COUSINS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Cousins, born say 1700, died before 23 February 1756 when James Holman was granted administration on her Cumberland County, Virginia estate. The following day the court ordered the churchwardens of King William Parish to bind out her orphans. She was probably the mother or grandmother of "Poor Orphans" Rocco, Jack, and Jane Couzens who were ordered bound out by the churchwardens of King William Parish on 28 July 1755 [Orders 1752-8, 284, 355, 369]. She may have been the mother of

i. John1, born say 1720, a "free Negro" who had to post bond in Goochland County court for his good behavior in March 1755 when he was accused of threatening to beat Charles Bates. William Pledge was his security [Orders 1750-7, 512]. John was listed as an overseer in William Pledge's Goochland County household in the list of tithables for 1755 [List of Tithables]. The Powhatan County court excused him from paying parish and county levies on 17 August 1780 [Orders 1777-84, 156]. He was sued for 3 pounds, 8 shillings by Robert Pleasants in Cumberland County on 22 August 1785 [Orders 1784-6, 399, 476], probably the same suit which Pleasants brought against him in Powhatan County on 18 August 1785 [Orders 1784-6, 201, 228].

ii. Elizabeth2, born say 1721, sued Anne Daniel in Goochland County court on 15 March 1742/3 for her freedom dues [Orders 1741-4, 194].

2        iii. Pat, born say 1724.

3        iv. Mary1, born say 1729.

4        v. Francis1, born say 1735.

5        vi. Frances1, born say 1737.

 

2.    Pat1 Cousins, born say 1724, was most likely identical to "Pat an Indented servant" (no last name or race mentioned) whose daughter "Margaret a Mulatto Girl" was bound apprentice to John Woodson, Jr., of Goochland County in June 1745 [Orders 1744-49, 75]. Margaret Cousins' children were later bound out to John Woodson in June 1759 [Orders 1757-61, 218]. Pat was probably the mother of

6        i. Margaret1, born say 1741.

7        ii. Elizabeth3, born say 1744.

 

3.    Mary1 Cousins, born say 1729, may have been identical to "Moll a Mulatto girl" of Goochland County who was bound by the churchwardens of St. James Parish to John Williams in November 1731 [Orders 1730-1, 46]. She was called Mary Cousins when she brought a complaint in Goochland County court against John Williams on 21 July 1748 and on 22 August 1750 when she sued Williams for her freedom dues. She was awarded 3 pounds, 10 shillings by the court in August 1751. She was called "Mary Cousins a free Negro" in April 1764 when the court summoned her to show cause why her children Nan and Sam should not be bound out. She did not appear, and the court bound them to Richard Davis Hines [Orders 1744-9, 457; 1750-7, 25, 85, 1761-65, 292, 320]. She was the mother of

i. Abraham, "a Mullatto being Son of Moll Servant to John Williams," bound by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish to John Williams in August 1745 [Orders 1744-9, p.99].

8        ii. Nan, born say 1760.

iii. Samuel, born about 1762, bound apprentice in Goochland County in May 1764 and called a "Mulatto" child of Mary Cousins when he was bound out again in September 1779 [Orders 1778-79, 232]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Goochland County from 1786 to 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 112, 154, 180] and a "M" taxable on a horse in Powhatan County in 1789 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frame 31]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1790 to 1793 and a "F. Negroe" taxable there from 1802 to 1810 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 61, 137, 178, 502, 578, 615, 657, 1717, 799]. He registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 20 September 1808: five feet five inches high, supposed to be forty five or fifty years of age, short curled hair, dark complexion [Register of Free Negroes, p.25, no.52] and registered in Chesterfield County on 8 November 1819: fifty seven years old, brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 369].

iv. James2, born say 1764, an infant of Mary Cousins ordered bound to John Woodson in Goochland County in March 1764 [Orders 1761-65, 282].

v. Frances2, born say 1765, child of Mary Cousins bound to William Blunkall in Goochland County in February 1767 [Orders 1767-71, 9]. On 2 December 1793 the Charlotte County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out her children Sally and Fanny Cozens, and on 6 January 1794 the court ordered them bound to Allen Anderson [Orders 1792-4, 151a, 152b].

vi. Jacob2, born say 1766, "mulatto" son of Mary Couzens, ordered bound out by the churchwardens of King William Parish to Jane Holeman by the Cumberland County court on 23 November 1767 [Orders 1767-70, 63].

vii. Nancy, born say 1775, a "Mulatto" child of Mary Cousins bound out in Goochland County in September 1779 [Orders 1778-79, 232].

 

4.    Francis1 Cousins, born say 1735, was a "Free Mulatto" charged with the felonious intent of poisoning Obediah and Mary Smith in Goochland County in March 1754. Paul Michaux and James Holman posted fifty pounds bond for him [Orders 1750-57, 364-5, 381, 383, 489]. He married Mary Martin in Goochland County on 15 December 1759:

Francis Cousins & Mary Martin Mulattoes both of Manikin town [Jones, The Douglas Register, 4].

He enlisted in the Revolution from Goochland County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 33]. He was living in adjoining Cumberland County on 9 April 1763 when he sued James Bryant for trespass, assault and battery. He was called Francis Smith Cousins on 26 January 1767 when he sued Samuel Goff for 4 pounds due by note. On 28 November 1774 the court presented him for failing to list Charles Howell as a tithable in his household [Orders 1762-4, 166; 1764-7, 386; 1774-8, 300, 441]. On 16 May 1782 the Powhatan County court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind John and Richard Dobbins to him [Orders 1777-84, 225].He was taxable in Powhatan County on 2 horses from 1787 to 1788, a "M" taxable in 1789, and a "Mo" taxable in 1793 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 4, 17, 31, 90]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:687]. He had a daughter Ridley, a slave who had three children: Frank, William, and Lucy Ann. He purchased them from Robert Pleasants and set them free on 18 March 1816 by his Goochland County deed [DB 22:191]. He was the father of

i. Francis2 (Frank), married Chloe Cousins, 16 April 1806 Goochland County bond, Edward Fuzmore surety. Chloe registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 15 January 1823: about Fifty six years old, about five feet two inches high...emancipated by a decree of the court of Appeals in vertue of the wills of John & Jonathan Pleasants [Register of Free Negroes, p.140]. Francis left a 3 December 1842 Goochland County will, proved 18 November 1844 leaving his estate to his wife Cloa during her lifetime and naming children Sam, Frederick, Henry, Watt (Walter) and invalid daughter Milly. John Copeland brought a chancery suit against the estate claiming that Francis had agreed to sell a 10 acre tract to him but had never made out a formal deed [LVA Chancery case 1848-022; 1849-019].

ii. Ridley, emancipated on 18 March 1816.

 

5.    Frances1/ Fanny Cousins, born say 1737, petitioned for her freedom from further service to James Holeman in Cumberland County on 25 September 1758. Her case was dismissed when she failed to prosecute [Orders 1758-62, 25, 85]. On 16 August 1763 the Goochland County court ordered the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish to bind out her children James, William, and Elizabeth [Orders 1761-65, 210], and on 26 September 1763 the Cumberland County court ordered the churchwardens of King William Parish to bind out her sons James and William to Walter Edie [Orders 1762-4, 314]. In October 1764 James and William were called "Mulatto Children of Frances Cousins" when the Goochland County court ordered them bound to William Maddox [Orders 1761-65, 437]. On 17 June 1779 the Powhatan County court ordered the churchwardens of King William Parish to bind out her children Barbara, Berkley, and Abba Cousins [Orders 1777-84, 97]. She was the mother of

i. ?John2, born say 1746, called Jack Cousins, a "Poor Orphan" bound out in Cumberland County on 28 July 1755 [Orders 1752-8, 284].

ii. ?Cate, ordered bound out by the churchwardens of King William Parish in Cumberland County on 23 October 1758 [Orders 1758-62, 19].

iii. James1, born say 1759, taxable in the upper district of Goochland County in 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 235]. He was a free man of color who served as a substitute in the Revolution from Goochland County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 148].

iv. William1, born say 1761, head of a Prince Edward County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:651].

v. Elizabeth4, born say 1763, bound apprentice in Goochland County in July 1763. She was called the "mulattoe" daughter of Fanny Couzens on 28 March 1770 when the Cumberland County court ordered the churchwardens of King William Parish to bind her to George Smith [Orders 1770-2, 3]. On 17 June 1779 the Powhatan County court ordered the churchwardens of King William Parish to bind out her daughter Editha Cousins [Orders 1777-84, 98]. Elizabeth was head of a Goochland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:686].

vi. ?Phillis, a "poor orphan" ordered bound apprentice to Thomas Turpin, Jr., by the churchwardens of Southam Parish in Cumberland County, Virginia court on 27 February 1769 [Orders 1767-70, 279].

vii. ?Nathaniel, born say 1768, a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1790 to 1793 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 60, 101, 138].

viii. ?Milley, a "poor orphan" ordered bound apprentice to Elizabeth Brooks by the churchwardens of Southam Parish in Cumberland County court on 27 February 1769 [Orders 1767-70, 279].

ix. ?Henry1, a "mulattoe orphan" ordered bound apprentice to Francis Smith Couzens by the churchwardens of Southam Parish in Cumberland County court on 28 May 1770 [Orders 1770-2, 2]. He was a "free negro" charged in Richmond City court on 24 March 1788 with stealing a pair of paste shoe buckles the value of 3 pounds. He was found guilty and agreed to receive 25 lashes rather than be sent for trial in the district court [Hustings Orders 1787-92, 299]. He was a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County in 1793 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frame 90].

x. ?Landy, born say 1773, taxable in Powhatan County from 1790 to 1798, called a "Mo" in 1798 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 44, 104, 117, 130, 144, 160], called "Alexander Cousins Mulatto" in 1803 when he was taxable in the lower district of Goochland County in 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 650].

xi. Barbary, born about 1772, ordered to be bound by the churchwardens of King William Parish to Joseph Sallee on 21 October 1784 because her former master John Duprey had removed to Kentucky [Orders 1784-6, 64]. She registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 18 April 1815: dark complexion, about five feet four inches high, about forty three years old...short curled hair [Register of Free Negroes, p.86, no. 163].

xii. Abbey, born say 1778, married Tom Mayo, 2 July 1799 Goochland County bond, Joseph Attkisson surety.

xiii. Walton, child of Frances bound out by the Powhatan County court on 20 July 1786 [Orders 1786-91, 18].

xiv. Sarah, child of Frances bound out by the Powhatan County court on 20 July 1786 [Orders 1786-91, 18].

 

6.    Margaret1 Cousins, born say 1741, was an indented servant of John Woodson in June 1759 when her daughter Margaret (no race mentioned) was bound apprentice in Goochland County. She was called a "free Negro" in March 1770 when her son William was ordered bound out [Orders 1757-61, 218; 1767-70, 388]. She was the mother of

i. Margaret2, born say 1758, "an Infant of Margett Cousens an Indented Servant unto John Woodson," ordered bound apprentice by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish in June 1759 [Orders 1757-61, 218]. She or a daughter by the same name (no race indicated) was in adjoining Cumberland County on 29 March 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Littleton Parish to bind her out to John Woodson [Orders 1774-8, 120].

ii. Charles, born about 1760, a child of Margaret Cousins bound to John Woodson in May 1767 [Orders 1767-70, 16], a "Free Black" head of a Nottoway County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1020]. He was about sixty years old and living in Nottoway County in 1819 when he petitioned the legislature to allow him to free his wife Aggy (who he had purchased at the sale of an estate in 1810) and for her to remain in Virginia [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 263].

9        iii. Jacob1, born say 1761.

iv. Sall1, born say 1764, a child of Margaret Cousins apprenticed to John Woodson in May 1767.

v. Shepherd, born say 1768, a child of Margaret Cousins bound to John Woodson in February 1769. He was called "Mulatto Shepherd" in 1788 when his tax was charged to John Woodson in the upper district of Goochland County in 1788, called Shepherd Cousins in 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 184, 246].

vi. William2, born say 1769, "a Child of Margaret Cousins (being a free Negro)" bound to Thomas Oliver in March 1770 [Orders 1767-70, 281, 388]. He may have been the William Cousins who was taxable in Charlotte County from 1787 to 1805: his tax charged to (his brother?) Jacob Cousins in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 109, 141, 175, 204, 228, 252, 264, 301, 326, 353, 382, 621, 639, 654]. And he may have been the William Cousins who married Polly Banks, 4 October 1811 Goochland County bond, John Banks surety, 5 October marriage.

vii. Jane, born say 1770, a child of Margaret Cousins, "a free Mulatto," bound apprentice to Edward Redford in March 1772. Her children Cyrus and Benjamin were bound out by the Powhatan County court on 20 July 1786. On 21 June 1792 she complained to the court that Benjamin's master Rowland Pointer was mistreating him, and the court bound him instead to Henry Moss to be a bricklayer [Orders 1796-91, 18; 1791-4, 127, 132].

viii. Pat2, born say 1772, a child of Margaret Cousins, "a free Mulatto," apprenticed to Edward Redford in March 1772 [Orders 1771-78, 115].

 

7.    Elizabeth3 Cousins, born say 1744, was a "Malatto Girl" (no parent named) apprenticed by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish in Goochland County in May 1754 [Orders 1750-57, 409]. She was the mother of Sall, John, and Celia who were ordered bound out as apprentices by the Goochland County court in November 1770 [Orders 1767-70, 497]. She was living in adjoining Cumberland County on 23 November 1767 when the court ordered the churchwardens of King William Parish to bind out her "mulatto" children Walter and Oyster Couzens to Jane Holeman [Orders 1767-70, 63]. She was taxable on a horse in the lower district of Goochland County in 1787, called a "free negroe Spinner" in 1801 when she was taxable on a free male tithable and a horse, taxable on a free male tithable in 1806 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 164, 579, 761]. Her children were

i. John3, born about 1761, a child of Betty Cousins who was bound apprentice in Goochland County in November 1770. His tax was charged to Thomas Pleasants in the lower district of Goochland County in 1787 and 1788, charged with his own tax in 1790, called a "Mulatto" in 1793, a "freed Negroe" in 1794 and 1795, a "free negroe planter" in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 117, 195, 210, 251, 265, 325, 405, 579, 650]. He registered as a free Negro in Goochland County in 1806: about five feet ten inches and three quarters high, about forty five years of age...short curled hair [Register of Free Negroes, p.14, no.31]. He was head of a Fluvanna County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:689].

ii. Walter, born say 1763, bound apprentice in Cumberland County on 23 November 1767. He was taxable in Captain William Miller's Goochland County household in 1779 and in Mary Miller's household in 1780 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frames 419, 464], a Goochland County taxable in 1782, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1783, taxable there from 1787 to 1789 and called a "free negroe wheelwright" in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 6, 34, 163, 190, 204, 579].

iii. Sall2, born about 1767, child of Betty Cousins bound apprentice in November 1770. She may have been the Sally Cousins who was head of a Goochland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:689]. She registered in Goochland County on 19 June 1815: dark complexion about five feet four inches high, about forty eight years old, short curled hair [Register of Free Negroes, p.87, no.166].

iv. Oyster, bound apprentice in Cumberland County on 23 November 1767.

v. Celia, born say 1770, child of Betty Cousins bound apprentice in Goochland County in November 1770.

vi. Francis2, born say 1772, a "bastard of Betty Cousins" bound to William Robards in Goochland County in September 1773. He may have been the Francis Cousins who was taxable in Charlotte County from 1790 to 1795 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 204, 228, 314, 339]. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County on 2 horses in 1803, a "free Negroe" planter living near Thomas F. Bates in 1804, a "Freed Negro" cooper on Robert Pleasants' land in 1805, listed with wife Cloe in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 666, 738, 864; 1810-32, frames 5, 158].

vii. Jesse, born say 1774, a son of Elizabeth Cousins bound to William Robards in Goochland County in August 1774 [Orders 1771-78, 360, 446].

 

8.    Nan Cousins, born say 1760, daughter of Mary Cousins, was bound apprentice in Goochland County in May 1764. She was living in Goochland County on 15 November 1784 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her son Alex Cousins [Orders 1784-7, 182]. She was the mother of

i. Landy, born say 1773, taxable in Powhatan County from 1790 to 1798, called a "Mo" in 1798 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 44, 104, 117, 130, 144, 160], called "Alexander Cousins Mulatto" in 1803 when he was taxable in the lower district of Goochland County in 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 650].

