DAVIS FAMILY

The Davis family may have descended from Hugh Davis who was ordered to be whipped "before an assembly of Negroes and others for abusing himself to the dishonor of God and shame of Christians, by defiling his body by lying with a negro" in 1630 [Hening, Statutes at Large, III:459-460].

 

1.    Mary1 Davis, born say 1700, was living in Surry County, Virginia, on 22 April 1742 when her daughters Mary and Isabella (no race indicated) appealed to the court that Richard Parker was detaining them as servants. The court ruled that they were free women and should be discharged from any further servitude. The same court bound out her children Jacob, David, and Lucy Davis [Orders 1741-42, 22]. She was the mother of

2        i. Mary2, born say 1721.

ii. Isabella1, born say 1723.

iii. Jacob, born say 1730.

iv. David, born say 1733.

v. Lucy, born say 1735.

 

2.    Mary2 Davis, born say 1721, was a "free Mulatto" whose unnamed children were ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Southampton County in September 1749. She was probably the Moll Davis whose "Mulatto" son Daniel was bound out in Southampton County ten years later on 11 May 1759 [Orders 1749-54, 19; 1754-59]. And she may have been the Mary Davis who was a taxable head of household in the eastern division of the Borough of Norfolk in 1765 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1751-65, 217]. Her children were

i. ?John3, born say 1746, "Mulatto" head of a Nansemond County household with no whites in 1784 [VA:74], head of a Norfolk County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:815], perhaps the husband of Nancy Davis who registered as a "free Negro" in Norfolk County on 16 August 1815: 5 feet 4 Inc, 22 Years of age, of a dark Complexion, Born free in Southampton County [Registry of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.101].

ii. Daniel, born say 1748, bound apprentice in Southampton County on 11 May 1759.

iii. ?Isabel2, head of a Southampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:79].

 

Other members of the family in Virginia were

i. Catherine, born say 1718, the (white) servant of Willoughby Newton of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County who confessed in court to having a child by "Akey a Negro Man Slave to her said Master." The court ordered that she serve her master an additional year and be sold by the churchwardens for five years after completing her indenture [Orders 1731-9, 173a].

ii. Sarah, born say 1719, the (white) servant of Captain John Elliott of Washington Parish, Westmoreland County on 29 July 1735 when she confessed in court to having a "Mulatto" child by her "Masters Negro man Fan." The court ordered that after her indenture was completed she should be sold by the churchwardens for five years [Orders 1731-9, 176a, 263, 270a].

iii. Daniel, "a mulatto," born in Lancaster County, who enlisted for the war and deserted from the ship Gloucester near Warwick with William Smith, a Creole born in Barbados, according to an advertisement in the 2 August 1780 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Virginia Genealogist 4:136].

iv. John, head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

v. George, head of a Loudoun County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:268].

vi. Deborah, head of a Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:894].

vii. Susan, head of an Isle of Wight County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:28].

viii. Toby, "Free Negro" head of an Isle of Wight County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:28].

ix. Sarah, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:91].

x. David, head of a Frederick County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:549].

xi. Lucy, head of a Buckingham County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:338].

xii. Samuel, head of a Buckingham County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:816].

xiii. Betsy, head of a Lunenburg County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:338].

 

North Carolina

3.    Robert Davis, born say 1715, was a "Black" taxable in 1753 in Osborn Jeffrey's Granville County list in 1753. In 1754 he was head of a household of four "Black" taxables including (his wife?) Margaret, (his children?) Ephraim, and Sarah Davis in Gideon Macon's list [CR 44.701.1]. He was listed as a "Mulatto" in the muster of Colonel William Eaton on 8 October 1754 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 718]. His children may have been

i. John1, born say 1733, a "Black" taxable in the 1754 list of Gideon Macon and a "mulatto" taxable with Margaret Davis in the 1761 list of James Paine for Cross Road District. He may have been the John Davis who purchased 400 acres in Granville County on both sides of Beaver Pond Creek on 5 March 1754 [DB B:294].

ii. Ephraim, born before 1743 since he was taxable in 1754.

iii. Sarah, born before 1743 since she was taxable in 1754.

iv. Simon, head of a Granville County household of 15 "free colored" in County Line District in 1820 [NC:35].

 

4.    William Davis, born say 1725, a "Molatto," was listed with 180 acres at the head of Chinquopin Creek in a 1753 Craven County list of landowners [Craven Wills, Deeds, Bonds, Inventories, Accounts of Sales, 306]. He was head of a Craven County household of one "Black" male taxable and three "Black" female taxables in 1769 [SS 837]. His descendants may have been

i. John2, born say 1743, head of a Craven County household of one "Black" male and one "Black" female taxable in 1769 [SS 837]. He married Nancy Godet, another "Black" taxable in Craven County in 1769, by 12 November 1796 Craven County bond with William Dove bondsman.

ii. Richard, head of a Brunswick County, North Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:13], probably the R. Davis who was head of a Brunswick County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:236]. In 1791 he petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly claiming that he had been an artilleryman in the Revolution, his wife had been emancipated by her master in 1784, and he asked that his children be also emancipated [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 99].

iii. Ephram, head of a Jones County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:257].

iv. Michael, head of a Jones County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:257].

v. Luzana, married William Godett, 24 May 1805 Craven County bond with Peter George bondsman.

vi. George, head of a Pasquotank County household of 4 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1800 [NC:627], 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:895], and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:247].

 

Other members of a Davis family were

i. Richard, head of a Brunswick County, North Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:13], probably the R. Davis who was head of a Brunswick County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:236]. In 1791 his mother Grace petitioned the North Carolina General Assembly stating that she had been emancipated by John Davis in 1764, her son Richard had served as an artilleryman in the Revolution, and that she had other children as well. She asked that the assembly confirm her freedom and that of her children [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 63].

 

DAY FAMILY

1.    Mary Day, born say 1671, was an indentured servant for whom Peter Cotanceau claimed transportation rights in Northumberland County court on 21 September 1699. On 22 November 1689 the Northumberland County court indicted her for having an illegitimate child. And on 21 December 1692 she was the servant of John Webb when the court indicted her for having twin "molatta" children John and Rachel who were born on 17 February 1692. On 22 November 1694 the court bound her "molatto" son Samuel Webb alias Day as an apprentice to William Yarratt. Samuel may have been the son of Daniel2 Webb who was called the "molatto" son of an English woman servant in the Northumberland County court on 6 October 1687 when he was freed from his indenture to the orphans of Major John Mottron. Daniel had a child by another English servant woman named Margaret Lawson before 16 July 1701 when she confessed in court that the father of her illegitimate child was "a Negro called Daniell Webb." In May 1703 the court indicted Mary for having another child [Orders 1678-98, 405, 412, 494, 681; 1699-1713, part 1, 167, 247]. Mary was the mother of

2        i. John1, born 17 February 1692.

3        ii. Rachel1, born 17 February 1692.

iii. Samuel1, born say 1694, called "Saml Webb als Day a Mulatto Servt. to Mrs. Jane Yarratt on 20 July 1715 when he sued for his freedom in Northumberland County court [Orders 1713-19, 126].

 

2.    John1 Day, born 17 February 1692, was bound to John Webb until the age of thirty, called "Mulatto Jack" on 18 April 1716 when he was sued in Northumberland County court by one of the executors of John Webb. He may have been identical to John Day who was the servant of William Grinstead on 18 June 1719 when the court ordered him to serve his master another six months for running away [Orders 1713-9, 153, 323]. He may have been the ancestor of

4        i. Ann2, born say 1759.

5        ii. Lucy1, born say 1760.

iii. John2, born say 1760, a "man of color" who enlisted in Granville County, North Carolina, in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment. He was said to have died in Valley Forge on 14 January 1778 [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 99].

6        iv. Rachel2, born say 1760.

7        v. Jesse1, born say 1761.

8        vi. John3, born say 1764.

9        vii. Nancy1, born say 1768.

10      viii. Susannah, born say 1769.

 

3.    Rachel1 Day, born 17 February 1692, was bound to John Webb until the age of thirty years. She was called "Rachell a Molatto Girle belonging to the estate of John Webb, deceased" on 22 September 1709 when she testified in Northumberland County court that Arthur Thomas was the father of her illegitimate child. On 17 December 1712 she was called "Rachel Day A Mulatto Servant to the Orph'ts of John Webb deceased" when she was presented by the court for having a child by a slave of Captain Kenner named "Negro Will." On 18 February 1712/3 she was called Rachel Webb alias Day when Sarah Webb, daughter of John Webb, deceased, reported to the court that Rachel had a child named Winnifred by "a Negro," and the churchwardens of St. Stephen's Parish bound Winnefred to Sarah Webb until the age of thirty-one. She was probably identical to "___ Day als Webb Servt. to Sarah Webb" whose "Mulatto" child was ordered bound to Sarah Webb on 15 June 1715 [Orders 1699-1713, Part 2, 627, 803, 809, 815; Record Book 1710-3, 269-70; Orders 1713-19, 114]. Rachel was the mother of

11      i. Winnifred1, born in June 1712.

12      ii. ?Ann1, born say 1720.

 

4.    Ann2 Day, born say 1759, was living in Caswell County, North Carolina, in 1780 when her children were bound out as apprentices [CR 20.101.1]. They were

i. George2, born in 1776, "of color, son of Nan Day," bound apprentice in Caswell County to Samuel Winstead on 20 June 1780 and then to J.S. Hutchinson on 12 July 1780. He was head of a Person County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498].

ii. Lucy2, born 1779, bound to Drury Allen in Caswell County on 20 March 1780 and to David Allen in March court 1783 [A:240].

 

5.    Lucy1 Day, born say 1760 (before 1776), was bound apprentice in Southampton County on 12 March 1762 (no parent or race named) [Orders 1759-63, 196]. On 28 May 1789 the grand jury of Greensville County presented her for living in fornication with John Turner's slave Cudger. She was called only "Lucy" on 25 August 1791 when the court dismissed the presentment. The court discontinued her case against Drury and Dorothy Peebles for trespass, assault and battery at defendants' costs on 23 July 1789 after the parties reached agreement. James Binford was her witness [Orders 1781-9, 412, 422, 427; 1790-9, 88]. She was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1791 to 1799 and from 1804 to 1820: taxable on a slave above the age of sixteen and 2 horses in 1791, taxable on a slave and a free tithable aged 16-21 in 1793, called "Lucy Day & Cudger Day" from 1804 to 1812, "Lucy Day & Cudgoe Mulattos" in 1813, "Cudjoe & Lucy Day Free Negros" in 1814. She was not on the tax rolls from 1800 to 1803, so she may have been related to John Day who was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, in the 1790s but not listed from 1800 to 1802 when he was in Dinwiddie County [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 126, 161, 178, 187, 200, 217, 230, 243, 320, 336, 352, 371, 386, 401, 414, 432, 446, 461, 481, 578, 602]. On 25 April 1793 the Greensville County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out her children Edmund, Cudger, and Lucy. She appealed the ruling, and on 25 July 1793 the court rescinded the order to bind Cudger to Stephen Ragland [Orders 1790-9, 195, 210, 212]. Her Greensville County land in the area between Great Swamp branch to Fountain's Creek up to Halifax Road adjoining Richard Sills was among those processioned in May 1800 [Processioners Returns 1796-1820, 27]. She was head of a Greensville County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 with "Cudjoe" [VA:261]. Lucy was the mother of

i. Edmund, born say 1784.

ii. Cudger, born say 1785.

iii. Lucy3, born say 1787.

iv. ?Thena Artis, born about 1787, registered in Greensville County on 7 February 1832: born free of a yellow complexion, about forty five years of age, five feet four & 1/2 inches high. She was probably the wife of Willie Artis who registered the same day. Her son Henry Day also registered the same day: son of Thena Artis, formerly Day, born free of a dark complexion, about twenty two years of age, five feet seven inches high...by occupation a farmer [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-1832, nos. 192, 195].

v. Nathaniel, born in 1789, registered as a "free Negro" in Greensville County on 14 April 1821: Son of Lucy Day, light dark Complexion, about 32 years of age, five feet 4 inches high (in Shoes)...a planter, & Shingle gator & coarse shoe maker [Register of Free Negroes, no. 89]. He was head of a Greensville County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:261]. He may have been the Nathaniel Day who was a "free Negro" taxable in Southampton County in 1812 [PPTL 1807-21, frame 289].

 

6.    Rachel2 Day, born say 1760, was living in Caswell County, North Carolina, in 1780 when her children were bound as apprentices. They were

i. Thomas1, born in 1777, "son of Rachel," bound apprentice to Samuel Winstead in Caswell County court on 20 June 1780 [CR 20.101.1]. He was head of a Person County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498].

ii. Jesse2, born in 1779, "son of Rachel," bound an apprentice to Drury Allen in Caswell County on 20 March 1780 and to David Allen in March court 1783 [Book A:240]. He married Love Pettiford, 27 January 1819 Orange County bond with William Day bondsman and was head of an Orange County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:306].

iii. ?Nancy2, born January 1783, bound apprentice in Caswell County to David Allen in March court 1783, no parent named [A:240].

