i. Roger, born about 1770, a twenty-eight-year-old "mulatto" who ran away from Francis Eppes of Prince George County according to the 3 July 1798 issue of the Virginia Gazette.

ii. Mary, head of an Elizabeth City County household of 8 "other free" and 1 slave in 1810 [VA:183].

iii. Sucky, born say 1770, mother of Frank Cook (born in January 1791) who registered in Petersburg on 27 June 1811: a brown man of colour, five feet three 3/4 inches high, twenty years old January last, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield, son of Sucky Cook a free woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 666].

iv. Phebe, deceased by 6 April 1801 when her six-year-old "free Mulatto" daughter Lucy Cook was bound by the Petersburg court to James Dugger to be a seamstress [Hustings Court Minute Book 1800-4, 42].

v. Jincy, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:123a].

vi. Judy, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121b].

vii. Ama, head of a Goochland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:687].

 

COOLEY/ COLLEY FAMILY

1.    Ann Colley, born say 1704, was the servant of Margaret Blagg of Westmoreland County on 28 March 1722 when the churchwardens of Washington Parish ordered her sold for five years after her indenture was completed for having a "Mulatto bastard Child" [Orders 1721-31, 15]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. George1, presented by the grand jury of Charles City County on 6 September 1758 for concealing a tithable. George, Charles, Thomas, and George Coley, Jr., pleaded not guilty, but the court decided that they were required to list their wives as tithables because they were "Mulatto" and fined them 500 pounds of tobacco each. George made an indenture of bargain and sale to Gabriel Coley which he acknowledged in court on 4 November 1761 [Orders 1758-62, 56, 78, 325]. He may have been identical to George Coley who was head of Montgomery County, North Carolina household of 7 white persons in 1790 [NC:165].

ii. Charles, a "Mulatto" convicted for not listing his wife as a tithable in Charles City County in 1758 [Orders 1758-62, 56, 78], perhaps the Charles Coley who was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 1 white male over 16, 1 under 16, and 3 white females in 1790 [NC:48].

iii. Thomas, a "Mulatto" convicted of not failing listing his wife as a tithable in Charles City County in 1758 [Orders 1758-62, 56, 78], perhaps the Thomas Colly who was head of a Robeson County, North Carolina household of 1 white male over 16 and 1 white female in 1790 [NC:48].

iv. George2, a "Mulatto" convicted of not listing his wife as a tithable in Charles City County in 1758 [Orders 1758-62, 56, 78].

v. Martin Colley, "F.N." head of a Rockingham County, Virginia household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:13]. He registered in Rockingham County on 20 October 1819: (a free man of Colour) about 45 years of age ... a Bright Mullettoe ... free born as appears by the affidavit of Abner Yates of this county [Boyd-Rush, Register of Free Blacks, Rockingham County, 20].

vi. Robert Cooley, head of a Richmond City, Virginia household of 8 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:374]. He served the nobility at Williamsburg and was later an attendant in the council chambers and courts of justice in Richmond [Mordecai, Richmond in By-gone Days, 312-3].

vii. Robin Cooley, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. The 25 February 1842 session of the Halifax County court allowed him to use his gun in the county.

viii. John Colley, head of a Richmond City, Virginia household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:367].

ix. William Coley, married Tabitha Peters, 25 April 1818 Halifax County, North Carolina bond. She may have been identical to Tobby Cooley who married Henry Peters, 8 November 1826 Halifax County bond.

 

COOPER FAMILY

Members of the Cooper family in Goochland and surrounding counties were

1         i. Daniel1, born say 1725.

2         ii. Joseph, born say 1745.

3         iii. Ann, born say 1747.

iv. Margaret, born say 1748, a "free negro" head of a Norfolk County household in Elizabeth River Parish in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 80].

4        v. James1, born about 1750.

5        vi. ?Rachel, born say 1753.

vii.William1, born say 1754, a taxable overseer on the Goochland County plantation of the Reverend William Douglas in 1774 and 1775 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frame 320].

 

1.    Daniel1 Cooper, born say 1725, was listed as Mrs. Anne Scott's tithable in Goochland County in 1746 [List of Tithables] and was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County on his own tithe and a horse in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 8]. His wife Polly testified in the trial against Daniel's brother James Cooper and his common-law wife Lilly Ann Craddock who were accused of murdering their new-born child on 27 April 1787 [Orders 1786-7, 429-431]. Daniel was the father of

i. James2, orphan of Daniel Cooper, deceased, bound to Robin Poor by the Goochland County court on 19 January 1789 [Orders 1788-91, 110].

