FAGAN FAMILY

Members of the Fagan family, born about 1750 were

1        i. Peter1, born say 1740.

ii. William, born say 1746, a taxable head of a Bertie County, North Carolina household with his unnamed wife in the list of Samuel Granberry for 1774.

 

1.   Peter1 Fagan, born say 1740, was called "a Negro man late the slave of Frederick Parker" in Sussex County court on 19 September 1765 when he recorded an order of confirmation of his freedom from the Halifax County, North Carolina court [Sussex County Orders 1764-66, 301]. He was called "A Free Negro...a Dancing Master living in Halifax (North Carolina) or Southampton County, Virginia" when a British merchant made a claim for a debt Peter had owed him since 1776 [NCGSJ XI:247]. In 1787 he was paid by the Southampton County estate of Lucy Hunt for teaching Charles and Henry Briggs to dance [WB 2:212]. On 4 January 1793 he was called Peter Fagan, Sr., when he manumitted a woman named Harriet, otherwise called Harriet Johnson, after purchasing her from Henry Adams of Southampton County, stating in the Isle of Wight deed that she had formerly belonged to Colonel Richard Kello and that he had purchased her with the intention of setting her free [DB 17:113]. He brought a Greensville County suit against the executor of Daniel Fisher for 25 pounds currency on 23 March 1797 and against the executors of David Putney on 22 March 1798 [Orders 1790-9, 474, 528; 1799-1806, 400], and on 9 February 1801 he was paid 3 pounds by the Greensville County estate of James Epps for teaching his daughter Polly Epps to dance during the year 1800 [WB 1:475]. He was taxable on a horse in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1801 to 1811 [PPTL 1792-1806, frames 514, 552, 621, 691, 805, 841; 1807-21, frames 71, 163, 191]. His deed of emancipation to a member of his family was proved in Southampton County court on 15 November 1802. He sued a number of people for debt in Southampton County between 1793 and 1805. He won a Southampton County case against John Wright for failing to pay the dancing school fees for his two daughters. Wright brought a suit in chancery against Peter in August 1805 claiming that Peter had moved away and neglected the school, but Peter replied that the school was kept by his son Peter, Jr., who was equally qualified [Minutes 1793-99, 33; 1799-1803, 195; 1804-7, 82, 83; LVA chancery case 1814-003]. On 13 June 1808 the Greensville County court awarded him 21 pounds in his suit against Andrew Rhea [Orders 1806-10, 237]. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" in 1810, and there was another who was head of a Petersburg household of 1 "other free" and 2 slaves [VA:126b, 125b]. Peter was the ancestor of

i. Peter2, Jr., born about 1767, taxable in Cabin Point district of Surry County, Virginia, from 1791 to 1805: called Peter Phaygan, Junr., in 1791 when he was listed with Anne, "a slave now his wife;" taxable on Major Debrix's tithe in 1792; taxable on a slave named Sarah in 1794; taxable on a slave and a two-wheeled carriage in 1796; taxable on 2 slaves in 1797; taxable on Tom French's tithe, slaves Sarah and Cupid, and a carriage in 1798 and 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 15, 65, 115, 166, 242, 292, 330, 371, 410, 485, 563, 593]. He was taxable on 60 acres in 1799 [1799 Land Tax List, p.7]. Anna registered in Surry County on 8 April 1807: Anna alias Anna Fagan a Mulatto woman, who was emancipated by Benjamin Drew by his deed (of emancipation) bearing date the 20th day of December 1792 and carried to record in the County Court of Southampton the 10th January 1793 as appears by an attested copy of said deed ... The said Anna is of a bright complexion, long but bushey Hair, small Eye-brows, 5'4" high rather delicately made, aged about 21 years [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no. 65]. And she registered in Petersburg on 9 June 1810: a bright yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet three and a half inches high, twenty five years old, long bushy hair, delicately made, emancipated by Benjamin Drew in Southampton County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 584]. Peter registered in Southampton County on 14 July 1804: age 37, blk, 5 feet 5 inches, emancipated by Peter Fagan, Sr. [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 311, 412]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 2 "other free" in 1810. Ann Fagan was head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:334b].

ii. ?Thomas, a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1809 to 1818 [Personal Property Tax List 1806-28, frames 134, 162, 235, 338, 388, 595, 654].

iii. ?John,  head of a Mecklenburg County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820.

iv. ?Peter3, born say 1786, taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, from 1804 to 1813, listed as a "Free Negro" from 1811 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1799-1815, frames 240, 343, 388, 433, 519, 559], head of a Free Town, Brunswick County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:769].

 

FAGGOTT FAMILY

1.    Mary Faggot, born say 1720, was living in Prince Edward County in May 1757 when the court ordered George Ewing, Sr., to appear in court to prove that he was holding (her son) Jethro Faggott, a "Molatto boy," under legal indentures. In October 1757 the court ruled that the indentures were not legal and ordered Mary to pay her witness Charles Irby 103 pounds of tobacco for testifying for her and travelling twenty-six miles from his home (in Amelia County). The court also ordered the churchwardens of St. Patrick's Parish to bind Jethro to Ewing on condition that he post a bond of 300 pounds currency not to remove him out of the colony [Orders 1754-8, 112, 127, 129]. Mary may have been identical to Mary Taggat, a white woman, whose "Molatto" son Peter was bound out by the churchwardens of Lunenburg County to Hugh Lawson on 9 July 1752 [Lunenburg County Orders 1752-3, 69]. Mary Faggot was the mother of

i. ?Agnes, born say 1739, called "Agnes Foquett, a "Mulatto," in Rowan County, North Carolina, on 25 October 1760 when she successfully sued Hugh Lawson for her freedom [Minutes 1753-67, 76, 78]. She married Isaac Freeman 19 January 1762 Rowan County, North Carolina, bond.

ii. Peter, born say 1750, bound to Hugh Lawson in Lunenburg County on 9 July 1752.

iii. Jethro, born say 1753, a "Malatto" boy bound to George Ewing in Prince Edward County in October 1757.

 

FARRAR/ FARROW FAMILY

Members of the Farrar family born about 1750 were

1 i.        Amy, born say 1746.

2 ii.        Drury1, born say 1748.

iii. Joseph, born say 1750, married Mally Gantlet, "Molattoes in Goochland," on 23 September 1773.

iv. Molly1, born say 1752, married Stephen Scott, "Molattoes," on 10 November 1773 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347].

v. Amy, born say 1754.

vi. John1, born say 1760, a "yellow" complexioned soldier who enlisted in the Revolution from Goochland County (called John Farrow) [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149]. John Farrar was a "Mulatto" taxable in Powhatan County from 1788 to 1792 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 18, 32, 46, 60, 77].

vii. Benjamin, born say 1763, married Elizabeth Cockrane, 10 March 1784 Goochland County bond, Mary Cockrane surety, Fleming Payne witness. Benjamin Farrow who was a "Free Negro" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1800 to 1805 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 484, 544, 622].

viii. Lucy Farrow, a "FN" taxable in Botetourt County on a horse in 1806 and listed in 1813 [PPTL 1787-1810, frame 565; 1811-1822, frame 513].

 

1.    Amy Farrow, born say 1746, was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1783 to 1797: taxable on 2 horses and 5 cattle in 1783; a free male tithable, 3 horses and 8 cattle in 1786, 1787 and 1789; taxable on 2 free males and 3 horses in 1790 and 1794 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 29, 75, 116, 201, 418, 480, 515]. She may have been the mother of

i. Molly2, born say 1772, taxable on a horse in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1794 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frame 418].

ii. Reuben, born about 1774, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1794, 1795, 1798, and from 1801 to 1813: listed with 2 horses in 1801; called "or gardner" in 1805; called a "Mulatto" from 1810 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-99, frames 418, 448, 554, 590; 1800-1813, frames 72, 118, 250, 296, 387, 434, 566]. He was called Reuben Farrar when he sued Minan Mills in Albemarle County court on 5 May 1797 for trespass, assault and battery. Mills pleaded not guilty and said the beating, if any there was, proceeded from an assault by the plaintiff. The jury found for Reuben and awarded him a penny [Orders 1795-8, 316, 355]. He registered in Albemarle County on 10 March 1810: a man of Colour about thirty six years of age, five feet 10-3/4 inches high [Orders 1810-11, 66].

3        iii. Thomas, born about 1778.

 

2.   Drury1 Ferrar, born say 1748, married "______, Mulattoes both of Maniken Town," on 27 October 1769 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347]. He was living in Cumberland County, Virginia, in November 1774 when he was presented for failing to list himself as a tithable but discharged (along with forty-two other persons) on 24 March 1778 for reasons appearing to the court [Orders 1774-8, 300, 441]. He was taxable on 3 horses and 7 cattle in Albemarle County in 1783 [PPTL, 1782-99, 29], a "Mulatto" taxable on 2 horses and 8 cattle in Powhatan County from 1784 to 1786 [PPTL 1782-86, frames 663, 680, 695], and taxable on 2 horses in Goochland County from 1790 to 1792 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 236, 280, 295]. Robert Pleasants won a suit against him in Goochland County in August 1790 for a debt of 10 pounds he owed since 19 March 1788 for the rent of a plantation in Powhatan County in 1785 and 1786, and Drury brought suit in chancery court in Goochland County against Robert Pleasants on 18 October 1790, claiming he had paid part of the rent. Samuel Howell deposed in Vaughan's Tavern in Richmond on 25 February 1791 that he recalled that Drury lived for two years on a plantation of Robert Pleasants in Powhatan County, and Samuel Red (who was emancipated by deed of Robert Pleasants acknowledged in Henrico County court on 4 November 1782 [Orders 1781-4, 114]) deposed in Vaughan's Tavern that Drury had admitted to him that he owed Pleasants the money and would have to sell some of his horses and cattle to pay the debt [Chancery case 1792-001]. He was called "Drury Farrow free negroe" when he was taxable on his son Daniel in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, in 1802 [1800-1813, frame 96], a "M"(ulatto) taxable in Buckingham County in 1804 [PPTL 1804-9], and a "Free N." taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1805 to 1813: called "Sr." in 1809, listed with 2 free males and 4 free persons of color in 1813 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 622, 695, 730, 767, 803, 853]. On 6 October 1814 he and his wife Elizabeth Farrow gave consent for their daughter Betsy Farrow to marry Littleberry Moss in Campbell County on 6 October 1814 with Drury Farrow, Jr., and Daniel Farrow as witnesses [Marriage Bonds and Consents, 1782-1853, frames 496-8]. He was the father of

4        i. ?Drury2, born say 1771.

ii. ?James, born about 1780, registered in Campbell County on 23 October 1834: Age: 54; 5 feet 8 Inches, bright Complexion, Born free. And his wife Charity Farrar, born about 1780, registered with him on the same day: Age: 54; 5 feet 2-1/2 Inches, bright Complexion, Born free [A Register of Free Negroes and Malattoes, p. 10]. He was called James Farrow in 1813 when he was a "free Negro" taxable on a female free person of color in Campbell County [PPTL, 1785-1814].

iii. Betsy, born say 1781, head of a Nelson County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:691], perhaps the Betsy Farrar who was counted in a "List of free Negroes & Mulattoes" in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frame 553]. She married Littleberry Moss October 1814 Campbell County bond. She was married to Benjamin Whitesides on 21 November 1831 when their daughter Judith Farrar, registered in Amherst County: daughter of Benjamin and Betty Whitesides of dark complexion 5 feet 5 inches high about 34 years of age [Register #50]. Benjamin Whitesides was head of an Amherst County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:297].

iv. Daniel, born about 1791, registered in Campbell County on 29 October 1831: Age: 40; 5 feet 10 Inches, Yellow Complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1801-50, p. 9].

v. Moses, a "Negr." taxable in Bedford County in 1813 [PPTL, 1785-1814].

vi. Mary, head of a Nelson County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:691].

 

3.    Thomas Farrow, born about 1778, was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1799, 1802, 1804, and from 1805 to 1810: taxable on 2 horses in 1799; called a "Mulatto" from 1805 to 1810 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 589; 1800-1813, frames 27, 117, 207, 250, 296, 343, 386]. He may have been identical to Thomas Farrar who was a "M"(ulatto) taxable in adjoining Buckingham County on a tithe and 2 horses in 1804 and taxable on a tithe in 1807 [PPTL 1804-9]. He registered in Albemarle County on 6 June 1808: Thomas Farrar, a free man of yellowish complexion aged about twenty nine years, five feet nine & 3/4 inches high [Orders 1808-10, 16]. He and his wife Charity Farrer were living in Campbell County on 1 November 1830 when their son John Pierce registered as a "free Negro." Thomas and Charity were the parents of

i. ?John2, born about 1797, registered in Campbell County on 3 October 1830: Age: 34; 5 Feet 7 Inches; Colour: Yellow; born free [Register p. 10].

ii. ?Wilson, born about 1799, registered in Campbell County on 16 June 1831: Age 32; 6 feet; Yellow Complexion, born free [Register, p. 9].

iii. John Pierce, born about 1801, registered in Campbell County on 1 November 1830: Age: 29; 6 Feet 2-1/2 Inches, Bright Mallattoe, Born free and a son of Thomas and Charrity Farrer [Register, p. 9].

iv. ?Elijah, born about 1804, registered in Campbell County in November 1836: Age: 32; 5 ft 7-1/2 in.; Bright complexion, Born free [Register, p. 15].

 

4.    Drury2 Farrar, born say 1771, married Elizabeth Banks, "daughter of Jacob Banks," 2 December 1792 Goochland County bond, 3 December marriage by Rev. Lewis Chaudoin. He was taxable on 2 horses in the upper district of Goochland County from 1790 to 1792 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 236, 280, 295], taxable in Fluvanna County on his own tithe and a 16-21 year-old tithable in 1793 [PPTL 1782-1826, frame 154] and a "F.N." taxable in the northern district of Campbell County in 1809 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 730]. He was called Drury Farrow when he was a "F.B." head of a Bedford County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:461], called Drury Farrar when he was a "Negr." taxable in the northern district of Bedford County from 1810 to 1816, listed with 2 tithes in 1813 (probably his wife) and in 1814 [PPTL 1806-16, frames 234, 325, 390, 453, 677]. He was a "F.N." taxable in Botetourt County from 1818 to 1820 [PPTL 1811-1822, frames 346, 391, 435]. He may have been the father of

i. Moses, a "Negr." taxable in the northern district of Bedford County in 1813 and 1816 [PPTL 1806-16, frames 390, 677].

 

FARRELL/ FERRELL FAMILY

1.    Mary Farrell, born say 1670, was the servant of Arthur Robins on 21 June 1687 when the Accomack County court ordered that she receive twenty-five lashes for having a bastard child. She was the servant of William Bradford on 18 February 1690/1 when she confessed to the Accomack County court that she had an illegitimate child named Thomas Farrell who was begotten by "Spindolz, Negro Slave to ye Said Bradford." On 15 September 1691 she bound her son Thomas to William Bradford until the age of twenty-four years. On 21 March 1693 she won a suit against her master, Richard Bally, for her freedom dues stating that she had served Arthur Robins and William Bradford before completing her indenture with Bally. The court found in her favor [W&Co 1682-97, 115; Orders 1690-7, 20a, 38, 99]. She was the mother of

2        i. Thomas1, born 1690-1691.

 

2.    Thomas1 Ferrell, born before 18 February 1690/1, was a "Mulatto" who petitioned the Accomack County court on 6 July 1715 for release from his indenture to William Bradford. He testified that he had completed twenty-four years of service as stipulated in his indenture, and the court ordered that he be released after verifying his age from the register of births [Orders 1714-7, 10]. However, he was still a servant on 14 December 1722 when he petitioned the Northampton County, Virginia court stating that he was born of a white woman and had completed thirty-one years of service. On 13 March 1722/3 the court allowed him three days liberty to get his indenture, and on 9 April 1723 the case was dismissed on agreement of the parties [Orders 1722-9, 41, 45, 55, 60; Mihalyka, Loose Papers I:52]. Thomas was taxable in the Northampton County household of Thomas Marshall from 1723 to 1725 and was head of his own household with (his wife?) Ann Ferrell in 1726 and 1727. Ann was taxable by herself in 1728 and 1729 in Jacob Stringer's household [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 43, 60, 85, 109, 122, 171]. Ann was the mother of

i. Peter, bound to John Lowry with the consent of hie mother Ann Ferrell on 15 May 1728 [Orders 1722-9, 327].

ii. Thomas2, bound to John Lowry with the consent of hie mother Ann Ferrell on 15 May 1728 [Orders 1722-9, 327].

iii. Moses, born in August 1730, bound to Abraham Collins with the consent of his mother Ann Ferril on 8 June 1736 [Orders 1732-42, 218].

iv. Sisley, born in the Spring of 1734, bound apprentice to Savage Bloxam with the consent of her mother Ann Ferrill on 10 February 1735/6 [Orders 1732-42, 197].

 

Other members of the Ferrell family were

i. Adam Farrell, head of a Baltimore City, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:202].

ii. Charity, head of a Beaufort County, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [SC:88].

iii. John, head of a Colleton District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:603].

iv. Watson, head of a Colleton District, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [SC:603].

v. William, head of a Colleton District, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [SC:603].

 

FARTHING FAMILY

1.    Ann Farthing, born say 1718, was living in Saint Paul's Parish, Kent County, Maryland, on 19 June 1739 when the court convicted her of having a "Mollatto" child by a "Negro" [Criminal Record 1738-9, 178-180]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Ann, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:844].

ii. Henrietta, a "mulatto" child living in Fairfax County, Virginia, on 17 February 1761 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Truro Parish to bind her as an apprentice to James McKensy [Orders 1756-63, 553].

 

FEARS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Fears, born say 1774, daughter of Absolem Fears, married James Dungee, 2 March 1795 Prince Edward County bond, 5 March marriage. She may have been the mother of

i. James, born about 1795, an "of Colr" or "free Negro" taxable in Prince Edward County from 1816 to 1820: listed in 1820 with John Dungee and taxable on 2 slaves [PPTL 1809-31, frames 185, 234, 255, 333]. He married Rebecca Dungey of Cumberland County, 28 December 1822 Prince Edward County bond, James Fears and Theodorick Carter securities. He registered in Charlotte County on 7 October 1850: a free man of bright mulatto Complexion, he was born free in the County of Prince Edward, fifty four years of age, 6 feet 3-1/2 inches high in shoes, a blacksmith by trade. His wife registered the same day: Rebecca Fears (the wife of James Fears a free woman of bright mulatto complexion. She was born free in the County of Cumberland is now 48 years of age & is 5 feet 2 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, nos. 624-5].