 

7.    Jesse1 Day, born say 1761, married Prissey Bass, 6 November 1782 Granville County, North Carolina bond with Solomon Walker bondsman. He applied for the Revolutionary War pension of his brother John [Crow, Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 99]. He was head of a Granville County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NC:916] and 5 "free colored" in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1820 [NC:312]. His children may have been

i. John4, born say 1785, head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:916].

ii. Reuben, born say 1788, witness to the 4 October 1808 Granville County marriage bond of Rhoda Day and Dempsey Bass. He was head of an Orange County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:288].

iii. Rhoda, born say 1790, married Dempsey Bass, 4 October 1808 Granville County bond.

iv. William2, married Jinsey Pettiford, 6 October 1818 Orange County bond, James Hopkins bondsman. He was head of an Orange County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:306].

v. Benjamin3, married Bedy Pettiford, 19 November 1819 Orange County bond, William Pettiford bondsman. He was head of an Orange County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:354].

 

8.    John3 Day, born say 1764, married Mourning Stewart, daughter of Dr. Thomas Stewart of Dinwiddie County [Dinwiddie County Chancery Orders 1832-52, 1; Sneed & Westfall, History of Thomas Day, 6]. He was taxable in Dinwiddie County from 1800 to 1802: charged with the tax for his brothers-in-law Henry and Armstead Stewart in 1800, his brother-in-law Armstead Stewart in 1801, and his brothers-in-law Armstead and John Stewart in 1802 [PPTL, 1800-19 (1800B, p.4; 1801A, p.4; 1802A, p.4)]. He was apparently the John Day who was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1795 to 1799 and taxable in St. Andrew's Parish, Greensville County, in 1803 and 1804 since his son John Day was born in Greensville County in 1797. He was taxable in Greensville County on a slave in 1795 and 1796, taxable on 2 free tithes from 1797 to 1799, called a "workman" in 1798 and 1799 to differentiate him from another John Day who was taxable in Greensville County. He was also called a "workman" when he was taxable in St. Andrew's Parish in 1803 [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 187, 200, 217, 230, 243, 296, 314]. According to the recollection of his son John, he purchased a small plantation in Sussex County near Edward Whitehorne's house in 1807, but later sold the land and moved back to Dinwiddie County, and then moved to North Carolina in 1817 [Sneed & Westfall, History of Thomas Day, 7]. The sale of his Sussex County land apparently took place in 1810 when the tax assessments on two parcels of land in Sussex County were transferred from John Day to George Dowden and William Parham [Sussex County Land Tax List, 1810; Dowden and Parham sold the land in 1813: DB L:249, 252]. John was listed as a cabinetmaker in the Dinwiddie County list of "Free Negroes and Their Occupations" between 1814 and 1817 [PPTL, 1800-19 (1814A, p.4; 1817A, p.23)]. In 1820 he was head of a Warren County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" [NC:808]. He died at the age of sixty-eight [Sneed & Westfall, History of Thomas Day, 10]. His wife Mourning was counted as an eighty-four-year-old woman living in the household of her son Thomas Day in the 1850 census for Caswell County [NC:193a]. John and Mourning were the parents of

i. John6, born on 18 February 1797 in Hicksford (Emporia), Greensville County, Virginia. When his family moved to Sussex County, he boarded with his neighbor Edward Whitehorne and went to school with Whitehorne's children. In 1804 his grandfather Dr. Thomas Stewart gave him a slave named Thody by his Dinwiddie County will which was proved in 1810. In 1817 he was living with his family in a rented house in Dinwiddie County when his father moved to North Carolina. He remained in Dinwiddie and carried on a small cabinetmaking business, but "associating myself with ___ young white men, who were fond of playing cards, contracted that habit" [Rev. John Day Letters, 1847-59 by Sneed & Westfall, History of Thomas Day, 5-8; Chancery Orders 1832-52, 1]. He may have been the John Day who was a "F.N." taxable in Greensville County on 2 slaves in 1827 and a slave and a horse in 1830 [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 827, 851]. He became a Baptist minister and emigrated to Liberia in 1830 with his wife and four children. He was superintendent of the Baptist Mission and later chief justice of the Liberia Supreme Court [African Repository 35 (1859):158; and 37 (1861):154-58 by Wiley, Slaves No More].

ii. Thomas2, born about 1801, operated the Yellow Tavern in Milton, Caswell County, the third largest furniture factory in the state, from 1823 to 1858. He married Acquilla Wilson in Virginia in 1829 but needed special dispensation from the legislature to allow her to migrate into North Carolina since a North Carolina law of 1827 made it illegal for free African Americans to enter the state. The Yellow Tavern is a National Historic Landmark. He was listed as a forty-nine-year-old in the 1850 census for Caswell County. His land near the main road from Milton to Yanceyville near County Line Creek was mentioned in a 3 April 1851 Caswell County land entry [Entry no. 1418].

 

9.    Nancy1 Day, born say 1768, was living in Person County, North Carolina, on 3 December 1794 when she consented to the court binding her "Negro" sons Jesse and John to Charles Allen [Minutes 1792-6, 3 December 1794; 1796-7, 22]. Her children were

i. Jesse3, born 2 August 1786, head of a Person County household of one "other free" in 1810 [NC:629]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Gallatin County, Illinois, on 25 November 1828: a man of colour, forty years of age or near as can be recollected, five feet eleven inches and a quarter high, well made, dark Complection tho not Black...born free in Person County, North Carolina. His wife Sina obtained a certificate in Giles County, Tennessee, on 31 May 1824: Sina Day wife of Jesse Day, formerly Sina Jones, a mulatto woman now residing in the town of Pulaski, was born free. She recorded the certificate in Gallatin County: Sina Day enters her five children Arenna, 17 years of age five feet five inches high, light complexion of the black cast, rather small features; Nancy, 15 years of age, dark complexion, nearly black; John, 13 years of age, dark complexion, nearly Black; Wilson, 8 years old, light colour tho not quite light enough for a mulatto; Elizabeth, six years old of the Colour of Wilson [Gallatin County Servitude Register 1815-39, 114, 122].

ii. John5, born 9 August 1788, head of a Person County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498].

iii. ?Betty, born say 1792, no parent named when she was ordered bound out by the 5 June 1797 Person County court [Minutes 1797-1802, 1].

 

10.    Susannah Day, born say 1769, was living in Southampton County on 11 December 1795 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out her son Solomon Day to Enos James. The court repeated the order on 14 July 1796 [Minutes 1793-9, 198, 225]. Susannah was the mother of

i. Solomon, born about 1790, taxable in Southampton County with wife Julia on William Whitehead's land in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL 1807-21, frames 316, 416]. They registered in Southampton County on 29 March 1823: Solomon Day, mulatto man, age 33, 5 feet 6 inches high, free born in So. Julia Day Mulatto woman, 26, 5 feet 6 1/2 inches high, born in So. [Register of Free Negroes, nos. 1376, 1377].

ii. ?Davis/ David, born about 1789, registered in Southampton County on 3 August 1810: Davy Day, age 21, Blk, 5 feet 9 inches high, free born [Register of Free Negroes, no. 824]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Southampton County on Ben Whitfield's land in 1812, taxable on a horse in 1813 and 1814, living with his sisters Silvia and Cherry on Ben Whitfield's land in 1813 [PPTL 1807-21, frames 289, 316, 416].

 

11.    Winnifred1 Day, born in June 1712, was bound by the Northumberland County court to Sarah Webb until the age of thirty-one on 15 June 1715. She may have been the ancestor of

i. David, born say 1745, a "Mulatto" who ran away from Augustine Smith of Middlesex County, Virginia, about 1766 according to the 27 July 1769 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 89].

ii. Joseph, born say 1765, taxable on a tithe and a horse in Westmoreland County in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 1115].

13      iii. Stephen, born say 1770.

14      iv. Samuel2, born say 1770.

 

12.    Ann1 Day, born say 1720, was the "Mallato" servant of Griffen Fauntleroy who left a 3 June 1750 Northumberland County will. He gave "Mallato" Benjamin Day, Elizabeth Day and Thomas Day to his daughter Nanney Fauntleroy and gave "negro" George Day to his daughter Elizabeth Edwards. They were listed in the 8 October 1750 inventory of his estate:

Mallato woman Nan Day 4 shillings

Mallato Boy Benjamin Day 15 pounds

Mallato Garl Elizabeth Day 10 pounds

Mallato Boy Thomas Day 5 pounds [Record Book 1749-51, 97-8, 122].

Ann was probably near to completing her indenture since she was valued at only 4 shillings. She may have been the mother of

i. Benjamin, born say 1736, taxable in Northumberland County from 1787 to 1796: listed by Jesse Crowder in 1787 and 1790, charged with his own tax in 1788 and from 1794 to 1796 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 308, 334, 357, 417, 431, 452], perhaps the Benjamin Day who was head of a Botetourt County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:618].

15      ii. Elizabeth, born say 1738.

16      iii. George1, born say 1743.

iv. Thomas, born say 1745.

 

13.    Stephen Day, born say 1770, and his wife Jinney Day and children Naney, Suckey, and Lucy were listed among the "Free Mulattoes & Negroes in Westmoreland County" in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40]. He was a "Blk" taxable in Northumberland County from 1809 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 635, 653, 668, 683] and a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810. His children were

i. Naney/ Nancy3 married Joseph Kelly, 18 December 1812 Northumberland County bond, Stephen Day security.

ii. Suckey.

iii. Lucy4, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 16 May 1821: Bright Mulatto, 19 years old, 5 feet 3 Inches high [Register, no. 133].

 

14.    Samuel2 Day, born say 1770, was a farmer living in Westmoreland County in 1801 when he and his wife Jinney Day were listed among the "Free Mulattoes & Negroes" living on James Rice's land [Virginia Genealogist 31:40]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:770] and 5 "free colored" in 1830. He may have been the father of

i. Samuel4, Jr., born about 1793, a child listed in the 1801 list of "Free Molattoes in Westmoreland County" [Virginia Genealogist 31:40], married Lotty Ashton, 7 January 1818 Westmoreland County bond, Samuel Tate security. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. He registered in Westmoreland County in May 1838: a Mulatto man, five feet four and three fourths inches high, aged forty five, born free. Charlotte Day registered in April 1838: a woman of light complexion, five feet three & 3/4 inches high, aged forty years [Register of Free Negroes, 1828-1849, pp.31-2, nos, 265, 269].

 

15.    Elizabeth Day, born say 1738, was the "Mallato" servant of Griffen Fauntleroy who gave her to his daughter Nanney Fauntleroy by his 3 June 1750 Northumberland County will. She was a "Mallato" girl valued at 10 pounds in the 8 October 1750 inventory of his estate [Record Book 1749-51, 97-8, 122]. She was the "free Negro" mother of Reuben Day, an illegitimate child bound to Edward Lewis by the Orange County, Virginia court on 23 November 1775 [Orders 1769-77, 354]. She was the mother of

17      i. ?Winnifred2, born about 1759.

18      ii. Judith1, born about 1766.

iii. Reuben, bound out in Orange County, Virginia, on 23 November 1775.

 

16.    George1 Day, born say 1743, was a seaman from Northumberland County in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 34]. On 14 June 1784 the Northumberland county court referred his suit against Samuel Haynie to arbitration. Cuthburt Harcum sued him and his security James Sorrell for a debt of 500 pounds of tobacco on 13 September 1784 [Orders 1783-5, 173, 239, 297]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1787 to 1813: listed next to Willoughby Day in 1801, listed with 2 tithables in 1805 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 320, 349, 364, 379, 422, 436, 444, 458, 491, 506, 536, 550, 573, 603, 623, 635, 654] and a "free negro" head of a Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:976]. He and his wife Nancy, no race indicated, registered the birth of their son Willoughby in St. Stephen's Parish, Northumberland County. They were the parents of

i. ?Jane, born about 1775, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 11 March 1822: Mulatto woman, about 47 yrs. 5 feet 3 Inches high, Born of free parents in Nd County [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 137].

ii. Willoughby, born 13 November 1778 [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births], taxable in Northumberland County in 1801 [PPTL 1782-1812, frame 515].

iii. ?Jesse4, born say 1790, taxable in Northumberland County from 1809 to 1812 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 635, 654, 668].

 

17.    Winnifred2 Day, born about 1759, "a free Malatto," registered the birth of her children Judith, Isaac, and Winnie in St. Stephen's Parish, Northumberland County [Fleet, Northumberland County Record of Births, 42]. On 10 June 1799 the Northumberland County court certified that she, called Winney Day, Senr., and Judith Day, Nanny Day, and Winny Day, Jr., were free born "Mulattoes" [Orders 1793-1800, 80]. She registered in Northumberland County on 1 August 1814: Mulatto, about 55 years, 5 feet & 1/2 an inch high, Born of free parents in Northd County [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 78]. Her children were

i. Judith2, born 3 September 1778, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 10 May 1819: Judy Day, jr., Black woman, about 40 years old, 5 feet 3-1/4 Inches hight, born of free parents in Northd County, presented her children, James, Polly, Sally, & Betsy, between the ages of 9 & 2. Her daughter Harriet Day registered the same day: Dark girl, about 12 years old, 5 feet 2-1/2 Inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, nos. 120, 121].

ii. Isaac, born 21 June 1780.

iii. Winnie3, born 11 January 1784, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 1 August 1814: Black woman, about 22 years old, 5 feet 2 & 1/4 Inches, Born of free parents in Northd County [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 82].

iv. ?Samuel3, born about 1791, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 10 February 1806: Black, nearly 15 years old, 5 feet 4 Inches high, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 20].

v. ?William3, born about 1805, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 11 March 1822: Black man, 19 years old, 5 feet 7 & 1/2 Inches high, Born of free parents in Northd County [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 136].