 

2.    Joseph Cooper, born say 1745, a "free mulatto," and his wife Lydia registered the birth of their son William in Bruton Parish, James City County, on 9 March 1768 [Bruton Parish Register, 32]. He was one of a long list of residents of Bruton Parish, York County, who were presented by the court on 15 November 1773 for failing to list themselves as tithables [Orders 1772-4, 436, 442]. He and Lydia were the parents of

i. William2, born 9 March 1768.

 

3.    Ann Cooper, born say 1750, was living in Goochland County in November 1770 when the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish were ordered to bind out her children Roger and Daniel, no race mentioned, to William Michell [Orders 1767-70, 502]. Her children were

6         i. Roger1, born say 1768.

ii. Daniel2, born say 1770, bound out in Goochland County in November 1770 [Orders 1767-70, 502]. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1799 to 1814: a "Mulatto" carpenter living near Edward Bolling's in 1804, a "free born carpenter" on George S. Smith's land from 1805 to 1813, listed with wife Nancy in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 525, 543, 596, 666, 686, 738, 778, 821, 864; 1810-32, frames 5, 97, 158, 190]. He married Nancy Cooper (who James Quigg testified was at "a distance from her parents"), 16 December 1803 Goochland County bond, George Tyler surety. Daniel was head of a Goochland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:689]. His Goochland County estate was assessed at $239 on 12 March 1817 [DB 22:354]. Nancy registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 20 September 1819: widow of Daniel Cooper decd. aged about thirty four years, about five feet seven inches high, of yellow complexion...free born [Register of Free Negroes, p.111].

iii. ?Isham, born about 1781, registered in Goochland County on 19 September 1808: five feet seven inches & an half high, about twenty seven years of age, light yellow complexion...free born [Register of free Negroes, p.23]. He was a "Black" or "person of color" taxable in Augusta County from 1810 to 1819 [PPTL 1796-1810, frame 623; 1811-20, frames 31, 76, 136, 248, 311, 427, 588], registered in Augusta County on 25 October 1816 [Free Negro Register 1810-64, no.19].

iv. ?William3, born say 1785, a "Mulatto" farmer living on M.V. Woodson's land in the upper district of Goochland County in 1811, a waterman in 1812, [PPTL, 1810-32, frames 70, 97, 113]. He married Nancy Banks, 29 August 1809 Goochland County bond, Jacob Martin surety, 1 September marriage.

 

4.    James1 Cooper, born about 1750, was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1789 to 1800, taxable on a slave under the age of 12 in 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 219, 236, 280, 420, 479, 525, 545]. He was called the brother of Daniel Cooper when his common-law wife, a white woman named Lilly Anne Craddock, had a child who was either stillborn or died shortly after birth in Goochland County in 1787 [Orders 1787, 429-436]. He was a "Black" or "person of color" taxable in Augusta County from 1800 to 1819 [PPTL 1796-1810, frames 192, 238, 337, 383, 434, 485, 530, 579, 622; 1811-20, frames 31, 76, 97, 118, 163, 250, 311, 427, 588]. He was a seventy-year-old "free man of color" who applied for a pension while residing in Augusta County, Virginia, on 26 June 1820. He stated that he had enlisted in Goochland County and that his family consisted of himself and Sukey Orchard, a free woman of color upwards of fifty years old, who lived with him. He owned a horse and was renting 4-5 acres. His application included a certificate dated October 1787 from a justice of the peace in Goochland County, describing him as a "molatto Free man," which was to be used as a pass to travel to North Carolina and Georgia [Dorman, Virginia Revolutionary Pension Applications, 20:76-7]. He was head of an Augusta County household of 2 "other free" and a white woman over 45 in 1810 [VA:371]. Sukey Orchard was head of an Augusta County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:371]. She registered in Augusta County on 26 September 1816: Sukey Lewis (alias Sukey Orchard) a Mulattoe woman about forty years of age, was born free and consequently all her children are free as appears from certificate in her possession by Spotswood Garland Clerk of Nelson County dated 26 August 1816 [Free Negro Register 1810-64, no.18]. He was the father of

i. Pleasant, received a warrant for bounty land for his father's services [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 33]. He was taxable in Augusta County from 1813 to 1820 [PPTL 1811-20, frames 97, 118, 249, 311, 427, 588, 606, 636].