 

9.    Jacob1 Cousins, born say 1761, "Son of Margaret Cousens," was apprenticed by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County, in November 1762 [Orders 1761-65, 133]. He was taxable in Charlotte County from 1783 to 1812: taxable on a horse and 6 cattle in 1783, charged with the tax for (his brother?) William Cousins in 1787, taxable on 3 free males in 1804, 2 free males in 1805. His Charlotte County estate was taxable on 2 horses in 1813. (His widow) Suckey Cousins, Sr., was listed with 2 "free Negroes" in her household in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 22, 109, 141, 175, 204, 252, 276, 300, 326, 353, 382, 484, 516, 550, 586, 621, 654, 688, 723, 756, 788, 821, 852, 894]. He purchased 100 acres in Charlotte County for 100 pounds on 2 September 1793. He purchased 60 acres on Wardsfork Creek in Charlotte County for 60 pounds on 6 October 1794 and sold the land to John Roach, Jr., for 41 pounds on 6 July 1795, reserving to lessee Benjamin Wilks undisturbable possession of the land. And he purchased 50 acres on the southside of Wardsfork Creek for 40 pounds on 31 December 1796 [DB 7:2, 76, 86, 129]. He was a "F.N." head of a Charlotte County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1018]. He and his wife Sukey were the parents of

i. ?John4, a "fn" taxable in Charlotte County from 1804 to 1810: listed with wife Lucy, a male child, and a female child in 1805, 1806 and 1807; listed with Betty Chavis in 1811 and 1812 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 604, 639, 648, 672, 682, 708, 717, 784, 814, 846].

ii. Jacob3, born about 1785, registered in Charlotte County on 10 February 1806: Son of Jacob Cozens, a Black Man five feet five inches & half high Twenty one years old. borne a freeman in the County of Charlotte [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 7]. He died about 1809 when his Charlotte County estate was taxable on a horse [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 756].

iii. James, born about 1789, listed in Charlotte County with Nancy Steward in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 894]. He registered in Charlotte County on 16 January 1819: a dark mulatto man five feet Eight inches high, about thirty years of age, son of Jacob Cozens and Suckey his Wife free persons of Colour, residing in the County of Charlotte [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 28].

iv. Henry, born 25 October 1791, registered in Charlotte County on 25 February 1811: a dark Mulato Man, five feet four inches high twenty years of age the 25th October 1811. Son of Jacob Cozens and Suky his Wife, free persons of Colour residing in the County of Charlotte where the said Henry Cozens was born [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 15]. He was taxable in Charlotte County to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 894].

v. Suckey Bird, born about 1805, registered in Charlotte County on 1 December 1828: a free woman of colour of dark complexion was born free the daughter of Susan Cozens about twenty three years of age...five feet seven inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 69].

vi. Nancy Brogdon, born about 1806, registered in Charlotte County on 1 December 1828: a free woman of colour of dark complexion was born free, the daughter of Susan Cozens about twenty two years of age...five feet four inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 70].

 

Other Cousins families in Virginia were

10       i. Polly, born about 1773.

ii. Martin, born before 1776, married Jincey Cole, 31 December 1802 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Robert Cole security. Martin was taxable on 1 poll in Country Line District of Granville County, North Carolina, in 1815 and was head of a household of 3 "free colored" in Country Line District in 1820 [NC:35].

iii. Henry2, taxable in Goochland County from 1809 to 1813: a "Mulatto" farmer living on William Richardson's land in 1811, a "free negroe" listed with wife Sally in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 844; 1810-32, frames 32, 52, 71, 120, 139]. He married Lydia Pierce, daughter of John Pierce ("a negro man of Dr. James Bryden's") and Milly Pierce, 30 May 1812 Goochland County bond. He was head of a Goochland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:685].

iv. Josiah, taxable in the upper district of Goochland County, listed with Lewis Chaudoine in 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 543]. He was head of a Buckingham County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:828].

v. Louis, born about 1800, obtained "free papers" in Brunswick County on 24 November 1828: the bearer hereof a free man of dark complexion about five feet five & an half Inches high ...about twenty eight years of age and was borne free as appears by the Evidence of James E. Webb.

vi. Joshua, born about 1804, obtained "free papers" in Brunswick County on 24 November 1828: the bearer hereof a free man of yellow complexion five feet five Inches high ...about twenty four years of age was born free as appears from the Evidence of James E. Webb [Wynn, Register of Free Negroes, 101].

 

10.    Mary2/Polly Cousins, born about 1773, was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1820. She was called Molly Cousins on 19 June 1820 when she registered in Mecklenburg County: five feet high, about forty seven Years old, of a light Complexion, free born [Free Person of Color, no. 6, p.15]. She may have been the mother of

i. George L., born about 1793, taxable in Country Line District, Granville County, in 1815. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820. He registered in Mecklenburg County on 19 June 1820: five feet Seven & 3/4 Inches high, about Twenty Seven years old, of a light Complexion [Person of Color, no. 1, p.13].

ii. Robert/ Robin, born about 1795, registered in Mecklenburg County on 19 June 1820: Robin Cousins, five feet Seven and 1/2 Inches high about twenty five years old...of a light Complexion [Person of Color, no.3, p.14]. He was called Robert Cousins in 1820, head of a Mecklenburg County household of one "free colored." He was probably the same Robert Cousins who was taxable in Country Line District, Granville County, in 1817, and was taxed on 120 acres on Grassy Creek in 1820. He was head of a Country Line District, Granville County, household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:35], called "free Negro" in the 1823 Granville tax list, taxed on 60 acres on Grassy Creek adjacent to Asa Cousins who was taxed on 4 acres.

iii. Henry3, born about 1797, registered in Mecklenburg County on 19 June 1820: five feet Eight & 3/4 Inches high about twenty three years old...of a light Complexion [Person of Color, no. 4, p.14]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of one "free colored" in 1820.

iv. Nelson, taxable on poll tax in Country Line District, Granville County, in 1815, head of a Mecklenburg County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820, perhaps the Nelson Cousins, born about 1797, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 July 1818: twenty one years old, black complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 321].

v. Lewis, born about 1801, registered in Mecklenburg County on 17 July 1826: a man of dark complexion 25 years of age five feet ten inches high... part of his left thumb Cut off by a whitlow, was born free in the County of Mecklenburg [Person of Color, no. 15, p.20].

 

Other members of the Cousins family in North Carolina were

i. John5, born about 1783, taxable in Country Line District, Granville County, in 1815. He registered in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 19 June 1820: about thirty Seven years old, dark complexion [Register, no. 2, p.13].

ii. Rebecca, "free born negro," bound an apprentice to Robert Davey by the July 1782 Caswell County court [A:205].

iii. Grief, head of a Randolph County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:64].

iv. Levina, "a woman of colour," presented in Granville County in November 1812 for moving to Granville from Virginia "without the necessary to entitle to be a citizen" [CR 044.928.25].

 

COWIGG FAMILY

1.    John Cowage, born say 1746, was a "Mollatto Boy" valued at 24 pounds currency in the 24 Jun 1752 Goochland County estate of Henry Miller [DB 6:352-4]. He was called John Cowigg when he served in the Revolution from Goochland County as a wagoner or in the service of supply [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 32]. He was taxable in Goochland County from 1787 to 1807: called a "Mulatto" in 1793, a "freed Negroe" in 1794, a "Mulatto" in 1803 and 1807. His wife was probably Clarissa Cowig free negroe who was taxable on her son John Cowigan in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 163, 190, 311, 376, 405, 568, 650, 803; 1810-32, 139]. They were apparently the parents of

i. John2, born about 1796, 16-21 years of age in 1813.

 

COX FAMILY

1.    Gilbert Cox, born say 1738, was taxable with (his brother?) Simon Cox in Bladen County in 1763, a "Molato" taxable in 1768, taxable with James Percey in 1770, a taxable "Mulato" in 1772 (also counted as a white taxable with James Purcey in 1772), a white taxable in 1774 with (his son?) John Cox, a "Molato" taxable in 1776, taxable on 100 acres of improved land and 300 acres unimproved in 1779, and counted in 1786 with one white male from 21-60 years old, one white male under 21 or over 60, four white females and two Blacks (slaves) from 12 to 50 and three over 50 or under 12 years of age [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:8, 34, 78, 94, 104, 130; II:68, 76, 117, 183]. He was granted a patent on 11 March 1775 for 300 acres southwest of Drowning Creek in the part of Bladen County which became Robeson County in 1787 [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:602], and he was taxable on 600 acres, one free poll, and 2 slave polls in Captain Barnes' District of Bladen County in 1784 [1784 Bladen County Tax List]. He entered 150 acres bordering this land on Ten Mile Swamp on 25 April 1791 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:45]. He purchased land in Robeson County by deed proved on 4 October 1797, purchased 340 acres on 2 January 1793, and sold land by deed proved 1 October 1798. He purchased "a Negro boy named Ned" by deed proved by his son Isham Cox on 3 October 1797, and sold this slave and 650 acres of land to Isham on 27 November 1809 [Minutes I:12, 15, 49; DB C:402; P:238-40, 263]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" and 8 slaves in 1790 [NC:49], 4 "other free" and 9 slaves in 1800 [NC:371], and he was counted as white in 1810, head of a Robeson County household of one male over 45 and one white female over 45 [NC:235]. By his 29 June 1810 Robeson County will he left 1,200 acres and twenty-three slaves to his wife Sarah and children: Isom (Isham), Mary Britt, Sarah Ivey, and Treacy Ivey [WB 1:119-20]. Gilbert was the father of

i. ?John, born say 1758, a "white" taxable in Gilbert Cox's Bladen County household in 1774, a "Molato" taxable in 1776, and counted in 1786 with one white male from 21 to 60 and one white male under 21 or over 60 years of age [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:130; II:68, 76, 183].

ii. Isham, born say 1775.

iii. Mary, wife of John Britt.

iv. Sarah Ivey.

v. Treacey, wife of Silas Ivey.

 

2.    Simon1 Cox, born say 1742, was taxable with (his brother?) Gilbert in Bladen County in 1763, a "Mulato" taxable with Adam Ivey in 1768, a "Molato" taxable in 1769 and 1770, taxable with James Perry/ Purcey in 1771, a white taxable from 1772 to 1774, a "Molato" taxable in 1776, taxable on 400 acres of improved land and 300 acres unimproved in 1779, taxable on 500 acres and one free poll in Captain Barnes' District of Bladen County in 1784, and counted in 1786 with one white male 21-60 years old, three white males under 21 or over 60 and four white females [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:4, 15, 33, 78, 94; II:68, 76, 116, 184; Bladen County Tax List (1763, 1784)]. He entered 40 acres between his two old surveys on both sides of Hog Swamp in Robeson County on 6 June 1788 and another 60 acres on 1 January 1789. On 8 October 1793 he entered 400 acres on "Gilbert Cox's meadow" and 200 acres bordering his own line [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:16, 20, 86]. He purchased land by deed proved in Robeson County court on 7 January 1799, 7 October 1806, and 1 January 1810; he sold land by deed proved on 2 April 1804, and transferred land to Levi Cox by deed proved on 6 January 1800 [Minutes I:55, 90; II:4, 172, 281]. He may have been the father of

i. Levi, counted as white in Robeson County in 1800, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:233].

ii. Simon2, Jr., born say 1778, head of a Robeson County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:371] and 4 in 1810 [NC:233].

iii. James, born say 1782, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:235] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:308].

iv. Jesse, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:233], perhaps the Jesse Cox who was head of a Wythe County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810. He was head of a Robeson household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:308].

v. Harmon, head of a Robeson County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:233].

 

Members of the Cox family in Virginia were

i. William, born say 1750, a "mulattoe" examined by the Cumberland County court on 19 June 1775 on suspicion of breaking and entering the house of Henry Skipworth and stealing corn valued at twenty shillings. He denied the charge and was discharged because there was no evidence against him [Orders 1774-8, 333]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:991].

ii. Rachel, born about 1752, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 May 1810: fifty-eight years old, black complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 129].

iii. Nancy, head of a Chesterfield County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062]. She married Manuel Valentine (free persons of colour), 13 September 1813 Chesterfield County bond, Jeremiah Ligon security [Marriage Register, 122]. She may have been the Nancy Valentine who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 28 October 1816, the same day that members of the Cox family registered: fifty-four years old, yellow complexioned, emancipated by will of John Brown, deced. [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 279].

iv. Ann, head of a Norfolk County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:892].

 

Endnotes:

1.    James Percey was probably related to John Purse, head of a Beaufort County, South Carolina, household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:104], and William Pierse, head of a Beaufort County, South Carolina, household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [SC:116].

 

COY FAMILY

Members of the Coy family were

i. Thomas, born about 1760, taxable in Petersburg on a tithe and a horse in 1799, taxable there from 1801 to 1815, listed as a "free Black" in 1813 and a "free Negro" in 1815 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 27, 74, 397, 452], registered in Petersburg on 13 June 1810: a brown Mulatto man, five feet two 3/4 inches high, fifty years old, born free & raised in Fredericksburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 602].

1        ii. Sarah, born about 1767.

iii. Anthony, head of an Amherst County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:307].

 

1.    Sarah Coy, born about 1767, was a "Mo" taxable on 2 horses in Powhatan County from 1799 to 1815: counted with 2 "free negroes & mulattoes over the age of 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 182, 205, 222, 238, 254, 276, 292, 315, 361, 378, 397, 419, 437, 456, 479]. She was called a "free Mulatto" on 17 November 1802 when the Powhatan County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out her children Joseph, Charles, Samuel, Billy, Judith, Sarah, Keziah and Rebecca Coy [Orders 1802-4, 207]. In April 1806 the court awarded her 11 pounds, 14 shillings in her suit against Martin Charlton, and in July 1806 the court awarded her $120 in her suit against Martin Charlton and John Wells on a forfeited bond for the delivery of property [Orders 1804-7, 565, cited by her descendant David A.G. Johnson, Jr.]. She registered in Powhatan County on 19 December 1822: Age 55; Color: Dark yellow; Stature: 5'5"; Born Free [Register of Free Negroes, 1820-65, no. 57]. She was the mother of

i. ?Nancy, born about 1783, over the age of twenty-one when she married William Armstrong, "Free Negroes," 13 July 1809 Powhatan County bond, Charles Coy surety. She registered in Powhatan County on 19 December 1822: Age: 39; Color: Dark yellow; Stature: 5'3-1/2"; Born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no. 52].

ii. Joseph, born about 1785, registered in Powhatan County on 20 September 1821: Age: 36, yellow complexion, 5'6" high, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no. 27].

iii. Charles, born about 1786, married Patty Hickman, daughter of Tim Mosby, "free Negroes," 4 October 1809 Powhatan County bond. He was a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1809 to 1815: a "F.B." taxable on 2 free tithes, 2 slaves and a horse in 1811; a "F.B." with 2 "free negroes & mulattoes over the age of 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 361, 378, 397, 419, 437, 456, 479]. He was a "F.B." head of a Powhatan County household of 17 "other free" in 1810 [VA:13]. He purchased 58 acres in Powhatan County in 1810 and leased 8 acres from Mickleberry Montague in 1821 on condition the owner build a commodious dwelling house of "logs with a shingled roof and plank floor in the loft with good chimneys of morter" as well as a blacksmith shop [DB 4:129; 6:354; 7:612; 11:100]. He registered in Powhatan County on 5 October 1840: Age: 54; Color: brown; Stature: 5'9-1/2"; Born Free [Register of Free Negroes, no. 477].

iv. Samuel.

v. Judith, purchased 1 acre in Powhatan County from John Ligon in 1811 [DB 4:261].

vi. Sarah.

vii. Keziah.

viii. Rebecca.

ix. William, a "F.B." taxable in Powhatan County in 1815 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frame 479].

 

CRANEY/ CRONEY FAMILY

1.    Margaret Croney, born say 1702, was listed on 18 August 1721 in the inventory of a York County estate as a servant with one-and-a-half years to serve. On 20 June 1726 the York County court presented her for having a "Mulatto" child [DOW 16:70, 387 (misnumbered 389)]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Sarah Craney, "free negro" head of a Northumberland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996].

 

CRAIG/ CRAGG FAMILY

Members of the Craig/ Cragg family were

i. George Crag, born about 1730, certified to be born of a free white woman and that he was upwards of forty years old in Halifax County, Virginia court in April 1770 [Pleas 6:488]. taxable in the upper district of Botetort County from 1787 to 1802: taxed on a horse in 1787, called a "Free Negro" in 1794 and 1798, a "free Mulatto" in 1802 [PPTL 1783-1810, frames 60, 171, 223, 238, 318, 426], a "Mulatto" laborer recorded in "A List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes within the District of James Trenor" near Salem in Botetourt County in 1802 [Free Negroes &c Registered in the Clerk's Office of Botetourt County, no. 16].

ii. Cattey (Catby?) Craig, born say 1780, mother of George3 Craig who registered as a "free Negro" in Alleghany County and presented his papers to the Botetourt County court on 18 June 1836: 33 years of age; Bright Mulatto ... Born free and son of Cattey (Catby?) Craig raised in the Town of Fincastle [Free Negroes &c Registered in the Clerk's Office of Botetourt County, no. 95].

iii. Thomas Craig, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:386].

iv. Thomas Cragg, "F. N." head of a Culpeper County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:18].

v. Sally Craig, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:386].

vi. Henry Craig, "F. Mo." head of a Culpeper County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:24].

vii. Betty Craig, a "Mulatto" spinster recorded in "A List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes within the District of James Trenor" in Botetourt County in 1803 and 1804 [Free Negroes &c Registered in the Clerk's Office of Botetourt County, 1803: no. 19, 1804: no. 27], head of a Botetourt County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:614].

viii. Samuel, born about 1778, registered in Fauquier County on 25 June 1821: age 43, 5'4-1/2", a bright Black [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 48].

viv. John Cragg, taxable on a horse in Botetort County in 1787 [PPTL 1783-1810, frame 60].