 

18.    Judith1 Day, born about 1766, was living in Northumberland County on 10 June 1799 when the county court certified that she, Winney Day, Senr., Nanny Day, and Winny Day, Jr., were free born "Mulattoes" [Orders 1793-1800, 80]. She was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:977]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 17 April 1819: Dark mulatto, about 53 years old, 5 feet three inches high, born of free parents in Northd County [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 119]. Her children were

i. ?Presly, born about 1788, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 10 February 1806: bright mulatto, about 18 years old, 5 feet 6-1/4 Inches high, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 19].

ii. ?Sally, born about 1795, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 16 May 1821: Bright Mulatto, 26 years old, 5 feet 6 inches high, Born of free parents in Northd County [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 132].

iii. ?Nancy Taylor, born about 1799, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 6 June 1818: Bright Mulatto, about 19 years old, 5 feet three Inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 111].

iv. Spencer, born about 1805, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 16 May 1821: son of Judy Day, Mulatto boy, 16 years of age, 5 feet one Inch high [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 130].

v. James Stokely, born about 1809, registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 16 May 1821: son of Judy Day, Mulatto, 4 feet 8 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 131].

 

Other Virginia descendants were

i. Simon Peter, "free negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:252].

ii. Tempy, head of a Botetourt County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:617].

iii. Judy3, born about 1780, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 8 December 1810: born free by cert. of the clerk of Essex County, dark Mulattoe, about 30 years of age, 5 feet 1-3/4 inches high [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.7, no.13].

iv. George3, head of a Middlesex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:472].

v. Elijah, born about 1790, married Judith2 Banks, twenty-one-year-old daughter of John Banks, 28 December 1815 Goochland County bond, Jacob Martin surety [Ministers' Returns, 127]. He registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 2 September 1829: yellowish complexion, about thirty nine years of age, and his wife Judy registered on 17 September 1829: yellow complexion, about thirty nine years of age, about five foot three & an half inches high [Register of Free Negroes, pp.201, 204].

 

Endnotes:

1.    The other Greensville County taxable named John Day purchased 100 acres on both sides of Lick Creek in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, from William and Lucy Robinson on 8 June 1769 [DB 9:505]. He was head of a Greensville County, Virginia household of one "white" (free) person in 1783 [VA:55] and taxable in Greensville County from 1782 to 1802, called John Day, Sr., from 1795 to 1797 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 3, 14, 34, 41, 62, 81, 187, 200, 217, 230, 243, 258, 273, 286]. He married Agnes Sexton, 3 January 1787 Greensville County bond. She may have been the Agnes Sexton who was fined 500 pounds of tobacco in Brunswick County on 24 July 1765 [Orders 1765, 339; 1765-8, 267-8]. John Day voted in Greensville County in 1792, 1794, and 1795. He and his wife Agga Day sold 35 acres adjoining the road from Hicks Ford (Emporia) to Eaton's Ferry in Greensville County on 8 February 1797. His 12 October 1801 Greensville County will was proved in October 1802 and witnessed by Henry and William Wyche. He left his land and estate to his wife Agnes during her lifetime and then to Joseph Sexton [DB 1:450; 2:134, 192; 3:283-4; WB 1:471].

 

DEAN FAMILY

The Dean family of Virginia may have originated in Maryland or Delaware. Members of the family in Virginia were:

i. Thornton1, head of a King George County household of 13 "other free" in 1810 [VA:196].

ii. Frances, born about 1751, registered in King George County on 3 August 1801: a dark mulatto woman, aged about fifty years, about five feet high, was born free [Register of Free Persons 1785-1799, no.27].

iii. John, born about 1767, registered in King George County on 8 August 1801: a bright mulatto man aged about thirty four years, five feet seven inches high having descended from a free woman. His wife Betsy registered the same day [Register of Free Negroes nos.33, 34]. He was head of a King George County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:196].

iv. William, born about 1769, registered in King George County on 18 November 1799: William Hall alias Dean a Mulattoe Man aged about Thirty Years & about five feet Seven Inches high, was born free [Register of Free Negroes no.11].

v. Susan, head of a Richmond City household of 2 "other free" and 5 slaves in 1810 [VA:335].

vi. Philip, head of a Goochland County household of 1 "other free" and 1 slave in 1810 [VA:690].

vii. Jane, born about 1777, registered in King George County on 3 August 1801: a light mulatto woman, aged about twenty four years, five feet & one inch high, was born in this County of a free woman [Register of Free Negroes no.26].

viii. Elijah Hall, born about 1779, registered in King George County on 14 October 1800: Elijah Hall alias Deen, a dark Mulatto man aged about twenty one years, & about five feet seven Inches high, was born in this County of a free Woman [Register of Free Negroes no.15]. He may have been related to Reuben and Rapple Hall, both heads of Fairfax County households of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:261, 268].

ix. James Hall, born about 1781, registered in King George County on 4 December 1800: James Hall alias Deen, a bright mulatto man aged about nineteen years and about five feet five inches high, was born in this County of a free woman [Register no.19].

x. Dicey, born about 1788, registered in King George County on 17 August 1801: a bright mulatto woman aged about twenty three years, four feet ten inches high, having descended from a free woman [Register of Free Negroes no.32].

xi. Thornton2, born about 1790, born about 1790, a poor orphan bound by the overseer's of the poor to Peter Hansbrough in King George County on 3 December 1795 [Orders 1790-9, 428]. He registered in King George County on 3 December 1807: a dark mulatto man about sixteen or seventeen years old, five feet high, stout made ... born free [Register of Free Negroes no.42].

xii. Ceiley, a "poor orphan Molatto" bound by the overseer's of the poor to Peter Hansbrough in King George County on 3 December 1795 [Orders 1790-9, 428].

 

DEAS FAMILY

Members of the Deas family were

1        i. William, born say 1740.

2        ii. Benjamin, born say 1745.

 

1.    William Deas, born say 1748, and Mary (his wife or sister?), "two adult Negroes," were baptized on 9 August 1772 in St. Thomas and Dennis Parishes, South Carolina [Parochial Register of the Parishes of St. Thomas & St. Denis, n.p. (alphabetical listing under D)]. They may have been the parents of

i. Joseph, married Venus Caunou, "Blacks," at St. Philip's and Michael's Parish, Charleston on 13 June 1806.

ii. William, married Ann Timothy, "free people of color," at St. Philip's and Michael's Parish, Charleston on 7 October 1812.

iii. Lydia, married Joseph Bull, 6 April 1815, "Col'd persons, free," at St. Philip's and Michael's Parish, Charleston.

iv. Ann, paid the "free Negro" capitation tax while living at Jehu Jones' Inn at Broad Street in Charleston in 1821 [Free Negro Capitation Tax Book, 1821, p.7]. Ann was Jones's stepdaughter. Jehu Jones, born about 1769, was a "Mulatto Man" who was manumitted by Christopher Rogers of Charleston on 22 January 1798. He worked as a tailor and was able to purchase a house on Broad Street behind St. Michael's Church for $2,000 in 1809. In 1815 he purchased the adjacent lot and house at 33 Broad Street for $13,000 and owned at least six slaves. The hotel became popular with Charleston's elite white society. Jehu was a trustee of the Brown Fellowship Society [S.C. Dept. of Archives & History, "Jehu Jones: Free Black Entrepreneur"]. Jehu's wife Abigail and Ann Deas visited New York about 1822 and were not allowed to return because of a law passed in 1823 barring the return of free African Americans who left the state. Jehu died in 1833 leaving an estate estimated at $40,000. Ann returned in 1835, bought the inn from the estate, received a pardon from the governor for entering the state without permission, and ran the inn for the next twelve years.

 

2.    Benjamin Dees, born say 1745, purchased 200 acres in Anson County, North Carolina, on the north side of the Pee Dee River on the Falling Creek branch of Hitchcock's Creek from Jordan Gibson on 15 November 1768 by deed witnessed by Gideon Gibson [DB 7:224]. He was a white taxable in Bladen County in 1770 and 1772 when he had "Mulato" Benjamin Sweat in his household [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:44, 78, 143]. On 13 October 1773 it was reported to the Governor of the colony that he was among a group of "free Negors and Mullatus" living on "the Kings land" in what was then Bladen County [G.A. 1773, box 7]. Other mixed-race families in the group were Chavis, Grant, Groom, Ivey, Kersey, Locklear, and Sweat. Many of these families had title to their land. He may have been the father of

i. Nancy, living with Thomas Lowry on 24 November 1812 when the Robeson County court ordered her to bring two of her illegitimate children by James Lowry to the next court [Minutes 1806-13, 351].

 

DEBRIX FAMILY

Two members of the Debrix family, perhaps brothers, were living in Surry County, Virginia, about 1760. They were

1        i. John1, born say 1725.

2        ii. David1, born say 1740.

 

1.    John1 Deverix/ Debrix, born say 1725, was one of fourteen free African Americans in Surry County (called John Deverix) who were presented by the court on 21 November 1758 for failing to pay taxes on their "Mulatto wives." The inventory of his Surry County estate was taken on 12 February 1772. On 25 March 1783 the court summoned the administrators of his estate, William Collins and Benjamin Putney, to give their account on motion of (his son?) John Debereaux [Orders 1757-64, 135; 1764-74, 211; 1775-85, 207]. He was probably the father of

3        i. John2, born say 1745.

ii. Burrell, born say 1766, taxable in Surry County from 1787 to 1805; his tax charged to John Debrix in 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 451; 1791-1816, frames 289, 326, 407, 560, 591].

 

2.    David1 Debrix /Debricks, born say 1740, purchased 43 acres on the south side of Cypress Swamp in Surry County, Virginia, from William Walden on 14 June 1762 [DB 8:129] and was taxable on 47 acres in Surry County in 1787 [Land Tax Lists, 1782-1820]. He was head of a Surry County household of 11 persons in 1782 [VA:43], 10 in 1784 (called David Debereaux) [VA:78] and 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:605]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1782 to : charged with Howell and David Debrix's tithes in 1787; charged with David Debreaux, Jr.'s tithe from 1790 to 1792; charged with Richard Deborix's tax in 1797; taxable on a slave named Isham, aged 12-16, in 1798 and 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 358, 380, 398, 450, 598; 1791-1816, frame 10, 59, 108, 161, 237, 289, 326, 368, 407, 446]. His will was proved in Surry County in 1816 [WB 3:95]. He was the father of

i. ?Howell, born about 1770, taxable in Surry County from 1787 to 1796: his tax charged to David Debrix in 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 450, 473, 551; 1791-1816, frames 10, 161, 257]. He purchased 75 acres in Surry County on 22 February 1790 from John Banks, Henry and Judy Charity, Susanna Howell, and Joseph and Hannah Roberts, being the land descended to them from Matthew Banks [DB 1792-9, 296]. Howell was executor of the 18 December 1796 Surry County will of William Cypress and was mentioned in the 3 September 1796 Surry County will of Mary Andrews [WB 1:183, 186]. He was taxable in James City County on a slave from 1798 to 1809 and was a "mulato" taxable there in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99; 1800-24].

ii. ?David2, born say 1771, taxable in Surry County from 1787 to 1794: listed with (his father?) David Debrix in 1787 (aged 16-21) and from 1790 to 1792 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 480, 598; 1791-1816, frames 10, 59]. He was taxable in James City County from 1805 to 1812, a "cold." taxable in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-24].

iii. Richard, born about 1776, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 22 May 1798: Richard Debereaux son of David Debereaux a mulatto resident yellowish complexion, straight made 5'10", 22 years of age, born of free parents [Back of Guardian Accounts Book, 1783-1804, no.29]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1797 to 1816: listed in his father's household in 1797, counted as a "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 289, 369, 447, 812, 852]. He married Anna Peters, 21 January 1817 Surry County bond, with the consent of her father Jesse Peters.

iv. ?Edy, born say 1779, married Samuel Thompson, 18 September 1790 Surry County bond, Howell Debrix surety.

v. ?Luran, married William Gilchrist, 20 December 1798 Surry County bond.

vi. ?John5, born about 1787, registered in Surry County on 11 June 1810: a Mulatto man aged about 23 years is 5'5" high, pretty stout and well made, of a bright complexion [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 41].