 

5.    Rachel Cooper, born say 1753, apprenticed her sons Daniel and David to Japheth Fowler for five years. In April 1783 she complained to the Goochland County court that he was ill-treating her sons and intended to remove them from the county [Orders 1779-83, 173]. She married Squire Caesar, "Free Negroes," 13 March 1800 Goochland County bond, Thomas F. Bates surety, 16 March marriage. Squire was head of a Goochland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:689] and was living with his wife Rachel near John Lewis in 1813 [PPTL, 1810-32, frame 159]. Rachel was the mother of

i. David, born say 1772, taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1798 to 1805: a "Black Free man" shoemaker at William Humber's in 1804, a "free born" shoemaker living on William Britt's land in 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 480, 525, 615, 666, 686, 738].

ii. Daniel2, born say 1773, taxable in the upper district of Goochland County in 1799, his tax charged to David Ross in 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 533].

iii. Nancy, daughter of Rachel Cooper ordered bound out on 19 July 1790 [Orders 1788-91, 458].

iv. Billy, son of Rachel Cooper ordered bound out on 19 September 1791 [Orders 1788-91, 720].

v. Jesse, son of Rachel Cooper ordered bound out on 19 September 1791 [Orders 1788-91, 720].

vi. Randal, child of Rachel Cooper ordered bound out on 21 October 1793 [Orders 1791-4, 388]. Randolph married Polly Cockran, "daughter of Henry Cockran," 13 December 1813 Goochland County bond, 16 December marriage. He was a "Mulatto" carpenter living at Squire Caesar's in 1813 [PPTL, 1810-32, frame 159, 190].

vii. Roger2, child of Rachel Cooper ordered bound out on 21 October 1793 [Orders 1791-4, 388]. He married Ruth Cockran, "daughter of Henry Cockran," 31 October 1814 Goochland County bond, 3 November marriage. He was a sawyer living at Squire Caesar's in 1814 [PPTL, 1810-32, frames 190].

 

6.    Roger1 Cooper, born say 1768, was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1786 to 1815: a "Mulatto" farmer living near William George's in 1804, listed with (wife?) Patsey on William M. Richardson's land in 1813, over the age of forty-five in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 140, 150, 175, 279, 387, 464, 525, 543, 615, 687, 738, 778, 822, 864; 1810-32, frames 5, 76, 159, 189, 258]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:688]. He may have been the father of

i. Francis, born say 1792, a "Mulatto Waterman" living at Roger Cooper's in 1813, a "Mulatto Ditcher" at Roger Cooper's in 1814 [PPTL, 1810-32, frames 159, 189, 258].

 

COPELAND FAMILY

Members of the Copeland family in Virginia were

i. Michael, head of a New Kent County household of 6 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:747].

ii. Richard, head of a Henrico County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:980].

iii. Exum, born about 1790, registered in Norfolk County on 21 October 1811: 5 feet 6 1/2 In. 21 years of age dark Complexion ... Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, #64].

iv. David, a "Free Negro" taxable at Allen's Mill in Nansemond County in 1815.

v. Allen, a "Free Negro" taxable at N. Milner's in Nansemond County in 1815.

vi. George, a "Free Negro" taxable at McClenney's in Nansemond County in 1815 [Yantis, Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia, S-14].

 

Members of the family in North Carolina were

i. Isaac, head of a Wake County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:105]. He purchased 200 acres in Wake County on the east side of a road adjoining Clifton and John Lewis on 26 November 1793, sold this land on 22 March 1799, and purchased 100 acres in Wake County on the waters of Middle Creek and both sides of Buffalo Swamp on 26 November 1799 [DB Q:154, 439]. He was probably the father of Thomas Copeland, born about 1790, who was head of a Wake County household of 6 "free colored" in 1840 and a "Mulatto" household in 1860 which included (his mother?) Nancy Harris Copeland, a "Mulatto" aged ninety.

ii. Cato, born about 1758, head of a Craven County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134] and 2 in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:12]. While a resident of Halifax County he applied for and was granted a pension for three years service in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment. According to the pension application he married Nancy Mitchell, 11 December 1778 Halifax County bond, 16 December 1778 marriage. Cato died in 1827 and his wife Nancy Copeland applied for a survivor's pension on 21 November 1842 [M805-219, frame 0072].

iii. Benjamin, born before 1776, head of a Hertford County household of 3 "free colored" men in 1820 [NC:182]. Benjamin, James and Donnel Copeland were among "Sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free African Americans [NCGSJ XI:252].