 

CREDIT FAMILY

Members of the Credit family were

i. Moses, a soldier in the Revolution from Northumberland County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 33].

ii. Sarah, taxable in Northumberland County on a slave and 2 horses in 1797; taxable on a free male, a slave and 2 horses in 1798; taxable on a free male and 2 horses in 1799 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 459, 475, 491], a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [Va:976].

iii. Thomas, taxable on a horse in Northumberland County in 1796 [PPTL 1782-1812, frame 474].

iv. John, taxable in Northumberland County from 1801 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 514, 550, 667, 682], a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:976].

v. George, a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:976].

 

CROSTON FAMILY

 

1.    Gustavus/ Travis D. Croston, born about 1757, was about sixty years old on 15 June 1818 when he appeared in Hampshire County court to make a declaration to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Alexandria and served for three years. He made a second declaration in court on 18 July 1820, stating that he enlisted in Newport (Charles County), Maryland, served as a private from 1778 to 1783 and was discharged in Alexandria, Virginia. He had 92 acres of land, debts of $60, had sold a horse to James Croston for $20 nearly three years previous, and six children who were all able to support themselves. He died on 19 August 1841 leaving no widow but several children [National Archives pension file no. S. 39379, http://www.fold3.com]. He was taxable in the lower district of Hampshire County from 1787 to 1813: called Gustavus in 1787 and 1788, Travis and sometimes Travis D., taxable on 2 tithes from 1807 to 1812, taxable on 1 tithe and 2 people of color (probably his wife) in 1813 [PPTL 1782-99, frames 96, 130, 162, 239, 251, 322, 337, 401, 513, 590; 1800-14, frames 32, 214, 301, 432, 506, 605, 657]. He was summoned by the Hampshire County court on 17 September 1796 to show cause why his children should not be bound out [Horton, Hampshire County Minute Book Abstracts, 1788-1802, 24]. He was head of a Hampshire County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:833], 11 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:281] and 2 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:8]. He was granted 50 acres in Hampshire County on North River adjoining Reece Prichard on 17 October 1796, 32 acres adjoining this land and James Higgins on 27 March 1811, 55 acres on North River adjoining Jacob Compton on 13 October 1812, 100 acres on North River adjoining Henry Compton on 31 October 1823 and 21 acres on North River on 4 November 1833 [Northern Neck Land Grants X:67; A-2:407-8, A-2:501, C-2:223-4, D-2:229-30]. He was probably the father of

i. Thomas D., born about 1785, taxable in Randolph County from 1819 to 1823: called a "F.N." in 1821, in the list of Free Negroes & Mulattoes in 1822 [PPTL 1787-1829, frames 516, 533, 548, 584, 615], head of a Randolph County household of 6 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:272], a "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Barbour County with "Mulatto" (wife?) Mary Croston and $1,000 real estate [VA:15a], a sixty-five-year-old "Mulatto" counted in Philippi with $2,000 real estate in 1860 [VA:26].

ii. Nancy, born about 1788, a "Mulatto" counted in Hampshire County in the 1850 census [VA:275a] and counted with $150 real estate in the 1860 census [VA:67].

iii. John, born about 1789, head of a Hampshire County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:251], 10 in 1830, 9 in 1840 [VA:8], a sixty-one-year-old "Mulatto" farmer counted in the 1850 Preston County census with (wife?) Elizabeth and $400 real estate, and a sixty-eight-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the Philippi, Barbour County census in 1860, a farm laborer with $18 personal estate [VA:35] and a seventy-seven-year-old "Mulatto" counted with Elizabeth Male in the Reno Township, Preston County census for 1870 in the household next to Wilmore Male [family nos. 215 & 216].

iv. James, born about 1790-1797, head of a Hampshire County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:15] and 3 in 1840 with a white woman aged 30-40 [VA:8], a "Mulatto" counted in Hampshire County in the 1850 census with white woman Elizabeth Wommick, born about 1802 [VA:275b] and counted with $500 real estate in the Eastern District of Hampshire County in the 1860 census [VA:67]. He and William Croston were granted 14 acres in Hampshire County on the drains of the North River on 31 December 1849 [Northern Neck Land Grants F-2:178].

v. Hanson, born say 1803, taxable in Randolph County on a tithe and a horse in 1820 [PPTL 1787-1829, frame 533].

vi. William, born about 1800-1807, a "Mulatto" counted in Hampshire County in the 1850 census with (wife?) Catherine, born about 1820) [VA:275a], and counted with $2,900 real estate in the 1860 census [VA:67].

vii. ?Charles, born about 1805-1814, head of a Hampshire County household of 5 "free colored," a white woman (20-30) and a white man (50-60) in 1840, a fifty-six-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the 1870 Philippi census with "Mullatto" wife Polly and $200 personal estate, a seventy-five-year-old "Mulatto" farmer (Charles Chroston) counted in the 1880 census for Philippi whose father was born in Maryland [VA:88c].

 

CUFF FAMILY

1.    John Cuff, born say 1750, was head of a Gates County household of one male 21-60, five males under 21 or over 60, and two females in the 1786 North Carolina State Census, 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:23], 8 in 1800 [NC:264], and 2 in 1810 [NC:835]. He may have been related to Will Cuff, head of a Fluvanna County, Virginia household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:474]. John Cuff's land adjoining White Pot Pocosin was mentioned in Gates County deeds of 28 December 1800 and 2 February 1801. He purchased 98 acres adjoining John Cuff, Jr., on 8 March 1805 [DB 5:222, 306; 9:278]. His children were most likely

i. Smith, born before 1776, head of a Gates County household of 4 "other free" in 1800, 8 in 1810 [NC:849], and 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:146]. He married Mary Knight, 24 October 1799 Gates County bond.

ii. Mason, born before 1776, head of a Gates County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:849] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:146].

iii. John2, born say 1780, owned land adjoining (his father?) John Cuff on 8 March 1805 [DB 9:278]. He may have been the John Cuff who was head of a Gates County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:835].

iv. Malechiah, born say 1786, purchased 50 acres "whereon his father lived on Honey Pot" on 7 April 1807 [DB 7:44]. He was head of a Gates County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:146].

v. Isum, born say 1789, purchased 29 acres at the head of White Pot on 18 February 1810 [DB 8:97].

vi. Levin, an insolvent taxpayer in 1819 [Minutes 1818-23, 1291]. He married Milley Ellis, 15 February 1823 Gates County bond with John Cuff bondsman.

vii. Daniel, an insolvent taxpayer in 1819 [Minutes 1818-23, 1291].

 

CUFFEE FAMILY

1.    John1 Coffee, born say 1690, was called "my Negro Coffee" in the 10 September 1716 Elizabeth City County will of James Burtell, recorded 10 days later. The following year on 17 July 1717 he appealed to the court for help in curing his ulcerated leg, and the court ordered Robert Taylor, one of the securities for Burtell's estate, to help him. Emanuel Alkin, a chirugeon, cared for his leg, but his suit against Taylor for payment was dismissed by the court. John Coffee was free the following year on 18 September 1718 when he was called "John Coffee a Negro" in a suit he brought against Robert Taylor for assault and battery. Taylor delayed the case each time it was called until it was dismissed on 19 August 1719 because of Taylor's death. Coffee then brought the suit on 18 November 1719 against the other administrators of Burtell's estate, John King and John Burtell, who also asked for a delay. When the suit was called again on 18 May 1720, it was restated as his suit for his freedom, but the case was dismissed because John Coffee was "gon" (left the county) [DW&O 1715-21, 49-50, 58-60, 73, 103, 129, 135, 145, 155, 166, 174, 184, 121]. His children may have been

2        i. Sarah1, Sr., born say 1725.

3        ii. Mary1, born say 1738.

 

2.    Sarah1 Cuffee, Sr., born say 1725, was a "free Negro" taxable in Norfolk County in the district from Great Bridge to Edmond's Bridge from 1751 to 1768: charged with her own tithe from 1751 to 1756; her tax charged to John Curling in 1761; listed with John Cuffee in 1765; charged with her own tithe, Mary Cuffee's and Ann Smith's tithe in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 25, 40, 47, 76, 97, 131, 176, 198; 1766-80, 23, 52]. On 19 March 1763 the churchwardens of St. Brides Parish were ordered to bind out her children Rachel and Charles as apprentices [Orders 1763-65, 15]. She was taxable in Norfolk County from 1782 to 1811 (called Sarah Cuffee, Sr., or oldest): taxable on 4 cattle in 1782; taxable on a horse and 4 cattle in 1787; a slave over the age of sixteen in 1792 and 1793, 2 free tithes in 1796; 2 slaves in 1798; a slave from 1801 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, frames 391, 414, 449, 494, 547, 589, 604; 1791-1812, frames 50, 65, 188, 271, 548, 609, 636, 674, 716]. She was the mother of

4        i. ?John2, born say 1743.

5        ii. ?Sarah2, Jr., born say 1745.

iii. ?Nan, born say 1747, taxable in the household of John Cuffee in the Norfolk County district from Great Bridge to Edmund's Bridge and New Mill Creek in 1765 and 1766, called Nan/ Nanny (no last name indicated) [Wingo, Norfolk County Virginia Tithables, 1750-65, 198; 1766-1780, 1]. She was called "Nan Coffee, a free negro," on 18 March 1773 when she and Drew Halstead's slave named Roger were convicted of hog stealing [Orders 1771-3, 161]. She was taxable on a free male in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, in 1791 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frame 5].

iv. ?Dinah, taxable on 2 cattle in Norfolk County in 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, frame 589].

v. Rachel, born say 1753, bound apprentice to Ruth Gamman in Norfolk County on 19 May 1763 [Orders 1763-65, 15].

6        vi. Charles1, born about 1755.

 

3.    Mary1 Cuffee, born say 1738, was a "free negro" taxable in Norfolk County in the district from Great Bridge to Edmond's Bridge and New Mill Creek from 1754 to 1768: charged with her own tithe in 1754 and 1768; her tax charged to Frances Curling in 1759; listed with John Cuffee in 1766; with Sarah Cuffee in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 76, 132; 1766-80, 1, 23, 52]. She was living in Norfolk County on 19 May 1763 when her daughter Frances was ordered bound apprentice to John Gammon by the churchwardens of St. Brides Parish [Orders 1763-65, 15]. She was called Moll Cuffy in the 31 March 1774 issue of the Virginia Gazette when it reported that she was a "Negro woman" about thirty-five years old who claimed to be free but was jailed in Norfolk [Virginia Gazette (Purdie & Dixon edition)]. She was called Molly Cuffee when she was taxable in Norfolk County from 1782 to 1794: taxable on a horse in 1782; charged with her son Lemuel's tithe, a horse and 6 cattle in 1784; her sons Lemuel and John in 1785 and 1786; taxable on a horse in 1787; a free male and 3 horses in 1792; a free male and a slave over the age of sixteen in 1793; a slave and 2 horses in 1794 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, frames 390, 414, 449, 494, 547, 698; 1791-1812, frames 5, 50, 64, 120]. Her children were

i. ?Elijah, born say 1759, taxable in the Norfolk County household of Benjamin Butt in 1780 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80]. He was charged with his own tax from 1784 to 1786, called "Elijah Cuffee Senior" in 1785 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, frames 449, 494, 547].

ii. Frances, born say 1762, bound apprentice on 19 May 1763. Fanny was taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, on 2 cattle in 1784 and 1786; 2 free males in 1798; a free male in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, frames 449, 547; 1791-1812, frames 272; 1813-24, frames 11, 67].

7        iii. Lemuel, born say 1765.

8        iv. John3, born say 1769.

v. ?Aaron, taxable in St. Bride's Parish from 1795 to 1817: in the "List of Free Negroes" which start in 1801; charged with 3 "free Negro" tithables and a horse in 1815 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 155, 317, 400, 558, 609, 674, 716; 1813-24, frames 11, 72, 206], head of a household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:794].

vi. ?George1, born about 1780, taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from 1799 to 1807: taxable on a horse in 1799, taxable on 2 free males in 1800 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 316, 337, 416, 456], a "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:445]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 7 November 1831: 6', age 51, a negro man of dark complexion, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 290].

 

4.    John2 Cuffee, born say 1743, was taxable in Norfolk County in the district from Great Bridge to Edmunds Bridge from 1761 to 1766: his tax charged to John Curling in 1761; charged with his own tithe, Sarah Cuffee and Nan in 1765; a "free negro" taxable on his own tithe, Molly Cuffee, and Nanny Cuffee in 1766 [Wingo, Norfolk County Virginia Tithables, 1750-65, 176, 198; 1766-1780, 1]. He may have been the father of

i. Courtney Allen, born about 1768, registered in Norfolk County on 18 October 1815: Courtney Allen formerly Courtney Cuffee 5 feet 6 1/2 Inches 47 Years of age of a dark Complexion, Born free in the County of Norfolk [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.103].

ii. Lydia Mitchell, born about 1771, registered in Norfolk County on 18 October 1815: Lydia Mitchell formerly Lydia Cuffee 5 feet 8 Inches 44 Years of age of a dark Complexion, Born free in the County of Norfolk [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.103]. She may have been the wife of Robert Mitchell, head of a Norfolk County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:794].

iii. Mary2 Mitchell, born about 1774, registered in Norfolk County on 18 October 1815: Mary Mitchell formerly Mary Cuffee 5 feet 2 Inches 41 Years of age of a Yellowish Complexion, Born free in the County of Norfolk [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.104].

iv. James, born about 1778, taxable in St. Bride's Parish of Norfolk County from 1797 to 1817: taxable on 2 tithes in 1815, 5 horses in 1817 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 205, 272, 400, 456, 548, 636, 802; 1813-24, frames 67, 72, 204]. He was head of a Norfolk County household of 11 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:795]. On 18 May 1812 he purchased 50 acres on the Northwest Creek from Southard Cartwright of Pricness Anne County for $210 and purchased another 50 acres in Saint Brides Parish, part of a tract of land called Long Ridge, from Hugh McQuillon for $250 on 13 March 1816 [DB 45:261; 46-290-1]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1836: age 58, 6'2-1/2", dark complexion, born free in Norfolk County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 382].

v. Sally, born about 1785, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831: 4'11", age 46, a bright mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 255].

 

5.    Sarah2 Cuffee, Jr., born say 1745, was taxable in Norfolk County in the district from Great Bridge to Edmunds Bridge from 1761 to 1766: her tax charged to Frances Curling in 1761, charged to William Sikes, Jr., from 1765 to 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 176, 198; 1766-80, 3]. She was taxable in St. Bride's Parish from 1782 to 1817 (called Sarah Cuffee, Jr., or youngest): taxable on a horse and 4 cattle in 1782; a slave over the age of sixteen and 4 horses in 1793; a free male and a horse in 1798; in the list of "free Negroes" which start in 1801; taxable on a slave over the age of sixteen from 1804 to 1810; taxable on 2 free male tithes, a horse and 12 cattle in 1815, 1 free male in 1817 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1791, frames 391, 413, 494, 661; 1791-1812, frames 65, 272, 548, 609, 636, 674; 1813-24, frames 72, 205]. She may have been the mother of

i. Euphan, taxable in St. Bride's Parish on 2 cattle in 1783, a horse in 1785, 3 cattle in 1787, perhaps identical to Fan Cuffee who was taxable on 2 free tithes and a horse in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, frames 413, 494, 589; 1791-1812, frame 802].

ii. Rhoda, taxable on a horse in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, in 1793 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frame 65].

 

6.    Charles1 Cuffee, born about 1755, was called the son of "free Negro" Sarah Coffe when he was bound apprentice to Nathaniel Sikes in Norfolk County on 19 May 1763 [Orders 1763-65, 15]. He was taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1791, frames ; 1791-1812, frames ; 1813-24, frames ]. He was a "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:445]. He enlisted in the Revolution in 1780 for eighteen months, and he applied for and was granted a pension while a resident of Princess Anne County on 7 June 1830 when he was seventy-five years old. He stated in court that he was living with his thirty-year-old wife Katy and his twelve or thirteen-year-old son Tom. His widow Catherine declared that she was about sixty years old when she applied for a survivor's pension on 28 August 1857. She further testified that her maiden name was Catherine Fuller, that they were married in Princess Anne County in 1815 by Samuel Brown, a Baptist Minister, and that her husband died on 1 Oct 1844. Her widow's pension was suspended during the Civil War, but it was reinstated based on her application of 3 June 1867 [National Archives Pension file W-9402]. One of their children was

i. Thomas, born about 1817.

 

7.    Lemuel Cuffee, born say 1765, was taxable in St. Bride's Parish Norfolk County from 1784 to 1817: charged with 2 tithes in 1788; taxable on slave in 1798; in the "List of Free Negroes" which start in 1801; taxable on 2 "free Negro" tithes in 1815, a "B.M." (Black Man) living on Deep Creek in 1816 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, frames 547, 603, 661, 699; 1792-1812, frames 5, 50, 188, 271, 337, 456, 636; 1813-24, frames 73, 126, 242]. He was head of a Norfolk County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:804]. He was the father of

i. Charles2, taxable in St. Bride's Parish from called "son of Lam" when he was counted as a "free Negro" in Norfolk County in 1813 and 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1813-24, frames 11, 73]. He may have been the Charles Cuffee, born about 1789, who registered in Norfolk County on 15 March 1811: 5 feet 3 In. 22 Years of age of a light Complexion, born free in the County of Norfk. [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.47].