 

3.    John2 Debrix, born say 1745, was head of a Surry County household of 13 persons in 1782 [VA:43] and was taxable on 280 acres in Surry County in 1782 [Land Tax Lists, 1782-1820]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1782 to 1816: called John Debereaux, Jr., in 1782; charged with Burrell and John Debrix's tax in Cabin Point district in 1787; charged with Major Debreaux's tax in 1790; charged with Major and Moses Debrix's tax in 1791; called John Deborix, Sr., in 1794; charged with John Deborix, Jr.'s tax in 1795 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 350, 398, 451, 472, 598; 1791-1816, frames 10, 60, 161, 237, 289, 326]. He was head of a Surry County household of 18 "other free" in 1810 [VA:605] and 3 "free colored" in 1830. On 28 December 1790 he (called John Debereaux) sold 160 acres in Surry County to Armistead Peters [DB 1788-92, 236]. By his 1829 Surry County will, he left 50 acres to his son Major [WB 7:410]. He was the father of

4        i. Major, born about 1766.

ii. John4, born about 1774, taxable in John Debrix's Cabin Point, Surry County household in 1795, charged with his own tax in 1797, called "son of John" in 1802 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames; 1791-1816, frames 237, 289, 326, 481]. He registered in Petersburg on 3 July 1810: a brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, thirty six years old, born of free parents in the County of Surry p. certificate [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 629]. John Debrix was taxable in Petersburg in 1803 and 1810, called a "free Black" in 1813 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 90, 284, 399] and head of a Petersburg household of 2 "other free" in 1810 (John Devereux) [VA:123b].

iii. Sally, born about 1775, married Jesse Peters, 9 January 1796 Surry County bond, Armstead Peters surety, 15 January marriage. She registered as a "free Negro" in Surry county on 20 August 1804: wife of Jesse, born of free parents (John Debrix and Lucy his wife); bright complexion, ca 30 yrs. old, 5'3/4" high [Registry of Free Negroes, Surry County courthouse].

iv. Moses, born say 1779, taxable in Surry County from 1791 to 1816: listed with (his father?) John Debrix in 1791 and 1792; head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes" over the age of sixteen in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 10, 60, 237, 561, 612, 650, 688, 735, 812, 853]. He married Anne Charity, 30 December 1800 Surry County bond, Davis Charity surety. Anne may have been the Anny Debrix who was head of a Surry County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

v. Henry1, born about 1782, registered in Surry County on 24 July 1805: a mulatto man (son of John Debrix a free mulatto of the county of Surry) is of a bright complexion aged 23 years or thereabouts, 5'1/4" high, has a projecting mouth [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 27]. His 1 June 1810 Surry County will was recorded on 24 July 1810 and left "Mr. William Allen's Negro woman Fanny, whom I have for a wife" all his property [WB 2:357].

vi. Polly, born say 1784, "daughter of John Debrix," married Elick Charity, 12 June 1800 Surry County bond, Aaron Taylor surety.

vii. David3, taxable in Surry County from 1801 to 1809, called the son of John Debrix [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 447, 523, 591, 630, 650]. He married Nancy Scott, 25 December 1802 Surry County bond, William Scott, surety, 26 December marriage.

viii. ?Nancy, married Robert Elliott, 19 September 1798 Surry County bond, John Debereux surety, 20 September marriage.

ix. ?Pamelia, born about 1778, thirty-five years old on 6 November 1813 when she married James Williams, Surry County bond, Nicholas Scott surety.

 

4.    Major Debrix, born about 1766, registered in Surry County on 25 November 1822: son of John and Lucy Debrix, free persons of this county aged about 56 is 5'6" high of yellow Complexion, has a large mouth and prominent teeth, and has hair rather long than otherwise [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 75]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1790 to 1816: listed in John Debrix's household in 1790; listed with Peter Fagan, Jr., in 1792; called Major Deborix, Sr., in 1797; listed with a slave named John, aged 12-16, in 1800; head of a household of 1 "free Negro & Mulatto" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frame 598; 1791-1816, frames 65, 161, 257, 289, 406, 481, 560, 612, 650, 688, 735, 853]. He married Silvey Cannady, 7 February 1797 Sussex County bond, Joseph Cannady surety; and second, Polly Walden, 18 March 1814 Surry County bond, Nicholas Scott surety. Major was head of a Surry County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. By his 1837 Surry County will he left his land to his wife Polly and after her death, to his son Thomas [WB 8:384]. His children were

i. David3, born about 1797, registered in Surry County on 26 June 1820: a Mulatto Man the son of Major Debrix of this County was born free of a bright Complexion aged about 23 years is 5'8" High Well made.

ii. Betsy, born in June 1802, married Robert Bailey, 26 May 1823 Surry County bond, Isham Inman security, "Robert a free negro and Betsy a mulatto." She registered in Surry County on 28 February 1825: Betsy alias Betsy Bailey, the Daughter of Major Debrix & Sylvia Debrix free Mulattoes of Surry County, the said Betsy was born free. She was 22 years old in June 1824 of a bright complexion is 5'6-3/4" high has pretty straight hair [Hudgins, Register of Free Negroes, 80].

iii. John6, born in August 1803, registered on 28 February 1825: the Son of Major Debrix & Sylvia Debrix free Mulattoes of Surry County the said John Debrix was born free, he was 21 years old in August 1824 of a bright complexion rather down look, his Head projected forward, distended Nostrils, tho' not remarkably large ... is 5'8-3/4 high, pretty straight and well proportioned.

iv. Henry2, born about 1807, registered in Surry County on 28 July 1828: son of Major Debrix ... about 21 years of age of a bright complexion, well made ... 5'8" high.

v. Thomas, born about 1823, registered in Surry County on 28 July 1845: son of Major Debrix and Polly his wife ... of a bright complexion, bushy hair ... aged about 22 years and is 5'8-3/4" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 72, 80, 87, 166].

 

Another member of the family was

i. John3, born say 1760, a "Negro" taxable in James City County in 1786 who served in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149].

 

DEMERY FAMILY

1.    John1 Demerea, born say 1685, was called a "Negro belonging to John Lear of Nansemond County" when he was allowed to sue for his freedom in the General Court of Virginia. On 13 June 1711 he complained that, contrary to instructions from the court, Lear had severely beaten him. The Council of Colonial Virginia ordered the attorney general to prosecute Lear for his contempt of court [McIlwaine, Minutes of the Council, III:277-8]. He purchased 118 acres on the south side of Seacock Swamp in Isle of Wight County adjoining Bartholomew Andrews on 8 September 1732 (called John Demaris); he sold 43 acres on the south side of Blackwater Swamp adjoining John Warren and Randal Revel on 21 February 1742 (called John Dimrea); and on 28 October 1745 he and his wife Bridget Demmira sold 97 acres to John Portis. This was land on the south side of Lightwood Swamp which was part of the 118 acres he had purchased in 1732 [DB 4:233; 6:198; 7:205]. He was called John Demira on 12 November 1747 when the Isle of Wight County court exempted him from paying taxes due to his old age and infirmity [Orders 1746-52, 57]. On 13 June 1754 he was one of fourteen heads of household who were sued in Southampton County court by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American and Indian women. He pled not guilty at first but withdrew his plea and confessed when Francis Locust, James Brooks, James Brooks, Jr., John Byrd and John Byrd, Jr., were found guilty. He was fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco, the fine for concealing two tithables, so he probably had two women in his household over the age of sixteen [Orders 1749-54, 501, 512; 1754-9, 25, 39]. He was called John Demaree of Northampton County in the 3 May 1758 session of the North Carolina Assembly when he was excused from paying taxes because he was old and disabled [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, V:1008]. He was probably the ancestor of

2        i. John2, born say 1735.

3        ii. Frederick, born say 1738.

4        iii. Daniel, born say 1740.

iv. David1, born say 1745, living in Southampton County on 18 March 1765 when John Wilkerson sued him for a debt of 9 pounds, 7 shillings due by note of 7 June 1763. The grand jury in Southampton County presented him in 1766 for not listing himself as a tithable, and Shadrack Kennebrough sued him for 1 pound, 12 shillings for a gun [Judgment Papers, 1765-6, frames 185-188, 1026; 1773-4, 595-7]. He sued Moses Haisty in Southampton County court on 12 October 1773 for 2 pounds, 16 shillings due by account which included 32 gallons of cider, a side of shoe leather, a cow, and four days work. His suit against William Brooks was dismissed on 12 August 1779 by agreement of the parties. He was executor of Frederick Demmery's 28 August 1780 Southampton County will. On 9 July 1784 he was a co-defendant with Abraham Freeman in a Southampton County suit brought by the administrator of Burwell Barnes, deceased, and he sued John and Britain Bowers for 2 pounds, 18 shillings on 13 August 1787 [Orders 1772-7, 302; 1778-84, 84, 439; 1784-9, 317; Judgment Papers, 1773, frames 918-923]. He was executor of the 28 August 1780 Southampton County will of Frederick Demmery [WB 3:348]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1782 to 1788: taxable on 3 horses and 17 cattle in 1782, charged with Richard Demery's tax in 1787, charged with Micajah Demery's tax in 1788 [PPTL 1782-92, frames 504, 545, 569, 635, 658].

v. Lucy, born about 1757, head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:226]. She registered in Southampton County on 15 March 1827: Lucy Dimmery, age 70, light complexion, 5 feet 4-3/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1757].

 

2.    John2 Demery, born say 1735, purchased 100 acres near Corduroy Swamp in Northampton County, North Carolina, on 8 January 1757 and another 100 acres adjoining this on 16 April 1771 [DB 2:345, 5:93]. He voted for Joseph Sikes in the Northampton County election of 1762 [SS 837 by NCGSJ XII:170]. He was one of the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster of Captain James Fason's Northampton County militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He sold his Northampton County land on 15 February 1778 [DB 6:227], and was taxed on 350 acres and one Black Poll in Captain Dupree's District of Bladen County in 1784 [Bladen Co. Historical Soc., 1784 Tax List, Bladen County, 13]. He was a taxable head of a Bladen County household of one "white" (free) male from 21-60 years old, six under 21 or over 60, and one white female in 1786 and taxable on 550 acres in 1779 and 450 acres in 1789 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:142, 171, 201]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:188] and a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:779] and he may have been the John Dimry, born before 1776, who was head of a Grainger County, Tennessee household of 6 "other free" and a white woman in 1810. His probable children were

i. Allen1, born say 1758, a taxable "Black Male" in Matthew Moore's Bladen County household in 1770 and head of a "white" (free) household in 1786: one male 21-60 years old, two males under 21 or over 60, and three females [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:50; II:174]. He was head of an Anson County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:35] and 5 in 1800 [NC:203]. He enlisted in the 10th North Carolina Regiment [Clark, Colonial and State Records, 16:1047]. He received an Anson County grant for land on Savannah Creek on 21 January 1800 and sold this land on 27 August 1806, 20 February 1807, and 2 April 1807 [DB 12:170, S:167, N&O:142, T:39, 90]. He was called a "Mulatto man" on 8 August 1800 when he and a white man named James Porter were charged in Southampton County court with the murder of Jacob Artis at Jacob's house in Southampton County on 30 July that year. The court heard testimony from five white witnesses and Rebecca Artis and sent the prisoners to Suffolk for trial [Minutes 1799-1803, 109-10, 123, 213].

ii. Derinda, head of a Bladen County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 and 4 "free colored" women in 1820 [NC:132].

5        iii. John3, born about 1774.

iv. Wiley, born say 1777, neglected to give in his list of tithables in Wake County in 1794 [MFCR 099.701.1, frame 212], head of an Anson County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:207], and counted a second time as Wiley Young [NC:203], called William Demery in 1810, head of a Marion District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" [SC:80].

 

3.    Frederick Demmery, born say 1738, was living in Southampton County, Virginia, on 28 August 1780, when he made his will, proved 8 November 1781, David Demmery executor [WB 3:348]. He named the following beneficiaries but did not state his relationship to them:

i. Richard, born say 1762, sued in Southampton County court by Lewis Artis for a debt of 4,000 pounds of tobacco. On 9 December 1784 the court attached his goods which included two feather beds and furniture, two spinning wheels, a chest, table, frying pan, pot, 20 weight of cotton, 20 barrels of corn, 250 pounds of tobacco, a plow hoe, four weeding hoes, two tubs, three water pails, and two brandy barrels [Orders 1784-9, 7]. He was taxable in Southampton County in Jacob Newsum's household in 1784, charged with his own tax in 1785, taxable in David Dimmory's household in 1787, in Drew Powell's household in 1788 and 1789, and in Thomas Holladay's household in 1792 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 549, 563, 635, 667, 716, 876]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:435].

ii. Tempy.

iii. Micajah1, born say 1765, a "Black" person 12-50 years old living alone in Captain Dupree's District of Northampton County in 1786 for the North Carolina state census. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, in David Demery's household in 1788 and was called Micajah Y. Dimory when he was charged with his own tax in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 658, 708]. He called himself Micajah Young on 30 April 1794 when he married Elizabeth Evans, Wake County, North Carolina bond. He was head of a Wake County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 (abstracted as Micajah Dempsey) [NC:106]. He was head of an Anson County household of 5 "other free" in 1800, counted as Micajah Young [NC:203] and counted a second time as Micajah Demery [NC:207], 7 in 1810 (as Micajah Demery) [NC:44], and 11 "free colored" in 1820, called "Micajah Demery alias Young" [NC:12].

iv. Day, born say 1773, probably identical to David2 Demery who was ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, on 11 September 1789 [Minutes 1786-90, n.p.]. David was over the age of 16 when he was listed as a taxable in John Kindred's St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County household from 1794 to 1796 [PPTL 1792-1806, frame 84, 164, 194]. He may have been the David Dimry who was head of a Wilson County, Tennessee household of 6 "free colored" in 1820.

v. Collin, born say 1775, ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, on 11 September 1789 [Minutes 1786-90, n.p.]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County in Howell Vaughn's household in 1795 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frame 172].