 

COPES FAMILY

1.    Margaret1 Copes, born say 1681, was presented by the churchwardens of Hungers Parish, Northampton County, Virginia, on 29 December 1699 for having a "Maletto Barstard child" but was discharged because her child was not born in the county. On 19 April 1701 she indentured her year-and-two-month-old daughter Tabitha to Richard Smith until the age of eighteen. She and John Harper proved the will of Captain Isaac Foxcroft in court on 8 November 1702 [OW&c 1698-1710, 36, 83, 106]. She was the mother of

2        i. Tabitha, born about December 1699.

ii. Margaret2, born say 1705, married Azaricum Drighouse (Driggers).

 

2.    Tabitha Copes, born before December 1699, was a "Mulato" presented by the Northampton County, Virginia court for bastardy on 11 May 1725 [Orders 1722-29, 181]. She was tithable in the Northampton County household of Azaricum and Margaret Drighouse in 1726 and was called Tabitha Carter in their household in 1727 with her husband Jacob Carter. They were taxable in their own household from 1728 to 1731 [L.P. 1726-31]. Her children were

i. Elishe, born about September 1719, thirteen-month-old "daughter of Tabitha Copes" bound apprentice by her mother to John Marshall on 10 October 1720 [Orders 1719-22, 95]. Elishe may have been the ancestor of Daniel Copes, head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:104] and 6 in 1810 [VA:87].

3        ii. Jacob, perhaps the bastard child Tabitha was presented for in 1725 (son of Jacob Carter?).

 

3.    Jacob Copes, born before 11 May 1725, was a "free Negro" listed in the muster roll of Abner Neale's Craven County, North Carolina Company between the head of Slocomb's Creek and Turnagain Bay on 4 October 1754 and 1755 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 708]. A petition in Craven County court on behalf of him and his wife and children was postponed on 13 September 1768 to the next court, but the matter of the petition and the outcome were not recorded [Minutes 1767-75, 93b]. He was a taxable head of a Craven County household of one Black male and 3 Black females in 1769 [SS 837] and taxable as a married man in the list for the District of Captains Adam Tooley and John Nelson in 1779 [LP 30.1], and was head of Craven County household of 16 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130]. His children were

i. Mary, born say 1755, called the daughter of Jacob Copes when she was deemed an insolvent person because of "her infirmity" by the 10 June 1772 Craven County court. On 8 September 1772 this decision was reversed on unstated evidence by the sheriff [Minutes 1772-84, vol.1, p.3a, p.6c]. She was head of a Craven County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:65].

ii. ?Nancy, born 1776-94, head of a Craven County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:76].

iii. ?Catherine, born 1794-1806, head of a Craven County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:72].

iv. ?Elsey, born 1794-1806, head of a Craven County household of one "free colored" in 1820 [NC:77].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Peter George and John Carter, also from Northampton County, Virginia, were "Free Negroes" listed immediately after Jacob Copes in Neale's muster.

 

CORN FAMILY

1.    Rebecca Corney, born say 1668, was the servant of John Baxter in August 1689 when she was fined by the Charles City County court for having an illegitimate "Mulatto" child [Orders 1687-95, 225]. She may have been the ancestor of

2        i. Robert Corn, born say 1745.

3        ii. Lucy1 Corn, born about 1758.

iii. Bess, born say 1762, a "poor child" bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 4 February 1763 [Orders 1759-67, 386].

iv. Joe, born about 1764, registered in Petersburg on 25 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, thirty years old, born free and raised in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 88]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1791 to 1805 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 82, 444, 482, 519, 557, 596].

v. Letty, born before 1776, head of a Petersburg household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Amey, born before 1776, head of a Petersburg household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

 

2.    Robert1 Corn, born say 1745, was taxable in the St. James Parish, Lunenburg County household of Hutchings Burton in 1764 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 247]. He was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 8 May 1780 when he applied for bounty land in court stating on oath that he was recruited as a soldier in the French and Indian War before 7 October 1763 [Orders 1779-84, 36]. He was taxable on a free tithe and 2 horses in Mecklenburg County from 1782 to 1789 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 14, 41, 79, 287]. He was security for Richard Evans when he was sued for debt in Mecklenburg County court on 10 May 1784 [Orders 1784-7, 6, 49, 107, 338]. On 6 March 1789 he made a deed of trust in Mecklenburg County of his household furniture, his working tools, 2 horses, and 14 hogs for a debt of 1,335 pounds of tobacco and 10 pounds he owed William Baskerville and George Hunt Baskerville [DB 7:550]. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:106] and one in 1800 [NC:756]. He was taxable on 200 acres in Wake County in 1792 [Haun, Wake County Court Minutes, II:635]. He married Prisey Wiggins, 12 December 1802 Wake County bond, Josiah Mitchell bondsman. Prissey was probably the widow of Matthew Wiggins. Robert's 1 June 1816 Wake County will, proved August the same year, named only his wife Priscilla and his son Robert Brooks Corn. Mary Locus was a witness, and Lawrence Pettiford was a witness and executor of the will [CR 099.801.16]. His children were

4        i. Julius, born about 1763.

ii. ?Hissey, born say 1765, married William Stuard, 21 ___ (no month or year but probably before 1790) Mecklenburg County marriage bond, Robert Corn surety.

iii. ?Justin, born say 1770, head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:106]. Perhaps his widow was Jane Corne, born before 1776, head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:370].

5        iv. Robert Brooks, born about 1772.

v. ?Rebecca, married Josiah Mitchell, 23 February 1798 Wake County bond, David Valentine bondsman.

 

3.    Lucy1 Corn, born about 1758, was living in Chesterfield County on 4 December 1778 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her daughter Phebe. She registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a dark brown, stout made Mulatto woman, with bushy black hair, five feet one inches high, thirty six years old, born free & raised in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 56]. She was called the next friend of Rowland Corn when he sued William Perrott in the Petersburg Hustings Court on 4 March 1792 for trespass, assault and battery and false imprisonment. John Walthall and Thomas Akin were her witnesses. The jury ruled that Rowland was born free, entitled to his freedom and awarded him 50 pounds damages on 4 March 1794 [Orders 1791-7, 35, 98, 100, 117]. She was the mother of

i. Phebe, born about 1768, daughter of Lucy Corn, bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 4 December 1778. She was apprenticed to John Stewart Redford on 6 December 1782 when he was ordered to appear in court to answer her complaint [Orders 1774-84, 197, 388]. She registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet one and a half inches high, twenty six years old, born free and raised in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 65].

ii. Lucy2, daughter of Lucy Corn, bound out in Dale Parish by order of the Chesterfield County court on 5 February 1779 [Orders 1774-84, 202].

iii. ?Robert2, born say 1770, a "poor child" bound apprentice with (his brother?) Matthew Corn in Dale Parish by order of the Chesterfield County court on 7 October 1774. The court again ordered him bound out on 5 July 1775 [Orders 1774-84, 56, 87].

iv. ?Matthew, born say 1772, a "poor child" bound apprentice in Dale Parish by order of the Chesterfield County court on 5 August 1774 and ordered bound out with (his brother?) Robert Corn on 7 October 1774. He was probably identical to Matt Cam, child of Lucy Cam, who was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Dale Parish in November 1781. He was called Matthew Corn when he was bound out again on 10 March 1787 [Orders 1774-84, 48, 56, 331; 1784-7, 463]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1795 to 1805 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 229, 297, 330, 369, 444, 482, 519, 558, 596].

v. ?Ritter, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a short well made, dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet one inches high, twenty five years old, short thick hair, born free & raised in the County of Surry [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 171]. She was taxable in Petersburg on a slave and 2 horses in 1800 [PPTL 1800-33, frame 4].

vi. Roland, bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 5 March 1779 [Orders 1774-84, 207].

vii. Pegg, bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 6 September 1782 [Orders 1774-84, 372].

viii. ?Mary, born about 1783, registered in Petersburg on 11 July 1804: a small made, yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 328]. She was head of a Petersburg household in 1810 [VA:121b].

ix. ?Sally1, born say 1788, head of a Petersburg household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:335].

x. ?John, born about 1793, registered in Chesterfield County on 26 February 1816: yellow complexioned, twenty-two to twenty-three years old, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 252].

xi. ?Sally2, born about 1805, registered in Petersburg on 3 August 1807: an infant daughter of Judah Harrison, a free woman, two years old Oct. next, of a dark brown complexion [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 415].