 

8.    John3 Cuffee, born say 1769, taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, from 1785 to 1814: a 16-21-year-old taxable listed with his mother Molly Cuffee in 1785 and 1786, called John Cuffe, Sr., in 1800, in the "List of Free Negroes" which start in 1801, taxable on 2 free males and a horse in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-91, frames 494, 547, 603, 661; 1791-1812, frames 5, 64, 187, 316, 337, 416, 456, 548, 636, 802; 1813-24, frames 11, 67]. He married Sally Shafer (Chavers?), 4 March 1790 Norfolk County bond, Lemuel Cuffee surety, with a note attached to the bond: John Cuffee, a free man, made oath before me that Sally Shafer, orphan of John Shafer, is upwards of twenty-one years of age. He was head of a Norfolk County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:794]. He was the father of

i. Charles3, called "son of John" when he was counted as a "Free Male Negro above the age of 16" in Norfolk County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1813-24, frame 11].

 

Their descendants in Norfolk County were

i. William, head of a household 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:794]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, 1812 and 1813 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frame 802; 1813-24, frame 11]. He was a man of color from Norfolk County who was listed in the size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Courthouse [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149].

ii. Isaac, born say 1772, a "N."(Negro) gardener living near Norfolk who was taxable on a slave over the age of sixteen in 1801, taxable on 2 horses in 1802, a horse and 2 carriage wheels in 1802 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 373, 428, 461A].

iii. Samuel, born say 1782, a "free Negro" taxable in St. Bride's Parish from 1799 to 1813: charged with 3 tithes in 1799 and 1800 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 316, 337, 456, 802; 1813-24, frame 11].

iv. Caleb, born say 1784, a "free Negro" taxable in St. Bride's Parish from 1801 to 1817: taxable on a slave aged 12-16 and a horse in 1802 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 400, 416, 548, 716, 802; 1813-24, 67, 205].

v. Willis, born say 1784, a "free Negro" taxable in St. Bride's Parish from 1801 to 1817 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 400, 416, 456, 548, 716, 802; 1813-24, 67, 204], head of a household 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:795].

vi. Patsy, head of a Norfolk County household 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:795].

vii. Nancy, head of a Norfolk County household 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:795].

viii. Nancy, head of a Norfolk County household 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:802].

ix. George2, taxable in St. Bride's Parish from 1811 to 1817: called George Cuffee, Jr., in 1811, George D. Cuffee in 1812 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frame 802; 1813-24, frames 11, 67, 205], head of a Norfolk County household 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:795].

x. Abram, a "free Negro" taxable in St. Bride's Parish in 1812 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frame 802].

xi. Lovey, head of a household 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:794].

xii. John3, born about 1779, head of a household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:795]. He registered in Norfolk County on 19 August 1811: 6 feet 2 In. 32 years of age of a light Complexion ... Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.56].

xiii. Henry, born about 1790, registered in Norfolk County on 4 March 1811: 6 feet, 21 Years of age, of a Yellowish Complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.46].

 

CUMBO FAMILY

1.    Emanuell1 Cambow, "Negro," was granted a patent for 50 acres in James City County on 18 April 1667 [Patents 6:39]. He may have been the "Mulata named Manuel" who was adjudged to be a Christian servant by the Virginia Assembly in September 1644. He was ordered to serve as other Christian servants and freed in September 1665 [VMHB XVII:232]. He was probably the father of

2        i. Richard1, born say 1667.

 

2.    Richard1 Cumbo, born say 1667, was living in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent and James City counties, on 15 February 168_ when his daughter Elizabeth was baptized [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 3]. He was taxed on 80 acres in New Kent County in 1704 [Smith, Virginia Quit Rent Rolls, 218], and he and his wife Ann sold 100 acres where they were living in Westover Parish, Charles City County, on 2 February 1724/5 [W&D 1725-31, 8, 9]. In January 1737/8 the Charles City County court dismissed a grand jury presentment against him, and in April 1741 he was awarded 50 shillings in his suit against Benjamin Evans [Orders 1737-51, 32]. His children were

3        i. Elizabeth1, born 15 February 168_.

4        ii. ?John1, born say 1700.

5        iii. ?Gideon1, born say 1702.

6        iv. ?Richard2, born say 1715.

v. ?David, born say 1722, sued James Nance in Charles City County in March 1744/5 [Orders 1737-51, 340, 352, 359]. He was a "Black" taxable in Brunswick County, North Carolina, in 1772 [G.A. 11.1].

vi. ?William, born say 1723, sued Hubbard Williams for trespass, assault and battery in Charles City County in January 1744/5 [Orders 1737-51, 329, 337, 341]. He was taxable on two white tithes in Cumberland County, North Carolina, in 1755 [T&C - Box 1], and he entered 181 acres in Granville County in January 1761.

vii. ?Mary, born say 1724, mother of William Bates who was bound out by the Charles City County court in August 1744 [Orders 1737-51, 319].

viii. ?Paul, born say 1726, presented by the Charles City County court in May 1742 for not going to church. He sued Lewis Delony in court in February 1748/9 [Orders 1737-51, 204, 213, 491, 497, 533, 561].

 

3.    Elizabeth1 Cumbo, born say 1688, was baptized 15 February 168_ in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County. She may have been the mother of

7        i. Elizabeth2, born say 1720.

 

4.    John1 Cumbo, born say 1700, received a patent on 22 February 1724 for 150 acres in Surry County, Virginia, on both sides of the Rockey Run of Little Creek and the south side of Three Creeks [Patents 12:162]. He was a "Mulo" listed in Col. Nathaniel Harrison's account books which were recorded in the Surry County estate of his wife Mary Harrison in 1733, and he was listed in the account of sales of the 16 August 1738 Surry County estate of John Barlow [Deeds, Wills 8:318, 881]. He was in Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1738 [Orders 1732-41, 192] and was living in adjoining Northampton County, North Carolina, on 2 July 1746 when a deed mentioned land on Peahill Creek and John Cumbo (on the Brunswick County, Virginia line) [DB 1:260]. On 5 February 1747 Nathan Edwards sued him for a 6 pound, 9 shillings debt in Brunswick County claiming that he had absconded. William Pettway, who had 30 barrels of Indian corn and part of a crop of tobacco belonging to John Cumbo, paid the debt for him [Brunswick Orders 1743-49, 130]. He was witness to the 20 April 1750 Northampton County deed of John Avent to John Wood for land on Peahill Creek [DB 1:420]. He purchased property be deed proved in Brunswick County from Joseph Right in 1751 and sold 238 acres in Brunswick County on 6 August 1760 [DB 5:135; 6:595]. There were four suits against him for debt in Brunswick County court between December 1753 and July 1756 [Orders 1753-6, 95, 191, 295, 370; 1756-7, 106]. James Gowen sued him in Brunswick County court on 27 December 1757 [Orders 1757-9, 143]. His plantation was probably the Northampton County tract of land called "Cumboes" in the 19 February 1759 Granville will of William Eaton [Grimes, Abstract of N.C. Wills, 172]. On 7 August 1761 Major Tiller was granted a patent for land adjoining "Cumboes" in Brunswick County, Virginia, on the north side of Peahill Creek, up the Stoney Lick Branch [Patents 33:1066-7]. On 6 April 1764 he made a Northampton County deed of gift of his cattle and household goods to (his son?) Thomas Cumbo for maintaining him for his lifetime [DB 3:197]. Perhaps he was the father of

i. John2, born say 1728, called John Cumbo, Jr., when he purchased 238 acres on the south side of Reedy Branch in Brunswick County, Virginia, adjoining John Jett's line on 30 December 1751 [DB 5:135]. He was sued for debt in Brunswick County court on 22 April 1755 and 27 January 1756. On 28 July 1760 the court ordered that he be given fifteen lashes for breaking into the house of John Pearson Taylor and stealing goods of very little value [Orders 1753-6, 386, 520; 1760-84, 90]. He was paid 5 shillings by the Brunswick County estate of James Stewart on 23 September 1765 [DB 3:436]. He was a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1772 and taxable with his wife Lucy in 1774 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:83, 124, 127]. He sold 100 acres in Bladen County east of the great Marsh on 11 January 1786 [DB 1:340].

ii. Cannon1, born say 1730, living on land owned by John MacKinne when MacKinne made his 28 February 1753 Edgecombe County, North Carolina will. He allowed Cannon the use of the land until 1758 [Gammon, Edgecombe County Will Abstracts, 54]. Cannon was listed in the Edgecombe County Muster Roll of Captain William Haywood in the 1750s [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 677].

8        iii. Thomas1, born say 1731.

iv. Fortune, born say 1733, the mother of a poor soldier in the Continental Service on 17 December 1778, 20 May 1779 and 19 August 1779 when the Halifax County, Virginia court issued a certificate to the Treasurer that she had been provided with public assistance. She may have been the mother of Thomas Gimbo, a poor soldier whose wife and children received assistance in Halifax County on 21 August 1777 [Pleas 1774-9, 236, 384, 414; 1779-83, 65].

v. Charles1, born say 1742, proved the 6 April 1764 deed of (his brother?) Thomas Cumbo in Northampton County, North Carolina court [DB 3:197]. He was one of the freeholders of Halifax County, Virginia, who were ordered to work on the road from the courthouse to Banister Upper Bridge in July 1770 [Pleas 6:510]. He was head of a Halifax County, Virginia household of 7 persons in 1782 [VA:22] and 7 in 1785 (Charles Kumbo) [VA:88]. He was taxable in the northern district of Halifax County from 1782 to 1801: taxable on 2 horses and 6 cattle in 1782 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 9, 21, 35, 66, 99, 158, 369, 559, 862; 1800-12, frames 9, 95]. He married Elizabeth Maskill, 17 April 1786 Halifax County bond, William Powell surety. He purchased property from James Maskill by deed proved in Halifax County court on 21 April 1780 [Pleas 1779-83, 129]. His 4 March 1802 Halifax County will, proved in April 1802, named his wife Elizabeth and children Molly, Sally, Elizabeth, Annis, Nancy, Elexander, William, Charles and Lucy C. Cumbo who were considered white [WB 6:347].

vi. Jacob, born say 1750, counted as white in 1790, head of a Chatham County household of 4 persons [NC:84].

 

5.    Gideon1 Cumbo, born say 1702, was a delinquent taxpayer reported at the vestry held for Blisland Parish, Virginia, on 11 October 1723 [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book of Blisland Parish, 7]. He was added to the list of tithables by order of the Brunswick County, Virginia court on 6 December 1733. His Brunswick County court petition against William Person was dismissed "on hearing both parties" on 2 June 1748 [Orders 1732-37, 41; 1743-49, 391, 427, 501]. He was called Gibeon Cumbo in Brunswick County court between 27 June 1750 and 28 January 1756 when a dozen suits were brought against him, most of them for debt [Orders 1749-50, 102; 1751-3, 213, 219, 438, 450, 512, 519; 1753-6, 94, 183, 221, 305, 309, 360, 417, 450, 529; 1756-7, 58, 70]. He was called "Gibeon Cumbo a Mallato" when he was sued for debt in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on 20 October 1758. His attorney asked for but was denied the right to claim insolvency. He was also sued for debt on 21 July 1759 by James Wright [Minutes 1755-59, 39, 41, 53, 60]. On 9 June 1762 Major Tiller entered a caveat against him for 222 acres on the south side of the Meherrin River in Brunswick County, Virginia, and Tiller was granted a patent for the land [Hillman, Executive Journals of the Council, VI:225]. Perhaps his children were

i. Peter1, born say 1723, sued Joseph Jeffries in Brunswick County, Virginia court in June 1749. The case was dismissed when both parties failed to appear. John Williams obtained an attachment against his estate, including a rug, wallet, plats, handkerchief, thread, a knife, a meal bag, a pewter dish, 9 yards of sheeting linen, 3 ells of chex cloth, remnants of chex, serge, brown linen, drugget, a hank of silk and some thread which was returned to court on 1 and 2 January 1752 [Orders 1743-49, 523; 1751-3, 118, 125, 170]. He may have been the Peter Combon who was a taxable in the 1751 Lunenburg County list of Hugh Lawson [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 174] and the Peter Cumbo who was taxable in Nash District of Caswell County in 1780 [CR 020.701.10].

9        ii. Solomon1, born say 1727.

10      iii. Elizabeth3, born say 1728.

11      iv. Stephen1, born say 1730.

v. Mary, called "Mary Cumbo alias Morris" on 26 December 1753 when Francis Myrick sued her in Brunswick County court for 47 shillings due by account [Orders 1753-6, 99].

12      vi. Cannon2, born say 1735.

 

6.    Richard2 Cumbo, born say 1715, was called Richard Cumbo, Jr., in June 1741 when the Charles City County court presented him for not going to church, and in February 1741/2 when he was fined 20 shillings for refusing to assist the sheriff in the pursuit of a runaway. He was probably the Richard Cumbo (no Jr.) who was fined 500 pounds of tobacco by the Charles City County court on 6 September 1758 for not listing his wife as a tithable [Orders 1737-51, 165, 180, 191; 1758-62, 57]. He was added to the list of tithables in York County on 17 August 1772. He sued Robert Evans in York County on 17 May 1773 and was awarded 1 shilling damages. Reuben and Peter Gillett were his witnesses [Orders 1772-4, 84, 272, 336]. He, or perhaps a son by the same name, was a soldier from Charles City County who served in the infantry during the Revolution [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198]. His widow may have been Sarah Cumbo whose deed to Simon Gillett was proved in York County court on 18 October 1784 by Lawrence De Rozario, a witness [Orders 1784-7, 86]. And a Sarah Cumbo was taxable on 53 acres in James City County in 1800 [1800 Land Tax List, p.3]. Richard may have been the father of

i. Edith, born say 1757, sued Adam White in York County court on 15 June 1778 for trespass, assault and battery [Orders 1774-84, 162]. She was head of a household of 2 persons in Williamsburg City in 1782 [VA:46]. She may have been the Edith Cumbo who was sued by the churchwardens of Antrim Parish, Halifax County, Virginia, in August 1769 (for having an illegitimate child?) in a case that was dismissed "for reasons appearing to the court" [Pleas 6:446].

 

7.    Elizabeth2 Cumbo, born say 1720, was living in New Kent County on 19 November 1772 when the St. Peter's Parish paid her son Turner for maintaining her [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book of St. Peter's, 181, 192, 206, 210]. She was the mother of

i. Turner1, born say 1750, paid by the churchwardens of St. Peter's Parish on 19 October 1772 for keeping his mother Elizabeth [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book of St. Peter's, 181, 192, 206, 210]. He was head of a New Kent County household of 3 "whites" (free persons) in 1785 [VA:92]. He was taxable in Blisland Parish, New Kent County, on the south side of Warrenny Road on 2 horses and 6 cattle from 1783 to 1785. His widow was probably Mary Cumbo who was taxable on a horse and 8 cattle in New Kent County in 1786 and 1787 and taxable on a horse from 1793 to 1803. Their child was probably Nelson Cumbo who was taxable on a horse from 1805 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1800, frames 33, 37, 61, 80, 94, 205; 1791-1828, frames 355, 368, 381, 405, 418, 429, 441, 453, 463, 474, 485, 497]. He and a woman over the age of forty-five (his mother Mary?) were counted as white in the 1810 New Kent County census [VA:748].

 

8.   Thomas1 Cumbo, born say 1731, was sued for debt in Brunswick County, Virginia court on 29 November 1752. He had left the county by June 1755 when William Wyche brought suit against his estate [Orders 1751-3, 352; 1753-56, 450; 1756-7, 58]. He bought 172 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, near Ivy's Branch and Gilliam's Spring Branch bordering Brunswick County, Virginia, on 10 December 1761 and sold this land two years later on 23 January 1764 [DB 3:188, 274]. He was one of the freeholders of Halifax County, Virginia, who were ordered to work on the road from the courthouse to Milner's Ordinary in April 1769 and was called Thomas Cumbo, Sr., in September 1769 when he was sued in Halifax County court for a debt of 24 pounds [Pleas 6:332, 462]. He was head of a Halifax County, Virginia household of 12 persons in 1782 [VA:24] and 13 in 1785 [VA:89]. He was taxable in the southern district of Halifax County from 1782 to 1797: taxable on his unnamed son in 1789, listed with 3 tithables in 1792, 1793, 1795 and 1796, 2 in 1797, called a "Mulo" in 1795, called Thomas Cumbee in 1797 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 7, 261, 413, 437, 535, 599, 673, 697]. He and his wife Susannah sued John Franklin in Halifax County court on 19 September 1783. On 27 August 1789 he was paid as a witness for Sarah Jones in her suit for false imprisonment against James Johnson, Jr., James Johnson, Alexander Hillson, William Johnson and James Hammonds. He sold property by bill of sale proved in court on 28 November 1791, and he sued William East for slander on 22 May 1797 [Pleas 1779-83, 400; 1788-9, 204; 1789-90, 46-47; 1790-2, 305; 1796-8, 176]. He was taxable from 1800 to 1802, called Thomas Cumby, Sr., in Charlotte County where the family was considered white [PPTL, 1782-1815, frames 484, 516]. He and his wife Susannah sold 148 acres in Charlotte County on Louse Creek for 80 pounds on 7 December 1801 [DB 9:117, 158]. He was the father of

i. ?Peter2, married Milly Ramsey, 28 December 1785 Halifax County, Virginia bond, Charles Cumbo surety; John Perkins and Thomas Cumbo witnesses. He was taxable on his own tithe and a horse in the southern district of Halifax County in 1789, called a "Mulo" in 1795, called Peter Cumbee, Jr., in 1797 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 296, 413, 534, 599, 673, 697, 812].

ii. ?Patience, married Robert Wilson, 16 April 1787 Halifax County, Virginia bond, surety Robert Smith.

iii. Molly, "daughter of Thomas Cumbo," married James Matthews, 20 July 1790 Halifax County, Virginia bond, David Gowing surety, 29 July marriage.

iv. ?Sarah, married Ezekiel Matthews, 23 April 1793 Halifax County, Virginia bond and 7 May 1793 Caswell County bond with Allen Going bondsman.

v. ?John6, born say 1773, married Polly Jennings, 19 August 1794 Halifax County, Virginia bond, Bolling Hamlett surety. He was a "Mulo" taxable in the southern district of Halifax County in 1795 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frame 599]. He died before 25 February 1797 when his Halifax County, Virginia estate was appraised at 20 pounds [WB 3:316].

vi. ?Jeffrey, a "Mulo" taxable in the southern district of Halifax County in 1795 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frame 599].

vii. ?Emanuel2 Cumbee, taxable in the southern district of Halifax County 1798 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frame 810], taxable in Charlotte County in 1799 and 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1813, frames 447, 484], taxable from 1801 in Campbell County where the family was considered white [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 512, 593, 728, 873].

viii. Major, born say 1783, son of Thomas Cumbo, married Margaret McMichael, daughter of John McMichael, 1804 Charlotte County bond, Thomas Cumbo surety.

ix. Patsey, born say 1788, daughter of Thomas Cumbo, married Elisha Smith, 1806 Charlotte County bond, William Turner surety.