 

4.    Daniel Demery, born say 1740, may have been identical to Daniel Dunery of Southampton County whose wife (no race indicated) gave birth to triplets, Jemima, Kezia (who died a few days after birth), and Karenhappuch, in October 1768 according to the 3 November 1768 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 100]. He was living in Southampton County on 8 June 1769 when he purchased a shoat from Nathaniel Tatum for 6 shillings, 5 pence [Judgment Papers, 1768-9, frame 920]. On 12 September 1771 when he was sued by Shadrack Kennebrough for 1 pound, 12 shillings, and he sued Simon Turner, executor of Exum Williamson, for a debt of 6 pounds, 19 shillings on 10 June 1773 [Orders 1768-72, 449; 1772-7, 204, 221, 356]. He was taxable in Northampton County, North Carolina, in 1780 [G.A. 46.1] and head of a household of 7 "Black" persons 12-50 years old and 8 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Captain Dupree's District in 1786 for the state census for Northampton County. He was head of a Northampton County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74]. The administration of his Northampton County estate was granted to Edward Lawry on 1 June 1795 on security of 100 pounds [Minutes 1772-96, 172]. His children may have beenn

i. Shadrack, born say 1775, married Charlotte Hicks, 8 February 1794 Southampton County, Virginia bond, Aaron Heathcock (Haithcock) surety. He was taxable in Southampton County in John Robertson's household in 1792 and in Thomas Taylor's household in 1795 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frame 883; 1792-1806, frame 171]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:718].

6        ii. Wright, born say 1777.

iii. James, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 11 "other free" in 1810. Perhaps his widow was Winny, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" females in 1820 [NC:145].

iv. John4, born about 1783, registered in Southampton County on 31 February 1804: age 21, yellow 5 feet 4 3/4 inches, Free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 303]. He married Rebecca Stewart, 10 February 1806 Greensville County, Virginia bond, Frederick Shelton surety. He registered in Greensville County on 9 May 1807: Born free as appears from a Certificate of Norfolk County, aged twenty four years ... five feet five Inches & 3/4 high [Register of Free Negroes, no.10]. He and his wife Rebecca were living in Northampton County, North Carolina, on 8 November 1806 when they sold 91 acres in Greensville County to Henry Stewart with Benjamin Gowing as witness [DB 3:523]. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, in 1806. He apparently died before 1810 since Rebecca was taxable in Greensville County on a horse in 1810 and was listed by herself as a "Mulatto" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 352, 432, 401, 446, 461, 487].

v. Beehy, head of a Greensville County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:261].

 

5.    John3 Demery, born about 1774 in Charleston, South Carolina, married Sarah Robinson in Anson County, North Carolina, in 1801 according to his own recollection [History of Randolph County, Indiana, 137]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 4 "other free" in 1800, 3 in Marion District, South Carolina, in 1810 [SC:80], and 5 "free colored" in Anson County in 1820 [NC:12]. He purchased land in Anson County on Island Creek on 12 January 1824 and sold it three months later on 6 April 1824 [DB V:108, 140]. He was the first African American to settle in the western part of Randolph County, Indiana. He came to Randolph County with Lemuel Vestal in 1825 and settled in Stony Creek. He had 80 acres of land and a house and lot in Winchester at the time of his death in 1860 [History of Randolph County, Indiana, 137]. He was a sixty-nine-year-old head of a Washington Township, Randolph County, Indiana household with Polly (sixty years old) and son Maston (thirteen years old) in 1850. His children were

i. Mary, married William Weaver.

ii. Irvin.

iii. John5, born say 1805.

iv. Hannah, married James Scott, son of Robert Scott who was emancipated in 1779 in North Carolina. They came to Randolph County from Wayne County in 1832. They had fourteen children.

v. Robert, who lived in Cabin Creek settlement.

vi. Charles.

vii. Coleman.

viii. William H., born say 1830, told his life story to the author of the History of Randolph County in 1888 as follows: He started life at sea in 1845 as servant to Commodore Perry aboard the James K. Polk which burned at the Strait of Gibraltar. In 1847 he worked as a steward on a steamer to Europe, the Middle East, and the West Indies. In 1852 he worked on several Mississippi steamboats and later returned to farm life in Randolph County [History of Randolph County, 137-138].

ix. Zachary.

x. Phebe Ann, married Jacob Felters.

xi. Maston, born about 1837, thirteen years old in 1850.

 

6.    Wright Demery, born say 1777, was head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:718]. His children may have been

i. William, born say 1798, married Tamer Wilkins, 31 January 1816 Northampton County marriage bond with Wright Demery bondsman. William and Tamer were found dead six years later on 5 March 1822 when a coroner's jury was appointed by the Northampton County court to determine the cause of death [Minutes 1821-25, 84].

ii. Micajah2, born 1814, married Nancy Roberts, 20 August 1833 Northampton County bond. They were counted in household no. 231 in the census for Jefferson Township, Logan County, Ohio, in 1850.

 

Other members of the family were

i.  John, born before 1776, head of a Grainger County, Tennessee household of 6 "other free" and a white woman in 1810.

ii. John, born before 1776, head of a Chesterfield County, South Carolina household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. John, born before 1776, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:779], one of two John Dimerys counted with 3 "other free" in Marion District in 1810 [SC:84a] and head of a Horry District, South Carolina household of 9 "free colored" in 1830. He was taxed on 300 acres and two free Negroes in Horry District in 1824 [Comptroller General, Returns 1824, no.311].

iv. John, born before 1776, head of a St. Clair County, Illinois household of 9 "free colored" in 1830.

v. Allen2, born before 1795, head of a Rutherford County, Tennessee household of 7 "free colored" in 1820. He was a "free person of color" residing in Nacogdoches County, Texas, in 1840 when he petitioned to remain in the state, stating that he had been living in the state at the time of the Declaration of Independence on 2 March 1836 [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 217].

 

Endnotes:

1.    The other Southampton County householders who were sued for failing to pay tax on their wives were John Porteus, Isaac Young, Thomas Wilkins, Francis Locust, James Brooks, Jr. and Sr., John Byrd, Jr. and Sr., Abraham Artis, Lewis Artis, William Brooks, Ann Brooks, and William Tabor.

 

DEMPSEY FAMILY

1.    Patience1 Dempsey, born say 1700, purchased 50 acres on Salmon Creek in Bertie County on 6 May 1743 and another 50 acres adjoining this land on 23 April 1759. She may have been the daughter of Mary Dempsey who also purchased land on Salmon Creek in Bertie a few years earlier on 4 June 1739 [DB F:84, 425; I:224]. Mary died shortly after, before November that year, when (her son?) George Dempsey proved an inventory of her estate in Bertie County court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, I:267]. George lived in the vicinity of Patience and her family but was taxed as white in all the extant Bertie tax lists. Patience was taxable on one tithe in the 1751 summary tax list for Bertie [CCR 190] and taxable in the 1756 list of Constable John Reddit adjacent to George and Joseph Dempsey [CR 10.702.1, Box 1]. She was probably a white woman who was taxable on her children. In 1759 she was listed in John Brickell's list, not taxed on herself, but taxable on her "sons Thorogood, James, Joshua," and "Negro Kate" (her daughter Catherine, named in her will). Her 12 February 1764 Bertie County will was proved in August 1764. She left 50 acres where she was then living to her son Thorough Good Dempsey, left 50 acres on Salmon Creek to be divided among her sons James and Joshua Dempsey and grandson Isaac Dempsey, a cow and a calf to each of her daughters Amey Dempsey, Cate, and Mary; a cow and calf to her grandchild--written as Billy Dempsey in the recorded will and Betty Dempsey in the original; and a cow and calf to Patience Dempsey raised from her unnamed mother's cow. She also gave her daughter Amey a horse "in trust for her father" [WB A:58]. However, there is no further record of him in the Bertie County records.

A June 1849 Bertie County court case provides a description of the family. A Dempsey descendant, accused of carrying his gun without a license, gave evidence of his parentage. A witness deposed that he heard "barncastle, a very old man now deceased," say that the defendant's great grandfather, Joseph Dempsey, alias Darby, was a "coal black negro;" his wife a white woman (Patience?); their child Joseph, a reddish copper colored man with curly red hair and blue eyes; his wife a white woman; their child William married a white woman; their son Whitmel married a white woman, and they were the parents of the defendant [Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning American Slavery, II:132].

William, the defendant's grandfather, was taxed in Joseph Dempsey's household about 1772 [CR 10.702.1, box 3]. Barncastle may have been Richard Barnecaster, counted in the 1790 census for Bertie County [NC:11]. "Whitmel" may have been Whitand Demsey, head of a Bertie County household of 13 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:68]. Patience's children were

2        i. Joseph, born say 1720, died after 1788.

3        ii. Amy, born say 1724.

4        iii. Catherine/ Kate, born say 1734.

5        iv. Thoroughgood1, born say 1740.

6        v. James1, born say 1742.

vi. Joshua, born say 1745, taxed as a single "free Mulatto" in the 1763 list of John Nichols, and in 1764 with wife, identified as Mary in the 1766 list of John Crickett. He purchased land on the south side of Salmon Creek on 1 October 1767 [DB L:101]. He was ordered to work on the road from Duckinfield's in May 1782, and his sons were ordered to work on the road from the "middle swamp to Hootins" in November 1787 along with the other freeholders of that district [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:680]. He purchased 75 acres near Duckinfield's line in December 1797 and sold land that same year [DB R:514; S:50]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:12], 7 in 1800 [NC:40], and 12 in 1810 [NC:147].

7        vii. Mary Brantly, born say 1744, married Peter Brantly.

 

2.    Joseph Dempsey, born say 1720, was not named in Patience Dempsey's will but may have been her son. He was taxable in Bertie County on 2 tithes in the 1754 summary list, and was a "Mul." insolvent taxpayer in 1758. He was taxable with his son George in 1759; with son William in 1770 and 1772, and with Keziah in 1774 and 1775 [CR 10.702.1, box 3]. He bought 78 acres on the south side of Bucklesberry Pocosin in Bertie County on 10 August 1742, sold this land to Robert West on 11 May 1752, and repurchased it again on 5 April 1756 [DB F:377; G:527; I:242]. His wife Eleanor Dempsey signed the dower release for the 11 May 1752 sale. Since she was not tithed in any of the tax lists, she was probably white as claimed in the 1849 court case. He sold the remainder of his land by a deed proved in the August 1788 Bertie County court [DB O:241]. His children were

i. George2, born before 1748, taxed in his father's household in the list of William Gray in 1759: "Joseph Dempsey and George his son" 2 black tithes. He was head of a Bertie County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:12].

8        ii. William1, born about 1760.

iii. Keziah, born 1762, taxable in Joseph's household in 1774.

iv. ?Johnson, born say 1770, among the freeholders ordered by the May 1792 Bertie court to work on the road from Luke Collins Ferry to Sprewell Road with William and George Dempsey [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:942]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 7 in 1800 [NC:40], 5 in Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1810 [NC:16], and 8 "free colored" in Halifax County in 1830.

 

3.    Amy Dempsey, born say 1724, was called "Amey Demsey of Bertie County Spinster" when she sued Samuel Ormes, agent for Nathaniel Duckingfield, for her freedom on 29 March 1745 in Chowan County General Court [General Court Dockets, 1742-45, 2nd and 3rd pages from the end of reel]. She was taxed as a "free molato" in John Nichols' list for Bertie County in 1763. By her mother's Bertie County will, she was allowed to keep a cow, a calf, and a mare previously lent to her. In her will Patience also mentioned a granddaughter Patience Dempsey, who was to receive the first calf from the cow she had given her unnamed mother. Both Amy and Catherine received cows, so one of them was Patience2's mother. Amy's children were

i. Jesse1, born about 1748, the eight-year-old son of Amy Demsey a "Free Mullatoe," bound to Margaret Dukinfield to learn husbandry on 27 January 1756. He was taxable in 1767 in John Pearson's household in the list of William Nichols. He was listed in the 1778 Bertie tax summary list, assessment blank.

ii. George3, born about 1748, the eight-year-old son of Amy Demsey a "Free Mullattoe," bound to Margaret Dukinfield to learn husbandry on 27 January 1756.

iii. Squire, born about 1750, the six-year-old son of Amy Demsey a "Free Mullattoe," bound to Margaret Dukinfield to learn husbandry on 27 January 1756 [CR 010.101.7 by NCGSJ XIII:168, 169, 170].

iv. ?Patience2, head of a Perquimans County household of 11 "other free" and 2 white women in 1810 [NC:948].