 

FIELDING FAMILY

1.    Eleanor Fielding, born say 1732, was the mother of William Fielding, a "Mulatto" boy bound out by order of the York County court on 18 June 1753. She was the mother of

i. William, born say 1752,  the "Mulatto" son of Eleanor Fielding bound to Rev. John Camm of Yorkhampton Parish by order of the York County court on 18 June 1753 [Judgments & Orders 1752-4, 232].

 

FIELDS FAMILY

Members of the Fields family were

1 i. Joyce, born say 1747.

2 ii. John1, born say 1753.

3 iii. Sarah, born say 1770.

4 iv. John2, born say 1775.

 

1.    Joyce Fields, born say 1747, was living in Amherst County on 7 September 1767 when the court bound her "Molatto" child Mink to Henry Bell. In July 1784 she complained to the court that Bell had sold his apprentice named Moses Thomas, but the court dismissed the case after a hearing [Orders 1766-9, 200; 1782-4, 344]. Joyce was head of an Amherst County household of 8 "whites" (free persons) in 1783 [VA:48]. She was the mother of

i. Mink, born say 1767.

 

2.    John1 Fields, born say 1753, was a "Mulatto" taxable in Buckingham County in 1774 [Woodson, Virginia Tithables From Burned Counties, 39]. He was a "free person of color" from Charles City County who enlisted in the Revolution in Amherst County [Register at Chesterfield Courthouse, cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149]. On 5 October 1785 the Amherst County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out his "Molatto" child Joice Fields [Orders 1787-90, 538]. He was head of a Buckingham County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:806] and was a taxable "man of color" in Amherst County in 1811 and 1812 [PPTL 1804-23, frames 211, 233]. He was the father of

i. ?John3, born say 1776, a "melatto" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1792 to 1813 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 231, 268, 302, 730, 696, 892].

ii. ?David, born about 1781, taxable in Campbell County from 1800 to 1813 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 484, 730, 696, 892], head of a Campbell County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:849]. He registered in Campbell County on 11 October 1831: age 50, 5 feet 9 inches, dark Complexion, born free and formerly bound to John McCallister [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, p.9].

iii. Joyce2, born say 1785.

 

3.    Sarah Fields, born say 1770, was head of a Buckingham County household of 19 "other free" in 1810 [VA:799] and 7 "free colored" in Campbell County in 1830. She was the mother of

i. Miles, born about 1807, registered in Campbell County on 11 October 1831: age 24, 5 feet 10 inches, dark complexion, born free, straight hair & bushy, and a son of Sarah Fields [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, p.9].

ii. Rixey, born about 1811, registered in Campbell County on 11 October 1831: age 20, 5 feet 7 inches, light complexion, born free, straight hair, daughter of Sarah [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, p.9].

iii. Sarah, Jr., born about 1814, registered in Campbell County on 11 October 1831: age 17, 5 feet 7 inches, Bright complexion, daughter of Sarah [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, p.9].

 

4.    John2 Fields, born say 1775, was head of a New Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:752]. In 1802 he received 9 pounds as his wife's part of the Charles City County estate of her father Edward Bradby [WB 1:591, 601]. He was probably the father of

i. Edna, born about 1796, registered in Charles City County on 16 September 1824: a bright mulatto woman, aged 28 years, born free in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 77].

ii. Littleberry, born say 1805, married Elizabeth Thomas before 16 February 1826 when he received her legacy due from the Charles City County estate of her father William Thomas [WB 3:158]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 November 1831: (testimony of Peter Crew) wife of Littleberry Fields who was Elizabeth Thomas, bright mulatto, was twenty three years old 23 March last [Minutes 1830-7, 84].

 

Other members of the Fields family were

i. Betty, head of a Buckingham County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:799].

ii. Thomas, a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1799 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 738, 863], a "F. Mo." head of a Culpeper County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:31].

iii. Nancy, "m." head of a Buckingham County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:806].

iv. Major, a "B.M." taxable in Augusta County in 1796 [PPTL 1796-1810, frame 28], a "free negro" charged with taking several articles of clothing, 7 crowns and $6 in silver the property of George Grove in Augusta County on 19 July 1797 and sent for further trial at the district court in Stanton [Orders 1796-9, 184-5].

v. William, head of a Washington, D.C. household of 4 "other free" in 1800.

vi. Adam, born before 1776, head of Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:641].

 

FINDLEY FAMILY

1.    James, born about 1704, and Chance, born about 1706, were the Indian slaves of Henry Clay who had their ages adjudged in Henrico County court in August 1712:

James an Indian belonging to Henry Clay is judged to be Eight years of Age & Chance a Girle also belonging to him is adjudged to be six years of Age [Orders 1710-4, 161].

Henry Clay left a 8 March 1749 Chesterfield County will dividing his slaves among his children William, Henry, Charles and John Clay. His undated inventory was returned to court on 7 November 1760:

Mulatto woman Phillis, Mulatto man slave James, Mulatto woman slave Phib, Mulatto lad slave Ned, Mulatto woman slave Sarah, Indian man slave Peter, Negro man slave Cumbo, Negro lad slave Cumbo, Mulatto girl slave named Rachel, Mulatto child slave name Hannah, Mulatto child slave named Frank, Mulatto child slave named Stephen, Mulatto lad slave named Sam, Mulatto girl named Rachel [OB 1759-67, 90; WB 1:350].

John Clay's inventory was returned to Chesterfield County court on 19 August 1763:

one Negro Bowser, one Negro Peter, one Indian Peter, one Mulato James, one Mulato Sam, Negro Combo, Mulato woman Nann, Indian woman Jude, Indian girl Chance, Mulato girl Anica, Mulato Boy Frank [WB 1:344; Orders 1759-67, 459].

The division of his slaves was recorded on 7 February 1772 [Orders 1771-4, 63]. About two months later on 29 April 1772 depositions were taken in Chesterfield County at the direction of the General Court in the suit of Ned, Lucy, Silvia, Bristol, Chance, Ned, Frank, Peter, Sam, Rachel and her children against Charles Clay, Millie Clay, Thomas Clay and Richard Newman for holding them in slavery. Henry Clay's eighty-five-year-old widow Mary Clay, Clay's seventy-three-year-old neighbor Bartholomew Stovall, Clay's eighty-five-year-old neighbor Elizabeth Blankenship and thirty-year-old grandson John Clay testified that Henry Clay had brought home two Choctaw Indians, one a boy and the other a girl named Chance, from a trip beyond Carolina in 1712 and that the plaintiffs Ned, Peter, Sam and Rachel were Chance's grandchildren. In November 1785 Hannah Fender/ Fendley brought a Henry County suit for her freedom which relied on the Chesterfield County depositions as well a deposition taken in Powhatan County in 1786 which stated that she was the grandchild of Chance [Fender vs. Marr, Henry Co. Va. Loose papers, Determined Cases 1788-1789, folder 66, LVA, published in the Virginia Genealogist]. Lucy Marshall, widow of Henry Clay the younger, deposed on 10 October 1786 that Henry Clay the elder gave her husband a "mulatto" or Indian Girl by the name of Judy, the mother of Hannah Fendley, and that Judy was the daughter of an old Indian named Chance, then in the possession of the elder Henry Clay. Elijah Clay received James and Bess Findley from his mother Lucy Marshall, by the will of his father, when he came of age. His father's Powhatan County will was proved in October 1764 and named fourteen slaves, including "Negro wench Nan, Negro girl Chance, Negro boy James and Negro girl Bess." Elijah deposed on 13 October 1819 that he had heard his mother and his brother Thomas Clay say that Nan was the daughter of "old Chance, an Indian woman who was brought from the Indian nation," and that Nan was the sister of Judy and mother of Rachel. Susannah Clay, widow of Thomas Clay, deposed on 13 May 1818 that her husband Thomas Clay was the owner of Sam and had Sam's sister Rachel in his possession as security for payment from William Clay, father of Mitchel Clay. She also deposed that Rachel was the daughter of Nan who was the daughter of Chance who was brought from the Indian nation by Thomas Clay's grandfather Henry Clay; Judy and her children were given by Henry Clay, the elder, to his son Henry Clay; Nan and her children were given to William Clay and his children [58, 106-8, 113; Powhatan County WB 1:289-92]. Chance was the ancestor of

2        i. Nan, born say 1730.

ii. Judy1, born say 1730, an Indian slave listed in the inventory of John Clay's Chesterfield County estate on 19 August 1763 [WB 1:344; Orders 1759-67, 459]. She was free by 2 July 1773 when the Chesterfield County court ordered the churchwardens of Manchester Parish to bind out her Indian children Chance and Frank [Orders 1771-4, 294].

3        iii. Sarah1, born say 1740.

4        iv. Hannah, born say 1745.

5        v. Thomas, born say 1765.

vi. Peter, perhaps identical to "and Indian named Peter" who was listed in the inventory of John Clay, Sr., in 1764.

vii. Bob alias Micajah Fendley, purchased as a slave by John Marshall who freed him in Mecklenburg County court on 9 September 1793 after he produced sufficient evidence that he was free-born [Orders 1792-5, 332].

 

2.    Nan Findley, born say 1730, may have been identical to "Mulato woman Nann" who was listed in the 19 August 1763 inventory of the Chesterfield County estate of John Clay [WB 1:344; Orders 1759-67, 459]. Seventy-one-year-old Frances Langsdon, who was raised in William Clay's household, deposed in Powhatan County on 22 March 1816 that Clay owned a "coloured woman" by the name of Nan who was said by Clay to have been born of an Indian mother, that Nan was the mother of Rachel who was sucking her when Henry Clay died, and that Nan was the sister of Indian Judy whose children regained their freedom [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 58]. Nan was the mother

i. Samuel, born say 1750, won a suit for his freedom from Thomas Clay in the General Court on 4 May 1773 in consequence of his being the grandson of an Indian woman [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 54]. He sued Jacob Cohan in Powhatan County court on 18 May 1780 and asked that the deposition of William Byrd be taken. Cohan sued him on 21 September the same year. Both suits were dismissed [Orders 1777-84, 151, 163, 165, 233]. He was guardian of Phoebe Ligon on 10 May 1788 when he gave his consent to her Henrico County marriage to Thomas Findley. He was taxable in Chesterfield County in 1792, 1795, and a "free Negroe" taxable in 1802 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 140, 248]. He died before 16 January 1802 when a coroner's inquest reported to the Chesterfield County court that he had been found dead at Manchester Warehouse with no marks of violence on his body [WB 5:492].

6        ii. Rachel, born about 1754.

 

3.    Sarah1 Findley, born say 1740, complained to the Powhatan County court on 18 May 1780 that Jacob Cohan had sold her "mulatto" son Arthur Findley as a slave. The court ordered Cohan to post 10,000 pounds security to produce the child in the September session of the court. The court also ordered Lucy Marshall and Elijah Clay to show cause why they were holding Sarah's "Mulatto" children James, Bess and Archer in their service [Orders 1777-84, 150, 153, 155]. She was the mother of

i. James, born about 1759, registered in Powhatan County on 19 December 1822: Age: 63; Color: Dark yellowish; Stature: 5'10"; Emancipated by order of Powhatan Court 18 August 1786 [Register of Free Negroes, no. 54]. He may have been the James Findley who was the plaintiff in two suits against Isaac Taylor for trespass, assault and battery in Botetourt County on 15 April 1778 and was awarded 5 pounds damages in one suit and 50 pounds damages in the other on 14 May 1779 [Orders 1776-80, 59, 122, 212-4]. He sued Edward Gibbs in Powhatan County for trespass, assault and battery on 16 May 1794, and the jury awarded him $50 damages [Orders 1791-4, 423; 1794-8, 24, 180, 217]. He was a Mo" taxable on a horse in Powhatan County from 1792 to 1800 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 77, 92, 184, 206].

7        ii. Bess, born say 1761.

iii. Archer, child of Sarah Findley's, bound by the Powhatan County court to Thomas Hubbard to be a carpenter on 17 June 1784 [Orders 1784-6, 2].

 

4.    Hannah Fender/ Fendley, born say 1745, "suppose to be an Igeon," sued John Marr, Esquire, for her freedom in Henry County court on 25 November 1785. The court allowed her to take the depositions of Lucy Marshall, Thomas Clay and Samuel Clay on her posting security for her return. On 13 August 1788 the court found in her favor and awarded her 40 shillings damages. Marr appealed to the General Court, but on 31 March 1789 he reached agreement with Hannah that he would not prosecute his appeal, would pay all costs, and that he would immediately free her children Sally, Judy, Prudence and Ned and free her other children Jeany, Alias, Peter, Patty, and Billy when they came of age, the boys at twenty-one and the girls at eighteen [Orders 1785-8, 62, 96, 279, 281]. Hannah was taxable on a horse in Patrick County in 1804 [PPTL, 1791-1823, frame 396]. On 29 October 1807 the Patrick County court bound to her (her granddaughter?) three-year-old Ruth Findley, child of Susannah Findley [Orders 1800-10, n.p.]. She was the mother of

i. Sally2, married Nicholas Rickman, 28 March 1799 Stokes County, North Carolina bond.

ii. Judy2.

iii. Prudence.

iv. Ned.

v. Jeany.

vi. Alias, married Polly Gowen, 1802 Grayson County bond.

vii. Peter, born say 1770, married Rebecca Gowens, 28 September 1797 Patrick County bond, John Cameron security. He purchased land in Patrick County in 1805 and sold it in 1810 [DB 2:475; 3:354]. He was taxable in Patrick County from 1800 to 1804 [PPTL, 1791-1823, frames 286, 342, 395] and head of a Grayson County, Virginia household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

viii. Patty.

ix. William, married Susannah Rickman, 1802 Patrick County bond, John Going surety. Suckey registered in Patrick County in June 1832: aged about 45 or 50 years, of dark complexion...with black eyes and somewhat a round face and 5 feet 3 inches and 3 quarters high...Free born in the County of Patrick [Pilson and Baughan, Alphabetical List of Lands Taxed in Patrick County, 11].

 

5.    Thomas Findley, born say 1765, married Phoebe Ligon, 10 May 1788 Henrico County bond, Hannah Liggon, Jerry Liggon, and William Logon witnesses. Samuel Findley, guardian of Phobe, gave his consent. On 14 May 1792 he, Jeremiah Ligon, and two white men were ordered by the Chesterfield County court to post bond of 2 pounds, 10 shillings to keep the peace for three months [Orders 1791-2, 346]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County in 1792, 1801, a "free Negroe" taxable in 1802 and 1804, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1805, 1806, 1807 and 1809 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 140, 467, 503, 579, 658, 717, 753]. He was a "Mullatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1800 to 1813 on a lot he purchased in 1800 [Land Tax List, 1791-1822, B lists]. He was head of a Chesterfield County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062]. He may have been the father of

i. Betsey, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 July 1823: twenty seven years old, light brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 490].

ii. Washington, born about 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 10 September 1827: twenty four years old, brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 591].

 

6.    Rachel Findley, born about 1754, won a suit for freedom for herself and her children from Thomas Clay in the General Court on 4 May 1773 but was taken away and sold by her master. She was called a twenty-year-old "Negro Woman" in the deed by which Mitchel Clay sold her and her seven-year-old daughter Juda on 23 April 1774 to John Draper who lived on the Bluestone River near present-day Princeton, West Virginia. On 10 June 1813 the Wythe County, Virginia court allowed her to sue John Draper in forma pauperis. A deponent in the case, Edward Moseley, testified that Rachel was said to have been the brother of Samuel Findley and the cousin of James Findley [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 11, 53-7, 79b]. She registered in Powhatan County on 17 August 1820: Age: 70; Color: Brown; Stature: 5'5"; Recovered her freedom in the Superior Court of Powhatan County May 1820 [Register of Free Negroes, 1820-65, no. 10]. She was the mother of

8        i. Judy, born about 1767.

ii. Tom, allowed by the Wythe County court on 10 June 1813 to sue John Draper, Jr., in forma pauperis and set free on 9 August 1820.

iii. Peter, allowed by the Wythe County court on 10 June 1813 to sue John Draper, Jr., in forma pauperis and set free on 9 August 1820 [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 53].

iv. Robin, allowed by the Wythe County court on 10 June 1813 to sue John Draper, Jr., in forma pauperis and set free on 9 August 1820 [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 11].

v. Polly, held in slavery by Colonel Henry Patton, [59-60], mother of sally and Maria born between 1813 and 1 August 1820 [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 90].

 

7.    Bess1 Findley, born say 1761, was called an Indian when she sued Elijah Clay for her freedom in Powhatan County court on 21 February 1782. Her case was continued in court until 17 July 1785 when it was dismissed by her order. After her brother James was manumitted by Clay, she again brought suit on 17 July 1788, and on 21 November 1788 the court ordered the deputy attorney to initiate a suit against Elijah Clay for the freedom of her children Fanny, Effee and Sally. A jury found in her favor on 21 October 1790, and a few months later on 16 December 1790 the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind her children Sally and Effee to Elijah Clay [Orders 1777-84, 187, 286, 326, 339; 1784-6, 60, 178, 192, 216, 247; 1786-91, 319, 370, 451, 545, 613, 617, 625]. On 19 May 1796 she sued Edward Haskins for trespass, assault and battery, and on 22 February 1798 she brought the same suit against Thomas Watkins. The jury found him guilty but did not award her any damages [Orders 1794-8, 241, 273, 428-9, 523]. She was the mother of

i. Effey, born about 1784, daughter of Bess Findley bound by the Powhatan County court to William Moseley on 19 April 1792 [Orders 1791-4, 95]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 11 October 1819: thirty five years old, dark complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 364].

ii. Sally3, born say 1781, daughter of Bess Findley bound by the Powhatan County court to Edward Haskins on 19 April 1792 [Orders 1791-4, 95]. She married Jacob Pitman, "free Negroes," on 27 December 1799 in Powhatan County [Marriage Register, 41].

iii. Fanny, born about 1787, daughter of Betty Fendley bound by the Powhatan County court to Valentine Ball on 16 August 1797 and bound to Elizabeth Blackburn on 20 February 1800 [Orders 1794-8, 376; 1798-1802, 203], head of a Chesterfield County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062]. She registered as a free Negro in Powhatan County on 18 April 1822: age 35, Brown complexion, 4'11-1/2" high, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1820-65, no. 41]. She registered in Botetourt County on 13 June 1823: 35 years of age; Brown colour; born free as per Certificate from Court Powhatan County [Free Negroes &c Registered in the Clerk's Office of Botetourt County, no. 38].

iv. Betty2, daughter of Betty Fendley bound apprentice seamstress to Benjamin Boatright by the Powhatan County court on 16 March 1803 [Orders 1802-4, 231].

v. ?Polly, bound by the Powhatan County court to Valentine Ball on 18 January 1804 [Orders 1802-4, 404].