 

9.    Solomon1 Cumbo, born say 1727, successfully brought suit in New Hanover County court against John Potter on 2 May 1759, William Wilkinson on 7 December 1764, and Thomas Watson on 5 April 1771 [Minutes 1738-69, 233; 1771-79, 8]. On 7 October 1768 the sheriff paid Thomas Lloyd, Esq., out of the county tax to attend to "Mrs. Cumbow while she was sick with the smallpox" [Minutes 1738-69, 377-378, 388]. He was called Solomon Cumbo "free Mulatto" when he was ordered to work on the streets of Wilmington [Wilmington Town Book by Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 29]. He was head of an Onslow County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:197], 5 in Brunswick County in 1800 [NC:14], and 7 in Brunswick County in 1810 [NC:226]. His children may have been

i. Reuben, head of an Onslow County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:197], 6 in Brunswick County in 1800 [NC:14], and 9 in Brunswick County in 1810 (R. Cumbo) [NC:226]. He entered 50 acres on the east side of Lewis Bridge in Brunswick County on 30 January 1801 and another 50 acres in this area on 5 November 1804 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Brunswick County, 69, 90].

ii. Absalom, entered 100 acres in Brunswick County on both sides of Russell's Branch on 22 September 1800, 50 acres in the fork of Scraping Hole Branch on 22 March 1813, and 100 acres on the east side of Scraping Hole Branch on 16 August 1814. On 27 January 1819 John Skipper, Sr., entered this land, including "Absalom Cumbow's improvement" [Pruitt, Land Entries: Brunswick County, nos. 1074 2123, 2169, 2512]. Absalom was counted as white in Cumberland County in 1820 [NC:169].

iii. Solomon3, head of a Brunswick County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:226], entered 50 acres in Brunswick County on both sides of Russell's Branch bordering his own land on 16 November 1804 and 75 acres on the east side of Lewis' Branch and Cypress Branch on 26 January 1811 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Brunswick County, 90, 123].

 

10.    Elizabeth3 Cumbo, born say 1728, was living in Surry County, Virginia, in July 1750 when the court ordered her "Natural-born" children: Darcus, Winifred and Hercules bound out by the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish [Orders 1749-51, 110]. She sued Charles Bass for debt in Brunswick County, Virginia court on 27 June 1758. On 24 April 1775 the Brunswick County court ordered the churchwardens of Meherrin Parish to bind out her orphan-son Cannon Cumbo [Orders 1757-9, 204; 1774-82, 73]. She may have been the Elizabeth Cumbo whose "mulattoe" son Solomon Cumbo was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Southam Parish, Cumberland County, Virginia, on 27 March 1775 [Orders 1774-8, 321]. She was the mother of

i. Dorcus, born say 1746.

ii. Winifred, born say 1748.

iii. Hercules, born say 1750.

13      iv. Cannon3, born say 1758.

14      v. Solomon2, born say 1765.

15      vi. ?Matthew, born say 1774.

 

11.    Stephen1 Cumbo, born say 1730, was taxable in Granville County in 1750 in the list of Jonathan White [CR 44.401.23]. In 1769 he was taxed on 4 persons in Brunswick County, North Carolina:

Cumbo, Stephen Mollo 3 Negro men, 1 Negro boy [SS 837],

and he was taxed in Brunswick County on 3 Black polls in 1772 [G.A. 11.1]. He was also taxable in 1772 with his son Jacob in Bladen County ("Molatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:78]. He was head of an Onslow County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:197] and 7 in Edgefield District, South Carolina, in 1810 [SC:797]. He may have been identical to Stephen Cumbee, a taxable on 150 acres in Winton, South Carolina, in 1788 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 34]. His children were

i. Jacob, taxable in his father's Bladen County household in 1772.

ii. ?Leroy, head of an Edgefield District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:777].

iii. ?Thomas2, called "Thomas Cumbee, overseer," when he married Charlotte Collins, "free persons of color," on 27 June 1805 at St. Philip's and Michael's Parish, Charleston.

 

12.    Cannon2 Cumbo, born say 1735, was taxable with his wife in Bladen County from 1768 to 1776 ("Molatoes"), taxable on a female slave and a male slave under 16, and head of a household of 8 "white" males under 21 or over 60, 4 "white" females, and 1 "Black" in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:5, /14, 34, 60, 78, 95, 123, 134; II:55, 74, 162]. He was granted a patent for 100 acres in Bladen County on the southwest side of Drowning Creek on 22 January 1773 [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:319]. He was taxable in Bladen County on this 100 acres and a free poll for himself and a slave poll in 1784 in Captain Regan's District. He entered two tracts of land of 100 acres each in what was then Robeson County on the north side of Jacob Swamp and Drowning Creek on 19 January 1789 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:21] and sold 100 acres of this land to Horatio Hammond on 17 May 1804 [DB N:216]. He transferred land to his sons Aaron and Elisha by deeds proved on 8 July 1800. On 22 May 1801 his slave, Caesar, was convicted of stealing two pairs of shoe bolts and a trunk from John Peter Martin and was given thirty-nine lashes at the public whipping post. He purchased two tracts of land in Robeson by deeds proved on 5 April 1802 [Minutes 1797-1806, 112, 152, 191]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50] and 6 "other free" and one slave in 1800 [NC:372]. His children: John, Stephen, Gibion, Elijah, and Aaron were ordered to work on the road from Raft Swamp to Gibion Gibson's Landing by the 6 October 1801 Robeson County court [Minutes 1797-1806, 173]. He and his descendants must have been very light-skinned since Robeson County residents thought they were Portuguese [Norment, The Lowrie History, 7]. Cannon's 19 March 1817 Robeson County will, proved in November 1823, named his children [WB A:204]. They were

i. Gideon2/ Gibion, born say 1755, called Gilbert Cumbo in 1784 when he was taxable in Captain Regan's District of Bladen County on 250 acres and one poll. He was head of a Bladen County household of 1 "white" male from 21 to 60 years old and 3 "white" females in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:162], head of a Robeson County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50], 5 in 1800 (called Gibby) [NC:372], and 6 in 1810 (called Gibby) [NC:231]. He made a Robeson County nuncupative will on 1 November 1837, proved May 1838, leaving all his estate to Mary Cumbo. Elizabeth and Jemima Cumbo were witnesses [WB A:327].

ii. Stephen2, born say 1758, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 and 4 "free colored" in New Hanover County in 1820 [NC:227]. He married Sarah Broom, 23 October 1799 Robeson County bond with (his brother) Aaron Cumbo bondsman. He was exempted from paying poll tax on 5 July 1808 [Minutes II:96]. He sold land by deed proved in Robeson County court in February 1827 [Minutes III:142].

iii. ?Nathaniel, born say 1761, not mentioned in his father's will, perhaps deceased or left the county before then. He was taxable on one poll in Captain Regan's District of Bladen County in 1784 and entered 100 acres on the east side of Drowning Creek on 5 May 1791 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:45]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50] and one of the "free persons of Colour" of present-day Liberty and Marlborough counties, South Carolina, who petitioned the legislature to repeal the discriminatory tax against "free Negroes" on 20 April 1794 [South Carolina Department of Archives and History, General Assessment Petition, 1794, no. 216, frames 370-374, Free People of Color ST 1368, series no. 165015, item 216].

iv. John4, born say 1765, head of a Robeson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50], 4 in 1800 [NC:372], and 3 in 1810 [NC:231]. He made a nuncupative will witnessed by his brother Gibson in Robeson County on 20 May 1814 leaving all his estate to his wife Mary [WB A:153]. His father Cannon left "Daughter Mary Cumbo, widow of John Cumbo 200 acres where she now lives." Mary was head of a Robeson County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:304].

v. Aaron, born say 1775, head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1800 [NC:372]. The 6 July 1803 Robeson County court attached seven of his cattle for a debt to Mitchel Biggs [Minutes 1797-1806, 255]. He sold land to his brother Elisha by deed proved by their brother Stephen in Robeson on 27 August 1811 [Minutes 1806-13, 282]. Aaron was head of a Georgetown, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:219].

vi. Elisha, born say 1777, head of a Robeson County household of 3 white males and 2 white females in 1800 and 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:231]. In 1805 one of Elisha's brothers was convicted of larceny on complaint of a white man named William Townsend. Soon afterwards, Townsend's horse was shot dead. He felt certain that Elisha had done it but was unable to obtain a warrant because he had no evidence. He prevailed upon Major William Odom and five other whites to arrest Elisha without a warrant for which Elisha brought a bill of indictment against them. In October 1805 the Superior Court of Fayetteville District fined Major Odom 15 pounds and the other six 10 pounds each for riot. They appealed to the North Carolina General Assembly, describing the Cumbos as "Mulattoes who are well known as Infamous Characters," but their petition was rejected [Schweninger, Southern Debate over Slavery, vol. 1: Petitions to Southern Legislatures]. Elisha purchased land from his brother Aaron by deed proved by their brother Stephen in Robeson County on 27 August 1811 [Minutes 1806-13, 282].

vii. Elijah, born say 1780, head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:231].

viii. Solomon4.

ix. Moses.

 

13.    Cannon3 Cumbo, born say 1758, orphan son of Elizabeth Cumbo, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 23 February 1778 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Meherrin Parish to bind him to Joseph Prince on the condition that he receive 15 pounds per annum during his apprenticeship and that he be taught the trade of shoemaker [Orders 1774-82, 73, 189]. He was living alone in 1783 when he was counted in the Greensville County, Virginia census [VA:54] and was taxable that year on a horse and 3 head of cattle [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1807, frame 17]. He was sued in Greensville County court on 23 March 1792 [Orders 1790-9, 122]. He was head of Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73]. He was not mentioned again in Northampton County records, so he may have been identical to "Bird Cumbo" whose estate inventory was dated 3 August 1799. Tabitha Cumbo, his widow, was allotted a years support in December 1799 [Gammon, Records of Estates, Northampton County, I:33]. She died before 17 November 1805 when her father Moses Newsom gave "the heirs of my daughter Tabitha Cumbo decd" one dollar each by his Northampton County will [WB 2:297]. They were

i. Jinny, received a dollar by her grandfather's will.

ii. Henry, born 1794-1806, head of a Northampton County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:222].

iii. John8, born 1794-1806, head of a Northampton County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:220].

 

Other members of the Cumbo family in Northampton County were

i. Phoebe, head of a Northampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:716].

ii. Polly, head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:716].

iii. Britain, born 1776-1794, head of a Northampton County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:222].

iv. Wyatt, deceased by 5 June 1820 when the Northampton County court granted administration of his estate to James Rowell [Minutes 1817-21, 274].

v. Fady, married Howell Wade, 17 May 1823 Northampton County bond. Howell Wade, born before 1776, was head of a Northampton County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

 

14.    Solomon2 Cumbo, born say 1765, was taxable on his own tithe and 3 horses in Williamsburg in 1788 [Personal Property Tax List, p.1]. He was the father of three children whose births were registered in Bruton Parish, York and James City counties. He died before 20 May 1799 when William Jarvis sued the administrator of his estate in York County court for 14 pounds, 7 shillings. Perhaps his widow was Martha Cumbo who sued James Cannady, Jr., for trespass, assault and battery in York County court on 19 May 1801 [Orders 1795-1803, 317, 458, 539]. His children were

i. James Johnson, born 11 June 1786 [Bruton Parish Register, 36].

ii. Elizabeth4, born 20 November 1787 [Bruton Parish Register, 36].

iii. Sarah, born 19 August 1790 [Bruton Parish Register, 36].

 

15.    Matthew Cumbo, born say 1774, illegitimate child of ___ Cumbo, was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, on 28 February 1780 [Orders 1774-82, 331]. He was head of a Hertford County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:188] and 4 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:405]. He may have been the father of

i. David, born about 1798, head of a Hertford County household of 3 "free colored" females (males crossed out) in 1820 [NC:186], 2 in 1830 [NC:405], a "Mulatto" counted with twenty-eight-year-old Nancy Cumbo in 1850 [NC:667].

 

Other members of the Cumbo family from Charles City and James City counties were

i. Jethro, born say 1750, taxable in James City County on a tithe and a horse from 1782 to 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99].

16      ii. Stephen3, born say 1755.

iii. Daniel, born say 1760, a solider from Charles City County who served in the Revolution [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198]. George Harwell sued him in Greensville County, Virginia court on 22 August 1782, and the sheriff sold a bay mare of his to pay a 10 pound debt he owed Robert Stewart on 25 May 1786 [Orders 1781-9, 40, 277]. He was taxable in James City County on 2 slaves and 2 horses in 1788 and taxable there from 1794 to 1813: taxable on a slave and a horse in 1794, 1798 and 1801, a slave and 3 horses in 1807 and 1808, and counted with one male and one female in a list of "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99; 1800-15].

iv. Michael1, born say 1760, enlisted in the 6th Virginia regiment on 12 September 1777, sick in the hospital in the August 1778 muster commanded by John Gibson, and listed as deceased in the September 1778 muster [http://www.fold3.com, researched by Jane Ailes].

v.  Michael2, taxable in York County from 1788 to 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 139, 161, 191].

vi. Richard3, enlisted in the 6th Virginia Regiment for three years on 5 September 1777 [http://www.fold3.com, researched by Jane Ailes].

vii. John3, born say 1762, died before 26 July 1791 when the overseers of the poor of Charles City County bound his orphan daughter Mourning Cumbo to George Hubbard until the age of eighteen [DB 4:61]. He may have been the John Cumbo who served in the Revolution from Charles City County [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198].

viii. Peter, a soldier from Charles City County who served in the Revolution [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198]. He may have been the Peter Cumbo who was listed as "runaway" in the 1783 tax list for Brunswick county, Virginia, in 1783 [PPTL 1782-99, frame 61] and sued by the churchwardens of Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, on 24 January 1785 [Orders 1784-8, 59, 85].

ix. Fluellen, born say 1765, taxable on one free tithe in Charles City County from 1787 to 1802. Perhaps his widow was Nancy Cumbo who was taxable on a horse in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List 1788-1814].

x. Jesse, born say 1767, taxable in James City County from 1788 to 1795: taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1790 and 1792. He apparently died before 1797 when his estate was taxable on 2 horses. His wife was probably Tabitha Cumbo who was taxable on a horse in 1798 and 1799, taxable on a free male tithe in 1803, 1804, and 1806, taxable on a horse in 1812 and a "mulatto" head of a household of a "Free Person of Colour above 16 years" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99; 1800-15]. On 22 November 1803 she was paid for travelling from James City County and attending York County court as a witness for Lucy Harris in her suit against William Jarvis [Orders 1795-1803, 602, 613].

xi. Abram Thomas (alias Cumbo), born say 1769, married Mary Brown, "daughter of Abram Brown deceased," by marriage agreement of 13 April 1791, proved in Charles City County court on 15 December 1791, by which he recognized her right to slaves Isaac and Jane, two feather beds, and some stock of cattle and hogs which were in her possession [DB 4:66]. He was taxable in Charles City County as Abraham Cumbo alias Thomas from 1790 to 1799 and called Abraham Thomas in 1800 and thereafter [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

17      xii. John5, born say 1771.

xiii. James, born say 1772, taxable in Charles City County in 1793 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814], taxable in James City County in 1802 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-15] and head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattos over 16" in Williamsburg in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

18      xiv. Anderson, born about 1773.

xv. Turner2, born say 1773, taxable in Charles City County in 1794, 1797, 1798, 1800, 1802, 1809 and 1813: called Turner Cumbo alias Thomas in 1794 and called "Turner Comboo Mulattoe" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814]. He was probably the Turner Cumbo who was taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1799 and 1800: his tax charged to William Thomas in 1799 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 420]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:953]. On 19 December 1811 he was married to Rebecca Cannady when their son Walker Cumbo received a Charles City County deed of gift of a cow and two calves from his grandfather James Cannady of James City County [DB 5:405-6]. Turner was a "cold" man taxable in James City County in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-15].