 

4.    Catherine/ Kate Dempsey, born say 1734, was taxable in 1751 in Thomas Ashley's household in the summary list for Bertie County [CCR 190]. She was a "free Mulatto" taxable in her own household in the 1762 Constable's list of Benjamin Ashburn(?) and taxed for the last time in 1767 in the list of William Nichols. Her son was

i. George4, born about 1750, ordered by the August 1763 Bertie court bound an apprentice to John Nichols, one of the executor's of his grandmother's will [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:631]. George was a taxable "free Mulatto" in John Nichols' household in the 1766 list of John Crickett.

 

5.    Thoroughgood1 Dempsey, born say 1740, was taxed in the 1763 list of John Nichols with Elizabeth Dempsey, identified as his wife in the 1764 summary and later Bertie tax lists. He received 50 acres by his mother's will. He probably left the county after 1770 since he and Elizabeth were last taxed in the 1770 list of Edward Rasor. He was head of a household of 5 free males and 5 free females in District 3 of Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1786 for the state census. He purchased 40 acres in Halifax County on Little Quankey Creek on 20 November 1792 [DB 17:465] and was head of a Halifax County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61] and 5 in 1800 [NC:307]. He may have been the ancestor of the many Dempseys who were living in Halifax County in the early nineteenth century:

i. James2, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:306], 11 in 1810 [NC:16], and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:145].

ii. Melvin, head of a Halifax County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:16].

iii. Uriah, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:16], 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:145], and 4 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. William2, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:17] and 11 "free colored" in Bertie County in 1820 [NC:68].

v. John, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:17] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:145].

vi. Eliza, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:17].

 

6.    James1 Dempsey, born say 1742, was a "free molatto" taxed in the Bertie County list of John Nichols in 1763 with "free molatto" Rebecca Dempsey, identified as his wife in the 1764 summary and later Bertie lists. He purchased 75 acres on Sams Branch adjoining his land and George1 Dempsey's on 13 October 1762 and sold this land to William James on 5 September 1772 [DB K:217; L:349]. He was taxed on a valuation of 513 pounds in the 1779 list of Ryan and Hardy. He moved to Halifax County where he was head of a household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:12] and 7 in 1800 [NC:304]. His children may have been

i. Thurogood2, born say 1760, head of a Bertie County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:12], 10 in 1800 [NC:40], and 7 in Martin County in 1810 [NC:433].

ii. Edmund, head of a Bertie County household of 14 "other free" in 1810 [NC:147].

iii. Josiah, born 1776-94, head of a Bertie County household of 10 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:68].

 

7.    Mary Brantly, born say 1744, was probably the "daughter Mary" mentioned in Patience Dempsey's 1764 will. She was taxable with Patience's grandson Isaac in the 1764 summary list, and she was taxable in her own household in the 1766 summary list and the 1767 list of William Nichols. Her children and husband were identified in the Bertie County court and indenture records:

i. Sarah, born about 1760, called orphan of Peter Brantly, deceased, in Mary's September 1771 Bertie County court petition to have her bound as an apprentice to John Pearson, the executor of Patience's will [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:982]. The indenture was signed the same month [NCGSJ XIV:34]. She received "one Motherless Calf" by the will of her grandmother Patience.

ii. Darby, born about 1768, also called orphan of Peter Brantly, bound out with his sister Sarah. He was head of a Bertie County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:11].

iii. ?Jeremiah, born 10 January 1774, (no parent named) bound to be a shoemaker on 16 May 1791 [NCGSJ XIV:165].

iv. Rachel, daughter of Mary Brantly, born February 1776, bound an apprentice in May 1786 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:582]. She married King Sanderlin, 21 December 1805 Bertie County bond, Richard Dempsey bondsman.

v. Joshua, born January 1778, bound an apprentice cooper in May 1786 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:582], head of a Bertie County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:147].

 

8.    William1 Dempsey was born about 1760 since he was taxed in the household of (his father?) Joseph Dempsey in 1772. He was head of a Bertie County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:41] and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:68]. According to the 1849 court case mentioned above, his son was probably

i. Whitand/Whitmel, born 1776-94, called Whitand Demsey, head of a Bertie County household of 13 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:68]. He was called Whitmell Demsey when he married Anna Bowen (who was most likely white), 17 June 1801 Bertie County bond with Elisha Dempsey bondsman.

 

Other Demseys

9.    Parthena Dempsey, born say 1760, had several of her children, "mulatto Bastards," indentured by the Bertie court. They were

i. Dick, born 1775, ordered bound to Zedekiah Stone in November 1778.

ii. Rendah, born 1777, ordered bound to Zedekiah Stone [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:274].

iii. Bristol, born 1779, bound to Zedekiah Stone to be a shoemaker, on 9 February 1780 [NCGSJ XIV:36].

iv. ?Thomas, born about 1779, no parent named when he was ordered bound by the August Bertie court to David James to be a blacksmith [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:458]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:40].

 

10.    Ann Dempsey, born say 1770, was head of a Bertie County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:41] and 3 in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:17]. Her children were

i. Johnston, son of Ann, no age or race stated when he was bound to Jehu Nichols to be a blacksmith on 3 February 1794 [NCGSJ XV:34]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:68] and one "free colored" in Halifax County in 1830.

ii. ?William3, bound an apprentice on 3 February 1794, no parent named [NCGSJ XV:34]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:68].

iii. ?Elisha, born before 1776, bound an apprentice on 3 February 1794, no age or parent named [NCGSJ XV:34]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:68].

 

11.    Henry1/ Harry Dempsey, born circa 1770, was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:436]. He obtained free papers in Northampton County on 11 October 1839, and registered in Logan county, Ohio, on 1 October 1847. The papers described him and his wife as

yellow complexion, 65 or 70, 5 foot nine and one half inches high, right leg missing, wife Tabitha, yellow complexion ... [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 12].

They were living in Urbana Township, Champaign County, Ohio, in 1850 [Census p.831]. Their children were

i. Wesley, born about 1817, married Sally Anders, 2 June 1838 Northampton County bond, Squire Walden bondsman. He obtained free papers in Northampton County on 9 October 1838: son of Henry and Tabitha Dempsy ... five feet nine or ten inches high of brown complexion well set ... married to Sally Andus daughter of Archer Andus. His wife Sally was born about 1820, of free parentage ... of bright complexion. They recorded their free papers in Champaign County, Ohio, on 22 December 1841.

ii. Henry2, born 28 December 1821.

iii. Eliza, born 28 May 1824.

iv. Elisha, born 22 February 1827.

v. Harrison, born 4 January 1829.

vi. Elizabeth, born 5 April 1832 [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 12].

 

12.    Jesse2 Dempsey, born about 1773, was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:224]. He was counted in the 1850 Ohio census for Logan County in Monroe Township, household number 155, page 20: seventy-seven years old, Male Mulatto, with sixty-year-old Angeline, twenty-year-old Willis, seventeen-year-old Rachel, and seven-year-old Edward, all born in North Carolina. Perhaps his other children were the Dempseys living in the nearby households:

i. James3, born in North Carolina about 1823, counted with Kiturah Dempsey who was thirty years old.

ii. Dillard, born in North Carolina about 1825, counted with Anna Dempsey. Like many free African Americans he moved to Canada where his children were born. They were listed with him in his 1860 Logan County household: six-year-old Thomas, seven-year-old Angeline, and three-year-old Joseph. He had real estate worth $1,800 and personal estate of $300 in 1860.

 

DENNIS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Dennis, born say 1736, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 24 June 1765 when she was sued for debt by the churchwardens of Meherrin Parish. She may have been the mother of Robert and Catherine Dennis, "mullata Bastard Children," who were bound out by the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County on 23 July 1759 [Orders 1765, 270; 1757-9, 374]. And she may have been related to Diverz Dennis, head of a Bertie County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:42]. Perhaps she was the mother of

i. Robert, born say 1754, called "a Certain Molatto Boy, Bob," in Chatham County, North Carolina court on 14 February 1775 when he complained that Pritteman Berry was unlawfully detaining him as a servant. He was called Robert Dennis "molatto" when the court ordered him released from his indenture to Berry about a month later on 9 May. He died about May 1795 when an inquest on his dead body was returned to court by the coroner [Minutes 1774-9, 51, 54, 61; 1794-1800, 43b].

2        ii. Catherine, born say 1756.

 

2.    Catherine Dennis, born say 1756, was living in Chatham County when her daughter Mary Dennis was bound to Joseph Griffin. She was the mother of

i. Mary, born about 1772, eleven years old when she was bound out by the Chatham County court on 13 May 1783 [Minutes 1781-5, 31b].

ii. ?Phillis, a "free woman of colour," living in Cumberland County on 10 June 1841 when the court gave her permission to use her gun in the county [Minutes 1840-2].

 

Another member of a Dennis family was

i. Andrew, born 22 February 1755, a sixteen-year-old "Mulatto" bound to Daniel Roberts in Norborne Parish, Frederick County, Virginia, on 7 August 1771 [Orders 1770-2, 239].

 

DENNUM/ DENHAM FAMILY

 

1.    Hannah Dennam, born say 1690, received slaves Jack and Peter by the 2 March 1726/7 Charles City County will of (her father?) Gibson Gibson [DW 1724-31, 122, 161-2, 166-7]. She may have been the mother of

i. Philip, born say 1730, taxable on his own tithe and John Going's tithe in Goochland County in 1754 in the list of William Burton [Tithables, 1730-1755, frame 282]. He was living in Halifax County, Virginia, when he and William Donathan were among those ordered to clear a road from Burches Creek to Mirey Creek. On 21 March 1765 his bill of sale to James Roberts, Jr., Gentleman, was proved, and on 16 May 1765 the court presented him, Shadrack Gowin, and Peter Rickman for concealing a tithable on information of John Bates, Gentleman. The tithables were probably their wives. Their cases were dismissed in August 1766, perhaps on payment of the tax. He was sued for debt seven times between June 1769 and 23 April 1774. In October 1770 the court awarded one of Philip's debtors 10 shillings for carpentry work that he had performed for Moses Echols [Pleas 1763-4, 303; 1764-7, 46, 358; 369, 415, 491, 528; 1770-2, 55, 86, 114, 147-8; 1774-9, 43].

 

Other members of the family were

i. David, born before 1776, head of a Claiborne County, Tennessee household of 9 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Harden, born before 1776, head of a Harrison County, Indiana household of 10 "free colored" in 1830.

 

DE ROSARIO FAMILY

1.    Lawrence De Rosario, born say 1735, and his wife Susannah, "free Negros," were the parents of Mary De Rozaras who was born 30 August and baptized 6 October 1765 in Bruton Parish, James City County [Bruton Parish Register, 26]. He was paid 2 pounds by Timson Crawley, orphan of Robert Crawley, in 1771 and paid Crawley 6 shillings for the hire of a slave girl in 1773 [Guardians' Accounts 1736-80, 485, 496]. He proved a deed from Sarah Cumbo to Simon Gillett in York County court on 18 October 1784 [Orders 1784-7, 86]. He was taxable in York County from 1782 to 1793 and taxable on 2 free tithes and a slave in 1794. His widow Susanna Derozario was taxable on a horse in 1796, a horse and a slave in 1797 and head of a household of a "free Negro & mulatto over 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 69, 92, 107, 140, 191, 201, 220, 229, 387]. Lawrence was taxable on 20 acres in York County in 1791, and his estate was taxable on 30 acres in 1800 [1791 Land Tax List, p.2; 1800, p.2]. A report of the allotment of Susanna's dower in the lands of her late husband Lawrence was returned to court on 19 June 1797 [Orders 1795-1803, 180]. He was the father of

i. ?Elizabeth Rozario, born say 1760, head of a household of 3 "free" black persons in Williamsburg in 1782 [VA:45], probably the mother of Caroline and Suckey Rosara who were counted in a list of "Free Negroes and mulattoes" in Williamsburg in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List]. See also the Rosario family.

ii. Mary, born 30 August 1765.

iii. ?Clary Rozorro, born before 1776, head of a James City County household of 4 free colored" in 1820 [VA:119].

iv. John, born say 1770, a "free black Man" taxable with his wife Rachel, slave Jack and 2 horses in Elizabeth City County in 1785: called John Rosario [PPTL 1782-1820, frames 40, 80], and taxable as John W. DeRozario in York County in 1796, 1804, 1805, 1807, 1812, 1814, and 1816, head of a household of a "free Negro & mulatto over 16" in 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 219, 296, 305, 327, 375, 405].

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Laurence Rosarran, born about 1804, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 19 February 1824: twenty years of age, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches, dark complexion [Minutes 1823-9, 25].

 

DOBBINS FAMILY

1.    George1 Dobbins, born say 1710, and his wife Mary were the parents of Elizabeth and Mary Dobbins, "poor orphans" of Southam Parish, who were bound out by the Cumberland County, Virginia court on 26 August 1752 [Orders 1752-8, 37]. They were the parents of

2        i. ?Sarah, born say 1730.