 

8.    Judy Findley, born about 1767, was about seven years old on 23 April 1774 when Mitchel Clay sold her and her mother Rachel to John Draper. She and her children Lockey and Rhoda were allowed to sue John Draper, Sr., in forma pauperis in Wythe County on 11 August 1813 [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 11]. She was the mother of

i. Locky, mother of Lucinda who was born after the institution of the suit in 1813 but before it was settled on 9 August 1820.

ii. Rhoda.

iii. Sam.

iv. Abram.

v. Charlotte, daughter of Juda, born after the institution of the suit but before it was settled in Wythe County on 9 August 1820 [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 12].

vi. Milly, allowed by the Wythe County court on 11 August 1813 to sue Alley Draper in forma pauperis for her freedom and for the freedom of her child Harvey [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 11, 12].

vii. Anna, allowed by the Wythe County court on 11 August 1813 to sue Alley Draper in forma pauperis for her freedom and for the freedom of her child Calvin. She and her children Malinda, Eliza, Randall and John registered as free persons in Wythe County on 13 March 1822 [Kegley, Free People of Colour, 11-3].

 

Endnotes:

1.    John Cameron, security for Peter Findley's Patrick County marriage, appeared in Patrick County court on 27 December 1804 and emancipated his slave Ceasar who was to be called Ceaser Fendly [Orders 1800-10, n.p.].

 

FINNIE FAMILY

1.    Margaret Finnie, born say 1730, was living in Westmoreland County, Virginia, on 29 January 1750/1 when the court agreed to William Fitzhugh's motion that she be taken into custody by the sheriff because she was "Dealing with peoples Slaves & other ill Compy. in the Dead time of Night." The court ordered that her "Mulatto" son John be bound out as an apprentice by the churchwardens of Cople Parish [Orders 1750-2, 26-26a]. Her children were

i. John, born say 1750.

ii. ?Daniel, born say 1752, head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:107].

iii. ?Abraham1, born say 1755, head of an Accomack County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:94], perhaps the father of Abraham2 Finnie, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:23].

iv. ?Phillip, head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:23].

 

FLETCHER FAMILY

1.    Polly Fletcher, born say 1745, was an Irish servant who was indentured to Matthew Whiting, Esq., of Prince William County, Virginia. Whiting's executor, E. Brooke, Sr., certified in the Court of the District of Columbia in Alexandria that Polly was the mother of Betsy, Mary, and Alice Fletcher, "Mulatto" women [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, nos. 57, 59, 61, 62, pp.51-3]. Her children were

2        i. ?Ann, born say 1764.

ii. Betsy, born about 1775, registered in Alexandria on 2 May 1820: a forty-five-year-old "bright Mulatto" woman born on the Prince William County estate of Matthew Whiting.

iii. ?Nelly, born about 1776, registered in Fauquier County on 25 September 1826: age 50, 5'3-1/2", Bright Mulatto, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 84].

iv. Mary, born about 1780, registered in Alexandria on 8 December 1820: a forty-year-old "bright Mulatto" woman born on the Prince William County estate of Matthew Whiting.

v. Alice, born about 1795, registered in Alexandria on 2 May 1820: a twenty-five-year-old "bright Mulatto" woman born on the Prince William County estate of Matthew Whiting.

vi. ?Peter, head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:94].

vii. ?John, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:398].

viii. ?Cloe, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:125b].

 

2.    Ann Fletcher, born say 1764, was head of a St. Mary's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1790. She may have been the mother of

i. Jane, born about 1784, a thirty-seven-year-old "stout negro woman" who obtained a certificate of freedom in Alexandria, Virginia, on 6 August 1821 and registered in Washington, D.C., on 3 November 1834. Sarah Harper swore that Jane was born free in St. Mary's County and was bound to Sarah's mother Catherine Cheveller to serve until she came of age. Harper testified that she and Jane "grew up and were girls together" and that Jane's parents were free as were her several brothers and sisters [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 254].

 

FLOOD FAMILY

Members of the Flood family born before 1750 were

1        i. Mary1 born say 1725.

2        ii. Absalom, born say 1727.

iii. John1, born say 1730, head of an Amelia County household of 3 "whites" in 1782 [VA:13]. He was taxable in Charlotte County on his own tithe and 3 horses in 1787, levy free from 1790 to 1804 when he was called a "fm" [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 94, 177, 205, 229, 253, 302, 383, 399, 448, 466, 517, 551, 606].

3        iv. Pat, born say 1738.

 

1.    Mary1 Flood, born say 1725, was living in Henrico County on 3 September 1764 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Henrico Parish to bind out her "Mulatto" children: Fanny, Lucy, Dick, and Charles [Orders 1763-67, 328]. Her children were

4        i. ?William1, born say 1752.

5        ii. ?Mary2, born say 1754.

iii. Fanny, born say 1755.

iv. Lucy, born say 1757, mother of Polly Flood, a nine-year-old "free Mulatto girl" bound to Abby Cook in Petersburg on 6 April 1801 [Hustings Court Minute Book 1800-4, 42].

v. Dick, born say 1760.

vi. Charles, born say 1763, "Free Negro" head of an Isle of Wight County household of one "other free" in 1810 [VA:37].

 

2.    Absalom Flood, born say 1727, was taxed with his unnamed wife in the 1757 and 1758 tax summary for Bertie County, North Carolina [CR 10.702.1, box 1]. He was probably living in the part of Bertie which became Hertford County. Few Hertford County records have survived, but he is listed in the Sheriff's tax receipt book in 1768 and 1770, taxable on two tithes [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 8], and taxable in the 1779 Hertford Property Tax list filed with the state government, taxed on a horse in District 2 [GA 30.1]. There is no record of his children, but they may have been those counted in the census for Hertford and Halifax County, North Carolina:

i. Jesse, born say 1748, taxable in Hertford County on two tithes in 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 42], head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:308] and 6 in 1810 [NC:19].

ii. Ann/ Nanny, born say 1750, taxable on one tithe in Hertford County in 1768 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 48].

iii. Josiah, born say 1760, head of a Hertford County household of 11 "other free" in 1800. He was a labourer in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" on Western Branch in Norfolk in 1801, head of a household with W. Turner and Willoughby Weaver [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frame 383].

iv. Benjamin, born say 1762, living in Halifax County on 4 August 1789 when he deposed that he had served as an eighteen months soldier in the North Carolina Continental line and assigned all that was due to him for the service to John Eaton [NCGSJ IX:153]. He purchased 40 acres in Halifax County on the north side of Beech Swamp on 4 January 1792 [DB 17:503]. He married Lackey Underdue, 1790 Halifax County bond [CR 047.928.2]. He sold 640 acres in Davidson County, Tennessee on the south side of the Cumberland River, a grant for his services in the Revolution, by Halifax County deed on 31 August 1801 [DB 18:806 & Franklin County DB 6:89]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:308], 6 in 1810 [NC:19], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:148]. Lackey Underdue was probably the daughter of Dempsy Underdew/ Underdue who purchased 85 acres in Halifax County joining Hunter on 15 September 1783 [DB 15:101]. He was counted as white in 1790, head of a Halifax County household of 1 male over 16, two under 16, and four females [NC:63]. He was a private in the Continental Line who assigned his right to 640 acres in Tennessee to Nicholas Long in Halifax County on 25 July 1795 [DB 17:810]. His widow may have been Polly Underdew, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:346], perhaps the Mary Underwood who was head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:52]. They were probably related to Underdue Austin, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:3].

v. William2, born say 1775, head of a Hertford County household of 3 "other free" in 1800, 2 in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:19] and 7 "free colored" in Halifax County in 1830.

vi. John2, born before 1776, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:99] and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:182]. John, Demsey, Jesse, and Samuel Flood were among "Sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free African Americans [NCGSJ XI:252].

vii. James, born before 1776, head of a Hertford County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

viii. Lovet, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:148] and 6 in 1830. He married Polly Amis, 2 March 1822 Halifax County bond.

ix. Demsey, born 1776-94, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:190]. He married Kitty Morgan, 30 December 1819 Halifax County bond with Hansel Dempsy bondsman.

 

3.    Pat Flood, born say 1738, was living in Raleigh Parish, Amelia County, on 26 November 1767 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her children: Tom, Frederick, Stephen, and Sawney (no race indicated). She was called a "free Mulatto" on 26 October 1769 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Raleigh Parish to bind out her unnamed children [Orders 1767-8, 113; 1768-9, 265]. She was the mother of

i. Burwell, born about 1756, registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a brown Mulatto man, five feet seven and a half inches high, thirty eight years old, born free & raised in Mecklenburg County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 49].

ii. Thomas, born about 1757, registered in Petersburg on 25 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet eight inches high, thirty seven years old, born free & raised in Amelia County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 87].

iii. Frederick.

iv. Stephen.

v. Alexander, born about 1765, taxable in Charlotte County, Virginia, from 1789 to 1799, called Sawney Flood in 1793 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 159, 205, 179, 253, 277, 302, 328, 383, 448]. He married Levina Lawrence, 4 April 1792 Charlotte County bond. He purchased 110 acres in Charlotte County from William Harris for 20 pounds on 2 December 1793, and on 7 April 1794 for 19 pounds he sold 22 acres on Wallace's Creek which was land that had been conveyed to him by Little Joe Morton. He and his wife Levinia sold 110 acres to Berry Jackson on 4 November 1799 [DB 7:21, 42, 212, 223]. He registered in Charlotte County on 7 October 1806: a dark Mulato man five feet eight inches high about forty one years of age...Born a free man in the County of Amelia. His wife Levina registered on 26 November 1806 with their children Coleman and Charity [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, nos. 9-11]. He registered again in Pittsylvania County using the Charlotte County registration papers, stating that he was born in Amelia County and his wife was born in Brunswick County. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Pittsylvania County from 1809 to 1816, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 and his unnamed son in 1815 [PPTL 1797-1812, frames 639, 684, 760, 781; 1813-23, frames 36, 59, 136, 171].

 

4.    William1 Flood, born say 1752, a "Free Negro," was living on land in Amelia County near Rowling's Church when James Farley placed an advertisement in the 31 October 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette cautioning the subscribers not to purchase William's land since Farley had already received part of the purchase price [Virginia Gazette, Dixon's edition, p.2, col. 2]. He married Molly Harris Brogdon, 12 November 1785 Mecklenburg County bond, William Brogdon consenting. He and his wife Molly sold 26 acres on the Little Roanoke River in Charlotte County where they were then living on 28 February 1799 [DB 7:192]. He was taxable in Charlotte County, Virginia, from 1782 to 1805: taxable on a slave named Dick, 4 horses and 12 cattle in 1782, taxable on a horse and 6 cattle in 1785, taxable on 2 free males and a slave in 1789, taxable on a slave in 1794, 2 slaves in 1795, 2 horses in 1796 and 1800, called a "f. Mulattoe" in 1801, a shoemaker counted in a list of "free Negroes & Mulatters" from 1802 to 1805 with his wife Molly and children Betsey, Polly, Patsey, William and John. He apparently died about 1806 when Molly was taxable on a horse and listed with 2 male and 2 female children in her household. She was listed as a weaver with 2 males and 3 females in her household in 1811 and 1812, 2 males and 2 females in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 10, 15, 52, 128, 191, 217, 242, 265, 290, 316, 340, 399, 434, 466, 503, 542, 580, 606, 648, 673, 682, 709, 717, 751, 806, 814, 886]. She was a "Free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 9 "other free" [VA:1010]. About 1810 his sons William and John sued their mother to divide the estate as specified in their father's 23 May 1806 will which was proved 3 December 1806 (mistakenly written as 1805). The will divided his personal estate between his daughters Polly and Patsey Coleman, divided his land among his wife and two sons, and left his daughter Elizabeth Gallimore the property she then had. The court apportioned 65 acres to his wife Mary Flood, and 63 acres each to William and John who was then an infant [LVA Chancery file 1810-019]. His children were

i. Betsey, "dau of William Flood who is surety," married Joshua Gallimore, 29 February 1803 Charlotte County bond.

ii. Polly.

iii. Patsey, married George Gallimore, 9 May 1813 Charlotte County bond, John Flood surety.

iv. William3, born about 1788, registered in Charlotte County on 28 December 1812: a Mulato Man five feet nine inches high 24 years old last October, son of William Flood born free in the County of Charlotte, now residing in the County and has lived in the same from his birth, a ditcher by profession [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 19]. He died before 21 February 1828 when his only child Jefferson Flood sued William's widow Susan (who had married Grey Byrd) for his part of his father's land. The suit was discontinued in July 1832 by the death of Jefferson [LVA, Chancery file 1832-006].

v. John3, born say 1792, a "fm" taxable miller in Charlotte County in 1809, and a "fm" taxable in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 743, 873].

 

5.    Mary2 Flood, born say 1754, was living in Chesterfield County on 2 July 1784 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind her daughter Nancy Flood to Abner Jackson [Orders 1774-84, 555]. She was the mother of

6        i. ?Jenny, born about 1770.

ii. Nancy, born about 1774, ordered bound apprentice to Abner Jackson in Dale Parish, Chesterfield County, on 2 July 1784 [Orders 1774-84, 555]. She registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet and one half inches high, twenty six years old, thick bushy hair, born free in the County of Mecklenburg as appears by the affidavit of Thomas Drumwright [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 172].

iii. Betsy, daughter of Mary Flood, bound apprentice to Edward Eanes by order of the Chesterfield County court on 2 July 1784 [Orders 1774-84, 555].

iv. ?Edia, child of Mary Banks, bound apprentice to Edward Eanes, Jr., by order of the Chesterfield County court on 2 July 1784 [Orders 1774-84, 555].

v. Polly Banks, daughter of Mary Flood, bound apprentice to Edward Eanes by order of the Chesterfield County court on 2 July 1784 [Orders 1774-84, 555].

 

6.    Jenny Flood, born about 1770, registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: Jenny Floyd, a brown Mulatto woman, slender made, five feet four inches high, twenty four years old, born free & raised in Mecklenburg County. She registered again on 9 July 1805 as Jenny Flood [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, nos. 50, 305]. She may have been the mother of

i. ?Mark, born about 1792, living in Mecklenburg County on 13 June 1796 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind him to William Pulliam [Orders 1795-8, 94]. He received a certificate in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 10 December 1817: a man of Colour, twenty five years of age, five feet five inches high, yellow complexion, Slender made ... his front under teeth placed in two rows, was born free [Free Person of Color, #17, p. 9].

ii. ?Matthew, born say 1794, living in Mecklenburg County on 13 June 1796 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind him (no race indicated) to William Pulliam [Orders 1795-8, 94]. He and Mark Flood were listed as "free Negroes and Mulattoes" in Mecklenburg County from 1813 to 1817 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frames, 307, 419, 576].

 

FLORA FAMILY

1.    Mary Floro, born say 1700, was the servant of Lewis Delony on 18 January 1718/9 when the York County court ordered that she serve him an additional year for having a bastard child [OW 15, pt. 2, 536]. She was probably the mother of

i. Peter Flora, called "Peater Flura, ye Spanard," head of a Norfolk County household in the Southern Branch District near Batcheldor's Mill in 1753 and 1754 and taxable in Western Branch District in Alice Forrester's household in 1767 and 1768. He was taxable in his own household in 1769 and 1770 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-1765, 55, 89; 1766-1780, 14, 71, 87, 105]. The Norfolk County court declared him to be levy free on 21 June 1771 [Orders 1771-3, 6].

2        ii. Mary Flora, born say 1730.

 

2.    Mary Flora, born say 1730, was the mother of a "free Negro" son bound apprentice to Joshua Gammon in Norfolk County in April 1763 [Orders 1763-5, 15]. Mary's child was

3        i. William, born about 1755.

 

3.    William Flora, born about 1755, was bound to Joshua Gammon in Norfolk County in April 1763 [Orders 1763-5, 15]. He was taxable in Norfolk County in 1771 in the Edmond's Bridge District in John Fentress' household and in William Bressie's household in 1773 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-1780, 128]. He was taxable in Portsmouth and Elizabeth River Parishes, Norfolk County, from 1782 to 1817: taxable on a slave and a horse in 1787; taxable on 6 horses from 1795 to 1799; taxable on 2 free males; a slave under 16, 5 horses and 4 carriage wheels in 1800; counted in a list of "free Negroes" as a pedlar living in Portsmouth with Gracy Flora in 1801; taxable on 3 riding chairs and 6 horses in 1802, 8 horses from 1804 to 1806; a stage wagon, 6 chairs and 6 horses in 1807 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 392, 485, 567, 613, 643, 682; 1791-1812, frames 22, 82, 138, 172, 248, 354, 383, 463, 560, 646, 689, 742; 1813-24, frames 101, 251]. He fought in the battle at Great Bridge, Norfolk County, in the Revolution, prying loose the last board in the bridge to prevent the British from attacking his retreating comrades [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 34; WPA, The Negro in Virginia, 23]. On 21 May 1798 he sued James and William North for 24 pounds rent and sued William Roe for $21 on 22 March 1803 [Orders 1799-1801, 15a; 1803-4, 247b]. He made a deed of emancipation to his daughter Grace on 1 April 1799 which he acknowledged in court on 21 October 1799 [DB 38:33; Orders 1799-1801, 15a, 39b]. He was living in the town of Portsmouth on 5 November 1818 when he made his Norfolk County will which was proved 18 January 1819. He left a bed, furniture, and a mahogany table to his daughter Grace Hanties and ordered that all his perishable estate and "old negro woman" Milley be sold to pay his debts and funeral expenses, his two dwelling houses to be repaired and painted and the lot to be put in good order by his executor and friend William Wilson, Esquire, of Portsmouth who was also to be guardian of his grandson William Flora and see that he was sent to school [WB 5:26-7]. He was the father of

i. Grace, sued William Truss for trespass, assault and battery in Norfolk County court on 21 April 1799 and was awarded 11 pounds damages when the case came to trial on 18 March 1800. On 17 June 1800 she made a complaint against Pluto, the slave of Doctor Silson, and he was required to post security for his good behavior [Orders 1799-1801, 20a, 55b, 94b, 129a].

ii. ?Kinner, born say 1800, a "free Negro" ordered by the Norfolk County court to be hired out by the sheriff to pay their taxes for the years 1823 and 1824 [Minute136-7, 153-4], perhaps identical to Kinner Flourey whose register as a free Negro in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831 was blank [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-1862, no. 281], a "F.B." taxable in Princess Anne County called Florry(?) Shoecraft alias Florry Kinner [PPTL, 1790-1822, frame 684]. Andrew Flory made a deed of trust to Wright Perkins for 7 acres of land that was proved in Norfolk County court on 18 January 1830 [Minutes 21:246]. John Price posted security of $200 in Norfolk County court on 16 July 1832 for Andrew Flurry to keep the peace towards William Cooper [Minutes 23:95]. And on 19 August 1833 the court certified, upon satisfactory evidence of white persons, that Priscilla Flury was of Indian descent and not a free negro or Mulatto" [Mintues 24:43-4].