 

4.    Julius Corn, born about 1763, was listed in the Mecklenburg County household of (his father?) Robert Corn in 1784, was taxable in his own household in 1787 and 1788 [Personal Tax List 1782-1805, frames 79, 189, 235] and was also taxable on a free tithe and a horse in Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 537]. He was head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:104] and 7 in 1800 [NC:756]. In June 1791 the Wake County court charged him with having an illegitimate child by Tempy Taborn [Haun, Wake County Court Minutes, II:499]. He was taxable on 200 acres in Wake County in 1793 and 1794, 200 acres and 2 free polls in 1799, and 100 acres and 2 free polls in 1802: listed with Robert Corn who was taxable on 100 acres and Robert B. Corn who was taxable on 38 acres and 1 poll [MFCR 099.701.1, frames 36, 151, 227, 253]. He died before 12 April 1817 when his estate papers were filed. His heirs were John Corn, Henry Corn, Willis Taborn, and minors: Caty, Terrell, Berry and Peggy Corn [CR 099.508.75]. His children were

i. John.

ii. Henry, born 1794-1806, head of an Orange County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 (with a woman born before 1776) [NC:304].

iii. Willis Taborn.

iv. Caty.

v. Berry, married Fanny Curtis Anderson, 11 May 1837 Guilford County bond, Lewis Jeffers bondsman.

vi. Peggy, married Barnabus Scott, 21 March 1829 Wake County bond, Gilford Scott bondsman.

 

5.    Robert Brooks Corn, born about 1772, was listed in the Mecklenburg County household of (his father?) Robert Corn in 1788 and was listed in the household of John C. Walden in 1791 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 235, 416]. He was surety for the 29 September 1794 Greensville County, Virginia marriage bond of Mark Going and Sarah Jones. He married Ginsy Jeffers, "over 21 years of age," 26 March 1795 Greensville County bond, Drury Going surety, and was head of a Wake County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:756] and 9 in Orange County in 1810 [NC:816]. His widow Jincey Corne, born before 1776, was head of an Orange County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:312]. He bought land in Orange County before his death but did not complete the payments. Richardson Corn (his son) purchased the land from the sheriff on 24 May 1830 and identified Robert's children: Dixon, Dickerson, Eaton, Richard, Anderson, Polly, Jane, and Ann Corn [DB 17:149; 24:94]. Their

i. ?James, married Tempy Hammon, 18 November 1816 Wake County bond, John Williams bondsman.

ii. Dixon, head of an Orange County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [Book A:412]. He married Tempe Jeffers, 5 February 1821 Orange County bond, Lewis Jeffers bondsman.

iii. Dickerson.

iv. Eaton, ("white") married Elizabeth Chavis (colored), 7 January 1832 Guilford County bond.

v. Richard.

vi. Anderson.

vii. Polly.

viii. Jane.

ix. Ann.

 

CORNET FAMILY

Members of the Cornet family were

1        i. Byrd, born say 1760.

ii. Sarah, born say 1762, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of one "Black" person 12-50 years old in the 1786 state census in Elisha Webb's District.

iii. Parthena, born about 1767, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a yellow Mulatto woman, five feet six & a half inches high, twenty seven years old, born in the County of Northampton, No. Ca., born free [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 20].

iv. Jonas, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 23 August 1794: a brown Mulatto man, five feet eight inches high, twenty three years old, from a certificate of Lawrence Smith appears to have been born & raised in Northampton County, N. Carolina [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 80].

v. Joseph, born say 1784, head of a Stafford County, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810.

 

1.    Byrd Cornet, born say 1760, enlisted in the North Carolina Continental Line on 20 July 1778 [N.C. Historical & Genealogical Register II:581]. He was living in Northampton County, North Carolina, between 24 June 1783 and September 1790 when he was paid money by the estate of Thomas Deloatch [Gammon, Records of Estates, Northampton County, I:72], and he paid one pound to the St. George Parish, Northampton County wardens on 4 June 1798 [CR 71.927.1, fol. 34]. Byrd was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1790 [NC:75] and was counted as "other free" in the Chatham County census in 1800, called "Hew Bird Cornet" [NC:196]. On 14 June 1819 he married Betsy Skippey (Skipper?), Cumberland County, North Carolina bond, Daniel Munroe bondsman. He may have been the father of

i. Ned, head of a Pasquotank County household of 2 "other free" and one slave in 1810 [NC:892].

 

CORNISH FAMILY

1.    Margaret1 Cornish, born say 1610, was probably the unnamed mother of "robt. Cornish & his Mother" mentioned in an April 1663 billing account recorded in Surry County, Virginia court [Haun, Surry Court Records, II:245]. Robert Cornish may have been the son of Robert Sweat who was made to do penance during divine service at James City Church on 17 October 1640 because he hath begotten with Child a negro woman servant belonging unto Lieutenant Sheppard [McIlwaine, Minutes of the Council, 477]. She was witness to the 2 February 1666 Surry County indenture of Dorothy Thorne to serve Charles Barham and his wife for six years. She was taxable on two tithes in the list for Lawns Creek Parish on Hog Island in 1668 and one in 1669 and 1670 [Haun, Surry Court Records, II:340, 314, 372; Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.22, no.2, 20, 21]. On 10 October 1670 the General Court of Virginia called her a "negro woman" when it exempted her from paying taxes because of her poverty and old age [McIlwaine, Minutes of the Council, 225]. Her children were probably

i. Robert1, born say 1640, mentioned with his unnamed mother in an April 1663 billing account recorded in Surry County court.

ii. William Sweat, born about 1642.

2        iii. Anthony, born say 1645.

 

2.    Anthony Cornish, born say 1645, was a taxable head of a household on Hog Island in Lawnes Creek Parish from 1673 to 1702, with (his son?) Robert Cornish in 1693 and 1694 and with John Prime (Prince?) in 1702 [Haun, Surry Court Records, III:37; Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol. 22, no.2, 42, 44, 49; no. 3, 56, 63, 68; no.4, 52, 57; vol. 23, no.1, 38, 43, 50; no.2, 65, 69; no.3, 61, 65, 73]. On 5 March 1677 the Surry County court granted Edward Travis an attachment against his estate for 1,056 pounds of tobacco, and on 5 July 1681 he and his wife were fined 50 pounds for not going to church. He was listed among the Surry County householders and freeholders on 3 January 1687. In September 1696 he and William Sweat were security for Margaret Sweat's administration on the estate of Robert Sweat. Perhaps his (first) wife was Katherine Cornish who was mentioned in a Surry County court case on 11 January 1685/6 [DW 2:285; Haun, Surry Court Records, III:193, 344; IV:622; V:168, 494]. And he may have married Margaret Shaw who was taxable in his household in 1698 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol. 24, no.2, p.73], perhaps the Margaret Cornish who was taxable in John Hencock's Lawns Creek Parish household in 1703 [DW 5:291]. Anthony was a defendant in a March 1702/3 Surry County court case for which the plaintiff failed to appear [Haun, Surry Court Records, VI:31]. His children were probably

i. Robert2, born say 1677, taxable in Anthony Cornish's household in 1693 and 1694 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.24, 65, 73]. He was a defendant in a November 1699 Surry County court case for which the plaintiff failed to appear [Haun, Surry Court Records, V:235].

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1685, taxable in 1701 in the household of James Ely, a neighbor of Anthony Cornish [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.24, no.3, p.71]. She may have been the Elizabeth Cornish who was living in the lower parish of Surry County on 20 January 1730/1 when she was presented by the court for having a bastard child [DW 8:69].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Dorothy Thorne was probably the ancestor of Thomas Thorn who was presented by the Surry court for failing to list his "Mulatto" wife as a taxable but excused the same day "for reasons Appearing to the Court" [Orders 1757-64, 135].

 

COTANCE/ COTANCH FAMILY

1.    Jack Cotance, born say 1726, was a "Mullatto" who brought an unsuccessful suit for his freedom from Simon Whitehurst in Princess Anne County, Virginia court on 21 July 1747 [Minutes 1744-53, 98, 105]. He was probably the John Cotanch who was listed in Child's Company of soldiers in the North Carolina Continental Line on 20 July 1778, listed as dead in Lytle's Company in 1782 [Hathaway's Register 1:582]. He was probably the father of

i. Willie, head of a Martin County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:67] and 7 in 1810 [NC:451]. Perhaps he was out of the county in 1800 when (his wife?) Dollee Cottanch was head of a Martin County household of 3 "other free" [NC:391].

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