3        ii. ?Jane1, born say 1740.

4        iii. Elizabeth, born say 1747.

iv. Mary, born say 1749.

v. ?Lydia, mother of Jane an orphan who the Powhatan County court ordered bound by the overseers of the poor to Stephen Hix on 20 September 1797. Earlier on 16 November 1792 the court called her Jane, "Molatto orphan of ____ Dobbins deceased," when it ordered the overseers to bind her to Mary McCraw [Orders 1791-4, 198; 1794-8, 391].

 

2.    Sarah Dobbins, born say 1730, petitioned the Cumberland County court on 27 August 1751 for her freedom from Thomas Walker and was granted her petition on 26 August 1752. She was called Sarah Dobbins alias Young on 27 August 1751 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind out her son Will. On 23 March 1761 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her son Charles Dobbyns to Philip Dunford, and on 27 July 1761 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her children William and George Dobbyns to William Clarke [Orders 1749-51, 316; 1752-8, 40; 1758-62, 371]. She was the mother of

i. William1, born say 1751, discharged from the service of William Clarke by the Cumberland County court on testimony of Joseph Robinson on 27 July 1772. On 23 November 1772 the court ordered William Clarke and his wife Martha to pay him his freedom dues [Orders 1770-2, 315].

ii. Charles, born say 1760, a "yellow" complexioned soldier born in Prince Edward County who enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution in Dinwiddie County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149]. He was taxable in Powhatan County in 1794, 1795 and a "Mo" taxable from 1802 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 105, 117, 239, 255, 277, 293, 316].

iii. George2, taxable in Powhatan County on 2 horses in 1787 and 1788 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 5, 18], head of a Nelson County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:689].

 

3.    Jane1 Dobbins, born say 1740, was mother of Benjamin Branham (no race indicated) who was bound by the Cumberland County court to Robert Moore on 24 August 1761. He was called Benjamin Branum, a "Mulattoe Boy," on 23 May 1763 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind him to Absalom Davenport [Orders 1758-62, 391, 477; 1762-4, 219]. She was the mother of

i. Benjamin Branham, a "Mulattoe" boy bound out in 1763.

ii. William2, son of Jane Dobbins bound to Joseph Harris in Cumberland County on 27 August 1764, no race indicated [Orders 1764-7, 4].

 

4.    Elizabeth Dobbins, born say 1747, was living in Cumberland County on 23 January 1769 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind out her son James Dobbins to James Bryden. On 28 August 1775 the court bound her "mulattoe" children Henry and John Dobbins to Hans Stegar [Orders 1774-8, 339]. She was the mother of

i. James, born say 1766, ordered bound to James Bryden on 23 January 1769 and a "poor orphan" bound to Francis Stegar on 26 April 1773 [Orders 1772-4, 178].

5        ii. Richard, born about 1768.

iii.Henry, born say 1772, taxable in John Chitwood's Powhatan County household in 1791 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frame 58], perhaps the Harry Dobbin who was head of a Greenville township, Muhlenberg County, Tennesse household of 1 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. John, born say 1774, called "John Colly alias John Dobbins" when he sued Richard Baugh for trespass, assault and battery in Powhatan County on 21 February 1799. He was awarded $50 damages [Orders 1798-1802, 12, 75, 109]. He was taxable in Powhatan County in 1801, a "F.B." taxable there in 1812, called John Colly, "F.B." in 1811 and 1813 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 222, 397, 419, 437]. On 19 September 1804 he was called John Colly alias Dobbins when the court ordered the clerk to furnish him and Richard Dobbins, "free born Mulattos," with certificates of their freedom [Orders 1802-4, 604].

 

5.   Richard Dobbins, born about 1768, son of Betty Dobbyns, was bound by the churchwardens of Southam Parish in Cumberland County to John Skip Harris on 23 September 1771 [Orders 1770-2, 320]. He was a "free Black" taxable in Powhatan County in 1792 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frame 76], a miller in a "List of free Negroes & Molattoes" in Stephen Bedford's district of Charlotte County with wife Jenny and a male child in 1802, a ditcher listed with George, James and Jenny in 1803 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 542, 580]. On 19 September 1804 the Powhatan County court ordered the clerk to furnish Richard and John Colly Dobbins, "free born Mulattos," with certificates of their freedom [Orders 1802-4, 604]. He was a "Mulatto" ditcher in the upper district of Goochland County in 1805 and 1806 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 739, 779] and a "free Negro" listed with a male and female (probably his wife) in Prince Edward County in 1813 [PPTL 1809-31, frame 97]. He registered in Petersburg on 8 July 1818: a free man of Colour, five feet seven and a half inches high, fifty years old, yellowish brown Complection, born free p. cert. of Registry from Prince Edward County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 920]. He was the father of

i. ?Jane2, married Anthony Jenkins, 26 October 1815 Goochland County bond, Austin Isaacs surety. On 16 July 1795 the Powhatan County court bound Anthony, son of Jenny Jenkins, to John Moss to be a shoemaker commencing 15 October 1795 for twelve years [Orders 1794-8, 123].

ii. George3, born say 1800.

iii. James, born say 1802.

 

DOLBY/ DOBY FAMILY

1.    John1 Daulby, born say 1740, and his wife Mary, were "F.N." taxables in St. Brides Parish, Edmonds Bridge District, Norfolk County, Virginia, in 1767 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-1780, p.27]. They were probably the parents of

i. Jarrot Doby/ Dalbey/ Dolby, born say 1760, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:75], 10 in 1800 [NC:435] and 7 in 1810 [NC:719].

ii. John2 Dobby, head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:718].

 

DONATHAN FAMILY

1.    Catherine Donathan, born say 1685, the white servant of Major Robert Bristow, had a "bastard Child born of her body begotten by a negroe man" in Lancaster County, Virginia, on 10 March 1703/4 [Orders 1702-13, 23]. Her child was most likely

2        i. William1, born 28 February 1704.

 

2. William1 Donathan, born 28 February 1704, a "Mullatto," petitioned the Spotsylvania County court for his freedom from his master John Grayson, claiming that he was over thirty-one years of age. However, Grayson convinced the court that William would not be thirty-one until 28 February 1735 [Orders 1734-5, 285]. He was sued for debt in Orange County, Virginia court in May 1738, but the case was dismissed on agreement of both parties. He was living in St. Thomas's Parish when the sub-sheriff reported that "he will not be taken" when he attempted to arrest William for a debt of 6 pounds, 11 shillings which he owed James Patten, Gentleman. The case was dismissed the following month on agreement of both parties. In July 1741 he purchased land by deed recorded in Orange County court. On 27 May 1742 he was living in St. Thomas's Parish when the Orange County court presented him and Elizabeth Hawkins for committing fornication. The charges were dismissed on 28 August when it was reported that they had run away. And on 1 December 1742 the sheriff reported that he could not be found when he tried to execute an order to seize 57 acres of land William owned in order to satisfy a debt of 68 pounds, 8 shillings which he owed Joseph Morton, Gentleman, by promissory note [Orders 1734-9, 324, 339; 1739-41, 429; 1741-3, 153, 223, 344; Judgments, February 1741 (LVA microfilm no. 81), frames 244-9; January 1742 (LVA film no. 83), frames 611-6]. He purchased 90 acres in Louisa County by deed proved on 26 March 1745, and he was living in Louisa County on 28 May 1745 when he was presented by the court for failing to list a tithable (probably his wife) [Orders 1742-8, 140, 152, 157, 172]. He was granted 200 acres in Louisa County on both sides of Gibby's Creek adjoining his own land and George Gibson on 7 August 1752 [Patents 31:183]. He was in Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, by 14 November 1753 when he purchased 227 acres on Fucking Creek. He sold this land on 31 July 1758 and purchased another tract of 200 acres in Lunenburg County on the head branches of Little Creek [DB 4:66; 6:82]. He purchased land in Halifax County, Virginia, by deed proved in August 1766 and was added to the list of tithables in September 1769 but exempted (due to old age) from paying taxes in June 1770. He was permitted to build a water grist mill on his property in July 1770 [Pleas 5:265; 6:461, 506, 512]. He was living in Halifax County on 16 July 1773 when he sold his 200 acre tract in Mecklenburg County to Jacob Chavis [DB 4:144]. He and his wife Betty sold 400 acres of land by deed proved in Halifax County on 17 February 1780 and 21 February 1782 [Pleas 1779-83, 114, 231]. He was taxable in Henry County on slaves Rose and Nance from 1782 to 1784 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 10, 33, 82]. He was probably the ancestor of

i. William2, head of a Wilkes County, North Carolina household of one white male over 16, one under 16, and 4 slaves in 1790 [NC:124].

ii. Sarah, born say 1750, living in Halifax County, Virginia, on 17 March 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her illegitimate son Frederick Donathan [Pleas 1772-4, 393]. Frederick was counted as white in Wilkes County in 1790 [NC:124].

iii. Elijah, and Rachel Donathan sold for 100 pounds 80 acres in Henry County on the south fork of the Little Dan River on 13 December 1787 [DB 1:432].

ivi. Nelson, sued jointly with William Donathan in Halifax County, Virginia court on 17 December 1773 for a debt of 2 pounds, 12 shillings [Pleas 1772-4, 322]. He was counted as white in Wilkes County, North Carolina, in 1790 [NC:122].

v. Benjamin, born say 1765, head of a Wilkes County household of one male over 16 and three females (counted as white along with the Gibson, Collins, Wooten, and Underwood families) [NC:124], 7 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [NC:35] and 9 "other free," a white woman, and 3 slaves in 1810 [NC:886].

vi. Jacob, born before 1776, head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:654] and 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:740].

vii. Reuben, head of a Wilkes County household of one "free colored" in 1820 [NC:531].

 

DOUGLASS FAMILY

Members of the Douglass family in Virginia and Maryland were

1        i. Gabriel, born say 1760.

ii. Adam, head of a Rockbridge County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [MD:271]. His son Elisha registered in Rockbridge County on 30 September 1820: a free man of colour who resides in this county, aged twenty two years since August last, a dark Mulatto Colour, middle stature five feet eight & a fourth inches high, stout but not heavily built, hair dark curly about a medium between that of a white man & Negro, large nose, born free in Rockbridge, son of Adam Douglass a free negro by his wife who is also free. Adam Douglass, born in August 1820, son of Adam & Polly Douglass, registered on 30 October 1820 [Free Negro Register 1803-28, nos. 21, 75].

iii. William, head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:89], perhaps identical to William Douglas who was head of a Petersburg Town household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:126a].

iv. Charles, "F.N." head of a Culpeper County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:26].

 

1.    Gabriel Douglass, born say 1760, was head of a Washington County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:636]. He was the father of Thomas Douglass who registered as a free Negro in Washington, D.C., on 3 October 1821: son of Gabriel Douglass, a free man, and his wife, who is also free. Douglass has passed as free in Harper's Ferry for some years past [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 10]. He was the father of

i. Thomas, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:63].

ii. ?James, head of a Prince George's County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:44].

 

DOVE FAMILY

The Dove family of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, may have been related to John Dove, the "Mallatto slave" of Doctor Gustavus Brown, who was brought before the Charles County, Maryland court on suspicion of burglary on 14 November 1727 [Court Records 1727-31, 42]. Vincent Askin, by his 1 October 1745 Charles County will, proved 22 October 1745, directed that, at his death, his "mulatto man John Dove" was to have his freedom [Prerogative Court (Wills), 1744-6, Liber 24, folio 229]. And "John Dove Mullatto" was valued at 60 pounds in the inventory of Askins'estate in 1745 [Prerogative Court (Inventories), 1745-6, Liber 32, pp. 36-7].

 

1.    Mary Dove, born say 1710, was a "Negro woman" slave listed in the Anne Arundel County, Maryland, inventory of the estate of Eleazer Birkhead on 28 April 1744 [Prerogative Court (inventories) 1744-5, 43]. Birkhead's widow married Leonard Thomas, and Mary Dove sued him in Anne Arundel County court for her freedom in June 1746 [Judgment Record 1746-8, 118]. The outcome of the suit is not recorded, apparently because Thomas took her with him when he moved to Craven County, North Carolina.

In September 1749 the Dove family was living in Craven County when William Smith complained to the court on their behalf that Leonard Thomas was detaining them as slaves:

Moll, Nell, Sue, Sall, & Will, Negroes Detained as Slaves by Leonard Thomas That they are free born Persons in the Province of Maryland and brought to this Province by the said Leonard Thomas

William Smith travelled to Maryland to prove their claim, and they were free by November 1756 when James Dove, a "Negro Servant," complained to the Craven County court that Smith was mistreating him, Nelly, Sue, Sarah, Moll, and William Dove [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, IV:11-12, 366].