 

16.    Stephen3 Cumbo, born say 1755, was a soldier from James City County who served in the Revolution [Gwathmey, Historical Register of Virginians in the Revolution, 198]. He was taxable in James City County from 1782 to 1814: taxable on 3 horses and 4 cattle in 1782, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1785, taxable on 2 horses and 6 cattle in 1787 and 2 tithes and a horse in 1800. He was counted with one male and one female in a list of "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in James City County in 1813 taxable in James City County [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99; 1800-15]. He may have been the father of

i. William, born say 1782, taxable in James City County from 1803 to 1812 and counted with one male and one female in a list of "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-15].

ii. Robert, born say 1788, taxable in James City County from 1809 to 1814, a "cold man" counted with one male and one female in a list of "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in James City County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-15].

iii. Kitty, counted in the list of "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in James City County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-15].

 

17.    John6 Cumbo, born say 1771, was taxable in Charles City County from 1792 to 1814: a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814] and head of a Charles City County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958]. He may have been the John Comboe who married Sally Delaney, 10 August 1797 York County bond. John was the father of

i. Thomas, born about 1814, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 20 August 1835: son of John Cumbo, mulatto man, straight hair, almost twenty one years old [Minutes 1830-7, 244].

 

18.    Anderson Cumbo, born about 1773, was taxable in Charles City County from 1792 to 1812 and was counted as a "Mulattoe" in 1813 [PPTL, 1788-1814]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 18 September 1823: a mulatto man aged fifty years, five feet seven & 1/2 inches high, much pitted with the smallpox, was born in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 8]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958] and 15 "free colored" in 1830. He was the father of

i. John9, born about 1807, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 July 1831: son of Anderson Cumbo, a bright mulatto man, about twenty four years old, is a free man of colour [Minutes 1830-7, 65].

ii. Warren, born 4 August 1810, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: son of Anderson Cumbo, a bright mulatto, twenty one years old 4 August last [Minutes 1830-7, 84].

iii. Stanhope, born about 1815, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 20 August 1835: son of Anderson Cumbo, mulatto man, twenty years old [Minutes 1830-7, 244].

.   

Endnotes:

1.    John Potter (6 "other free"), James Potter (7 "other free"), and Robert Potter (4 "other free") were heads of Brunswick County, North Carolina, households in 1800 [NC:14].

 

CURLE FAMILY

Members of the Curle family of North Carolina and Virginia were

i. William, head of a Petersburg Town household of 9 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:119b].

ii. Susan, head of a Petersburg Town household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:125a].

1        iii. Nancy, born say 1765.

 

1.    Nancy Curle, born say 1765, was living in Gates County, North Carolina, in May 1791 when the court ordered her four-year-old "Molatto" son Bryant Curle bound apprentice to Aaron Ellis. She was the mother of

i. Noah, born about 1783, eight-year-old illegitimate child of Nancy Curle, no race indicated, bound apprentice to Michael Lawrence by the August 1791 Gates County court.

ii. Bryant, born about 1787, bound apprentice in May 1791 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1787-93, 84, 90].

 

CUNNINGHAM FAMILY

1.    Mary Cunningham, born say 1730, was living at John Kinsman's on 13 November 1750 when the Charles County, Maryland court presented her for bearing a "Mullatto Child" by information of Constable Alexander MacPherson [Court Record 1750, 140]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Waters, a "Mulatto" child bound apprentice to John Williams in Frederick County, Virginia, on 9 March 1753 [Orders 1751-3, 449].

ii. John, head of a Washington County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:570].

iii. Benjamin1, head of a Hampshire County, Virginia household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:818].

iv. Philip1, head of a King George County, Virginia household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:193].

v. Benjamin2, head of a King George County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:193].

vi. Cyrus, born about 1777 when he was bound as an apprentice, registered in King George County on 28 May 1799: of a dark yellow Colour aged about twenty two years and about five feet ten inches high is now a free man, has served William Hooe, Gent., of this County twenty one years [Register of Free Persons, no.10].

vii. Philip2, Jr., head of a King George County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:195].

viii. Nancy, head of a Goochland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:688].

ix. Jas.(?), head of a King George County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:195].

x. Charity, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76].

 

CURTIS FAMILY

The Curtis family may have originated in St. Mary's County, Maryland, where there were five "other free" families in 1790. (See Free African Americans of Maryland and Delaware by this author). Jonathan Curtis was a "Free Negro" living in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in June 1744. He was called "Jonathan Curtis late of Charles County, Planter," in March 1749/50 in Charles County, Maryland court when William Hunter and Company of Spotsylvania County sued him for debt, and he was called "free Negroe" in Hunter's accounts which were copied into the court record. He may have been the father of Ignatius Curtis whose "Mulatto" son Henry was bound out in Fauquier County, Virginia, in 1769. (Ignatius was a common name among the Roman Catholic families of Maryland). His son Henry was taxable in Caswell County, North Carolina, in 1790.

Members of the Curtis family in Virginia and North Carolina were

1        i. Jonathan1, born say 1715.

2        ii. Richard, born say 1730.

3        iii. Jonathan2, born say 1755.

iv. James2, born say 1755, an apprentice boy who ran away from William Row before 1 August 1771 when Row advertised for his return in the Virginia Gazette: yellow complexion, has a sharp nose, and wears his own short hair [Virginia Gazette (Rind edition)].

v. Chloe, a "free Negro" head of a Culpeper County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:24].

 

1.    Jonathan1 Curtis, born say 1715, was indicted by the Spotsylvania County, Virginia court on 5 June 1744 (along with five other persons) for selling liquor without a license. He was called a "Free Negro" on 6 November 1744 when the court ordered him to post bond of twenty pounds for his good behavior because John Doncastle complained that he had broken open some of his locks. Doncastle sued him for a one pound, nine shillings debt on 6 February 1744/5, but the court found in Jonathan's favor [Orders 1738-49, 265, 286, 308, 322, 335]. He was called "Jonathan Curtis late of Charles County, Planter," in March 1749/50 in Charles County, Maryland court when William Hunter and Company of Spotsylvania County sued him for a debt of 10 pounds, 12 shillings Maryland currency. He was called "free Negroe" in Hunter's accounts which were copied into the court record. The accounts were from October 1746 to 18 November 1747 and included a pocket book, shoes, rum, cloth, sheeting, buttons, thread, handkerchiefs, and a padlock. Samuel Luckett was Jonathan's security [Charles County Court Records 1748-50, 630-2]. He was also sued by William Hunter in Spotsylvania County court in July 1749, but the case was dismissed [Orders 1748-50, 521]. Jonathan may have been the father of

3        i. Ignatius, born say 1737.

 

2.    Richard Curtis, born say 1730, received a patent for 158 acres in Onslow County, North Carolina, on 26 September 1751 [Hoffman, Land Patents, I:254]. He and his wife were "free Negro" taxables in Beaufort County in 1755 [SS 837]. On 9 November 1764 he received a patent for 400 acres in Beaufort County on the north side of the Bay River between Chapel Creek and Raccoon Creek and on the side of Whitehouses' Creek [Hoffman, Land Patents, I:519]. He was listed in the Beaufort County militia under command of Colonel William Brown prior to 1765 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 782]. He was counted as white in 1764 with his son James (Cortis Richd & Son James) [SS 837]. His wife may have been Mary Cirtis who received land on Raccoon Creek by the 23 April 1773 Beaufort County will of her father James Muckelroy. Richard's children were

i. James1, born say 1748, perhaps the husband of Ann Curtis, head of a Beaufort County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:125].

ii. ?John, taxed on an assessment of 247 pounds in Beaufort County in 1779 [LP.30.1 by NCGSJ XV:145]. His 3 August 1791 Beaufort County will loaned his wife Mary his plantation which was to go to his daughter Easter after her death and gave his son David 100 acres on Raccoon Creek. His son David and Adam Mackelroy were executors. James Mackelroy was a witness [Original at Archives].

iii. ?George, born say 1760, married Casiah Johnston, 20 May 1783 Craven County bond with George Ransom bondsman.

 

3.   Jonathan2 Curtis, born say 1755, was a "Mulatto" head of household in Buxton's list for Nansemond County in 1784 [VA:74], taxable on a tithe and a horse in Petersburg in 1799 [1799 PPTL B, p.3] and head of a Petersburg household of 9 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:117b]. On 6 November 1799 he purchased about a half of an acre plot (no. 65) in the part of Petersburg called Pocohontas for $200 [DB 2:736]. He was taxable in the Chesterfield County part of Petersburg from 1800 to 1813: listed with a slave and 2 horses in 1810, called a "free Black" in 1813 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 16, 64, 95, 306, 423]. He may have been the father of

i. Simon, born about 1776, taxable in Petersburg on one tithe, a slave and a horse in 1799 [Personal Property Tax List B, p.3], registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet eleven inches high, twenty four years old, born free & raised in Nansemond County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 185].

ii. Isham, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on 12 November 1801: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet ten inches high, short bushy hair, twenty years old, born free in Nansemond County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 218].

 

4.    Ignatius Curtis, born say 1737, was a "free Negro" taken before the Spotsylvania County court on 21 March 1757 and accused of breaking open the storehouse of John Spotswood, Esq., and stealing several pieces of cloth. He was sent for further trial at the General Court [Orders 1755-65, 65]. He was called a "Criminal Free Negro" on 11 October 1759 when the sheriff of Henrico County was paid for putting him in jail [Orders 1755-62, 379-80]. He was living in Fauquier County, Virginia, on 28 August 1769 when the court bound out his "Mulatto" son Henry as an apprentice carpenter to George Henry [Minutes 1768-73, 132]. He was the father of

5        i. Henry1, born say 1760.

6        ii. ?Ann, born say 1770.

 

5.    Henry1 Curtis, born say 1760, a "Mulatto," was ordered bound to George Henry as an apprentice carpenter by the Fauquier County court on 28 August 1769. He was called "Harry, a Mulatto" on 25 September 1769 when he complained to the court about George Henry [Minutes 1768-73, 132, 141]. He was taxed in Caswell County in 1790 [NC:79], and was head of a Person County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:596] and 2 in Caswell County in 1810 [NC:468]. In 1797 he was one of the freeholders of Person County who were ordered to work on the road from the Caswell County line to Hyco. He was sued for a 27 pound debt in the June 1799 Person County court and was again ordered to work on a Person County road in June 1802 [Minutes 1797-1802, 17, 132, 350]. He was bondsman for the 18 May 1807 Caswell County marriage bond of Jesse Hood to Polly Sawyer. He (or perhaps Henry, Jr.) purchased two tracts in Person County on the waters of the South Hyco Creek on 3 March 1816 - one of 41-1/2 acres and the other 40 acres [Deeds p.471]. This was land on the border of Caswell and Person Counties. He may have been the father of

i. Henry2 Jr., born say 1785, head of a Caswell County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:468].

ii. James J., head of a Caswell County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:468] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:50]. He married Nancey Pendergrass ("colored"), 19 February 1800 Person County bond with Byrd Rogers bondsman.

iii. Elizabeth, born say 1780, married Richard Pendergrass, 6 December 1798 Person County bond, Richard Pendergrass (Sr.?) bondsman.

 

6.    Ann Curtis, born say 1770, was the wife of Austin Curtis Jones of Halifax County, North Carolina. He was called "Austin Curtis a Mulatto Slave belonging to Willie Jones" when the North Carolina General Assembly approved his manumission [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 4]. He was the former servant of Willie Jones, Sr., who received $200 by Willie's 22 February 1798 Halifax County will, proved August 1801 [WB 3:355]. He may have been the "Austin" who was head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:289]. He purchased 165 acres on Red Hill branch of Quankey Creek in Halifax County for $600 on 19 August 1803 and another 145 acres nearby for $300 on 21 March 1808 [DB 19:147, 207]. In his 3 December 1808 Halifax County will, proved February 1809, Austin left 330 acres to his wife Nancy Curtis Jones and nine of his children who were free and mentioned his son William, whose freedom he had recently given him [WB 3:484]. His free children were probably children of Ann Curtis. She was called Ann Curtis Jones on 19 August 1810 when she received title to 110 acres on Quankey Creek adjoining John Hawson, her third part of the land mentioned in her husband's will. In November 1826 her children were called by the name Curtis when Henry, Joseph, Patsy, and Lucy sold their share of their father's land, and Betsy, Fanny, and Jackey divided the remainder [DB 21:469; 27:218]. Ann Curtis was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" and 6 slaves in 1810 [NC:13], and 8 "free colored" in 1830 (born 1776-94). She was probably related to Lucy Murray who mentioned Fanny Curtis and Patsy Jones, mother of William Jones, in her 15 November 1815 Halifax County will [WB 3:587]. Austin Curtis Jones' children were

i. Henry3.

ii. Lucy Bell, whose husband, by her father's will, was to receive no part of her inheritance. He was probably Zadock Bell, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:290] and 5 in 1810 [NC:7].

iii. Patsy.

iv. Elizabeth.

v. Joseph.

vi. Frances.

vii. Jacky.

viii. Matilda.

ix. Austin2.

x. William.

 

Other members of the Curtis family in Halifax County were

i. Rachel, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Mary, born 1794-1806, head of a Halifax County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Margaret, bound apprentice to Henry Curtis by order of the 17 November 1840 Halifax County court. Henry may have been the H.W. Curtis, living in household # 1847 in the 1860 Halifax County census: 44 years old, "Mulatto," $250 personal estate.

iv. Mary, bound apprentice to Melvin Dempsey by order of the 17 November 1840 Halifax County court.

 

Endnotes:

1.    George Ransom was head of a Craven County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134].

2.    Polly Sawyer was probably a descendant of Joanna Sawyer whose race was not mentioned when the court ordered David George to post 1,000 pounds to appear in Granville County court to answer a charge of having "disposed of" her children [Minutes 1773-83, August 1777 dockets]. Others were Job Sawyer, head of a Chatham County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 and Solomon Sawyer, head of a Caswell County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:88].

 

CUSTALOW FAMILY

1.    John Castellaw, born say 1730, a white man, was taxable in the Bertie County, North Carolina on a "Free Mulatto Female" named Martha Butler  in 1761 and 1763 and taxable on her tithe in the lists for 1766 through 1772 [CR 10.702.1]. In June 1768 he was security in Bertie County court for the maintenance of Martha's illegitimate child [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:831]. She was apparently his common-law wife since in 1771 William Castellaw was taxed in the Bertie County list of Humphrey Nichols as a "free Molattoe," and in 1771 John made a deed of gift to "William Castellaw son of Martha Butler." The deed was proved in Bertie County by the oath of Arthur Williams who was probably the common-law husband of Martha's sister Elizabeth Butler [DB L:283; CR 10.702.1]. Martha was head of a Gates County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:143]. Her children were

2        i. William Castellaw, born say 1755.

3        ii. ?Agnes Custalow, born say 1767.

 

2.    William Castellaw, born say 1755, was a "free Molattoe" taxable in Bertie County in 1771. He may have been identical to William Custaloe who was a "FM" taxable in Richmond City in 1799 [PPTL 1799-1834], and he may have been the father of

i. James Custalow, born say 1781, a "FM" taxable in Richmond City in 1799, taxable on a slave in 1801 and 1809, a "FN" taxable in 1813, and a "Free negro" taxable on 2 slaves in 1814 [PPTL 1799-1834], a "free Mulatto" taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1803 [Land Tax List, 1799-1816 (includes Personal Property Tax lists)] and head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:373].

ii. Reuben Custiloe, born say 1783, a "free negro" taxable in St. Martin's Parish, Hanover County, Virginia, in 1800, a "Mul." taxable there in 1801 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1792-1803, pp. 177, 199]. He was a "FN" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in 1804 and 1805 [Land Tax List, 1799-1816 (includes Personal Property Tax lists)].

 

3.    Agnes Custalow, born say 1767, may have been the illegitimate child born to Martha Butler before 1768 when her common-law husband John Castellaw of Bertie County was security for the maintenance of her child. Agnes was a charter member of Lower College Baptist Church in King William County, Virginia, on the "coloured" roll" from 1791 [Colosse Baptist Church Minute Book, 1813-1834 cited by Rountree, Pocahontas's People, 342]. She was a seventy-two-year-old spinster listed in Jack Custiloe's household in the 1833 King William County list of possible emigrants to Liberia [LVA, Auditor of public accounts inventory no. 757, Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1833; transcribed by Selma Stewart]. She was probably the mother of

i. Caroline, born about 1786, purchased 1 acre on the east side of the road leading to Mrs. Chamberlayne's mill in St. John's Parish, King William County, from Pamela Madison and Thomas B. Chamberlayne for 3 pounds on 22 October 1805 [Record Book 5:25]. She was listed as a forty-seven-year-old spinster in the 1833 King William County tax list which was taken to determine possible emigrants to Liberia and was a sixty-year-old "Mulatto" woman counted in the 1850 King William County census [VA:243].

ii.Jack, born about 1796, listed as a thirty-six-year-old bricklayer and farmer in the 1833 King William County list of possible emigrants to Liberia. He was taxable in King William County from 1833 to 1851, called a "free Negro" from 1842 to 1851 [PPTL 1833-51]. He was a sixty-year-old "Black" man counted in the 1850 King William County, Virginia census with thirty-nine-year-old "Black" woman Nancy [VA:243].

 

 

CUTTILLO FAMILY

1.    Katherine Jewell, born about 1639, was the mother of a "Malato" boy William who was bound apprentice to William Boosh for thirty years in York County, Virginia, on 6 March 1670/1. By the terms of the indenture Boosh was required to give William a heifer when he reached the age of fourteen. Fourteen years later on 24 March 1684/5 Boosh confirmed in York County court that he had marked a heifer which William was to receive with its increase when he completed his indenture [DOW 7:61]. Katherine may have married Stephen Pond, a white man. Sixty-year-old Katherine Pond and her thirty-year-old daughter Mary Catilla made depositions in York County on 14 December 1699 concerning Jane Merry's nuncupative will. Stephen Pond was one of the securities for administration of the will. Mary was probably identical to Mary Jewell, "a mollotto" whose fine for having an illegitimate child was paid by Stephen Pond on 24 May 1694 [DWO 9:341; 11:269-70, 287; Richter, A Community and its Neighborhoods, 343]. She was the mother of

2        i. Mary1, born about 1669.

3        ii. William1, born before 6 March 1670/1.

4        iii. Matthew1, born say 1672.

 

2.    Mary1 Jewell/ Cattila, born about 1669, was called Mary Jewell, a "mollotto," on 24 May 1694 when the churchwardens of the lower precincts of Poquoson Parish presented her for having a child by John Berry (a white man). Stephen Pond was security for her fine and for the maintenance of the child [DOW 9:341]. She was called Mary Catilla, daughter of Katherine Pond, and was about thirty years old on 14 December 1699 when she made a deposition in York County court concerning Jane Merry's nuncupative will [DOW 11:269-70]. She was called Mary Qustilla on 20 May 1724 when the Elizabeth City County court excused her from paying levies [Orders 1723-9, 13]. Mary was the unmarried mother of several children born in Charles Parish, York County [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 60-1]. Her children were

i. James Cattilla (Berry), born 16 September 1693, no father named in the register.

ii. Matthew3 Cattilla, born 12 December 1700, no father named, apparently the illegitimate birth Mary was indicted for on 24 February 1700/1 [DOW 11:400, 444], perhaps the Matthew Cattila whose death (13 November 1748) was registered in Charles Parish.

iii. Catherine Cattilla, born 1 November 17(03) in Elizabeth City County, no father named, died 7 November 1718.

iv. Ann1 Cattilla, born 31 March 1710, daughter of Mary Cattilla by Christopher Robinson [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 60-1, 207].

 

3.    William1 Catillah, born before 6 March 1670/1, sued his mistress, Mrs. Margaret Booth, for his freedom in York County court on 6 April 1695, swearing that he was born of a free woman, was a baptized Christian, and had served his mistress to the full age of twenty-four years. The 24 May 1695 session of the court ordered her to release him and pay him his freedom dues. He was sued for debt by Stephen Pond on 24 February 1701/2 [DOW 10:137, 153; 12:553]. He gave evidence in Elizabeth City County court for Joshua Myhill in his suit against John Sampson on 20 January 1725/6 [Orders 1723-9, 148]. He and his wife Ann registered the birth and baptism of their children in Charles Parish, York County. In April 1725 the Elizabeth City County court granted Anne's petition to be levy free [Orders 1723-9, 94]. She may have been the Ann Cattilla whose death on 13 October 1729 was recorded in the Charles Parish Register [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 207]. On 16 February 1729/30 he confessed to the York County court that his daughter Judith had delivered an illegitimate child in his house, and the court fined him for failing to give notice of the fact to the churchwardens. When he failed to give security for payment of the fine, the court ordered that he receive twenty-five lashes [DOW 17:29]. William and Ann's children were

5        i. Judith, born 20 December 17(03).

ii. William2, baptized 12 April 1702, perhaps the William Cattilla who was married to Hannah on 10 December 1726 when their daughter Angelica was born [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 60, 61]. He was called William Qustilla, Jr., on 20 May 1725 when the Elizabeth City County court dismissed a suit brought against him by John Sampson [Orders 1723-9, 103].

 

4.    Matthew1 Cattilla, born say 1672, was a witness for John Pond in his suit against Francis Callohill in York County court in January 1694/5. He owed money to the estate of Samuel Mackentosh in February 1697/8 [DOW 10:141, 514]. He and his wife Mary had two children whose births were recorded in the Charles Parish Register of York County. His death was recorded there on 15 March 1700 and Mary's death was recorded on 10 December 1703 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 61, 207]. Their children were

6        i. Edward1, born 8 September 1693.

7        ii. Matthew2, born 2 September 1697.

 

5.    Judith Cuttillo, born 20 December 17(03), daughter of William and Ann Cattilla, was charged in York County on 15 December 1729 with bearing an illegitimate "mulatto" child [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 61; DOW 17:12]. She may have been the mother of

8        i. Edward3, born say 1729.

 

6.    Edward1 Cuttillo, born 8 September 1693, was married to Elizabeth on 26 June 1720 when their son Matthew was baptized in Charles Parish, York County [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 61]. He was residing in Elizabeth City County on 1 October 1750 when he purchased for 20 pounds 293 acres in Lunenburg County bounded by Bears Element Creek [DB 2:117]. His suit against William Parsons, Jr., in Elizabeth City County court for trespass was dismissed on agreement of both parties on 2 June 1752 [Orders 1747-55, 258, 280]. In 1752 he was taxable in the Lunenburg County list of Richard Witton with (his sons) Matt. and Abrm. Cuttillo, and with Jas. Lowman [1748-52 Tithables]. In July 1761 the Lunenburg County court exempted him from paying personal tax [Orders 1761-2, 81]. The vestry of Cumberland Parish in Lunenburg County paid for the upkeep of his son William between 1 November 1762 and 11 November 1784 and for (his wife?) Elizabeth Cuttillo on 8 January 1784 [Bell, Cumberland Parish, 385, 415, 450, 456]. He sold 171-1/2 acres in Lunenburg County on Bears Element Creek to (his son) Abraham Cuttillo on 11 February 1779 [DB 13:185]. His 1 July 1771 Lunenburg County will, proved 11 April 1783, left his land to his son Abraham, mentioned his son William and mentioned his unnamed wife [WB 3:134]. His wife (apparently his second) was Elizabeth, daughter of John Epps according to the 1798 Lunenburg County chancery suit which settled the estate of John Epps. Edward was the father of

i. Matthew4, born 30 May, baptized 26 June 1720 in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 61], made a 25 March 1754 Lunenburg County will, proved 3 September the same year, naming his wife Lucy and her unborn child, his brother Abraham Cuttillo, and his father Edward Cuttiller. He also mentioned but did not state his relationship to John Cuttiller, Edward Cuttiller, and Isaac Brown [WB 1:135]. Lucy and her brother Isaac Brown were named in the 22 August 1757 Lunenburg County will of their father Israel Brown [WB 2:21] (who was named in the 10 April 1727 Charles City County will of Edward Gibson [DW 1724-31, 167-8]). Lucy rented 200 acres in Lunenburg County on Flat Rock Creek from Isaac Brown during her life for an unstated amount on 12 November 1767 [DB 11:104]. She was a widow, taxable on 200 acres in Cumberland Parish of Lunenburg County in 1764 and 1769 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 229, 273].

ii. Elizabeth1, born 31 March, baptized 23 May 1725 in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 61].

iii. ?John, born say 1730, tithable "at Mr. Kerby's Quarter" in Lunenburg County in 1751 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 173]. He and his two slaves were among the male tithables ordered to work on a road in Lunenburg County in June 1754 [Orders 1753-4, 110].

9        iv. Abraham2, born say 1733.

v. William3, born say 1749, perhaps an invalid, supported by the vestry of Cumberland Parish between 1 November 1762 and 11 November 1784 [Bell, Cumberland Parish, 385, 415, 456].

 

7.    Matthew2 Cattiler, born 2 September 1697, and his wife Judith baptized their children in Charles Parish, York County. Judith died 10 December 1735. He had married, second, Sarah, by 6 January 1737/8 when their son John was born [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 60, 61, 207]. On 17 November 1740 he was presented by the York County court for not listing his "Mallatto" wife as a tithable, and he was called a "Molatto" on 19 June 1744 when he was presented for the same offence [W&I 18:667; 19:314, 332]. Perhaps Sarah's maiden name was Combs since Sarah's daughter Martha lived in Thomas Combs' household in 1763. Matthew died 13 November 1748 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 207]. On 19 November 1750 Sarah was presented by the York County court for failing to list herself and Ann Berry as tithables. The case was dismissed after she paid the levies and court costs. She was presented again on 18 May 1752 for not listing herself as a tithable and fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 364, 384, 393; 1752-4, 18, 58-9]. Matthew and Judith had

i. Edward2, born 11 December, baptized 11 January 1724, died 6 November 1748 ("Edward Catilla, son of Matthew").

ii. Sarah, born 20 September, baptized 29 October 1727.

10      iii. Abraham1, born 18 March 1729/30.

iv. Matthew5, born 20 September, baptized "private" 5 November 1732.

v. Rachel, born 18 January, baptized 16 February 1734 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 60, 61, 207].

 

Matthew and (his second wife) Sarah had

vi. John1, born 6 January baptized 12 March 1737/8.

vii. Frances, born 15 March, baptized 27 March 1740/1.

viii. Martha, born 9 November 1743, baptized 8 January 1743/4, mother of Nancy, born __ September, baptized 12 October 1766, "bastard child of Martha Cattillow." She was a tithable in Thomas Combs' household in 1763. The York County court presented her on 21 May 1764 for having a bastard child and fined her 500 pounds of tobacco [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 186, 254].

ix. William4, born 14 September, baptized 21 September 1746.

x. Mary2, born 22 October 1747, baptized 22 November 1747 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 61].

 

8.    Edward3 Cuttillo/ Cottillin, born say 1729, was married to Anne (Berry?) on 3 March 1771 when they recorded the birth and baptism of their daughter Ann and son John Berry Cottillow in Charles Parish, York County [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 61, 72]. Edward's wife Anne may have been identical to the Ann Berry who was living in Sarah Cuttillo's household on 19 November 1750 when Sarah was presented by the court for failing to list her as a tithable. And she may have been the Ann Cottiller who was paid for attending three days as a witness for Frazier on 2 March 1762 in the Elizabeth City County suit of Armistead vs. Frazier et uxor [Court Records 1760-9, 66]. The vestry of Elizabeth City Parish paid Edward for boarding "Old" James Berry in 1765 [von Doenhoff, Vestry Book of Elizabeth City Parish, 163]. He was taxable in Elizabeth City County on a horse in 1783, 2 horses and 10 cattle in 1784, his own tithe in 1787, and a slave over 16 in 1788 [PPTL 1782-1820, frames 16, 24, 59, 74]. He was security for Charles Hobson in Elizabeth City County court on 24 August 1787, and he sued Thomas Ross for 7 pounds on 27 August 1787 [Orders 1784-8, 452, 473, 498]. He was taxable on a free tithe in York County in 1784, 2 tithes in 1789 and exempt from personal tax in 1790 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 87, 95, 140, 149, 161]. He was the father of

11      i. ?Abraham3, born say 1760.

12      ii. ?Edward4, born say 1763.

iii. ?James2, born say 1767, taxable in York County from 1790 to 1801 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841], perhaps the James Critillow who was taxable in Lunenburg County in 1804 and 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1806].

iv. Anne3, born 4 August 1770, baptized 3 March 1771.

v. John Berry, born 27 October 1773, baptized 23 January 1774 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 61], taxable in York County from 1794 to 1801 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1814].

 

9.    Abraham2 Cuttillo, born say 1733, was taxable in the Lunenburg County household of (his father) Edward Cuttillo in 1752 [1748-52 Tithables]. He was witness to a Lunenburg County deed for land on Flat Rock Creek, bounded by John Evans, which James and Mary Loman sold on 12 October 1769 [DB 11:303]. In 1774 John Drew was taxable in his Lunenburg County household [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 330]. He purchased 171-1/2 acres in Lunenburg County on Bears Element Creek from (his father) Edward Cuttillo on 11 February 1779 [DB 13:185]. He was taxable in Lunenburg County on one free tithe, one slave over sixteen years of age named Suck, 4 slaves under 16, and 12 horses in 1782 and taxable on 3 slaves under 16, 9 horses and one head of cattle in 1785 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1841]. His 7 March 1790 Lunenburg County will named his wife Sarah as executrix and named his sons: John, Abraham, and Edward, and his daughters: Mary, Sally, Jane Lowman, and Betsy Cuttillo, who were to receive their share of his estate when they came of age. Mary Loman was a witness to the will [WB 3:365]. His children were

i. John2, born say 1774, taxable in Lunenburg County from 1799 to 1804 [PPTL 1782-1806], head of a household in the Lunenburg County "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1802 [Lunenburg County Free Negro and Slave Records, 1802-3, LVA], a taxable "FN" in Halifax County in 1812 [PPTL, 1800-12, frame 1023].

ii. Abraham4, born before 1776, a "FN" taxable in Halifax County, Virginia, in 1812 [PPTL, 1800-12, frame 1023], head of a Halifax County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Mary3.

iv. Sally/ Sary, married Thomas Stewart, 15 July 1800 Mecklenburg County bond, Richerson Farrar bondsman, or perhaps she was the Sally Curtiller who was listed as a "FN" over the age of sixteen in Halifax County in 1813 [PPTL 1813-21, frame 9].

v. Jance Loman, probably the daughter of James and Mary Lowman who sold 100 acres on Flat Rock Creek on 12 October 1769 [DB 11:303].

vi. Elizabeth2, married John Epps.

vii. Edward4, a taxable "FN" in Halifax County in 1812 [PPTL, 1800-12, frame 1023].

 

10.    Abraham1 Cuttillo, born 18 March 1729/30, was baptized on 3 May 1730 in Charles Parish, York County. He and his wife Mary baptized their daughter Ann in Charles Parish on 25 April 1750. Mary, "wife of Abraham Cattilla," died 3 May 1750 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 60, 207]. Their child was

i. Ann2, born 26 March baptized 25 April 1750, perhaps the Nanny Cotillo who was listed in the account of Edward Berry's York County estate in October 1790 [WI 23:450-2] and the Ann Cottillo who was taxable on a horse in York County in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List, 1788-1814].

 

11.    Abraham3 Cuttillo, born say 1760, married Mary Francis, 10 November 1787 York County bond, Robert Gillett bondsman. In July 1791 they sold 16 acres in Elizabeth City County that Mary had inherited from her great-grandmother Hannah Francis [Deeds & Wills 34:118]. He was taxable in York County from 1784 to 1814 and head of a household oaf 5 "free Negroes & Mulattoes over the age of 16," one of whom was tithable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1814, frames 76, 95, 104, 149, 161, 200, 244, 285, 326, 352, 363, 387] and was head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:873]. He died before 1815 when his estate was taxable on a horse and 11 cattle [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 421]. On 21 May 1838 Henry Buchanan, aged seventy-seven, of York County, deposed that Abraham Cottiler, a "free man of color" from York County, enlisted in the Revolution in 1779, served at the Battle of Yorktown, and died about thirty years previous leaving children: Nancy Cottiler, Betsy Cottiller (wife of, first, John Francis, then James Wallace), and John Cottiller [Hopkins, Virginia Revolutionary War Land Grant Claims, 58]. He was the father of

i. Nancy, born about 1799, registered in York County on 19 February 1827: a bright mulatto woman 5 feet 4-3/4 inches high about 28 years of age, has long hair which she keeps combed up, thin visage...born free [Guardians' Accounts, 1823-46, end of book, Register of Free Negroes, No. 224], perhaps the Nancy Cotillo who was head of a Warwick County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Betsy, married John Francis, 25 January 1816 York County bond, the age of the bride attested to by Edward Cottiler. She married, second, Robert Wallis/ Wallace, 25 August 1838 bond, John Wallis bondsman.

iii. John3, born about 1792, taxable in York County in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 404], registered in York County on 20 February 1815: a bright Mulatto about 22 or 23 years of age 5 feet 6-3/4 Inches high - has very black fierce Eyes & long bushy hair [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no.84].

 

12.    Edward4 Cuttillo, born say 1763, was called Edward Jr., when he was first taxable in York County in 1785 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 95]. He married Elizabeth Berry, widow of Edward Berry, before 21 December 1791 when she returned the account of Edward Berry's estate in York County court [WI 23:450-2]. He was taxable on a slave in York County from 1791 to 1819 and head of a household of 4 "free Negroes & Mulattoes over the age of 16," two of whom were tithable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1814, frames 387, 404, 420, 468]. He was one of the inhabitants of York, Warwick, and Elizabeth City who signed a 19 November 1796 petition to the House of Delegates to establish a landing where Rose Warehouse formerly stood on Charles River near Charles Church (signing Edwd Cottilo) [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 34:147]. He was bondsman for the 20 December 1799 York County marriage of Thomas Eppes Hobson and Martha Hobson. He was head of a York County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:872]. He was the father of

i. Mary, born say 1804, of Charles Parish, York County, married John Hopson ("Free Black"), 10 September 1822 marriage with the consent of her father Edward.

 

Other members of the Cuttillo family were

i. John Cotillo, born 1775-1794, head of a Person County, North Carolina household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498].

ii. Edward, Junior, registered in York County on 19 February 1827: a bright mulatto about 22 years of age 5 feet 9-1/2 inches high, has long curly hair...born free [Guardians' Accounts, 1823-46, end of book, Register of Free Negroes, No. 226].

iii. Holland, born about 1806, registered as a "Free Negro" in York County on 19 September 1831: a woman of very bright complexion, 5 feet 5-1/4 inches high about 25 years of age ... long strait dark hair, grey eyes [Free Negroes Register 1831-50, no.294].

 

CYPRESS FAMILY

1.    Tom1 Cyprus, born say 1707, was listed among the "Negros &c At the Home House" in the 15 July 1728 inventory of the Surry County, Virginia estate of Nathaniel Harrison, Esq. [DW 1715-30, 843]. He may have been the husband of Judith Cypress who was described as an Indian when her children Tom and Frank Cypress were bound apprentices by the churchwardens of Southwarke Parish in Surry County on 16 April 1754 [Orders 1753-57, 64]. Judith was the mother of

2        i. ?Eleanor, born say 1742.

3        ii. Thomas2, born say 1748.

4        iii. Frank, born say 1750.

 

2.    Eleanor Cypress, born say 1742, was the mother of William Cyprus--called "Son of Eleoner Cyprus" when he was bound out in Surry County on 15 July 1766 and called a "poor Mulatto Boy" when he was bound out on 24 June 1772 [Orders 1764-74, 90, 310]. She was the mother of

5        i. William1, born say 1762.

 

3.    Thomas2 Cypress, born say 1748, was bound apprentice in Surry County in 1754, and bound apprentice to Henry Deloney in Lunenburg County in November 1760 [Orders 1759-61, 191]. He was taxable in his own household in Mecklenburg County in 1783 [Personal Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 48]. William Rainey sued him in court on 10 Nov ember 1795, but the case was discontinued on agreement of the parties [Orders 1792-5, 517]. He was security for the 27 July 1801 Mecklenburg County marriage of John Chavous and Sally Blair. He may have been the father of

i. William2, head of a Mecklenburg County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820, married Polly Thomas, 1816 Mecklenburg County bond. His widow and eight children are mentioned in a Mecklenburg County chancery case settled in 1846 [LVA, 1846-012].

 

4.    Frank Cypress, born say 1750, was bound apprentice in Surry County in 1754, bound apprentice to Henry Deloney in Lunenburg County in November 1760 [Orders 1759-61, 191] and listed in the Surry County account of the estate of Dr. Patrick Adams in 1771 [WB 12:248]. On 27 August 1782 the Surry County court ordered Francis's son Zachariah bound out [Orders 1775-85, 160, 332]. Frank was the parent of

i. Zachariah, born say 1769, listed as Henry Gilbert's Surry County tithe in 1789 and 1790 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 525, 572]. He was probably identical to Sacky Cypress who married John Jones, 12 February 1807 Sussex County marriage [Marriage Returns, 283].

ii. ?John, born about 1771, charged in the Court of Oyer & Terminer in Sussex County on 15 September 1798 with stealing a horse belonging to William Welborne of Sussex and selling it to Augustine Carseley. Carseley testified that he had checked with his brother, Hartwell Carseley, as to John Cyprus' character before purchasing the horse, but his brother assured him that Cyprus had "a pretty good" character when he had known him in Petersburg [Haun, Sussex County Court Records, 60-2]. He registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, twenty three years old, born free in the County of Surry [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 18]. He was a "F.N." taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1803 to 1805 [Land Tax List, 1799-1816 (includes Personal Property Tax lists)] and head of a Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [VA:799].

 

5.    William1 Cypress, born say 1762, was bound out in Surry County on 15 July 1766 and was called a "poor Mulatto Boy" when the court ordered him bound out on 24 June 1772 [Orders 1764-74, 80, 310]. He married Rebecca Walden, daughter of William Walden, 30 December 1785 Surry County bond. He was taxable in Cabin Point district of Surry County from 1786 to 1795: taxable on slave Agga in 1787, taxable on slave Nanny in 1788, charged with Charles Andrews' tithe in 1789, charged with William Charity's tax in 1793, William Gilchrist's in 1794 and 1795. (His widow) Rebecca Cypress was taxable on a horse in 1797 and 1798 and taxable on a free male from 1806 to 1816: listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 397, 450, 472, 548; 1791-1816, 7, 107, 158, 236, 256, 288, 611, 650, 733, 774, 851]. William's 18 January 1796 Surry County will, recorded 25 October the same year, mentioned his unnamed wife and children. Howell Debereaux was executor [WB 1:183]. Rebecca was head of a Surry County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:604]. William was the father of

i. David, born about 1785, taxable in Surry County from 1810 to 1816, a "free Negro & Mulatto" taxable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 667, 706, 809, 851]. He married Elizabeth Walden, 28 July 1812 Surry County bond, Sillar Walden witness, David Sebrell surety, 6 August marriage. He registered in Surry County on 22 December 1831: a bright mulatto man about 42 years of age, was born of free parents, is the son of Becky, has long bushy hair ... 5'5-1/4" [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 106].

ii. ?Hamblin, born say 1789, witness to the 23 March 1807 Surry County marriage of David Fulks and Sarah Charity, registered as a free Negro in Surry County on 22 July 1850: aged 57 years and upwards, very bright complexion, 5 feet 9-1/4 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, p.59, #1093].

iii. ?Elizabeth, born say 1791, married John Bruce, 24 December 1812 Surry County bond, Benjamin Banks surety, Samuel Blizzard witness. Their son William Bruce registered in Surry County on 23 December 1842: a mullatoe boy, son of Betsy Cypress ... is a spare make, bushy hair ... aged about 24 years and is 5'8-1/4" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 164].

iv. ?James, born say 1795, married Rebecca Bird, 26 January 1818 Surry County bond, John Charity surety.

 

DALE/ DIAL FAMILY

1.    Benjamin Dolls, born say 1620, "a Negro," was granted a patent for 300 acres in Surry County, Virginia, on the south side of the Reeded Marsh and the east side of Blackwater River adjoining Captain Jordan's line on 17 December 1656 for the importation of six persons [Patents 4:71-2]. On 26 December 1659 Judah Hide authorized him (called Benjamin Dawl) to act as her attorney, and on 19 July 1660 he witnessed a deed from William and Alice Lea to William Heath [Haun, Surry County Court Records I:146, 156]. He was probably the father of

2        i. John1, born say 1648.

 

2.    John1 Daule, born say 1648, and his wife Isabell were the "Negro" servants of Arthur Jordan on 10 March 1669 when they paid him to release them from any further service [Haun, Surry County Court Records I:146, 156]. John Doll purchased 162 acres in Newport Parish, Isle of Wight County, from John Sojourner sometime after 21 April 1689 [DB 7:217]. They may have been the ancestors of

3        i. James1 Doyal/ Dial, born say 1740.

4        ii. William Dales, born say 1743.

 

3.    James1 Doyal, born say 1740, purchased 100 acres near Ash Pole Swamp in Bladen County, North Carolina, on 19 July 1765 and sold this land on 20 February 1767 [DB 23:162]. He was taxable in Bladen County with his wife and Arthur Evans ("Mulatoes") in 1768 and taxable with his wife from 1769 to 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:6, 15, 44, 61, 95]. He was granted land on the south side of Ash Pole Swamp in Bladen County on 23 October 1782 and was taxable in Bladen County on 100 acres in 1784 [DB 1:264; 1784 Tax List]. He was the father of

i. Tapley Dial, born before 1776, head of a Opelousas, Louisiana household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [LA:312] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [LA:107]. He was called Tapley Dial "of North Carolina," son of James Dial and Elizabeth Hill, when he married Sarah Johnson, 24 January 1816 Opelousas, Louisiana marriage [License no.1].

ii. ?Peter Dial, born before 1776, head of a Robeson County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:231], 6 in 1810 (Peter Deal) [NC:144] and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:311], perhaps the father of Duncan Dial, head of a Robeson County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:309].

iii. ?Keziah Dial, born say 1775, married James Ashworth "of South Carolina" according to the 3 October 1810 Opelousas, Louisiana marriage license of their son Jesse Ashworth to Sarah Perkins [License nos.14, 17]. James Ashworth was head of an Opelousas household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [LA:306] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:101].

 

4.    William Dales, born say 1743, and his wife Sarah sold 50 acres in Brunswick County, Virginia, on the south side of Fountain Creek on 14 July 1764 [DB 7:508]. He was sued for a two pound debt in Brunswick County in April 1765 [Orders 1765, 127]. He received a patent for 150 acres in Brunswick County on 14 July 1769 [Patents 38:658-9]. He and his wife Sarah and George Ledbetter and his wife Elizabeth sold 250 acres on Fountain Creek in Brunswick County on 8 November 1779 [DB 14:9]. He was called "father" of John Dale in Greensville County court on 25 July 1782 when they sued Julius Perry and Thomas Pair for trespass. He sold land by deed proved in Greensville County court on 23 October 1783 [Orders 1781-9, 40, 88]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76] and 3 in Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1800 [NC:304]. He was the father of

i. ?Mary Dole, born say 1767, married Andrew Jeffries of Greensville County, Virginia, according to the Greene County, Ohio, court suit of their grandson Parker Jeffries (son of Sally Jeffries) in 1841 [Parker Jeffries v. Ankeny].

ii. John2 Dale, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:304] and 4 in 1810 [NC:16].

iii. ?Fanny Doles, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:17].

iv. ?Bery Dale, head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:491].

v. ?Charles Dale, head of a Rockingham County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:491].

 

Other members of the family were:

i. Lucy Ann Deal, born in December 1819 in Brunswick County, North Carolina, of free parentage, was residing in Cumberland County, North Carolina, when the court issued her a certificate of freedom, describing her as: a bright Mulatto about five feet three and one half inches high [Minutes 1840-42, Wednesday, 9 September 1840].

 

DALTON FAMILY

1.  Henry1 Dalton, born 8 September 1750, a "mulatto" and apparently the son of white woman, was bound to Samuel Pruitt until the age of thirty-one years in Frederick County, Maryland court in August 1750 [Rice, Frederick County, Maryland Judgment Records 1748-65, 49]. He was probably the son of Ann Dorton who was presented by the Prince George's County court on 27 March 1750 for having a base born child (no race indicated) on information of Jane Martin [Court Record 1749-50, 128]. He was a "Mulatto" who petitioned the Frederick County court on 23 November 1775 stating that he had been bound to Samuel Pruitt in 1750 but that Pruitt had since died and that his present master John Randle had no other claim to him than his marrying the widow of the deceased. The court ordered that he be at his liberty [Minutes 1773-5, 420]. He married Eleanor Russell on 4 June 1781 [Barnes, Maryland Marriages, 1778-1800]. Eleanor was probably a descendant of James Russell, a "Mallatto" who won his freedom in Charles County court on 13 March 1721 because he was the son of a white woman and had reached the age of thirty-one [Court Records K-2:236]. He was living in Prince George's County by 26 August 1729 [Court Record 1729-30, 136]. Henry was taxable in Monongalia County, Virginia, from 1791 to 1821: called "Henry Dorton Senr. a man of color" starting in 1810, listed with 2 tithables starting in 1802, his profession a farmer in 1820 [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 91, 101, 139, 177, 199, 216, 238, 264, 289, 319, 349, 373, 406, 455, 520, 536, 583, 611, 629, 679, 856, 898, 679, 787, 808, 856]. He was head of a Eastern District, Monongalia County census of 12 whites for 1810 [VA:495], 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169] and 8 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:344]. He was granted a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating in his application on 31 November 1832 that he was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, in 1748, enlisted in 1777 at Redstone settlement near Brownsville, Pennsylvania, resided in Prince George's County for nine years after the Revolution and then moved to Monongalia County. He died on 11 June 1836 [National Archives Pension file S-5362; http://www.fold3.com]. He was probably the father of

i. Daniel Dorton, born before 1776, head of a Harford County, Maryland household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Levi, born about 1785, a "man of color" taxable in Monongalia County from 1805 to 1821: his profession a mason in 1820 [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 406, 455, 520, 536, 583, 629, 679, 787, 808, 856, 898, 916, 976]. He married Hannah Billey, 12 January 1806 Monongalia County bond and was head of an Eastern District, Monongalia County household of 3 whites in 1810 [VA:495], 9 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169] and 12 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:344], a "Mulatto," born in Maryland, listed in the 1850 census for Monongalia County with (wife?) Ann and with $500 real estate [VA:481].

iii. Elizabeth, born 1776-1796, head of a Monongalia County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169].

iii.John, a "man of color" taxable in Monongalia County from 1810 to 1821: his profession a mason in 1820 [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 536, 583, 679, 787, 808, 856, 898, 916, 976]. He was head of a Eastern District, Monongalia County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169] and 7 in 1830 [VA:344].

iv.Henry2, Jr., born about 1794, a "man of color" taxable in Monongalia County from 1812 to 1821, his profession a stone mason in 1820 [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 611, 679, 787, 808, 856, 898, 916, 976]. He was head of an Eastern District, Monongalia County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:344] and a "Mulatto" head of a Decatur, Washington County, Ohio household with white wife Elizabeth in 1850 [family no. 76], a "Mulatto" farmer, born in Virginia, counted in the 1870 census for Troy Township, Athens County, Ohio, in 1870 with "Mulatto" (wife?) Hannah (born in Ohio) and $400 real estate [OH:20].

v. Bethuel, born about 1797, a fifty-three-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the Eastern District, Monongalia County census of 1850 with $600 real estate with white (erased?) wife Nancy [VA:469, family no. 185], a "Mulatto" widower living in Clinton District, Monongalia County in 1880 [VA:17].

vi. Nimrod, born 1794-1806, head of a Monongalia County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169].

vii. ?Malachi, born about 1796, head of a Wilkes Township, Gallia County, Ohio household of 7 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:53], a "Mulatto" farmer, born in Virginia, counted in the 1850 Wilkeson, Vinton County, Ohio census with (wife?) Mahala Dorton [OH:589, family no. 1026].

 

DAVENPORT FAMILY

1.    Ann Davenport, born say 1720, was living in Stratton Major Parish, King and Queen County, on 9 October 1738 when the churchwardens ordered her bastard children bound to Doctor John Strachey [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book of Stratton Major Parish, 33, 44, 59, 73, 119]. She was apparently the common-law wife of a slave or free African American since she had a number of "Mollatto" children bound out over a twenty year period. She was the mother of

i. Amey, born say 1736, bound apprentice on 10 October 1744, head of a Williamsburg City household of 3 "Blacks" in 1782 [VA:46].

ii. Anne, born say 1738, ordered bound apprentice to Dr. Strachey on 10 November 1741.

iii. William1, born say 1745, "Mollatto Baster'd of Ann Davonport," bound apprentice to Doctor John Strachey in Stratton Major Parish on 9 October 1747 [Chamberlayne, Vestry Book of Stratton Major Parish, 73].

iv. George, born say 1753, ordered bound apprentice to Mary Strachey on 16 November 1757.

v. Thomas, born say 1756, ordered bound apprentice to Thomas Metcalfe on 16 November 1757.

vi. ?Stephen1, a soldier in the Revolution from York County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 34].

 

Their descendants were

i. William2, born say 1771, married Elizabeth Alvis, 7 July 1796 York County bond. He was taxable in York County from 1792 to 1813: called a "Mulatto" in 1792, taxable on a slave in 1804 and 1809, and head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 182, 254, 276, 296, 315, 339, 364, 387]. He was taxable on 15 acres in 1800 [Land Tax List, p.2] and head of a York County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:873].

ii. Henry, born say 1772, taxable in York County in 1793 and from 1801 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 191, 264, 286, 305, 327, 353, 387] and head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:873].

iii. Stephen2, born about 1778, registered as a free Negro in York County on 19 October 1802: dark mulatto with woolly hair, large flat nose, wide mouth ... 5 feet 7 Inches high proved to be born of a free woman by the oath of John Crittenden [Register 1798-1831, no.20]. He was taxable in York County from 1803 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 286, 305, 327, 353, 387].

iv. Hannah, born about 1782, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a dark mulatto abut 40 years old, 4 feet 11-3/4 inches high - she has small feacears (features) ... short woolly hair [Register, no.187].

v. Anthony, born about 1785, head of a York County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:873]. He registered as a free Negro in York County on 20 January 1823: a black fellow between 36 & 40 years of age 5 feet 11-1/2 Inches high has short hair, large whiskers ... Born free [Register 1798-1831, no. 201].

vi. Disy, born about 1789, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a Mulatto woman about 33 years of age ... born free [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 148].

vii. John, born 1801, registered as a free Negro in York County on 17 October 1831: a mulatto man about 30 years of age, 5 feet 10-1/2 inches high ... large eyes & nose [Free Negroes Register, no.322].

viii. Mary Ann, born about 1806, registered as a free Negro in York County on 17 October 1831: dark complexion, about 24 or 25 years of age, 5 feet 5 inches high ... large mouth, thick pouting lips & full head of hair [Register, no.312].

 

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