 

FLOWERS FAMILY

Members of the Flowers family were

1        i. Sarah, born say 1745.

2        ii. Mary, born say 1748.

 

1.    Sarah Flowers, born say 1745, was a "Mulatto" woman living in Sussex County, Virginia, on 19 June 1777 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish to bind out her children Ben, Lucy, and Cealy Flowers to Isaac Robertson [Orders 1777-82, 17]. She was the mother of

3        i. Benjamin1, born say 1768.

ii. Lucy, born say 1771.

iii. Cealy1, born say 1773, married Joseph Lewis, 3 November 1797 Sussex County bond. Joseph was a "FN" taxable in Sussex County in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 705]. He registered in Sussex County on 25 July 1818: dark complexion, 5 feet 8-1/2 inches high, age 45, free born [Register of Free Negroes, 1800-50, no. 333]

iv. ?Isham2, born say 1776, a "FN" taxable in Sussex County from 1797 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 444, 598, 677, 701, 749, 782, 815, 836]. He was a planter in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" for Sussex County from 1803 to 1812: listed with Polly Flowers on Benjamin Batt's land in 1805, with Beck and Moll Flowers in 1806, with Beck Flowers and a child named Celia Flowers on William Harper's land in 1807 [List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1801-1812, frames 13, 26, 32, 33, 47, 49, 55, LVA micrfofilm no. 221].

 

2.    Mary Flowers, born say 1748, "a free mulatto," registered the birth of her daughter Nancy in Bruton Parish, James City County on 27 July 1766. On 16 May 1785 the York County court charged her with failing to list her taxable property [Orders 1784-7, 150]. Her children were

i. Nancy, born 27 July 1766 [Bruton Parish Register, 30].

 

3.   Benjamin1 Flowers, born say 1768, married Anne Owen, 5 August 1790 Sussex County bond. Anne was probably related to James and Nathan Owen who were "FN" taxables in Sussex County in 1806 and 1807 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 683, 707]. Benjamin was taxable in Sussex County from 1789 to 1813: taxable on 2 tithes and a horse in 1803; called a "FN" starting in 1806; taxable on 2 tithes in 1807 and 1809; 3 tithes in 1811; 4 tithes and 2 horses in 1812 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 251, 286, 344, 407, 444, 458, 500, 550, 598, 515, 611, 647, 677, 701, 749, 782, 815, 836]. He was listed with Ann and their children John, Berry, Benjamin, Sally, Betsy, Celia, Nancy, Billy and Tom in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" for Sussex County from 1801 to 1812 [List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1801-1812, frames 1, 8, 18, 27, 32, 34, 47, 49, 55, LVA micrfofilm no. 221] and head of a Dinwiddie County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. He and Ann were the parents of

i. Sally, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Sussex County on 21 April 1817: light complexion, 5 feet 4 inches high, age 27, free born [Register of Free Negroes, 1800-50, no. 302].

ii. John, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Sussex County on 9 September 1814: light complexion, 5 feet 6-3/4 inches high, age 23, free born [Register of Free Negroes, 1800-50, no. 242].

iii. Betsy, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Sussex County on 21 April 1817: light complexion, 5 feet 2 inches high, age 25, free born [Register of Free Negroes, 1800-50, no. 301.

iv. Ben2, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Sussex County on 9 September 1814: bright complexion, 5 feet 8 inches high, age 21, free born [Register of Free Negroes, 1800-50, no. 246].

v. Celia2, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Sussex County on 21 April 1817: light complexion, 5 feet 2 inches high, age 21, free born [Register of Free Negroes, 1800-50, no. 303].

vi. Berry.

vii. Thomas2, perhaps the Thomas Flowers who was head of a New Hanover County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:222].

 

Other Flowers family members were

i. John, head of a Sampson County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:52], perhaps the father of Thomas2 Flowers, head of a New Hanover County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:222].

ii. Isham1, born say 1770, a "free" (Negro) taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1799 and 1800 [Personal Property Tax List 1799, B, p. 5; 1800l, B, p. 5].

iii. Thomas1, born before 1776, head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:191].

 

FORTUNE FAMILY

Members of the Fortune family in Virginia and North Carolina were

1        i. Humphrey, born say 1745.

2        ii. William, born say 1747.

3        iii. James2, born say 1750.

iv. John, a free man of color who enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution from Amherst County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149].

v. Armistead, born say 1760, taxable in Caroline County from 1783 to 1814: taxable on 2 horses and 3 cattle in 1783, 2 tithes in 1791, counted in the "list of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" starting in 1813 when he was taxable on 3 persons over 16 including females; taxable on 2 tithes in 1814, perhaps the father of Armistead Fortune, Jr., who was a "free Mulatto" taxable from 1819 to 1824 [PPTL 1783-99; 1800-11; 1812-20]. In November 1785 the administrators of John Robinson's estate won a suit against him in Caroline County court for a debt of 1,000 pounds of tobacco, and on 13 November 1787 Robert Beverly won a suit against him for ejectment from 100 acres of land [Orders 1785-7, part 1, 178; 1787-9, part 2, 287].

vi. Lewis, a free man of color born in Caroline County but living in Essex County when he was listed in the size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Courthouse [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149]. He was taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, on a horse in 1786 (no race indicated) [PPTL, 1782-1803, p. 145], was taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in the same household as William Maxfield in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 128] and a "Mo" or "free Black" taxable in Powhatan County from 1792 to 1813: taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1809 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 76, 92, 105, 118, 132, 162, 184, 206, 239, 256, 294, 341, 362, 438], except for 1795 and 1797 when he listed as a "free Negro or Mulatto" taxable in Richmond City [PPTL 1787-99]. He was a "free Negroe" summoned to the Powhatan County court for committing a breach of the peace against his wife Rose, "a free Mulatto," but discharged on 21 March 1804 when no evidence appeared against him [Orders 1802-4, 452].

vii. Samuel, a free man of color born in Caroline County but living in Powhatan County when he enlisted in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149].

viii. Patience, born say 1771, a free "Negroe" woman who sued Archibald Hopkins in Rockingham County, Virginia court for her freedom on 24 May 1796. The court awarded her one penny damages since she ought to have been discharged from service in 1789. On 23 July 1798 the court ordered her to appear to show cause why her children Sarah and David should not be taken away from her and returned to her late master Archibald Hopkins, Sr., (on his motion) as slaves until the ages of eighteen and twenty-one since they were born before she became free [Judgments & Orders 1795-8, 175, 286, 578].

 

1.    Humphrey Fortune, born say 1745, was paid 4 pounds currency by the Essex County estate of Sarah Brooks in 1769 [DB 12:520]. He was a "Mulatto" head of an Essex County, Virginia household of 8 persons in 1783 [VA:52]. He was presented by the grand jury in Essex County on 17 May 1784 and 16 May 1785 for failing to list his tithables, and on 21 August 1786 the court ordered his list to be added to the list of William Waring, Gentleman. He and Andrew Kee were sued for debt in Essex County on 20 December 1785 [Orders 1784-7, 9, 174, 185]. He was taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, from 1783 to 1816: taxable on a tithe; 3 horses and 5 cattle in 1783; taxable on a slave over the age of 16 in 1787 and 1788; taxable on 2 free tithes and a horse in 1794, 1796, 1798-1800, 1809 and 1810, taxable on a male and female "Free Negro & Mulatto" above the age of sixteen in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 42, 64, 99, 156, 171, 185, 199, 213, 225, 237, 249, 275, 310, 371, 396, 428, 460, 625]. He left a 29 January 1820 Essex County will, offered for proof by Thornton Chandler but opposed by John Bird (Byrd) and Daniel Johnson, and proved on 20 March 1820. He left all his estate to his wife Jarusy during her lifetime or widowhood. He left to son John Fortune that part of a tract of land whereon his son Thomas Fortune was then living on the south side of the branch in B.H. Munday's line, and gave the remaining part of the land to son Thomas Fortune and daughter Caty Chandler. He divided the remainder of his estate between his daughters Polly and Anny Fortune and left a shilling to daughters Sally Bird and Patsy Johnson. He also asked his sons to take care of their unnamed mother [WB 19:92]. He was the father of

i. John, born say 1778, taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, from 1804 to 1814 when he was listed as a "free Negro & Mulato" [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 371, 384, 413, 460, 538]. He sold property in Essex County by deed proved on 4 April 1822 [DB 40:364].

ii. Anna, born about 1785, listed as a "free Negro" in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frame 510]. She registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 4 August 1829: sister of Thomas Fortune, born free, bright Mulattoe, 44 years of age, 5 feet 6 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.65, no.114].

4        iii. Polly, born about 1786.

iv. Thomas, born about 1792, taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, from 1811 to 1816: listed as a "free Negro" from 1813 to 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frames 538, 625]. He married Judith Kay (Kee), 23 December 1813 Essex County bond. He registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 4 August 1829: born free by certificate of Richard Rowzee, very bright Mulattoe almost white, 37 years of age, 5 feet 9-3/4 inches. His wife Judith registered the same day: wife of Thomas Fortune who was Judith Johnson, born free by certificate of Richard Gouldman, tawny, 30 years of age, 5 feet 6 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.64, nos.147-8].

v. Catherine Chandler, born about 1795, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 15 August 1829: wife of Thornton Chandler who was Catherine Fortune, born free by statement of Col. Richard Rowzee, bright Mulatto, about 34 years of age, 5 feet 5 inches [Register 1810-43, p.94, no. 192].

vi. Patsy, wife of Daniel Johnson.

vii. Sally, wife of John Bird.

 

2.    William Fortune, born say 1747, was a "Mulatto" head of an Essex County, Virginia household of 8 persons in 1783 [VA:52]. He was presented by the grand jury in Essex County on 17 May 1784 for failing to list his tithables. His suit against Taylor Noell for debt was dismissed by the court on 21 August 1786 [Orders 1784-7, 9, 222]. He was taxable on a horse in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, from 1783 to 1785 [PPTL, 1782-1819, frames 42, 99, 145], was a taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, in 1787 and 1790 [PPTL, 1782-91, pp. 179, 249] and head of a Martin County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68]. He was taxable in Hanover County again in 1809 [PPTL, 1804-23] and taxable in Caroline County from 1811 to 1813: taxable on 2 tithes in 1811 and 1812, taxable on 4 men and women over the age of 16 in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 [PPTL 1800-11; 1812-20]. He may have been the father of

i. Hannah, head of a Martin County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68] and 2 in Henrico County, Virginia, in 1810 [VA:980].

ii. Jesse, born say 1785, head of a Martin County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:444], and a "Free Negro" taxable on one slave, a horse, and 2 cattle in Hanover County in 1815 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1803; 1804-23].

 

3.    James2 Fortune, born say 1750, was a "free Negro" or "Mulatto" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, Virginia, from 1782 to 1814: taxable on 3 horses and 6 cattle in 1782; taxable on his own tithe and a free male aged 16-21 in 1785; taxable on 2 free males from 1792 to 1798; his own tithe in 1799; taxable on 2 free males from 1800 to 1810; paid for a merchant's license in 1804 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-91, pp.15, 35, 70, 114, 178, 209, 219, 249, 262; 1792-1803, pp. 12, 44, 65, 95, 108, 130, 149, 189, 210, 226, 249; 1804-18]. And he was taxable in Hanover County on 291 acres from 1782 to 1801 [Land Tax List, 1782-1801]. He was head of a Hanover County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:845]. He may have been the father of

i. James3, Jr., born say 1784, a "Free Negro" taxable in Hanover County from 1805 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1804-23] and a "free Negro" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1807 to 1814, his tax charged to John Harvie's estate in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 533, 661, 758, 823].

ii. Curtis, born say 1791, a "Free Negro" taxable in Hanover County in 1803 and from 1811 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1792-1803, p. 249; 1804-23].

iii. Milley, head of a Hanover County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:901].

 

4.    Polly Fortune, born about 1786, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 10 August 1829: born free by cert. of Richard Rowzee, dark Mulattoe, 43 years of age, 4 feet 5-1/8 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.71, no. 161]. She was the mother of

i. Susan, born about 1803, registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 10 August 1829: daughter of Polly Fortune, born free by cert. of Richard Rowzee, bright Mulattoe, 26 years of age, 5 feet 4-5/8 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.71, no.162].

 

Accomack County

Members of the Fortune family in Accomack County were

i. Shadrack, a free man of color who enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution from Amherst County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149].

ii. Major, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:95].

 

Endnotes:

1.    The Fortune family of Accomack County may have been related to James Fortune, born say 1745, the "Mulatto" son of Sarah Game, who bound himself as an apprentice in Somerset County, Maryland court to James Laws until the age of twenty-one in March 1761 to learn the trade of light cooper [Judicial Records 1760-3, 63b].

 

FOX FAMILY

Members of the Fox family of Virginia were

i. Judith, born say 1753, mother of Rhoda Martin who married Edward Fuzmore, 22 September 1794 Goochland County bond. She may also have been the mother of James Fox, a "Mulatto" farmer living at Samuel Martin's in Goochland County in 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1810-32, frame 192].

ii. James, born say 1760, taxable in New Kent County from 1791 to 1815: taxable on 2 tithables and 2 horses in 1799, 1800, 1802, 1804 and 1805; listed as a "M"(ulatto) in 1804, 1807 and 1809; a "Mul." taxable on his wife, son and daughter in 1813; charged with his son William's tithe in 1814. He may have been the father of Joseph Fox, a "F.N." New Kent County taxable in 1806 and 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 164, 184, 207; 1791-1828, frames 267, 295, 306, 319, 330, 343, 369, 394, 406, 419, 431, 442, 464, 474, 491, 503]. He was head of a New Kent County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:752].

iii. James, a "Mulatto" living in Loudoun County on 12 June 1780 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Cameron parish to bind him to James Oram [Orders 1776-83, 247]. He was a "free negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:255].

iv. Toby, head of a Stafford County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:127].

 

FRANCIS FAMILY

Members of the Francis family were

1        i. Hannah1, born say 1664.

ii. John1, born say 1677, married Mary Savoy, 19 December 1698 Elizabeth City County marriage license [DW 1688-1702, 218 (restored page 133)].

 

1.    Hannah1 Francis, born say 1664, petitioned the Elizabeth City County, Virginia court to be levy free (not have to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American women). Her petition was granted on 20 May 1724 (as was the petition of Mary Pickett and Elizabeth George [DWO 1724-30, 15]. Her brother Francis Savoy left her and her two sisters 50 acres on the Poquosin River bounded by the land of Thomas Wythe and John George by his Elizabeth City County estate. Hannah exchanged her third part of the land on 7 March 1740/1 for 16 acres adjoining the land of William Mallory on the south side of the King's gaol and 6 pounds, 10 shillings and twenty hogsheads of cider [DW 1737-56, 101]. Her descendant Mary Cuttillo sold this land in July 1791 [DW 34:118; Richter, A Community and its Neighborhoods, 362]. Hannah was probably the ancestor of

2        i. John2, born say 1728.

3        ii. Abraham1, born say 1740.

4        iii. Hannah2, born say 1740.

5        iv. Thomas1, born say 1745.

v. William1, born about 1757, paid by Anthony Robinson's York County estate for currying leather in November 1779 [WI 22:483]. He was taxable on one tithe and 6 cattle in York County in 1784 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 89, 97, 112, 140] and head of a York County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:872a]. He registered in York County on 18 June 1810: a Mulo man abt 53 yrs. of age 5 feet 10 Inches high ... Born of free parents [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no. 40].

vi. Christopher, born say 1758, a soldier in the Revolution from York County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 34], taxable in York County on one free tithe and a slave in 1784, taxable on slave Nanny in 1786 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 78, 122].

vii. Elizabeth, born about 1793, registered in York County on 18 November 1833: a bright mulatto about 40 years of age, 5 feet 3 inches high, long straight hair [Free Negro Register, no.354].

 

2.    John2 Francis, born say 1728, acknowledged a debt to John Holt of 4 pounds, 8 shillings in York County on 17 July 1749. He was indicted by the York County court on 19 November 1750 for not listing his wife as a tithable for which he was fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 226, 364, 384, 393]. He and his wife Susanna registered the birth of their daughter Elizabeth in Charles Parish, York County in 1750. Susanna died soon after on 24 January 1750/1. On 15 June 1752 the court fined him 1,000 pounds for not listing himself as a tithable in Charles Parish, and on 17 September 1753 the court ordered that he and his wife be added to the list of tithables in Mr. Moore's precinct (the upper precinct of Charles Parish) [Judgment & Orders 1752-4, 59, 303]. By 22 May 1756 he had married Sarah when their son Thomas died [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 216]. On 19 September 1763 the court ordered that he and his "Mulatto" wife be added to the list of tithables for the upper precinct of Charles Parish. He died before May 1765 when three white men were acquitted of his murder in York County court. His estate was ordered to be appraised on 15 July 1765. His wife Sarah was the administratrix of the estate [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 83, 87, 372, 439, 450]. John was the father of

i. Elizabeth1, born 15 September 1750 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 91, 91].

ii. Thomas2, died 22 May 1756.

iii. ?Mary2, born say 1762, married Abraham Cuttillo, 10 November 1787 York County bond, Robert Gillett bondsman. In July 1791 they sold 16 acres in Elizabeth City County that Mary had inherited from her ancestor, Hannah Francis [DW 34:118].

 

3.    Abraham1 Francis, born say 1740, was presented by the York County court on 20 May 1765 for not attending Charles Parish Church [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 374, 448]. He and his wife Mary baptized several of their children in Charles Parish, York County. He was taxable in York County on a horse and 14 cattle in 1784, taxable in York County in 1788, 1790, 1796 and 1797, 1804, 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 89, 140], a "Mulatto" taxable on himself and 2 horses in Warwick County in 1798 [1798 Personal Property Tax List, p.2] and head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:872a]. His children were

i. Elizabeth2, born 26 May 1761, baptized 7 June.

6        ii. ?Mary3, born say 1763.

iii. John3, born 20 February 1766, died November 1782 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 91, 216].

7        iv. Abraham2, born 30 May 1769.

 

4.    Hannah2 Francis, born say 1740, was the mother of an illegitimate child by Philip Chavis who was bound out by the Johnston County, North Carolina court. She may have been the Hannah Chavis whose son Charles was bound out in Orange County, North Carolina, in May 1763. Her children were

i. Philip, born about 1758, ordered by the January Johnston County court bound as an apprentice to William Calvet in January 1762 [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, I:86, 89].

ii. Charles, born about October 1760, son of Hannah Chavis ordered bound an apprentice shoemaker to William Mebane by the May 1763 Orange County court.

8        iii. ?Burrell, born say 1773.

iv. ?Levy, born say 1775, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:148].

 

5.    Thomas1 Francis, born say 1745, and his wife Mary registered the birth of their child in Charles Parish, York County [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 91]. On 20 October 1766 the York County court presented him for not listing himself as a tithable [Orders 1765-8, 161]. He was a "M"(ulatto) taxable in Warwick County on his own tithe, a slave and a horse in 1798 [1798 Personal Property Tax List, p.2]. His child was

9        i. Betty3, born September 1767.

 

6.    Mary3 Francis, born say 1763, was the mother of several children baptized in Charles Parish, York County, no father named [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 91]. They were

i. Sarah, born 28 October 1780, baptized 25 February 1781.

ii. Mary4, born 20 January, baptized 23 March 1783.

iii. Molly, born 15 November, baptized 30 April 1786, probably the Polly Francis who registered in York County on 21 November 1831: a bright mulatto about 40 years of age, five feet two inches high ... flat face, long straight hair which she wears plaited [Free Negroes Register 1831-50, no.334].

 

7.    Abraham2 Francis, born 30 May 1769, was baptized 25 June in Charles Parish, York County [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 91, 216]. He was a "M"(ulatto) taxable above the age of sixteen in Warwick County in 1798, taxable on a slave and a horse (called Abraham Francis, Jr.) [1798 Personal Property Tax List, p.2]. He was head of a Warwick County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:678]. He was living in Warwick County on 25 January 1816 when he consented to the York County marriage of his minor son John. One of his children was

i. John4, born say 1798, married Elizabeth Ketiller (Cuttillo), 25 January 1816 York County bond.

 

8.    Burrell Francis, born say 1773, was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free in 1810 [NC:20], 9 "free colored in 1820 [NC:147], and 3 "free colored" in 1830. There is no record of his children, but they may have been those members of the Francis family counted in the census for Halifax County:

i. Burck, born say 1795, head of a Halifax County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:148] and 8 in 1830.

ii. Willis, born say 1800, married Temperance Price, 29 December 1821 Halifax County bond, Edmund Francis bondsman. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Daniel, born say 1802, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. John5, born say 1805, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1830.

v. Beb, born say 1807, married Nancy Jones, 27 May 1828 Halifax County bond, James Brewer bondsman. He was head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. He was fined $1 for a petty offence in the 20 May 1834 Halifax County court. On 25 February 1842 the court included him among several: persons of color of good character allowed to use their guns ... And on 17 August 1846 he renewed his permit: allowed to carry shot gun they having produced a certificate of good character signed by 5 or more of their respective neighbors of good character: ... Beverly Francis, Willis Francis [Minutes 1732-46].

 

9.    Betty3 Francis, born September 1767, baptized 15 November the same year, registered the birth of her daughter Sukey Francis in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 91]. She was the mother of

i. Sukey, daughter of Betty Francis, born Feb _, baptized 10 April 1768.

ii. Rebecca, born about 1772, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a bright Mulatto about 50 years of age 5 feet 2-1/2 Inches high ... born free [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no.150].

 

Members of the Francis family on the Eastern Shore of Virginia were

i. John, born say 1750, married Ibby Shepherd, widow, 28 December 1792 Northampton County, Virginia bond, Abraham Lang security. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358].

ii. William, born say 1770, married Polly Jacob, 30 December 1791 Northampton County, Virginia bond, Abraham Lang security.

iii. Thomas, born say 1775, married Tabby Press, 26 December 1796 Northampton County, Virginia bond, Edmund Press security.

iv. Betty, born say 1783, "free negro," married Thomas Stephens, 13 July 1804 Accomack County bond, Babel Major, "free negro," surety.

v. Thomas, born 24 March 1796, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: Yellow Colour, 5 feet 1-3/4 Inches ... Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no.82].

 

Other members of the Francis family were

i. John, born say 1760, head of a Beaufort District, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Nathl., "f. negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 6 "other free" in 1810.

 

FRANKLIN FAMILY

Charles, Ambrose1, and Noah Franklin were sons of Martha Walden, wife of Micajah Walden of Northampton County, North Carolina. Martha was the heir of her sons Charles and Ambrose Franklin who died while serving in the Revolutionary War. According to the testimony of Micajah Walden, administrator of their estate, their heirs were granted land warrants for 228 acres. They were also granted an additional 412 acres to be released when there was additional proof of their death. The additional land was released on 13 December 1805 when Micajah Walden presented the testimony of Samuel Parker, Henry Parker, and James Bradley, Captain of the North Carolina Regiment of Halifax [NCGSJ III].

 

1.    Noah Franklin, born say 1760, another son of Martha Walden, was not counted in the census, so he may have been living with Micajah and Martha Walden. He was a buyer at the Northampton County, North Carolina estate sale of Solomon Pace on 20 December 1798 [Gammon, Record of Estates, Northampton County, 101]. He was identified as Martha's son in Micajah Walden's 6 November 1806 Northampton County will and Martha's 18 August 1807 will, proved March 1808. He received $50 from his foster father and furniture from his mother [WB 2:575, 597]. His children were not identified but may have been

i. Archibald, an orphan (no race indicated) bound apprentice in Granville County to Richard Inse and then bound instead to John Owen in November 1794 [Minutes 1792-5, 205-6], head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:19], perhaps the Archer Franklin, born 1776-94, who was head of a Northampton County household of 11 "free colored" in 1830. He married Celia Evans, 15 January 1820 Halifax County bond with Randolph Morgan bondsman.

ii. Zebulon, born 1776-94, head of a Northampton County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Ezekiel, born about 1792, apprenticed as a carpenter to Isaac Ross of Franklin County, North Carolina, in 1804 [NCGSJ XI:12]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:230].

iv. Ambrose2, born about 1790, married Hicksey Jones, 3 October 1814 Wake County bond with (her father?) Francis Jones bondsman. Francis Jones was head of a Wake County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:103]. Ambrose was a "Negro" head of a Guilford County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830 and was living in household #110, New Garden Township, Wayne County, Indiana, in 1850.

 

2.    Elizabeth Franklin, born say 1754, was the mother of Delilar Franklin, a nine-year-old "Mullato" girl ordered bound to Drury Jackson in Warren County, North Carolina, in September court 1780 [Minutes 1780-3, 50]. Her child was

i. Delilah, born 22 February 1771, but called a twelve-year-old "base born mulatto" when she was bound by the Warren County court to John Mayfield on 2 March 1792 [WB 6:79 by Kerr, Warren County Records].

 

FRAZIER FAMILY

1.    Caty Frazier was head of a King George County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:199]. She may have been the mother of

i. James Fraser, born about 1777, registered in King George County on 6 June 1802: a black man, aged about twenty five years, about five feet five inches high, rather stout made about the body and shoulders, who has been deprived of the left leg and greater part of the thigh by amputation ... was born in this county of a free negro woman ... served Thomas Jordan formerly of this county ... the term of twenty one years, for which he was bound by his said mother [Register of Free Persons, no.37].

 

FREEMAN FAMILY

1.    Abraham1 Freeman, born say 1721, was the servant of Thomas Jerrell of Southampton County on 9 April 1752 when he petitioned the court to sue for his freedom in forma pauperis. His lawyer Richard Baker, Gent., sued Jarrell for trespass, assault and battery and false imprisonment, but the case was dismissed on 11 June that year when he and Jarrell reached agreement. He sued Arthur Washington in court on 10 July 1755. Richard Vick sued Abraham on 14 August the same year but he was found not guilty. He was paid by the county for maintaining Flower's Bridge each year from 1759 to 1762. On 10 July 1761 the court excused his wife from paying taxes for the year 1761. On 20 November 1769 he was paid by the county for guarding a prisoner named Richard Harris alias Chapman for six days, and on 10 January 1771 he was paid for guarding a slave named Will for seven days. James Vaughan sued him for 2 pounds, 10 shillings in May 1770. He was added to Nicholas Maget's list of tithables on 12 September 1771. He died before 9 July 1784 when a suit for debt brought against him in Southampton County court abated by his death. The suit, brought by the administrator of Burwell Barnes, deceased, continued against his co-defendant David Demery [Orders 1749-54, 216-7, 235, 238; 1754-9, 105, 125, 221; Orders 1759-63, 11, 123, 171, 253; 1768-72, 220, 341, 442; 1778-84, 439; Judgment Papers 1769-71, frames 442-5]. He was probably the ancestor of

2        i. Nathaniel, born about 1747.

3        ii. Jacob1, born say 1768.

iii. Benjamin, born say 1777, a "f. Negro." taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County in 1794 and 1795 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 104, 128].

iv. James, born say 1778, a "f.N." taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County in 1794, listed in the St. Luke's Parish household of John Simmons in 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 104, 202].

v. Thomas, born about 1794, registered in Southampton County on 20 December 1815: age 21, light Complected, 5 feet 9-1/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 990]. He was listed in Southampton County with his wife Tempty on Thomas Newsum's land in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frame 290].

 

2.    Nathaniel Freeman, born about 1747, registered in Southampton County on 30 January 1807: age 60, yellow (Colour), 5 feet 7-1/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 405]. He was taxable in Southampton County from 1782 to 1807: taxable on a horse in 1782, 1792 and 1794, called a "Mulatto" in 1802 and thereafter, charged with Jacob Freeman, Jr.'s tithe in 1805, taxable on 2 persons in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 507, 518, 546, 590, 622, 691, 660, 710, 760, 874; 1792-1806, frames 80, 161, 189, 267, 317, 379, 553, 806, 841; 1807-21, frame 50]. He may have been the father of

i. Jacob2, born about 1787, registered in Southampton County on 31 July 1810: age 23, Mulatto, 5 feet 8-1/2 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 763].

 

3.    Jacob1 Freeman, born say 1768, married Sally Artis, 4 February 1789 Southampton County bond. Sarah was the mother of Benjamin Artis who was ordered bound apprentice in Southampton County on 13 June 1793 [Minutes 1793-9, 20]. Jacob was taxable in Southampton County from 1787 to 1814: called a "M"(ulatto) in 1802 and thereafter, taxable on 2 free male tithables in 1806 and 1807, listed without a wife in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 267, 317, 379, 413, 622, 638, 691, 710, 760, 874; 1792-1807, frames 80, 161, 189, 553, 806, 841; 1807-21, frames 50, 72, 168, 192317, 417]. He may have been the father of

i. Abraham3, born about 1787, registered in Southampton County on 30 July 1810: age 23, Blk, 5 feet 11 inches, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 754]. He was listed in Southampton County with his wife Elitha on Ann Hunt's land in 1812, listed with his wife Delilah on Mac Bryant's land in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 290, 317, 417].

 

Other members of the Freeman family in Virginia were

4        i. Margaret, born say 1740.

5        ii. Ann, born say 1744.

iii. Richard, born say 1746, taxable in Gloucester County in 1770 [Tax List 1770-1, 51] and in 1784, listed as a "Mulatto" in Gloucester County in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99; 1800-20].

6        iv. James, born say 1748.

7        v. Thomas, born say 1750.

vi. Robert, born say 1763, taxable in Gloucester County from 1784 to 1811, called a "Mulatto" after 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99; 1800-20]. He was head of a Gloucester County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1810 [VA:403b].

 

4.    Margaret Freeman, born say 1740, was a "Free Negro" living in Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, on 22 May 1766 when the grand jury presented her for not listing herself as a tithable. On 29 May 1767 the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish were ordered to bind out her "free Negro" children Isham and David to John Marshall [Orders 1765-7, 90, 101]. She was the mother of

i. ?Charles, born say 1758, a "Mulatto Boy" living in Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, on 28 June 1759 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him as an apprentice to John Howsing [Orders 1757-60, 224]. He was a free man of color from Amelia County who enlisted in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149].

ii. ?Matthew, born say 1759, a Free Mulatto" boy living in Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, on 28 February 1760 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him as an apprentice to John Howsing [Orders 1757-60, 271].

iii. Isham, born say 1763, bound to John Marshall in Amelia County on 29 May 1767 [Orders 1766-9, 58].

iv. David, born say 1765, bound to John Marshall in Amelia County on 29 May 1767 [Orders 1766-9, 58], a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County in 1790 [Personal Property Tax List, p.6].

 

5.    Ann Freeman, born say 1744, "a free mulatta," was the mother of Joseph Freeman who was baptized in Bruton Parish, James City County. Her son was

i. Joseph, baptized 4 July 1762 [Bruton Parish Register, 20].

 

6.    James Freeman, born say 1748, was taxable in Gloucester County in 1770 [Tax List 1770-1, 51] and head of a Petsworth Parish, Gloucester County household of 7 free persons in 1784 [VA:69]. He was taxable on 34 acres in Gloucester County from 1787 to 1813, called a "Mulatta" from 1805 to 1813, listed with the notation "Mulo decd." in 1814 [Land Tax List 1782-1820]. He, his unnamed wife and daughters Betsey and Lucy were counted in a list of "Mulattoes and Free Negroes" in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20]. He was head of a Gloucester County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:403b]. He was the father of

i. Betsey, over the age of sixteen in 1813 when she was counted in a list of "Mulattoes and Free Negroes" in Gloucester County.

ii. Lucy, over the age of sixteen in 1813.

iii. ?Jasper, born say 1774, taxable in Gloucester County from 1796 to 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99; 1800-20]. He was taxable on 7-1/2 acres in Gloucester County from 1795 to 1814 and another plot of 6 acres in 1813 and 1814. His widow Rachel held a life estate on this land from 1815 to 1819 [Land Tax List 1782-1820].

iv. ?John, born say 1775, taxable in Gloucester County from 1796 to 1819, head of a Gloucester County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1810 [VA:403b]. He was a bricklayer, taxable on 30 acres in Gloucester County from 1806 to 1819, called a "Mulatto" from 1814 to 1819. In 1820 his widow Frances Freeman was taxable on the land with the notation "Transferred to her by John Freeman, decd., mulattoe, see his will recorded in Gloucester Court office" [Land Tax List 1782-1820].

 

7.    Thomas Freeman, born say 1750, was taxable in Gloucester County in 1769 and 1770, called Thomas Freeman, Jr. [Tax List 1770-1, 206]. He was head of an Abingdon Parish, Gloucester County household of 4 free persons in 1784 [VA:68]. He was taxable on 25 acres in Gloucester County in 1791 to 1805. From 1806 to 1812 the land was taxable with the notation "deceased Mulo." In 1813 Thomas and William Freeman were taxable on 12-1/2 acres of this land and Mary Freeman was taxable on the other 12-1/2 acres [Land Tax List 1782-1820]. Mary was called the widow of Thomas Freeman when she was counted in a Gloucester County list of "Mulattoes and Free Negroes" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20]. He was apparently the father of

i. Thomas, taxable in Gloucester County in 1812, called Thomas, Jr. [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20], jointly taxed with William Freeman on 12-1/2 acres in 1813.

ii. William.

 

North Carolina

1.    Abraham2 Freeman, born say 1730, was a "free Negro" taxable in Bladen County with (his wife?) Sue and (daughter?) Rachel in 1763 (called "Abrm. Sue Rachal free Negroes"). He was a "Negro" man taxable in Bladen County from 1768 to 1779 (called Abraham Freeman from 1768 to 1770 and called "free Abe" in 1771), taxable on three males and one female in 1774, taxable on three males in 1775, and taxable on 300 acres, five horses and fifteen head of cattle in 1779 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:12, 40, 51, 53, 124; II:36, 141]. His wife may have been Susanna Freeman who was taxable with him in Bladen County from 1763 to 1771, called Susannah Freeman in 1770 when she was listed with (their daughter?) Rachel Freeman [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:12, 40, 51]. He and Abigail Chavis were named as executors of the 21 May 1793 Bladen County will of James Moore [Campbell, Abstracts of Wills, Bladen County, 54]. He sold 600 acres in Bladen County on Platt Swamp on 20 July 1799 [DB 1:261]. He was head of a Brunswick County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:13] and 5 "other free" in Bladen County in 1810 (called Abraham Freeman, Senr.) [NC:196]. He may have been the father of

i. Rachel, born say 1748, taxable in Bladen County with Abraham and Susanna from 1763 to 1771.

2        ii. Samuel, born say 1751.

3        iii. Roger, born say 1753.

iv. William, born say 1754, a "Black" taxable in Bladen County, called "free Will" in 1771 and called William Freeman when he was a "Mixt Blood" taxable on one male and one female in 1774. He was taxable on two males in 1775, and taxable on 100 acres, two horses, and three head of cattle in 1779 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:53, 124; II:36, 141]. He was taxable in Bladen County on 100 acres and one black poll in Captain Dupree's District in 1784 [1784 Bladen County Tax List, 13]. He was head of a New Hanover County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194].

 

2.    Samuel Freeman, born say 1751, was a "Negro" man taxable in Bladen County in 1768 and 1770, taxable in the household of Isaac Hays in 1771 and 1772, listed with the "Mixt Blood" taxables in one list for 1774 and called a "free Negro" taxable in John Smith's list for 1774 when he was taxable on one male and one female, and taxable on a horse in 1779 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:12, 40, 51, 76, 91, 124, 125; II:141]. He was head of an Onslow County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:197], 14 in Brunswick County in 1800 [NC:13], and 9 in Bladen County in 1810 [NC:196]. There is no record of his children, but they may have been

i. James, head of a Brunswick County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:13] and as J. Freeman, head of a Brunswick County household of 4 in 1810 [NC:234].

ii. B., head of a Brunswick County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:234].

iii. Isaac, born before 1776, head of a Columbus County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:55]. He entered 100 acres in Brunswick County on Bear Pen Branch on 17 January 1799 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Brunswick County, 52].

 

3.    Roger Freeman, born say 1753, was a "Negro" man taxable in Bladen County in 1768 and 1770, taxable on 50 acres, a horse and three head of cattle in 1779, and taxable on 150 acres and one black poll in Captain Dupree's District of Bladen County in 1784. He was head of a Bladen County household of two Blacks from 12 to 50 years old and six Blacks over 50 or under 12 years in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:12, 40, 51; II:169; 1784 Bladen County Tax List, 13]. He was head of an Onslow County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:197], and 8 in 1800 [NC:14]. His widow may have been Elizabeth Freeman, head of a Brunswick County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:228]. He may have been the father of

i. Abraham2, Jr., head of a Bladen County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:196].

 

Members of the Freeman family in Rowan County, North Carolina, were

1        i. Isaac, born say 1740.

ii. Ruth, born say 1762, mother of a molatto" child who was taken from Samuel Cooper by the Rowan County court on 5 February 1784 and returned to his mother because he was born free and not subject to be dealt with as a poor orphan [Minutes 1753-95, II:377 (original p. 140)].

 

1.    Isaac Freeman, born say 1740, married Agnes Faggott, 19 January 1762 Rowan County bond. He was called a "free Negro" on 9 August 1786 when administration on his Rowan County estate was granted to his widow Agnes Freeman on 100 pounds bond [Minutes 1753-1795, II:416]. His children John, William, Leonard and Mary petitioned for division of his land [C.R. 085.508.58 cited by Mosher, Merrill Hill, John Freeman of Norfolk County, Va.]. His children were

i. John.

ii. William.

iii. Leonard, married Love Birth, 17 August 1808 Rowan County bond.

iv. Mary.

 

FROST FAMILY

Members of the Frost family in South Carolina were

i. John, head of a Bartholomew's Parish, Charleston District household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in Colleton County in 1800 [SC:178]. He was a "free" taxable on himself, his wife, and daughter ("Free Negroes & Mulattoes") in St. Bartholomew's Parish, Charleston District in 1798.

ii. Cyrus, head of a Charleston District household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and a "Free" taxable on himself and his wife in St. Bartholomew's Parish, Charleston District in 1798 [S.C. Archives microfilm AD 942, frame 248].

iii. Benjamin, head of a Richland District household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:178].

iv. William, head of a Richland District household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [SC:177a] and 2 "free colored" in Washington County, Tennessee, in 1830.

v. Lydia, a slaveowner from Charleston whose son Florian H. Frost was elected to the state house of representatives in 1870 [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 198].

 

FRY FAMILY

Three members of the mixed-race Fry family were living in Westmoreland County about 1730:

1        i. Jane/ Joanna, born say 1690.

ii. John, born say 1711, petitioned the Westmoreland County court against William Bridges for his freedom and freedom dues on 28 July 1732. The suit was agreed by both parties [Orders 1731-9, 35]. He sued Thomas Finch in Westmoreland County court on 28 May 1751 [Orders 1750-2, 56a].

iii. Ketany, born say 1713, a servant to the estate of Daniel McCarty, deceased. The Westmoreland County court ordered that she be freed and be paid her freedom dues in February 1744/5 [Orders 1743-7, 57, 64a].

 

1.    Jane Fry, born say 1690, was living in Washington Parish, Westoreland County, on 9 February 1713 when she bound her one-year-old "mulatto" son William Fry to Jonas Williams [DW 1716-20, 66]. She was the "Mulatto" servant of William Bridges on 26 June 1723 when she was summoned before the Westmoreland County court to answer the presentment of the grand jury. On 28 February 1723/4 she was ordered to serve her master an additional year and a half for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1721-31, 41-2, 45a]. She was called Joanna Fry in February 1744/5 when she and Ketany Fry sued the executors of the estate of Daniel McCarty, deceased. The court ordered that they be freed and paid their freedom dues [Orders 1743-7, 57, 64a]. Jane was the mother of

i. William, born 31 March 1712.

ii. ?George, born say 1723, called a "Free Mulatto" when he came into Westmoreland County court on 29 January 1750/1 and agreed to serve Lawrence Butler for four years in exchange for payment of 2,000 pounds of tobacco [Orders 1750-2, 26]. He may have been the George Fry who was head of a Fredericksburg household of 5 "other free" and 7 whites in 1810 [VA:113a].

iii. Alice, a "Mulatto" child ordered bound to Sarah Martin by the churchwardens of Washington Parish, Westmoreland County, on 27 November 1751 [Orders 1750-2, 86a].

iv. ?Andrew, a "Mulatto" head of an Essex County, Virginia household of 6 persons in 1783 [VA:52].

 

Other descendants were

i. Nathan, born say 1755, a man of color born free in Westmoreland County, enlisted in the Minute Service of the Revolutionary War in Henrico County, served as a drummer against the Creek Indians in Georgia and applied for a pension in Henrico County [National Archives pension file S39545 cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 177-8]. He was a "F.N." taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1790 to 1813: charged with Jeffry Golding's tithe in 1806, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813. Perhaps his son was Jeffry Fry who was listed there as a "free Negro" in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 376, 402, 444, 486, 532, 593, 636, 661, 757, 823]. Nathan, Will Anthony and Agnelica Barnett were in the Henrico County jail on 7 February 1791 for a breach of the peace and were ordered to remain there until they gave security of 40 pounds each for their good behavior for a year. William Anthony was a Negro slave emancipated by William Duval by deed proved in Henrico County court on 8 August 1789. On 10 October 1798 Nathan posted bond of 10 pounds for his good behavior for twelve months on the complaint of Patty Cole for a breach of the peace [Orders 1789-91, 67, 428; 1798-9, 256]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman aged 26-45 in 1810 [VA:978].

ii. Thomas, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:107a].

 

FULLAM FAMILY

1.    Mary Fullam, born say 1700, was the white servant woman of Henry Ashton of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, on 27 July 1720 when the county court convicted her of having a "Mulatto" child and ordered that she be sold for five years at the completion of her indenture. On 25 March 1724 the court ordered her arrested to answer the churchwardens, and she was still Henry Ashton's servant on 30 July 1729 when the churchwardens of Cople Parish informed the court that she had had another "Mulatto" child [Orders 1705-21, 392a; 1721-31, 61, 72a]. She was the mother of

i. Alexander1, born 23 January 1723, the "mulatto bastard son of Mary Fulliam, late servant of Henry Ashton, Gent.," bound by the churchwardens of Cople Parish to Henry Ashton until the age of thirty-one on 25 August 1731 [Deeds & Wills 1723-32, 479].

2        ii. ?Martha, born say 1729.

 

2.    Martha Fullam, born say 1729, was the mother of two "Mulatto" children bound apprentice in Prince William County. They were

i. Alexander2, born 3 March 1748, bound to Richard Blackburn on 22 January 1751.

ii. Baker, born 3 March 1748, bound to Richard Blackburn on 22 January 1751 [Dettington Parish Vestry Book 1748-85, 3, 4]. He ran away from Thomas Blackburn of Prince William County near Dumfries in September 1775 according to an ad Blackburn placed in the 1 December 1775 issue of the Virginia Gazette: a 31 years servant...a likely well set fellow, about 27 years old, 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, is of a light colour, with hazle eyes, and wears his hair, which is short, and of a dark brown colour [Virginia Gazette (Purdie edition)].

 

FULLER FAMILY

1.    Shadrack Fuller, born say 1710, was a "Mullatto Boy" bound by the Princess Anne County court to John Bryan on 7 December 1715 until the age of thirty-one to learn the trade of weaver [Minutes 1709-17, 198]. He may have been the father or uncle of

i. Abby Fullard, born 11 October 1739. On 16 October 1753 the Princess Anne County court ordered her, Jane, and William Fullard, "Mullattos," bound to James Moore. On 21 June 1756 the court ordered Moore to provide land and security not to remove or sell Joanah and Abby Fullard ("two free Mulattos bound to him by this Court") out of the county [Minutes 1753-62, 62, 242].

ii. Jane Fullard, born in May 1742, twelve years old when she was bound to James Moore.

2       iii. William1, born in February 1743.

3        iv. Mary, born say 1748.

4        v. Robert, born say 1750.

5        vi. Lavinah Fullard, born say 1751.

vii. Sall Fullard, a "Mullatto" bound by the Princess Anne County court on 21 July 1756 to Mary Walke, daughter of Major Thomas Walke [Minutes 1753-62, 242].

viii. Plymouth Fuller, born say 1764, a "Mulatto" ordered bound to Charles Williamson by the Princess Anne County court on 19 February 1765 [Orders 1762-9, 157], perhaps identical to Plumb Fuller, "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:453].

 

2.    William1 Fuller, born in February 1743, was an eleven-year-old "Mullatto" when he (called William Fullard) was bound to James Moore by the Princess Anne County court on 16 October 1753 [Minutes 1753-62, 62]. He (called William Fuller) was taxable in 1767 and 1768 on the north side of Tanners Creek in Norfolk County with his wife Sarah Anderson [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 49, 73]. Sarah was head of a Princess Anne County household of 7 "Blacks" in 1783 [VA:61]. They may have been the parents of

i. Hannah, born say 1770, married Meshack Africa, 4 April 1789 Princess Anne County bond, Beriah Butt surety, 19 April marriage. He may have been identical to Meshack Fuller who was taxable in Norfolk County in 1794 and a "free Negro" taxable in St. Brides Parish from 1803 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 103, 456, 548, 609, 674]..

ii. Nancy, born say 1772, married Samuel Anderson, 26 December 1792 Princess Anne County bond, Charles Whitehurst surety, 27 December marriage.

6        iii. Fanny, born say 1768.

iv. Diana, born about 1781, head of a Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:802]. She registered in Norfolk County on 19 August 1811: 5 feet 5 In., 30 years of age light Complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, #57].

v. Africa, born about 1789, a "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:453], married (second?) Nancy Davis, "persons of colour," 6 January 1821 Norfolk County bond, Robert Armistead surety. He registered in Princess Anne County on 6 September 1831: 5'7", age 42, a Dark mulatto man, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 230].

 

3.    Mary Fuller, born say 1748, complained to the Princess Anne County court on 8 November 1771 on behalf of her son William Bullard that his master William Barker was mistreating him [Minutes 1770-3, 210]. She may have been identical to Molly Fuller, "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:452]. She was the mother of

i. William Bullard, a "free Negro" bound by the Princess Anne County court to William Barker on 4 April 1771 [Minutes 1770-3, 99].

 

4.    Robert Fuller, born say 1750, was living in Northampton County, North Carolina, between 1772 and 1784 when money was received from him by the estate of Benjamin Roberts [Gammon, Records of Estates, Northampton County, I:46]. He purchased 100 acres on Middle Branch in Northampton County adjoining John and David Futrell on 15 January 1789 [DB 9:88]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74] and 3 in 1800 [NC:443]. His 10 July 1803 will, proved in September 1803, left his land to his wife Mary during her lifetime and then to his daughter Cidney [WB 2:248]. Mary was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" and 1 slave in 1810 [NC:722]. Their daughter was

i. Cidney Fuller.

 

5.    Lavinah Fullard, born say 1751, was a "Mullatto" bound by the Princess Anne County court on 21 July 1756 to Mrs. Mary Walke. On 18 July 1858 the cour bound her to Miss Mary Anne Walke and stated that she should teach her to read and sew [Minutes 1753-62, 242, 323]. She was the mother of

Sally, born about 1772, regsistered in Princess Anne County on 5 September 1831: 5'3-1/2", age 59, a bright Mulatto woman, born free (daughter of Lavina Fuller). Her daughter Betsey Fuller registered on 7 October 1831: (daughter of Sally), 5'4-1/2", 36, a negro woman of light complexion [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 205].

 

6.    Fanny Fuller, born say 1768, purchased 32 acres in Norfolk County adjoining Thomas Jefferson and Joshua Nichols from William and Elizabeth Williams on 26 November 1808 for 33 pounds [DB 44:190]. She was head of a Norfolk County household of 9 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:800], a "free Negro" listed in St. Brides Parish in 1813 [PPTL, 1813-24, frame 11]. Her land in Elbow District of Princess Anne County was processioned on 8 November 1824 [Processioners Returns 1796-1858, 83-4]. She was the mother of

i. Polly, born about 1788, registered in Princess Anne County on 5 September 1831: 5'1/2", age 43, black woman, born free (daughter of Fanny Fuller) [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 207].

 

Other Fuller descendants were

i. Lydia, sued Richard White for trespass, assault and battery in Princess Anne County on 8 June 1791. The jury found in her favor on 2 August 1791 [Minutes 1790-2, 113, 147].

ii. Edom, head of a Currituck County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:21].

iii. Anthony, born say 1771, bound by the Princess Anne County court to Nicholas Griffin on 1 August 1771 to learn the trade of millwright [Minutes 1770-3, 162]. He and Thomas Fuller, infant "Free Negroes," were bound to Thomas Walker to be planters on 10 February 1780 [Minutes 1773-82, 460].

iv. Peter, born say 1772, a "free negro" living in Norfolk County on 21 May 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind him to John Guy [Orders 1773-5, 54]. He was a "Free Mulatto" bound by the Princess Anne County court to William Nimmo, Gent., to be a planter on 11 September 1778. He and William Fuller, "two free Negroes," were charged in Princess Anne County court with felony on 10 April 1788, but they were discharged because there was no evidence against them [Minutes 1773-82, 310; Minutes 1788-90, 29].

v. Thomas, born about 1771, an infant "Free Negro" bound by the Princess Anne County court on 10 February 1780 to Thomas Walker to be a planter [Minutes 1782-4, 2]. He won a suit in Princess Anne County court against John Francis for a debt of 2 pounds, 16 shillings on 16 May 1789 [Minutes 1788-90, 204, 231]. He was a "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:453]. His land in Princess Anne County was processioned on 10 February 1829 [Processioners Returns 1796-1858, 151]. He registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831: 6'1/4", age 60, negro man of light complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 260].

vi. Mary2/ Molly, born about 1776, "Free Black" head of a Princess Anne County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:452]. Molly registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1836: age 60, 5'5", Mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 391].

vii. William2, an infant "free Negro" bound by the Princess Anne County court to Malbone Shelton to be a shipwright on 11 March 1779 [Minutes 1773-82, 369]. He married Nancy Moss, "free persons of colour born free," 27 June 1818 Norfolk County bond, Henry Oatest surety. He may have been the William Fuller, born before 1776, who was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:148].

viii. Betty, born about 1784, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831: 5'1", age 47, a black negro woman, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 239]. She may have been the Betsy Fuller who was a "free Negro" huckstress of Norfolk County who owned her husband before the Civil War [Lower Norfolk County Virginia Antiquary, IV:177].

ix. Keziah, born about 1787, registered in Princess Anne County on 5 September 1831: 5'5", aged 44, Dark Complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 200].

x. Judy, a "free negro" ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish, Norfolk County, to Malbone Sheldon on 16 October 1783 [Orders 1782-3, n.p.].

xi. Catherine, born about 1797, a sixty-year-old resident of Norfolk County on 28 August 1857 when she applied for the Revolutionary War pension of her husband Charles Cuffee [W-9402].

 

FUZMORE FAMILY

Members of the Fuzmore family were

1        i. Isaac, born say 1760.

ii. Edward, born say 1770, married Rhoda Martin, "of age daughter of Judith Fox," 22 September 1794 Goochland County bond. Edward was surety for the 16 April 1801 Goochland County marriage of Frank Cousins and Chloe Cousins, the 29 July 1801 marriage of Thomas Lynch and Sally Banks, and the 3 January 1810 marriage of James Shelton and Charity Coons. Edward was head of a Goochland County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:691].

 

1.    Isaac Fuzmore, born say 1760, was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1783 to 1791: a "free Negro" taxable on a "Negro" tithe, 2 horses and 2 cattle in 1783 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 36, 87, 131, 151, 219, 280]. He was taxable in Louisa County from 1793 to 1805, listed with 2 tithables in 1803 and 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1814]. He was head of a Louisa County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [Louisa County Historical Society (June 1972)] and was a farmer living near Foster's Creek in Louisa County about 1802-1803 when he, his wife Patty, and their children were counted in the list of free Negroes in the district of Peter Crawford [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 19]. He was taxable on 2 free male tithes and a horse in Fluvanna County in 1806 and 1807 [PPTL 1782-1826, frames 365, 385]. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1809 to 1815: a "Freed Negroe" planter on Dabney Wade's land in 1809, living on Francis Cousins' land in 1812, listed with wife Amey and (daughters) Nancy, Betty and Fanny Fuzmore on John Hicks' land in 1813, over the age of forty-five in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 866; 1810-32, frames 21, 73, 98, 160, 192, 260]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:692]. He had married the mother of Amey Bennett before 1 January 1814 when he gave his consent for her Goochland County marriage to James Scott. Isaac and Patty's children were

i. Martha, born say 1780.

ii. Agnes, born say 1782.

iii. Lucy, born about 1784, registered as a free Negro in Louisa County on 29 July 1817: a free woman of colour, born in sd. county, 5'1" high, dark complexion about 33 years. Her daughter Betsey registered on 28 February 1839: (daughter of Lucy Fuzemore) who was free born, black complexion, about 25 years of age [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 24, 56].

iv. Tabitha, born about 1786, registered in Goochland County on 13 May 1813: a free woman of colour aged about twenty seven years, dark complexion, short black hair [Register, p.60, no.119].

v. Isaac2, born say 1787.

vi. Nancy.

vii. Betty.

viii. Judith.

ix. Fanny.

x. Sarah.

 

Another member of the family was

i. Harriet Dickinson, born about 1805, registered in Louisa County on 1 October 1832: wife of Garland Dickinson who was Harriet Fuzzamore a free woman of colour, about 5'2" high, light complexion, hair inclined to be straight ... about 27 years old [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 42].

 

GALLIMORE FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth1 Gallimore, born say 1720, was living in Amelia County in September 1746 when her son William (no race indicated) was ordered bound apprentice. She was summoned before the Amelia County court to answer the complaint of the churchwardens in June 1750, but she did not appear, the sheriff reporting that she was no longer an inhabitant. On 25 May 1759 she was presented by the Amelia County court for "unlawfully Cohabiting with a Negro Slave belonging to Henry Jones and having Several Mulatto Children" [Orders 1746-51, 21, 250; 1757-60, 218]. Her children were

2        i. William1, born say 1737.

3        ii. ?Elizabeth2, born say 1748.

4        iii. George1, born about 1757.

iv. ?Joan, born say 1759, a "Free Mulatto," ordered bound to Henry Jones of Raleigh Parish, Amelia County, on 28 June 1759 [Orders 1757-60, 229].

v. ?David, born say 1761, a "Free Mulatto," ordered bound apprentice in Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, on 27 June 1771. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Charlotte County from 1809 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 757, 790, 823].

vi. ?Anna, born say 1763, a "Free Mulatto," ordered bound apprentice in Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, on 27 June 1771.

vii. ?John, born say 1765, a "Free Mulatto," ordered bound apprentice in Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, on 27 June 1771 [Orders 1769-72, n.p].

 

2.    William1 Gallimore, born say 1737, was bound apprentice in Amelia County in September 1746. He was called the son of Elizabeth Gallimore on 22 January 1756 when the court bound him as an apprentice to John Flynn [Orders 1746-51, 21; 1751-5, 10; 1755-7, 25]. He was taxable in Charlotte County in John Fuqua's household in 1782, taxable on a horse and 3 cattle in 1785, levy free from 1788 to 1796 when he was taxable on 2 horses [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 6, 59, 95, 129, 161, 191, 217, 265, 290, 316, 341]. He was the father of

i. Sarah, born say 1772, "dau. of William Gallimore," married Acquila Hailey, 13 December 1790 Charlotte County bond, Thomas Hayes surety, 16 December marriage.

ii. Polly1, born say 1778, "dau of William Gallimore," married John Smith, 31 October 1796 Charlotte County bond, 3 November marriage. John was head of a Charlotte County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:64].

 

3.    Elizabeth2 Gallimore, born say 1748, a "Free Mulatto," was ordered bound to Henry Jones of Raleigh Parish, Amelia County, on 28 June 1759 [Orders 1757-60, 218]. She was the mother of

i. Ritta, born say 1770, "daughter of Elizabeth Gallimore," ordered bound to Zachariah Vaughan of Raleigh Parish, Amelia County, on 25 July 1771 [Orders 1769-72, n.p.].

ii. ?James, head of a Chester County, South Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [SC:94].

 

4.    George1 Gallimore, born about 1757, was taxable in Charlotte County from 1797 to 1799: taxable on 2 free males and 3 horses in 1797 and 1798, and 3 free males and 2 horses in 1799, levy free in 1807 and 1811 when he was taxable on a horse [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 368, 400, 435, 724]. He registered in Charlotte County on 7 January 1812: a bright Mulatto Man five feet five and half inches high about 54 or 55 years old, son of Betty Gallimore born free in the County of Amelia and now residing in the County of Charlotte & has been so for some time...a shoe maker by trade [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 17]. He was the father of

i. ?Joshua, born about 1779, married Betsey Flood, "dau. of William Flood who is surety," 29 February 1803 Charlotte County bond. Joshua, a "free Mulatto" planter, was taxable in Charlotte County from 1802 to 1811: taxable on a horse in 1807, listed with 4 males and 2 females in his household in 1811, 3 males and 2 females in 1812 and 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 542, 580, 673, 710, 743, 775, 807, 846, 886]. He was a "free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household in 1810 [VA:50] and a seventy-year-old "Black" man counted in the 1850 census with Betsy Gallimore who was born about 1783 [VA:12b]. Joshua registered in Charlotte County on 7 November 1831: a free man of colour of yellow complexion about fifty two years of age was born free, six feet two inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 124].

ii. ?Polly2, born say 1785, a "free Mulatto" weaver listed with 3 females in her Charlotte County household in 1812 and 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 846, 886].

iii. ?George2, born about 1786, called George Gallimore, Jr., when he was a "Mulatto" taxable in Charlotte County in 1809 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 757, 790]. He was a "free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:50]. He married Patsey Flood, daughter of William Flood, 9 May 1813 Charlotte County bond, John Flood surety, 10 May marriage. George registered in Charlotte County on 7 November 1831: a free man of colour of yellow complexion about forty five years of age was born free six feet high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 125].

iv. ?William2, a "Mulatto" taxable in Charlotte County in from 1809 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 757, 790, 823], a "free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:50].

v. James, born in June 1792, taxable in Charlotte County in 1811 [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 823]. He registered in Charlotte County on 7 January 1812: a bright Mulatto Man five feet nine inches high twenty years old next June son of George Gallimore born free in the County of Prince Edward now residing in the County of Charlotte and has been so for some time [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 18].

 

GARDEN FAMILY

The Garden family of South Carolina may have been identical to the Gordon family. Members of the Garden/ Gordon family of South Carolina were

i. William1 Gordon, born say 1744, head of a Beaufort District, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" and a slave in 1790 and 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:104].

ii. William2 Gordon, head of a Newberry District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:77].

iii. Melia Gordon, head of a Beaufort County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:104].

iv. Penelope Gordon, born say 1746, "free" head of a St. Philip's & Michael's Parish, Charleston, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1790.

1        v. Flora Garden, born say 1753.

vi. James Gordon, head of a Camden District, Lancaster County, South Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790, perhaps the James Gordon who married Teresa Roberts, "col'd persons," on 2 February 1814 in St. Philip's Parish, Charleston, South Carolina.

 

1.    Flora Garden, born say 1753, was called a "free Mustee" when she married Robert Baldwin, "a free Blackman" and house carpenter, in Charleston, South Carolina, on 5 September 1801. Before her marriage to Baldwin, she had

i. John, born about 1772, married Elizabeth Susan Gardner who inherited nine slaves by the 1788 will of her grandfather William Raper. John applied for membership in the Brown Fellowship Society of Charleston in 1795 [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 16, 17, 141-2]. He was head of a "free colored" St. Paul's Parish, Charleston District household with 26 slaves in 1820.

ii. ?Martha, married Robert Wells, "colored persons," in St. Philip's and Michael's Parish, Charleston on 12 October 1815.

 

GARDNER FAMILY

Members of the Gardner family of South Carolina were

1        i. George, born say 1750.

ii. John, born say 1752, head of a Georgetown District, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" and 40 slaves in 1810 [SC:219].

 

1.    George Gardner, born say 1750, married Ruth Raper. He was head of a St. Philip's and Michael's Parish, Charleston, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" and 9 slaves in 1790. The slaves were the property of his daughter Elizabeth Susan who received them by the 1788 will of her grandfather William Raper. George died in 1797. His children were

i. Elizabeth Susan, still a minor in 1788 when her grandfather left her nine slaves. She married John Garden, a "free mestizo" [Koger, Black Slaveowners, 16, 17, 141-2].

ii. Rachel.

 

GARNER FAMILY

Members of the Garner family were

1        i. Ann, born say 1733.

2        ii. Sarah, born say 1735.

iii. Mary Gardner, born say 1750, a "Mulatto" woman held as a servant by John Richmond in Louisa County on 11 February 1771 when the court ordered that she be set at liberty, "the said Richmond failing to appear when called and it appearing she is no servant" [Order 1762-72, 438].

 

1.    Ann Gardner/ Garner, born say 1733, was the servant of Isaac Mason of Southampton County on 11 October 1753 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind out her unnamed "Mulatto" child. On 11 April 1754 the court ordered Mason to deliver a "Mulatto" child in his possession to Henry Blunt and bound the child to Blunt. The churchwardens sued Ann for debt (probably for bastardy) on 12 August 1756. On 8 December 1757 the court charged her with being a person of lewd life and conversation and ordered her to post a total of 60 pounds bond for her good behavior and ordered her "mulatto" daughter Peggy bound out. On 13 April 1759 the court fined her 15 pounds for bastardy [Orders 1749-54, 420, 478; 1754-9, 291, 296, 402, 430]. Her children were

i. Margaret1/ Peggy, born say 1754.

ii. William1, born say 1756, a "Mullatto" son of Ann Garner, ordered bound by the Southampton County court on 10 May 1759 [Orders 1754-59, 498].

iii. Priss, born say 1758, a "Mullato" child of Ann Gardner ordered bound out in Southampton County on 12 July 1759. On 13 April 1775 the court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind her to John Scott, noting that she had formerly been bound to John Bradley until the age of thirty-one but that Bradley had not been able to perform the covenants of the indenture [Orders 1754-9, 516; 1772-7, 405].

iv. ?Burwell Gardner, born about 1767, taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, from 1794 to 1811: called a "free Negro" in 1796, 1801 and 1802, a "Mulatto" in 1792, 1795, and 1797, taxable on 2 free males and 2 horses in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frames 10, 31, 105, 129, 221, 245, 294, 414, 483, 659; 1807-21, frames 17, 99, 137, 220]. He registered in Southampton County on 29 July 1815: age 48, Mulatto, 5 feet 7 1/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 422, 969]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:60].

v. ?Sylvia Gardner, born about 1778, registered in Southampton County on 8 November 1808: age 30, Mulatto, born free. She was about 40 when she registered again on 10 February 1819 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 433, 1170]. She was head of a Southampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:56].

vi. ?Pherebe Gardner, born about 1781, registered in Southampton County on 8 November 1808: age 27, Mulatto, 5 feet 2-1/2 inches high, free born. She registered again on 18 May 1815 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 434, 953].

vii. ?Smith, born 1776-1794, head of a Caswell County, North Carolina household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:86].

 

2.    Sarah Garner, born say 1735, was living in Isle of Wight County on 1 May 1760 when she was presented for having a "Molatto" child. She pleaded not guilty, but the court ordered her sold for five years. On 4 December 1760 the court ordered the churchwardens of Newport Parish to bind out her "__l_tt_" children Fanny, Betty and Abell, and on 5 July 1765 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her "Bastard" children John Randolph Garner and Sarah Garner [Orders 1759-63, 145, 186, 191, 195; 1764-8, 204]. She was the mother of

i. Urina, born say 1754, "Molatto" daughter of ___ Garner living in Isle of Wight County on 5 June 1760 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Newport Parish to bind her out [Orders 1759-63, 152].

ii. Fanny, born say 1756, ordered bound apprentice on 4 December 1760.

iii. Betty, born say 1758, ordered bound apprentice on 4 December 1760.

iv. Abel, born say 1759, ordered bound apprentice on 4 December 1760.

v. ?Dennis, born say 1760, a "yellow" complexioned soldier from Isle of Wight County listed in the size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Court House [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 149].

vi. Randall/ Randolph, born say 1762, "Bastard" child of Sarah bound out on 5 July 1765, a "poor Mulatto" ordered bound out in Isle of Wight County on 5 August 1773. He was ordered bound out to someone else on 7 May 1778 when he complained that John Murphey was misusing him [Orders 1764-8, 204; 1772-80, 164, 421]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 3 "other free" in Captain Lewis' District in 1800, 6 in 1810 [NC:725], and 9 "free colored" in Northampton County in 1820 [NC:230].

vii. Drucilla, born say 1764, bound apprentice in Isle of Wight County in 1765.

viii. ?Miles, born say 1767, a "poor Mulatto" ordered bound out in Isle of Wight County on 5 August 1773 [Orders 1772-80, 164].

 

GARNES FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth1 Garns, born say 1720, and Lucy, Janey, David, Martha, and Lydia Garns complained to the Surry County, Virginia court in August 1751 that Sarah Edwards, John Powell, and Lucas Powell were holding them in servitude. Sarah Edwards refused to allow them to appear in court, so on 19 December 1752 the court ordered her committed to the custody of the sheriff until she posted bond of 300 pounds that she would produce them. On 17 January 1753 the court ruled that they were free. Martha was called "Daughter of Elizabeth Gerns" when she was bound apprentice by the same session of the court [Orders 1749-51, 278, 299; 1751-3, 118, 170, 296-7, 312-3, 318]. On 23 January 1753 the Brunswick County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out her "natural" children Lucy, David, Lydia, and Jane to Lucas Powell [Orders 1751-3, 366]. She was the mother of

2        i. Lucy1, born say 1740.

3        ii. Martha, born say 1742.

4        iii. Janey/ Jenny, born about 1747.

iv. David1, born say 1748.

5        v. Lydia1, born say 1749.

 

2.    Lucy1 Garnes, born say 1740, was living in Lunenburg County, Virginia, on 13 December 1764 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Cumberland Parish to bind out her children: Jeffrey, Thomas, Edward, and Elizabeth Garnes to William Cocke. She was sued by William Cocke in Lunenburg County court on 13 April 1765 [Orders 1764-5, fol.200; 1765-66, 59]. Jeffry was six years old and Thomas was four years on 8 May 1765 when they were bound to William Cocke in Granville County, North Carolina (no parent named) [N.C. Archives Indentures, CR 044.101.2]. The Mecklenburg County, Virginia court bound out her son Gaby Garnes (on 14 July 1766) and her son William (on 10 August 1767) to John Lynch. On 8 November 1773 the court ordered her children David and Elijah bound out to the Rev. Mr. John Cameron, and 14 April 1777 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her children Gaby and William Garnes to William Bridgewater with the consent of their master John Lynch. On 8 June 1778 Lucy complained to the court that Bridgewater had disposed of Billy and Gaby, but the court dismissed the complaint after a hearing on 15 September 1778. On 12 February 1781 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her children Isaac and Lucy. On 9 September 1782 she complained to the court on behalf of her daughter Nancy Garnes against her master James Hughes, and the court cancelled the indentures and instead bound Nancy to William Randolph, Gentleman [Orders 1765-8, 173, 380; 1773-9, 127, 251, 413, 437; 1779-84, 89, 208]. She was granted administration of the Granville County, North Carolina estate of her deceased sons Thomas and Jesse Garnes in August 1791 [Minutes 1789-91]. She was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:153b]. Her children were

i. Jeffrey, born about 1759, a six-year-old bound by the Lunenburg County court to William Cocke to be a planter on 8 May 1765. In the 1778 Militia Returns for Captain Richard Taylor's Company of Granville County, North Carolina, he was listed as "a black man," twenty years old, (serving) in place of William Edwards Cock [Mil. T.R. 4-40 by Granville County Genealogical Society, Granville Connections, vol.1, no.1, 10].

ii. Thomas, born about 1761, a four-year-old bound to William Cocke on 8 May 1765 to be a planter, died before August court 1791 when his mother Lucy was granted administration on his Granville County estate [Minutes 1789-91].

iii. Edward, born say 1762.

iv. Elizabeth2, born say 1764.

v. Gabriel1/ Gaby, born say 1765.

6        vi. Nancy, born say 1765.

vii. William1, born say 1766, ordered bound to John Lynch on 10 August 1767 [Orders 1765-8, 380].

viii. Moses1, born say 1768, child of Lucy Garnes, ordered bound apprentice to Samuel Wooton in Mecklenburg County on 12 October 1772 [Orders 1771-3, 337].

ix. David, born say 1770, bound to the Rev. John Cameron in Mecklenburg County on 8 November 1773.

x. ?Catherine, born about 1772, a seventy-eight-year-old "Black" woman living with sixty-five-year-old Lucy Garnes in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census [VA:65b].

7        xi. Elijah1, born say 1772.

xii. Isaac1, born say 1775, son of Lucy Garnes, ordered bound out by the Mecklenburg County court on 12 February 1781 [Orders 1779-84, 89]. He married Fanny Mayhaw (Mayo), 17 February 1797 Warren County, North Carolina bond, Elijah Garnes bondsman. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:153b].

xiii. Lucy, born say 1777, child of Lucy Garnes, ordered bound out in Mecklenburg County on 12 February 1781.

xiv. Margaret2, born say 1785, "bastard Child of Lucy Garnes" bound to Samuel Wooton, Sr., in Mecklenburg County on 9 June 1788 [Orders 1787-92, 237]. She married Henry Mayo, 17 October 1809 Warren County bond, Richard Russell bondsman.

 

3.    Martha Garnes, born say 1742, "Daughter of Elizabeth Gerns," was bound apprentice by the Surry County court on 17 January 1753 [Orders 1751-3, 318]. She may have been the mother of

i. Anthony, born about 1761, head of a Hertford County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 (called Anthony Garner) [NC:26]. He applied for a pension at the age of fifty-nine while residing in Wilson County, Tennessee, on 27 October 1820 with his thirty-eight-year-old wife and three step children. He stated that he enlisted in the 7th North Carolina Regiment in 1778 and served until 1782 [M804-1050, frame 940].

8        ii. Lucy2, born say 1765.

iii. Daniel, born before 1776, head of a Hertford County household of 2 "other free" in 1800, 3 in 1810 [NC:98], and 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:192].

iv. Doll, born before 1776, head of a Hertford County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:99] and one "free colored" over forty-five years old in 1820 [NC:190].

 

4.    Jenny Garnes, born about 1747, was called Jenny Guarnes in Surry County, Virginia, on 20 September 1797 when her son Drury registered as a "free Negro." She registered herself on 25 March 1805: a bright complexion aged about 58 years, 5'2-1/2" high ... born of a free woman [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 25]. Her Children were

i.David2, born about 1777, taxable in Surry County from 1792 to 1804: listed as Robert McIntosh's tithable in 1792 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 89, 372, 411, 450, 486, 526, 563]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 29 June 1803: son of Jenny Garns a free mulatto woman, of a yellowish complexion, 5'3" high, square and pretty stout made aged about 26 years and by profession a waterman [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 21].

ii. Drury, born about 1778, registered on 20 September 1797: son of Jenny Guarnes a free mulato woman resident of this county, 19 years old, yellowish complexion, 5'2-1/2 inches tall, square & pretty stout made by profession a waterman [Back of Guardian & Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.21].

iii. Caty, born about 1779, registered in Surry County on 23 July 1808: (daughter of Jenny Garnes a free Mullatto Woman late of Surry county) is of a yellow complexion, 4'11-1/4" high, about 29 years of age.

iv. ?Lydia2, born about 1782, listed as a "free Negro & Mulatto" in Surry County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frame 738]. She registered as a free Negro in Surry County on 22 November 1847: dark complexion; born of free parents; about 65 years of age, 4 feet 11-1/2 inches tall [Register of Free Negroes, p.8, no.945].

v. ?Patsey, born 30 September 1784, registered in Surry County on 31 December 1804: a free woman of this county is of a bright complexion aged 20 years the 30th day of September 1804, she is 5'4-3/4" high, has a small nose, was born of a free woman of this county [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 37, 24].

 

5.    Lydia1 Guarnes, born say 1749, was freed from the service of Sarah Edwards in Surry County, Virginia, on 17 January 1753. On 23 January 1782 the court bound out her "Molatto" children Betty, James, David and Lucy [Orders 1751-3, 312-3; 1775-85, 135]. She was the mother of

9        i. Elizabeth3, born say 1766

ii. James, born before 1774, head of a Lenoir County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820.

iii. David3, born say 1774.

iv. Lucy3, an "other free" woman living alone in Lenoir County in 1810 [NC:293].

 

6.    Nancy Garnes, born say 1765, "a bastard Child of Lucy Garns," was bound apprentice to John Lynch in Mecklenburg County on 10 September 1770 (no race mentioned), probably identical to Nan Garnes, child of Lucy Garnes who was ordered bound apprentice to Samuel Wooton on 12 October 1772, called "Nanney Garnes, Bastard of Lucy Garnes," on 8 March 1773 when she was released from John Lynch and bound to James Hughes. She was removed from James Hughes' service and bound to William Randolph on 9 September 1782 [Orders 1768-71, 465; 1771-73, 337, 479; 1779-84, 208]. She was the mother of

i. William2, born say 1783, ordered bound apprentice by the Mecklenburg County court on 9 June 1788 (no parent named), child of Nancy Garnes, bound to Francis Moody by order of the court on 10 September 1792. On 11 January 1802 he was charged in Mecklenburg County court with stealing articles from Benjamin Heulin but was found not guilty. On 13 October 1806 he was charged with breaking and entering the house of James Johnson, tavern keeper, and stealing about $30 worth of goods. A witness named Henry Wilson testified that he had seen Lewis Cousins return some of the goods to Johnson and that Cousins had said the property had been left with him by William. He was sent for trial at the district court in Brunswick County [Orders 1787-92, 240; 1792-5, 60; 1801-3, 137; 1805-6, 334]. He may have been the Billy Garns who was head of a Henrico County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:996].

10      ii. Lucy3, born about 1785.

iii. David2, born say 1787, ordered bound apprentice by the Mecklenburg County court on 9 June 1788, bound to Richard Thompson on 10 July 1797 and bound to Francis Lett, hatter, on 9 July 1804. He and Henry Mason were licensed by the Mecklenburg County court as hawkers and peddlers from 16 June 1806 to 16 June 1807 [Orders 1787-92, 240; 1795-8, 289; 1803-5, 190; 1805-6, 294].

iv. Lewis, born say 1789, child of Nancy Garnes, bound to Edward Holloway by order of the court on 10 September 1792 [Orders 1792-5, 60, 226].

v. Letty, born say 1792, child of Nancy Garnes, bound to Edward Holloway by order of the court on 10 February 1794 [Orders 1792-5, 226].

vi. ?Moses2, born say 1795, a "Mullatto" bound by the Mecklenburg County court as an apprentice to Jacob Garrot, millwright, on 13 June 1806 [Orders 1805-6, 63].

vii. ?Sally, born say 1800, a "Mullatto" bound by the Mecklenburg County court as an apprentice to Jacob Garrot and his wife on 13 June 1806 [Orders 1805-6, 63].

viii. Gabriel2, born say 1803, illegitimate son of Nancy Garnes, bound to Isaac Watson, carpenter, on 8 August 1808 and bound instead to Lewis Smith, blacksmith, on 14 November 1808 [Orders 1807-9, 437, 486].

 

7.    Elijah1 Garnes, born say 1772, was ordered bound apprentice to the Reverend John Cameron in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 8 November 1773. He married Rhoda Mayhoe/Mayo, 5 February 1797 Warren County, North Carolina bond, Charles Durham bondsman. He was in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 14 August 1797 when his suit against Adam Loving and Major Butler for trespass, assault and battery was submitted to arbitration [Orders 1795-8, 297]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:165a]. He may have been the father of

i. John, married Peggy Brannum (Brandon), 8 September 1823 Warren County bond, Benjamin Durom (Durham) bondsman.

ii. David5, born about 1800, registered in Mecklenburg County in August court 1824: about 24 years of age about five feet Eight 1/2 inches high ... of black complexion [Free Person of Color, no.13].

iii. Elijah2, Jr., head of a Mecklenburg County household of one "free colored" in 1820 [VA:150a].

 

8.    Lucy2 Garnes, born say 1764, "a Free Mullatto Woman," moved from Hertford to Bertie County by 29 December 1783 when James Jones of Hertford agreed to transfer the indentures of her children Sarah and Benjamin to James Fleetwood of Bertie County [CR 10.101.7 by NCGSJ XIV:159]. Her children were

i. Sarah, born say 1780, bound to James Jones of Hertford and then bound to James Fleetwood of Bertie on 29 December 1783.

ii. Benjamin, born say 1782, bound to James Jones of Hertford and then bound to James Fleetwood of Bertie on 29 December 1783.

 

9.    Elizabeth3 Garnes, born say 1766, was living in Surry County on 5 January 1804 when her son Henry Garns registered as a "free Negro." She was the mother of

i. Henry, born about 1784, registered in Surry County on 5 January 1804: a negro man of dark complexion who is 5'5-1/4", is the son of Betty Garns a free woman of this county [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 22]. He was listed as Robert Watkins' Surry County tithable in 1801, listed with Samuel Butler in 1802 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frame 466, 473].

 

10.    Lucy3 Garnes, born about 1785, child of Nancy Garnes, was bound to Edward Holloway by order of the Mecklenburg County court on 10 September 1792 [Orders 1792-5, 60, 226]. She head of a Mecklenburg County household of 4 "free colored" females in 1820 [VA:155a] and was sixty-five years old when she was counted in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census [VA:133b]. She was the mother of

i. Isaac2, born about 1793, "son of Lucy Garnes," bound apprentice to Richard Brown, carpenter, on 14 May 1805 and bound instead to Jacob Garrot, millwright, the following day [Orders 1803-5, 376, 389]. He registered in Mecklenburg County in July 1820: a man of dark complexion, five feet Seven and one fourth Inches high, twenty Seven Years old [Free Person of Color, no.7].

 

GEORGE FAMILY

1.    Peter1 George, "Negro," born say 1630, was imported as a slave by Nathaniel Littleton in 1640. He, "the Negro carpenter," and his daughter Jane were mentioned without surnames in the 1656 Northampton County, Virginia will of Littleton's wife Anne who left Peter to her son Edward [VMHB 75:17-21]. Edward Littleton mentioned Peter and his wife Joan by their surnames in his 1663 will to his wife Frances who later married Francis Pigot [DW 1657-66, 168]. Peter was taxable in 1664 in Frances Littleton's household in Northampton County:

Mr. Littletons Family

Wm Clements

peter George Negro

Paull Carter & wife

Ould Jack Negro 5 [Orders 1657-64, fol.198].

He and his wife "Jone" were taxable in Captain Francis Pigott's household with Thomas Carter "Negro" in 1667, 1668, 1671, and 1675. Joan probably died about 1677 since she was not listed with him in Pigot's household that year [Orders 1664-74 fol. 42, p.55, fol.114; 1674-79, 75, 191]. About 1676 he received his freedom from Pigot on the promise to pay 10,000 pounds of tobacco. He completed the last payment in 1682 [DW&c 1680-92, 53 by Deal, Race and Class, 444]. He must have been a free man when he was a witness to the will of King Tony, "Negro," proved 28 February 1677/8 [Orders 1674-79, 247]. He rented land on the estate of Southy Littleton for 2,400 pounds of tobacco for the years 1679 to 1685 (near Emmanuel Driggers) [OW 1683-9, 150-151]. In March 1687/8 he was duped into thinking that "free Negroes should be slaves againe" by one of his white neighbors, Robert Candlin. He left all his household goods and livestock with Candlin and fled to Somerset County, Maryland, with his neighbor, Sarah Driggers, and several other unidentified free African Americans. He was called Peter George of Wiccocomoco Hundred Negro" on 23 April 1688 when he posted 5 pounds surety, and he and (his wife?) Mary George were witnesses in a Somerset County court case for "Sarah Driggers Negro woman wife of Thomas Driggers Negro" [Archives of Maryland 91:47]. Perhaps his wife Mary was Mary Rodriggus whose Northampton County tax was paid by the parish in 1674 [DW 1664-74, 273]. Peter George and Sarah Driggers had returned to Northampton County by 29 May 1691 when they successfully sued Candlin's widow for the recovery of Peter's livestock. On 19 September 1698 Peter was charged with being in possession of a silver spoon stolen from Henry Harmonson's house. He testified that he had bought the spoon from King Tom Indian who stated that he had gotten it from Living Denwood of Somerset County. The court found King Tom guilty and ordered that he receive twenty lashes [OW 1689-98, 106, 115-116, 510]. Peter's children were

i. Jane, born say 1653.

ii. Susan, born say 1655.

2        iii. Anthony1, born about 1660.

iv. Peter2, born about 1666, a thirty-nine-year-old man listed in the 20 August 1705 inventory of Ralph Pigot's estate on Hog Island [DW 1692-1707, 417].

3        v. Peter3, born say 1678.

vi. ?Samuel, born say 1680, a "Negro" who, in company with John and Johnson Driggers on 8 November 1702, was convicted of killing a hog belonging to Samuel French and then "in an insolent manner" abusing several white persons. On 28 January 1703/4 the court ordered Sarah Drighouse, alias Landman, to pay him for appearing as her witness in the suit of Colonel John Custis [OW&c 1698-1710, 106, 182].

 

2.    Anthony1 George, born about 1660, remained a slave and was forty-five years old when he was listed in the inventory of Ralph Pigot's Northampton County estate in 1705 [DW 1692-1707, 417]. He married Frances Harman in 1693 when she recorded her livestock mark in Northampton County court [DW 1651-4, 26]. He, or perhaps a son by the same name, was taxable in Ralph Pigot's household in 1720 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 1]. Since his wife was free, so were their children. They may have been

i. William1, born say 1688, perhaps the illegitimate child born to Frances Harman before May 1688 [OW 1683-89, 202]. He was tithable in his own household in 1720, tithable with his brother Anthony in 1721, a "negro" tithable by himself in 1723, with his wife Elizabeth in Anthony's household in 1724, and in his own household with Elizabeth from 1725 to 1731 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 1, 18, 36, 53, 76, 101, 119, 147, 168, 222]. He was sued by William Mills on 11 March 1730/1 but did not appear when the case came to trial on 11 May 1731 [Orders 1729-32, 77, 85].

4        ii. Anthony2, born say 1690.

iii. Joannah, born say 1695, tithable in Anthony George's household from 1724 to 1726.

 

3.    Peter3 George, born say 1678, may have been the Peter George, "free Negro" who was sued by Thomas Harmonson, Sr., in Northampton County on 28 November 1700 for 700 pounds of tobacco [OW&c 1698-1710, 53]. On 2 March 1705/6 he and his wife Mary bound their one-year-old "free mallato or negro child" Amarrica to George and Susannah Corbin until the age of twenty-one [OW 1698-1710, 448-9]. Perhaps Mary was identical to Mary Carter who was presented for bastard bearing on 30 May 1699 (for a child she had by Daniel Benthall's slave Daniel) and in 1703 [OW&c 1698-1710, 8, 18, 165]. Peter and Mary's child was

5        i. America, born about January 1704/5.

 

4.    Anthony2 George, born say 1690, may have been the unnamed illegitimate child born to Frances Harman before May 1690 [DW 1689-98, 35, 58]. He was tithable in Ralph Pigot's Northampton County household in 1720, in the household of (his brother?) William George from 1721 to 1723, head of a household with William, Joannah, Ann, and Elizabeth George in 1724, with Joannah and Ann George in 1725 and 1726, not counted in 1727, and head of a household with (his wife?) Ann from 1728 to 1731 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 1, 18, 36, 53, 76, 101, 119, 147, 168, 222]. Ann made a deed of gift of 150 acres in Craven County, North Carolina, on the Neuse River at the head of a long creek to (her son?) Elijah George in 1757 [DB 9:425]. She may have been the "Nanney George" who was head of a Craven County household of 1 "Black female" in 1769 [SS 837]. Anthony and Ann's children may have been

i. Peter4, born say 1720, listed in the 4 October 1754 muster of Abner Neale's Craven County, North Carolina Company between the head of Slocomb's Creek and the head of Turnagain Bay. In Neale's 4 October 1755 muster he was among five "free Negroes" including John and Abel Carter [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 708]. In 1757 he witnessed the Craven County deed of Ann George to Elijah George [DB 9:425]. His will, proved in 1763, named his brother William and sisters Susanny and Deborah [DB 8:220].

ii. Elijah, born say 1722, received 150 acres on the Neuse River by deed of gift from Ann George in 1757. He probably died before 20 September 1765 when his brother William sold this land [DB 9:425; 17:290].

iii. Susan, born say 1725, mentioned in the 1760 will of her brother Peter taxable in her own Craven County household in 1769 [SS 837].

iv. Deborah, born say 1728, mentioned in the 1760 will of her brother Peter George. She may have married George Godett.

6        v. William2, born say 1730.

 

5.    America George, born about January 1705/6, was one year and two months old when she was bound out by her parents Peter and Mary George in Northampton County, Virginia. She was presented by the churchwardens of Accomack County for having a bastard child in 1728 [Orders 1724-31, 99]. She probably moved to Maryland where a George America was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124]. One of her children was most likely

7        i. Sabra, born say 1728.

 

6.    William2 George, born say 1730, was mentioned in the 1760 Craven County will of his brother Peter George. As "William George Free Negroe" he sold 100 acres of Peter's land on the south side of the Neuse River in Craven County on 20 September 1765, and on the same day he sold 150 acres which his brother Elijah received by deed of gift from Ann George [DB 14:286; 17:290]. He was tithable in Craven County in 1769 [SS 837]. In 1779 he was taxable in the District of Captain Adam Tooley & Captain John Carney on an assessment of 196 pounds [LP 30.1]. He sold 100 acres on the south side of the Neuse River in Craven County to Mingo Stringer in 1782 [DB 24:284]. He was head of a Craven County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130] and 4 "other free" in Wake County in 1800 [NC:764]. In 1801 he sold Craven County land [DB 36:96]. His children may have been

i. John, born say 1769, a "negro fellow" wanted on 5 April 1794 for breaking jail in New Bern District where he was indicted for burglary [Fouts, NC Gazette of New Bern, II:39]. 9, no.430]. He may have been the same Jonathan George who married Pheraby Locus 27 January 1802 Orange County bond with Lawrence Pettiford bondsman. He married, second, Anna Manuel, 23 August 1815 Wake County bond with Jesse Manuel bondsman.

ii. Kezia, born say 1775, married Jesse Moore, 16 April 1792 Craven County bond with Joseph Dring bondsman.

iii. Hannah, married Joseph Dring, 18 December 1794 Craven County bond with William George bondsman.

iv. Ned, head of a Pasquotank County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:900].

v. Peter5, married Hannah Carter, 9 April 1795 Carteret County bond with George Carter, bondsman. He was head of a Craven County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:65]. On 4 November 1821 he and Hannah sold land in Craven County which Hannah inherited from her father George Carter. He purchased land from the Martin family in 1825 [DB 43:82; 45:428].

vi. William3, married Charity Carter, 16 February 1804 Craven County bond with Peter George bondsman.

vii. Elijah, married Nancy Carter, 24 September 1803 Craven County bond with Samuel Moore bondsman.

viii. Betsy, married Theophilus Carter, 16 November 1804 Craven County bond with George Carter bondsman.

ix. Polly, married Peter Godet, 10 January 1805 Craven County bond with Peter George bondsman.

 

7.    Sabra George, born say 1728, was presented on 27 January 1746 by the churchwardens of Accomack Parish for having a bastard child. She was ordered to serve Covinton Corbin an additional year because he paid her fine [Orders 1744-53, 182]. She was probably the mother of

i. Joshua, born say 1744, bound as an apprentice cooper to Samuel Toddiman of Accomack County on 31 March 1747 [Orders 1744-53, 195]. On 22 February 1774 Robert Martin sued him in Accomack County court for a 4 pound, 17 shilling debt due by account [Orders 1774-7, 100]. He was head of an Accomack Parish household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108] and 7 in 1810 [VA:26].

ii. Bridget, born say 1746, bound to Samuel Toddiman of Accomack County on 31 March 1747 [Orders 1744-53, 182].

 

8.    Scotch and Bess George, "2 F.N.," were "Black" taxables in Perquimans County, North Carolina, in 1771. In 1772 Scotch George was head of a Hertford District, Perquimans County household of 4 taxables, including himself, Bess, Dinea, and Juda George [CR 077.701.1].

 

Other members of the family were

i. Zachariah, a "Mulatto" bound by the churchwardens of Accomack Parish to John Matthews, Jr., on 22 February 1774 to be a shoemaker [Orders 1774-7, 43]. He was head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:107].

ii. Parker, head of an Accomack Parish household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:107] and 7 in 1810 [VA:97].

iii. Jacob, head of an Accomack Parish household of one "other free" and one white woman (Sally Jarvis) in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108].

iv. Jemima/Jesemine, head of an Accomack Parish household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:107] and 5 in 1810 [VA:97].

v. Esther, registered in Accomack County about 1832: born about 1780, a Black, 5'6-1/2" high, born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 554].

vi. Sarah, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:19]. She registered in Accomack County: born about 1789, a light Black, 5'6" high, born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 392].

 

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