A grandson of Mary Dove named William Dowry was still held in slavery in Anne Arundel County in 1791 when he sued for his freedom in the General Court of Maryland. In October 1791 a fifty-seven or fifty-eight-year-old woman named Ann Ridgely (born about 1734), who was the daughter-in-law of Leonard Thomas, testified in Anne Arundel County that Mary Dove was a tall, spare woman of brown complexion and was the granddaughter of a woman imported into the country by the deponent's great grandfather. The deponent always understood that the grandmother of Mary Dove was a "Yellow Woman," had long black hair, was reputed to be an East Indian or a Madagascarian, and was called "Malaga Moll." Ridgely testified that Mary Dove had a daughter named Fanny who was the mother of William Dowry who petitioned for his freedom in the General Court of Maryland in 1791. She also testified that Mary Dove sued Leonard Thomas for freedom in Maryland, but before the suit was decided he moved with his family about twenty miles from Newbern, North Carolina, and took with him Mary, her three children, and her grandchildren Will and Sal. A certain Alexander Sands, commonly called Indian Sawony, was a witness for Mary Dove in her suit in Craven County, North Carolina, in 1749 and testified that her grandmother was an East Indian woman [Craven County Miscellaneous Records, C.R. 28.928.10, cited by Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 37-8].

Mary died before 6 April 1763 when the Craven County court appointed her son James Dove administrator of her estate on security of 100 pounds. On 6 April 1765 the court appointed George Hays administrator as greatest creditor on security of 200 pounds [Minutes 1762-66, 13d, 21b]. Her descendants were

i. Fanny, born about 1734, mother of William Dowry according to testimony by Ann Ridgely.

ii. James, born say 1737, described as "a free negro a Negro Servant" in Craven County court in November 1756 when he complained on behalf of himself, Nelly, Sue, Sarah, Moll, and William Dove for mistreatment by William Smith, their master [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, IV:366]. He complained in court again on 17 February 1759 that he had not received his freedom dues [Minutes 1758-61, 22a].

2        iii. Nelly, born say 1738.

iv. Lucy, born say 1742, a servant girl, no age or race mentioned, who was ordered by the Craven County court to serve her master, Thomas Hasline, Esquire, another five months more than her indenture in July 1763 - perhaps as punishment for having a child during her indenture [Minutes 1762-64, 28c].

v. Susan, born say 1746.

vi. Sally, born say 1747.

3        vii. William1, born say 1748.

 

2.    Nelly Dove, born say 1738, complained to the Craven County court on 17 February 1759 that she had not received her freedom dues, but the court ruled that she should not be freed since she had two children during her indenture [Minutes 1758-61, 22a]. She was head of a Craven County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131]. One of her children may have been

4        i. Susan, born 25 December 1768.

 

3.    William1 Dove, born say 1748, was the grandson of Mary Dove according to testimony by Ann Ridgely of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, in 1791. He purchased 90 acres on the east side of Hancock's Creek on Cahoque Creek in Craven County from Martin Black on 6 February 1775 [DB 22:73]. He received 4 pounds pay for 40 days service in the Craven County Militia under Major John Tillman in an expedition to Wilmington [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal "A", 141]. He was head of a Craven County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131]. Perhaps his children were

i. Pompey, born say 1770, head of a Craven County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131].

ii. John, born before 1776, head of a Craven County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:69].

iii. Isaac1, born 5 May 1771, bound an apprentice tanner to Bartholomew Howard by the 14 March 1775 Craven County court [Minutes 1772-84, vol. 1, 29d].

iv. Jacob, head of a Craven County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67]. He married Charity Carter, 3 June 1815 Craven County bond with George Carter bondsman. On 4 November 1821 Jacob and Charity Dove sold land in Craven County which she inherited from her father, George Carter [DB 43:82].

v. Keziah, married Richard Lewis, 16 March 1798 Craven County bond with Thomas Lewis bondsman.

vi. William2, married June Moore, 13 March 1805 Craven County bond with Isaac Dove bondsman. He was head of a Craven County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:65]. He and his wife June were mentioned in the 1816 Craven County will of her father John Moore.

vii. Simon, married Anna Carter, 16 January 1802 Craven County bond with Abel Carter and Isaac Perkins bondsmen. He was head of an Onslow County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:775] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:338].

viii. Hester, head of a Craven County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:70].

 

4.    Susan Dove, born 25 December 1768, was a "Free Base Born Negroe Girl" bound to Bartholomew and Ruth Howard in Craven County on 14 March 1771 [Minutes 1767-75, 167b]. She was head of a Craven County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:70]. On 20 July 1793 she was called "Susannah Dove, free Negro" when she bound out her sons to John Brown of Craven County [DB 31:97, 99]. They were

i. Isaac, born 4 April 1787, perhaps the Isaac Doves ("colored") who married Silvey Richards ("colored"), 24 September 1803 Carteret County bond. He was head of a Craven County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:70]. Silvey was probably related to Silas Richards, head of a Carteret County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:450] and 7 "free colored" in Craven County in 1820 [NC:65].

ii. Thomas, born 4 May 1790.

 

DRAKE FAMILY

Members of the Drake family were

1        i. Aaron1, born say 1745.

ii. Susanna, a "Mulatto" ordered bound by the churchwardens of Washington Parish, Westmoreland County, Virginia, to William Mitchell on 24 September 1776 [Orders 1776-86, 6].

 

1.    Aaron1 Drake, born say 1745, was a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1768 and 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:5, 82]. John Aaron Drake, "Mulato libre" of "Elisabeth, Virginia," and his wife Charity Chaves (Chavis), "Mulato libre" native of Virginia, had been living in the parish of Saint Martin Attapakas in Louisiana for fourteen years on 10 May 1800 when their son John Drake, a "Mulato libre natural de Carolina" (free Mulatto native of Carolina), married Rosalie Abcher (Abshier) [Hebert, Rev. Donald J., Southeastern Louisiana Records, 1750-1900 (1999), IV:195, cited by Barbara Ellison of Oklahoma in email correspondence]. Charity Chavis was taxable in the Granville County, North Carolina household of her parents Richard and Luraina Chavis in 1762 [CR 44.701.20]. Her family appears to have moved to Marlboro County, South Carolina, sometime between 1766 and 1800. Aaron and Charity were the parents of

2        i. John, born say 1775.


2.    John Drake, born say 1775, married Rosalie Abshier, 10 May 1800 in Lousiana. They were probably the parents of

i. Marie Rachel,  married John Dial, 30 August 1822 Opelousas marriage [Opelousas Courthouse License nos. 46, 79].

ii. Aaron2, born 1794-1806, head of a St. Landry Parish, Louisiana household of 3 "free colored" in 1830 [LA:26]. He married Sarah Ashworth, 26 November 1831 Opelousas marriage.

 

DREW FAMILY

Members of the Drew family were

1        i. Ephraim1, born say 1752.

2       ii. John, born say 1757.

 

1.    Ephraim1 Drew, born say 1752, was taxable in Lunenburg County, Virginia, in the household of William Stewart in 1772, was head of a household with George Chavers in 1775 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 299, 351], and was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 4 "whites" and 2 "blacks" (slaves) in the 1782 Virginia census [VA:33]. On 12 May 1783 the Mecklenburg County court ordered his male laboring tithables to work on a road with William Stewart (shoemaker) and William Stewart (blacksmith) [Orders 1779-84, 300]. He was taxable on slaves Beck and Jim and 2 other slaves 12-16 years old in 1782, taxable on 2 horses in 1784, taxable on Titus Stewart in 1785, taxable on a slave named Charles in 1786. An exempt tithable named Alexander Williams was in his household in 1787. He was taxable on a 12-16-year-old slave named Jemima in 1788, taxable on Edward Chavis in 1789, taxable on an emancipated slave named Charles in 1790 and 1792 (probably Charles Durham), taxable on only his own tithe in 1791, and taxable on his own tithe and his son Pinson in 1799 [Personal Property Tax 1782-1805, frames 12, 61, 86, 99, 164, 213, 318, 442, 369]. James Chavous was security for him when he was sued for 23 pounds on 8 January 1798. William Stewart was security for him when Robert Birchett & Company sued him on 11 May 1801. Frederick Ivy sued him on 10 September 1804 for a 5 pound debt due by note of hand and on 8 April 1805 for a bond of 15 pounds [Orders 1795-8, 387; 1798-1801, 582; 1803-5, 267, 360]. He was security for the 20 December 1800 Mecklenburg County marriage of Nancy Brandon and Frederick Graves. He was taxable on his son James, Frederick Drew and Hutchins Mayo in 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 1082]. His wife may have been identical to Caty Drew who deposed that Peggy Going came to her house after drawing water from a nearby spring on 3 August 1811 and complained to her daughter Polly Drew that Matthew Flood had raped her at the spring [Orders 1809-11, 7]. Ephraim was listed as "free Negro and Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814, with 2 females over the age of sixteen in his household in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frame 307, 418]. He died about 1818 when his estate was settled in Mecklenburg County. He was the father of

i. Pinson, born say 1780, over the age of sixteen when he was taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household from 1796 to 1799, taxable in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805; 1806-28, frame 7]. Frederick Ivy was his security when he was sued for debt in Mecklenburg County court on 10 March 1806 [Orders 1805-6, 104].

ii. ?Priscilla, born say 1784, married William Chavis, 29 January 1806 Mecklenburg County bond.

iii. Claiborne, born say 1785, over the age of sixteen when he was taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household from 1801 to 1803. He was taxable in his own household from 1804 to 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, 871, 971, 996; 1806-28, frames 7, 84, 108, 286].

iv. James, born about 1786, registered in Mecklenburg County on 19 June 1820: five feet two and a half Inches high, of a light Complexion about thirty four years old ... born of a free woman [Free Person of Colour, #5, p.15]. He was called the son of Ephraim when he was a taxable in his father's household from 1804 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 996, 1082; 1806-28, frame 6]. He was indicted on 14 August 1814 for retailing spirituous liquors at Sarah Naish's house in Mecklenburg County, but the case was dismissed [Orders 1809-11, 10, 29]. He was taxable on a lot in Clarksville, Mecklenburg County, from 1819 to 1822 [Land Tax List 1811A-1824B, B lists].

v. Frederick, born say 1789, over the age of sixteen in 1805 when he was taxable in his father's household [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, 1082].

vi. Ephraim2, Jr., born about 1793, registered in Mecklenburg County on 18 September 1814: born in the County of Mecklenburg ... free by birth, is five feet 11-1/2 Inches high of a yellow Complexion about Twenty one years old ... has Supported good character from his youth up as I have been acquainted with him nearly all his life & never heard anything to the Contrary ... a Shoemaker by Trade J. T. { Jos. Towers, Jun. [Free Person of Colour, #9, p.5]. He was called the son of Ephraim when he was listed as a taxable in his father's household in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frame 286]. He purchased 7 acres on the waters of Gum Branch adjoining William Stewart from William Avery in 1820 and was taxable on the land until 1824 [Land Tax List 1806B-1824A, A lists].

vii. ?Polly, born say 1795, probably a teenager in August 1811 when she testified with her mother Caty Drew in the Mecklenburg County trial of Matthew Flood [Orders 1809-11, 7].

 

2.    John Drew, born say 1757, was taxable in Abraham Cuttillo's Lunenburg County household in 1774 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 299, 330]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County on his own tithe and his son Benjamin in 1799 and a "mulatto" taxable from 1806 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805; 1806-28, frames 33, 60, 134, 258, 336, 387] and taxable on 100 acres in the lower district of Mecklenburg County on Fox's Road near the Warren County line from 1804 to 1823 [Land Tax List 1782-1811A, 1811B-1824A, B lists]. His 8 May 1827 Warren County, North Carolina will was proved in August 1827. He named his wife Althew and children. He divided his land among his sons Hardaway and Anderson. He was the father of

i. Nancy, born say 1780, married George Guy, 11 December 1799 Mecklenburg County bond.

ii. Benjamin, born before 1776, over the age of sixteen when he was taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household from 1799 to 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 758, 795, 845, 944]. He married Mason Griffiths, 10 May 1804 Orange County, North Carolina bond. He was head of an Ashe County household of 11 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Kesiah, born say 1784, married Matthew Stewart, 20 June 1804 Warren County bond, Stanfield Drew security.

iv. Stanfield, born say 1785, over the age of sixteen when he was taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household from 1801 to 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 845, 917, 944]. He was a "mulatto" Mecklenburg County taxable from 1806 to 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frames 33, 134, 161, 258, 387, 504].

v. Elizabeth, born say 1787, married Bartlett Stewart, 21 October 1807 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, George Guy security.

vi. Hardaway, born say 1790, married Polly Guy, 1813 Mecklenburg County bond. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:159b]. In 1831 he sold the land he inherited from his father [DB 24:327].

vii. Anderson, born say 1795, head of a Mecklenburg County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:159b].

viii. William, called Buck Drew when he married Betsy Griffis, 16 June 1812 Orange County, North Carolina bond. He was called "Buck Drew alias William Kersey" in his War of 1812 pension application.

ix. Didamy, called Daisy Drew when she married Philemon Harris, 22 January 1816 Warren County bond.

x. Parthenia, married Jesse Brandom, 2 July 1822 Warren County bond.

 

Go to next family:   Driggers-Dutchfield

Return to Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina