FARMER FAMILY

1.    William1 Farmer, born say 1711, was a "Mallato" taxable in the Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household of widow Elizabeth Davis from 1727 to 1733, taxable in Daniel Wells' Bogerternorton household in 1734 and in the Pocomoke Hundred household of Isaac Morris in 1738 [List of Taxables]. He may have been the William Farmer who was sued by Archibald Smith in Kent County, Delaware court but not found by the sheriff in August 1727 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1722-1732, frames 170, 171] and he may have been the William Farmer who was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1768 and in Dover Hundred in 1772 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 10, 151, 159] and he may have been the father of

2        i. John1, born say 1740.

3        ii. William2, born say 1745.

 

2.     John1 Farmer, born say 1740, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1768 and in Dover Hundred from 1772 to 1779 when he was listed without assessed tax [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 10, 151, 159, 222, 303, 345, 374]. He died before 29 February 1785 when administration on his estate was granted to Thomas Nixon, Esq., and James McClement [RG 3545, roll 74]. He may have been the father of

i. John, born say 1761, a "free Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, in 1782 and taxable there in 1783 and 1784, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1787 and 1788, taxble in Murderkill Hundred in 1789 and 1791, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1792 and 1794, a "Mulatoe" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 550, 595, 628; 1785-96, frames 71, 74, 106, 147; 230, 267, 337; 1797-8, frame 473, 483], head of a Mispillion Hundred household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:105].

ii. Nancy, head of a Caroline County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:188].

iii. Adam, born say 1777, a "Mulatto" or "Negro" single man, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 and 1800 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1797-98, frames 473, 482; 1800-2, frame 326]. He married Betty Buck, 16 October 1805 Sussex County bond, John Calloway bondsman [DSA, Marriage Records 16:36].

3.    William2 Farmer, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1768, called William Farmer, Jr. and taxable in Murderkill Hundred from 1770 to 1786, listed as a "free Negro" in 1782 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 10, 80, 188, 281, 300, 345, 374, 457, 508, 544, 550, 595, 628; 1785-1796, frames 11, 52]. He was a "Negro" living on 100 acres of land belonging to Vincent Lockerman, Jr., deceased, on 13 December 1793 when the annual rent of the land was valued at 22 pounds [Brewer, Kent County Guardian Accounts, Houston to McBride (v.4), 147]. He was head of a Mispillion Hundred household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:111]. He may have been the father of

i. William3, born say 1767, called Wm Farmer Junr when he was taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1786, in Little Creek Hundred in 1787 and 1788, and in Murderkill Hundred in 1789, perhaps the William Farmer who was taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1791, a "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798, taxable in Mispillion Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frames 52, 74, 106, 147, 230; 1797-8, frames 473, 478].

 

Their descendants in Delaware were

i. Abel, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372].

ii. Gilbert, born 1794-1806, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:24].

 

FARRELL FAMILY

1.    Margaret Ferrell, born say 1753, was a spinster servant of Mr. Edward White of Caroline County in November 1774 when she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negro." the court ordered her master to deliver her up to the court at the expiration of her service to be sold for seven years and sold her child to Daniel Godwin until the age of thirty one for 102 pounds of tobacco [Criminal Record 1774-8, 61]. She may have been the mother of

i. Adam, head of a Caroline County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:216].

 

FARTHING FAMILY

1.    Ann Farthing, born say 1718, was living in Saint Paul's Parish, Kent County, Maryland, on 19 June 1739 when the court convicted her of having a "Mollatto" child by a "Negro" [Criminal Record 1738-9, 178-180]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Ann, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:844].

ii. Henrietta, a "mulatto" child living in Fairfax County, Virginia, on 17 February 1761 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Truro Parish to bind her as an apprentice to James McKensy [Orders 1756-63, 553].

 

FISHER FAMILY

1.    Mary1 Molloyd, born say 1660, was an Irish woman who came to Maryland as the indentured servant of Madam Vansweringen and was later the servant of Thomas Beale. According to the petition for freedom brought by her grandchildren in Anne Arundel County Court in June 1743, she had an illegitimate child named Mary by Peter, an East Indian servant who lived with Lord Baltimore in St. Mary's County. Peter "became a free Molato after serving some time to Major (Thomas) Beale of Saint Mary's County" [Judgment Record 1734-6, 83; 1743-4, 11]. They were the parents of

2        i. Mary2, born say 1680.

 

2.    Mary2 Molloyd, born say 1680, was kept as a slave by Thomas Beale's son John Beale Gentleman, of Anne Arundel County. She married Francis Fisher, a "Negro slave" of Beale's, in a ceremony performed by a Roman Catholic priest named Robert Brooke [Judgment Record 1734-6, 83; 1743-4, 11]. Richard and Mary Fisher had

3        i. Ann, born about 1702.

ii. Robert, born say 1704, held as the slave of Thomas Jennings of Anne Arundel County in June 1743.

iii. James, born say 1706, held as the slave of John Dorsey, son of Caleb Dorsey, Gentleman, of Anne Arundel County in June 1743.

iv. Richard, born say 1708, held as the slave of Richard Dorsey, Gentleman, of Anne Arundel County in June 1743.

v. Mary, born say 1710, held as the slave of Richard Warfield, Jr., Gentleman, of Anne Arundel County in June 1743.

vi. Frances, born say 1712, held as the slave of Colonel Henry Ridgely of Anne Arundel County in June 1743.

vii. Edward1, born say 1714, held as the slave of Philip Hammond, Esq., of Anne Arundel County in June 1743.

viii. Charles, born say 1716, held as the slave of Elizabeth Beale, widow, of Anne Arundel County in June 1743 [Judgment Record 1743-4, 11-12].

 

2.    Ann Fisher, born about 1702, was about thirty-two years old when she petitioned for her freedom from John Beale of Anne Arundel County in August 1734. She was held as the slave of Thomas Gassaway of Baltimore County in June 1743 when she and her brothers and sisters brought an unsuccessful suit in Anne Arundel County court for their freedom [Judgment Record 1734-6, 83; 1743-4, 11-12]. On 26 May 1783 her daughter Eleanor Toogood sued for her freedom by reason of her descent from a free white woman and won her case. The Court of Appeals affirmed the judgment in Eleanor's favor and also ruled that Eleanor's grandmother Mary Fisher should have been free. Ann was the mother of

i. Eleanor Toogood, born say 1750, won her freedom in a suit in the General Court against Doctor Upton Scott in October 1782 by reason of her descent from a free white woman [Cases in the General Court and Court of Appeals of Maryland, 26-31; Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning Slavery, IV:49-50].

ii. ?Edward2 Fisher, head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 16 "other free" in 1800 [MD:341].

iii. ?Henry Fisher, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:160].

iv. ?Joseph Fisher, a "Free Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1787 and 1789, head of a Little Creek, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:35] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:27].

 

Another member of the family was

i. Catherine, a free "Negro" who sued Richard Starbuck, cutter, in Anne Arundel County court in August 1765 for two pounds currency for cash and other articles she had lent him [Judgment Record 1765, 296-7].

 

FLAMER/ FLAMES FAMILY

Members of the Flamer family were

i. John1, born say 1717, a "Molatto" servant man having "eleven months and 15" to serve and valued at 4 pounds in the inventory of the Queen Anne's County estate of William Hernsley on 28 October 1737 [Prerogative Inventories 1737-1739, 45-6]. He had an illegitimate child by Elizabeth Grinnage in September 1736 [Judgment Record 1735-9, 344, 382]. He may have been identical to Jonathan Flamar who owed 994 pounds to the Queen Anne's County estate of Solomon Clayton (who died in 1739) [Prerogative Inventories 98:18-22].

1        ii. Rachel, born say 1720.

2        iii. Judith, born say 1722.

 

1.    Rachel Flamer, born say 1720, a "poor old Woman," was supported from public funds by the Queen Anne's County from 12 December 1775 to 1787. She was called a "poor molatto woman" by the court when it approved her allowance for 1777 [Surles, and they Appeared at Court, 1774-1777, 65, 80; 1779, 1782, 1785, 1786, 1787, 35, 53, 89, 96, 117]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. William, a "Molatto" servant man having "eleven months and 15" to serve and valued at 4 pounds in the inventory of the Queen Anne's County estate of William Hernsley on 28 October 1737 [Prerogative Inventories 1737-1739, 45-6].

 

2.    Judith Flamer, born say 1722, was the servant (no race indicated) of Mark Hargadine of Saint Paul's Parish in March 1745 when the Queen Anne's County court convicted her of having an illegitimate child named John in 1742 and another child in 1743. In August 1750 she confessed to having other children on 10 June 1747 and 10 December 1748 [Judgment Record 1744-6, 161-2; 1750, 40-2]. She was a spinster living in St. Paul's Parish when she received 30 lashes and was ordered to pay four-fold the value for stealing a hog worth 40 pounds [Criminal Record 1751-9, n.p.]. She owed the estate of Thomas Kendall 4 pounds, 19 shillings on 10 August 1756 [Prerogative Inventories 73:243]. She was the mother of

i. John2, born on 10 October 1742, a "black" taxable in the Upper Hundred of Kent Island, Queen Anne's County in 1776 [MSA 148], married to Sherry Grinnage's daughter Sarah on 1 November 1790 when Sherry gave her 5 pounds currency by his Caroline County will [WB JR B:168-70].

ii. ?Ann, mother of William and John Flamer (no race indicated) who were with George Sweat on 26 January 1774 when the Queen Anne's County court ordered him to bring them to court [Surles, and they Appeared at Court, 1774-1777, 41], perhaps identical to the "Molatto girl named Nan" who was valued at 16 pounds in the inventory of the Queen Anne's County estate of William Hernsley on 28 October 1737 [Prerogative Inventories 1737-1739, 45-6].

iii. ?Solomon, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [MD:99] and 9 in 1800 [MD:341].

iv. ?William, head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1800 [MD:506].

 

FLETCHER FAMILY

1.    Polly Fletcher, born say 1745, was an Irish servant who was indentured to Matthew Whiting, Esq., of Prince William County, Virginia. Whiting's executor, E. Brooke, Sr., certified in the Court of the District of Columbia in Alexandria that Polly was the mother of Betsy, Mary, and Alice Fletcher, "Mulatto" women [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, Register, nos. 57, 59, 61, 62, pp.51-3]. Her children were

2        i. ?Ann, born say 1764.

ii. Betsy, born about 1775, registered in Alexandria on 2 May 1820: a forty-five-year-old "bright Mulatto" woman born on the Prince William County estate of Matthew Whiting.

iii. Mary, born about 1780, registered in Alexandria on 8 December 1820: a forty-year-old "bright Mulatto" woman born on the Prince William County estate of Matthew Whiting.

iv. Alice, born about 1795, registered in Alexandria on 2 May 1820: a twenty-five-year-old "bright Mulatto" woman born on the Prince William County estate of Matthew Whiting.

v. ?Peter, head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:94].

vi. ?John, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:398].

vii. ?Cloe, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:334].

 

2.    Ann Fletcher, born say 1764, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1790. She may have been the mother of

i. Jane, born about 1784, a thirty-seven-year-old "stout negro woman" who obtained a certificate of freedom in Alexandria, Virginia, on 6 August 1821 and registered in Washington, D.C., on 3 November 1834. Sarah Harper swore that Jane was born free in St. Mary's County and was bound to Sarah's mother, Catherine Cheveller, to serve until she came of age. Harper testified that she and Jane "grew up and were girls together" and that Jane's parents were free as were her several brothers and sisters [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 254].

 

1.    Ann Fletcher, born say 1711, was a spinster living in St. Stephen's Parish, Cecil County, in March 1732/3 when she was convicted of having a child by a "Negro." The court ordered her sold for seven years [Criminal Record 1733-41, 3].

 

FORD FAMILY

1.    Amy1 Ford, born say 1698, was the servant of John Southern on 12 November 1706 when the Charles County court presented her for having an illegitimate "Molatto" child [Court Record 1704-10, 273]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. Aptha, born say 1742.

 

2.    Aptha Foard, born say 1742, confessed to the Prince George's County court on 22 November 1763 that she had an illegitimate "Mulatto" child. The court ordered her sold for seven years and bound her ten-month-old daughter Amey to her master, John Billingsley, until the age of thirty-one. On 25 March 1766 she confessed to having another "Mulatto" child. The court ordered her sold for a second seven year term and bound her one-month-old daughter Ally to her master until the age of thirty-one. She was called Appey Ford on 23 August 1768 when the court ordered her to serve another seven year term and sold her daughter Sarah, born 10 May 1768, to John Mitchell [Court Record 1763-4, 8; 1765-6, 385-6; 1768-70, 34-5]. She was the mother of

i. Amy2, born January 1763.

3        ii. Ally, born February 1766.

4        iii. Sarah, born 10 May 1768.

iii. ?Rachel, head of a Montgomery County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

iv. ?Mary1, head of a Baltimore Town household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

v. ?Ninian, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1790, perhaps identical to N. Ford, head of a Prince George's County household of 2 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [MD:6].

vi. ?Philis, "F.N." head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vii. ?Jacob, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:160].

viii. ?William, head of a King George County, Virginia household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:199].

ix. ?George, head of a Westmoreland County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

x. ?Edward, a laborer, head of a Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

 

3.    Ally1 Ford, born February 1766, was bound to John Billingsley on 25 March 1766 until the age of thirty-one. She was a "free woman of colour" living in Prince George's County between 1819 and 1826 when her children obtained certificates of freedom. She was the mother of

5       i. Chloe, born about 1777.

        ii. ?Sarah, born say 1778.

iii. Daphney, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 28 September 1826: a mulatto woman, about 43 years old ... born free in Prince George's County, being the daughter of Ally Ford, a free woman of colour. Her son Henry, born about 1802, registered on 28 September 1826: a mulatto man, about 24 years old, and 5 feet 11 inches tall ... son of Daphney Ford, a free woman of color.

iv. Mary2, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom on 28 September 1826: a very dark mulatto woman, about 41 years old ... born free in Prince George's County ... daughter of Ally Ford.

v. Thomas1, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom on 19 January 1819: a yellow man, about 27 years old ... descendant of Ally Ford.

vi. John, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom on 19 January 1819: a black man, about 25 years old ... has thick lips ... descendant of a free woman named Ally Foard.

vii. Benjamin, born about 1801, obtained a certificate of freedom on 28 September 1826: a copper-colored man, about 25 years old ... son of Ally Ford.

viii. Jane2, born about 1806, obtained a certificate of freedom on 28 September 1826: a black woman, about 21(?) years old ... daughter of Ally Ford.

ix. Nancy, born about 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom on 28 September 1826: about 18 years old ... daughter of Ally Ford.

x. Rebecca, born about 1809, obtained a certificate of freedom on 28 September 1826: a copper-colored girl, about 17 years old ... daughter of Ally Ford [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 27, 28, 61, 62].

 

4.    Sarah Ford, born 10 May 1768, was a free woman living in Prince George's County in 1817 when her son Charles obtained a certificate of freedom. She was the mother of

i. Charles, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom on 2 April 1817: a black man, about 23 years old ... descendant of a free woman named Sarah Ford who lived in the family of Benjamin Wood [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 23].

 

5.    Chloe Ford, born about 1777, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 18 September 1819: a black woman, about 42 years old ... raised in the family of John Billingsly of Prince George's County ... daughter of Ally Foard. She was the mother of

i. Thomas2, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom on 18 September 1819: a black man, about 21 years old ... son of Chloe Foard.

ii. Alley2, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom on 18 September 1819: a mulatto woman, about 25 years old ... daughter of Chloe Foard.

iii. Jane1, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom on 18 September 1819: a mulatto woman, about 19 years old ... daughter of Chloe Foard.

iv. Mary3, born about 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom on 17 February 1825: about 17 years of old ... daughter of Chloe Foard [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 31, 50].

 

Other members of a Ford family in Maryland were

i. Rachel, born say 1760, a witness for the state against Patrick Hopkins who was charged with fornication by the Queen Anne's County court in 1782. On 3 August 1787 the court allowed 5 pounds per annum from public funds to support Henry Ford, "mulatto orphan of Rachel Ford" [Surles, and they Appeared at Court, 1779, 1782, 1785, 1786, 1787, 95].

ii. Thomas, head of a Cecil County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:252].

 

FORTUNE FAMILY

1.    Fortune Game, born say 1687, was called Fortune Magee, the servant of Mrs. Mary Day, on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County, Maryland, who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, in Land Records GI:251]. In 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251; 1711-3, 220]. She was called Fortune Game, a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household from 1728 to 1735, with Betty Game in 1728 and 1731, and with Betty and Rose Game in 1733. She was the mother of

i. Rose, born March 1703.

ii. Sue Magee, born in April 1705.

iii. Perlina, born in April 1707, five years old "next April" in March 1712 when she was bound apprentice. She was probably identical to "Ner Game," a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1734 and to Polina Gam who was a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household with Sarah Gam in 1759.

2        iv. ?Betty, born say 1712.

3        v. ?Sarah Fortune, born say 1715.

vi. ?Anville, born say 1722, taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1738 and 1740 and taxable in Isaac Bebbings' Nanticoke Hundred household in 1744.

 

2.    Betty Game, born say 1712, was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Fortune Game from 1728 to 1731. Betty Game purchased 50 acres on the south side of the Nanticoke River in Somerset County in 1753. By his 14 June 1753 Somerset County will, proved 17 August 1757, George Day Scott left Betty Fortune the 50 acre tract where she was then living if she paid the balance due [WB 1756-61, 58]. She was probably identical to Betty Fortune who was a taxable head of household in Nanticoke Hundred with (her daughter?) Fortune Fortune in 1757. Betty was probably one of "Two Women of a Dark Complection Live at the Head of Tippin(?)" listed by the constable as having refused to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American women in 1743. The constable reported further that "they are full as Dark as most Mallatos. They are of the Breed of old fortune and Robt. Game" [List of Taxables, 1743]. Betty was head of a taxable household in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777 and 1790. She may have been the mother of

i. George1 Game, born say 1733, taxable in Betty Game's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1749.

ii. "Negro Patience Thomson," a taxable in Betty Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1756, called Patience Game in 1783, taxable in Nanticoke Hundred [MSA S1161-9-10, p.45].

iii. ?Fortune Fortune, born say 1740, taxable in Betty Fortune's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1757.

iv. Levin2 Game, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1777 to 1791.

v. John Game, taxable in Indian River, Sussex County in 1789, called a "Mulato" in the list of delinquents: "not Settled anywhere," and taxable there in 1790 and 1791.

 

3.    Sarah Fortune, born say 1715, was a "Mullatto" living "at Widow Ann Fooks" on 11 March 1734/5 when the Charles County court presented her for having an illegitimate child [Court Record 1734-9, 1].(1) She may have been identical to Sarah Gam, a taxable in the Nanticoke Hundred household of (her sister?) Polina Gam in 1759. Sarah was the mother of James Fortune, "a Mulatto of Sarah Fortune," who bound himself as an apprentice to James Laws until the age of twenty one in Somerset County in March 1761 to learn the trade of light cooper [Judicial Records 1760-3, 63b]. She was the mother of

4        i. James1 Fortune, born say 1745.

5        ii. ?Humphrey Fortune, born say 1745.

6        iii. ?William, born say 1747.

iv. ?Charles1 Fortune, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" and one slave in 1790 [MD:64].

 

4.    James1 Fortune, born say 1760, was a "Free Mulatto" taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, Virginia, in 1782, taxable on 3 horses and 6 cattle and on one tithe, 2 horses, and 7 cattle in 1785. In 1803 he was called James Fortune, Sr., and in 1804 he paid for a merchant's license [Cocke, Hanover County Taxpayers, 45]. He was head of a Hanover County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:845]. He may have been the father of

i. Charles2, born say 1782, a "Free Negro" taxable in Hanover County in 1803.

ii. James3, Jr., born say 1784, a "Free Negro" taxable in Hanover County in 1805.

iii. Robert, head of a Hanover County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:900].

iv. Curtis, born say 1791, a "Free Negro" taxable on one tithe and a horse in Hanover County in 1812.

v. Milley, head of a Hanover County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:901].

 

5.    Humphrey Fortune, born say 1745, was a "Mulatto" head of an Essex County, Virginia, household of 8 persons in 1783 [VA:52]. Perhaps he was the father of

i. Major, born say 1783, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:95].

 

6.    William Fortune, born say 1747, was a "Mulatto" head of an Essex County, Virginia, household of 8 persons in 1783 [VA:52]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Hanover County from 1787 to 1790 [Cocke, Hanover County Taxpayers, 45] and head of a Martin County, North Carolina, household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:68]. In 1803 he was again taxable in Hanover County but not taxed thereafter. He may have been the father of

i. Sewa(?), taxable in Hanover County on one horse in 1786 (no race indicated).

ii. Hannah, head of a Martin County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68] and 2 in Henrico County, Virginia, in 1810 [VA:980].

iii. Jesse, born say 1785, head of a Martin County, North Carolina, household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:444], and a "Free Negro" taxable on one slave, a horse, and 2 cattle in Hanover County in 1815 [Cocke, Hanover County Taxpayers, 45].

 

Endnotes:

1.    The Fooks family was from Somerset County [1783 Worcester County Tax List, MSA 1161-11-5, p.4].

 

FOUNTAIN FAMILY

1.    Mary Fountain, born say 1675, the servant of Emanuel Ratclife, was presented by the Charles County court on 13 March 1693/4 for having an illegitimate child. She was living at Penelope Land's on 14 June 1698 when she was presented for the same offense. And she was the servant of Penelope Land on 14 January 1700/1 when she was presented for having a "Mollatto" child. She confessed to the fact on 11 March 1700/1 [Court and Land Record 1692(3)-94, 242; Court Record 1696-1701/2, 373, 397; 1698(9)-1699/1700, 176]. She was the mother of

2        i. Thomas, born in May 1698.

 

2.    Thomas1 Fountain, born in May 1698, a "Mallattoe," was almost six years old on 14 March 1703/4 when the Charles County court bound him to Joseph Douglass until the age of thirty-one. He had been purchased from the William and Mary Vestry by Mrs. Land and given to her daughter Penelope Douglass, wife of Joseph Douglass. Thomas was the "Mallatto Servant" of Captain Joseph Douglass on 11 March 1728/9 when the Charles County court ordered that he serve his master an additional ten days for each of the thirty days he had absented himself from his master's service [Court Record 1701-4, 327; 1727-31, 231]. He was probably the ancestor of

i. Thomas2, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:512].

ii. William, head of a Caroline County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:188].

iii. Sam, head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:188].

iv. James, born 1794-1776, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:13].

 

FOWLER FAMILY

Members of the Fowler family were

i. Freeman, head of an Octararo, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Sarah, born say 1767, mother of Elizabeth Fowler who obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 20 September 1823: daughter of Sarah, aged about thirty five years ... of a bright complexion ... born free. Elizabeth was the mother of Louisa Fowler who obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 30 April 1822: Daughter of Eliz. Fowler ... aged about fifteen years, bright complexion .... born free & was born & raised in Saint Mary's County [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 60, 63].

 

FRANCISCO/ SISCO FAMILY

1.    John1 Francisco, born perhaps 1630, was the slave of Stephen Charlton for whom Charlton claimed a headright in Northampton County, Virginia, in August 1647 [DW 1645-51, 97 cited by Deal, Race and Class]. In July 1648 Charlton made a deed of manumission to free him ten years later in November 1658: and then the said Negro is to bee a free man. He was called "Black Jack" in Charlton's October 1654 will by which he received his freedom. Charlton also agreed to free John's wife Christian, a "Negro woman," three years after his death or within six months if she paid 2,500 pounds of tobacco [DW 1645-51, 150-2; 1654-55, fol.57]. John and Christian were tithable in their own household in Northampton County from 1665 to 1671. Grace Susanna (Sebastian Cane's wife?) was in their household in 1667. In 1668 the court agreed to have the "Negro" child of Thomas Driggers, then living with him, bound to him until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1657-64, 198; 1664-74, fol.14, p.42, 53, fol.54, fol.115]. He was called "John Francisco Negroe" on 7 July 1685 when the Accomack County court ordered him to pay his debt of five thousand and ninety pounds of tobacco to Colonel William Kendall [W&cO 1682-97, 66a]. He was taxable in Accomack County from 1674 to 1695, called a "negro" in 1676 and 1686. In 1684 one of his three tithables was identified as his unnamed wife [Orders 1676-78, 33, 57; 1678-82, 18, 99; W&cO 1682-97, 191, 258; Nottingham, Accomack Tithables, 12, 16, 18, 19, 22, 23, 25, 27, 28, 31, 33, 35, 37, 40, 42, 44, 47, 50, 52, 54, 60]. John was probably the ancestor of

2         i. Daniel1, born say 1680.

3        ii. Elizabeth, born say 1695.

iii. Thomas1 Frisco, born say 1700, a Northampton County taxable with Ann Frisco in 1724 and tithable without Ann in Nathaniel Anders' household in 1725 [L.P. 1724, 1725]. He may have been identical to Thomas2 Sisco of Kent County, Delaware.

 

2.    Daniel1 Francisco, born say 1680, was sued for debt in Northampton County, Virginia, on 28 November 1706. The case was dismissed because neither part appeared [Orders, Wills, Etc., 1698-1710, 308]. Daniel was probably in company with William Driggers because Daniel had a child by Mary Winslow in Somerset County sometime in 1708, and William Driggers helped him by carrying her out of county to avoid prosecution. Daniel was called a Somerset County planter when he admitted to being the father of Mary's child when he appeared in court seven years later in March 1713/4. He was probably living with Elizabeth Francisco, "of Somerset County," who was sued for a debt of 500 pounds of tobacco on 5 June 1712 by Samuel Daughty with whom she had contracted to pay by 7 May 1712 at Pocomoke. On 7 August 1712 her bail was forfeited to pay the debt [Judicial Records 1707-11, 94-6, 103; 1711-13, 167, 225; 1713-5, 5, 26]. Daniel was in Accomack County on 6 July 1715 when the court ordered that he, John Smith, John Martiall, and Richard Rowle/ Rowlin be summoned to the next court for disobeying Constable Hill Drummond while he was trying to break up a fight. The other parties were fined when they appeared at the next court on 4 October, but there was no further mention of Daniel [Orders 1714-17, 10a, 11]. He was sued for debt by Evan Jones in Kent County, Delaware court in November 1724, by Nicholas Greenway in May 1725, by Jonathan Griffin in May 1731 and Nicholas Nixon for a 16 pound debt in August 1731 [RG 3815.031, Dockets 1722-1732, frames 83, 84, 492, 498, 519, 593 ; MS case papers]. He was listed in the Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware tax assessments from 1727 to 1733 (listed near Winslow Drigers, Thomas Comsoloe, Julius Caesar, William Beckett, and Jacob Miller in 1727) [RG 3535, Assessments 1726-42, frames 346, 352, 358, 363, 369], apparently identical to David Francisco who died before 22 September 1732 when the inventory of his Kent County, Delaware estate was taken. (This inventory is not the original, but a copy made in 1752. Perhaps the clerk wrote David for Daniel). Daniel may have married the daughter of Thomas Consellor who mentioned his daughter Elizabeth Francisco in his 26 September 1739 Kent County will. "Elisabeth Siscom" was head of a household in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, in 1738, taxable on (her son?) Thomas. Doctor Ridgely was allowed 7 pounds for her maintenance by the Kent County levy court on 18 December 1766 [Kent Count Levy List, 1727-67, frame 531]. Daniel and Elizabeth may have been the parents of

4        i. Daniel2, born say 1700.

5        ii. Thomas2, born say 1721.

6        iii. John2, born say 1723.

iv. Rebecca, sued in Kent County court in August 1748 by John Clayton in a case decided out of court [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, frame 423].

 

3.    Elizabeth Francisco, born say 1695, was a "negro" who bound out her daughter Rachel to Robert Nottingham in Northampton County on 17 March 1717/18 [Orders 1716-18, 84]. She bound out her daughter Sabra, "a Negro Child," to Abraham Bowker on 18 August 1719 [Orders 1719-22, 31]. On 13 September 1722 she was accused of murdering her child but was acquitted of the charge [Orders 1719-22, 183]. In November 1722 Bowker sued her to recover his costs for looking after her during her childbirth. She may have left the county since Ralph Pigot forfeited the bail he posted for her appearance in court to answer Bowker [Milhalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 37, 42]. Her children were

7        i. Rachel1, born perhaps 1715.

ii. Sabra, born perhaps 1717.

 

4.    Daniel2 Francisco, born say 1700, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1748, listed next to John Francisco [Assessments 1743-48 (RG 3535-2), frame 51], but not listed in later assessments, so he may have been the brother of John Francisco who petitioned the Kent County Orphans Court on 26 February 1756 stating that his brother had died "some years ago," as had his brother's wife Catherine, leaving an infant [Estate Accounts, by Heite]. Perhaps Daniel's widow was Ruth Fransisscoe who was being maintained by James Starling on 18 November 1766 when the Kent County levy court allowed him 10 pounds for her maintenance [Levy List 1727-67, frame 530], and perhaps he was the father of

8        i. Ephraim Sisco, born say 1745.

 

5.   Thomas2 Francisco, born say 1715, was taxable in the Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of his mother Elisabeth Siscom in 1738 and taxable in his own household from 1740 to 1745. He died before 16 July 1748 when his widow Patience Sisco was granted administration on his Kent County estate. The 29 November 1750 account of his estate included the payment of a bond to Daniel Durham for 18 pounds [WB I-1:231; RG 3845.000, roll 80, frames 332-3]. Thomas and Patience may have been the parents of

9        i. Benjamin, born say 1735.

 

6.    John2 Francisco, born say 1723, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1743 to 1758 [1743 to 1767 Levy Assessments, frames 16, 24, 43, 51, 107, 136, 143, 187, 226]. On 26 February 1756 he petitioned the Kent County Orphans Court stating that his brother (Daniel?) had died "some years ago," as had his brother's wife, Catherine, leaving an infant in the care of John Swaney who was unable to care for it. The court placed the child in his care. He married Sarah Durham, the Sarah Sisco who was mentioned in the 9 April 1788 Kent County will of her father John Durham [WB M-1, fol.170-1]. John Francisco died before 24 October 1798 when administration of his Kent County estate was granted to (his son?) Charles Francisco. The inventory of his estate totalled over 942 pounds and included 80 acres of wheat worth 90 pounds and another 35 acres of crops worth 20 pounds. On 10 November 1800 the estate was divided among his widow Elizabeth Francisco and Charles, Lydia, and Esther Francisco [RG 3845.000, roll 80, frames 196-208]. His children were most likely

i. John3, Jr., born say 1738, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1758.

ii. James, born say 1740, sued Isaac Carty in Kent County in a case discontinued by the plaintiff before trial in February 1762 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1760-1762, frame 406]. taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1770.

10      iii. Charles, born say 1745.

11      iv. Lydia, born say 1747.

v. James, born say 1749, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1770.

vi. William, born say 1750, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1770 and 1771, in Duck Creek Hundred in 1773, in Little Creek Hundred in 1776 and 1778 and in Dover Hundred in 1778 [DSA, RG 3535, Assessments 1768-84, frames 66, 129, 180, 263, 335, 341].

vii.Esther, born say 1752, called herself a "free woman of color" when she made her 11 February 1813 Kent County will, proved 21 March 1815, by which she left 4-1/4 acres and her personal estate to Geloco Lockerman, requiring her to pay George Derham's wife over a period of four years [RG 4, roll 201, frames 816-7; WB P-1:69].

 

7.    Rachel1 Sisco, born perhaps 1715, was bound apprentice by her mother Elizabeth Francisco in Northampton County, Virginia on 17 March 1717/18. She was tithable in Ann Batson's Northampton County household in 1738. Her children were

i. Phillis1, born about 1737, five-year-old "Negro" daughter of Rachel Sisco, bound apprentice in Northampton County in March 1741/2 [Orders 1732-42, 484].

ii. Bridget, born about 1739, three-year-old "Negro" daughter of Rachel Sisco, bound apprentice in September 1742 [Orders 1732-42, 484].

iii. ?Rachel2, born about 1760, nine years old when she was bound apprentice in August 1769 [Minutes 1765-71, 306].

 

Other likely descendants of Rachel Sisco were

i. Phillis2, born about 1758, a five-year-old "Negro" bound apprentice in Northampton County on December 1763 [Minutes 1761-65, 111]. She was the mother of Isaiah Sisco, born about 1776, nine years old when he was bound apprentice by the Northampton County court on 1 May 1785 [Orders 1783-87, 284].

ii. James, born about 1768, four years old in July 1772 when he was bound apprentice in Northampton County [Minutes 1771-77, 44].

iii. Daniel3 Cischo, born about 1771, five years old on 19 August 1776 when he was bound apprentice in Northampton County [Minutes 1771-77, 372]. He was head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:14].

 

8.    Ephraim Sisco, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1765 to 1783 when he was crossed off the list [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 509, 521, 553, 566; 1768-84, frames 27, 129, 185, 223, 263, 310, 335, 341, 367, 368, 443, 503, 542, 583]. He was indicted by the Kent County court in November 1765 for having an illegitimate male child by Rachel Sisco, Jr., about May 1765. The court ordered Ephraim to support the boy for five years. Daniel Durham was his security [DSA, RG 3805.002, 1734-79, frame 446; MS case files November 1765]. He was a "Mulatoe" taxable on a mare, two horses, eight cows, two calves and eight sheep in Little Creek Hundred in 1800 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1800-1, frame 413] and head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:36]. He was the father of

i.John5, born say 1765, called "son of Ephr." from 1788 to 1790 when he was taxable in Little Creek Hundred [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frames 75, 107, 191]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33].

ii. ?Amelia2 Cisco, born say 1770, married Jeremiah Shad in July 1790. Jeremiah was head of a New Castle County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:161].

 

9.    Benjamin Sisco, born say 1735, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1754 to 1756, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1761 to 1767 and taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1768 [DSA, RG 3535, 1743-67, frames 136, 143, 168, 187, 315, 345, 354, 381, 396, 427, 436, 491, 518, 534, 551, 566; 1767-84, frames 10, 26]. Benjamin Wynn sued him in Kent County court in November 1769 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-71, frame 43]. He may have been the father of

i. Amelia1, born say 1755, married Hanser, perhaps Nehemiah2 Hanser who was taxable in Dover Hundred from 1785 to 1788. Amelia died before 9 December 1814 when administration on her Kent County estate was granted to John Francisco [WB P-1:61].

ii. Mary, born say 1758, had an illegitimate male child in Little Creek Hundred in December 1775 [RG 3805.0, MS case papers, May Term 1776]. She died before 29 May 1808 when administration papers were filed on her estate which amounted to $41.61 [DSA, RG 3845.000, roll 80, frames 325-8].

iii. George, born say 1763, had an illegitimate daughter by Ann Munt in Duck Creek Hundred in 1782 [DSA, RG 3805.0, MS Kent County Court case papers, August 1782 Indictments]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1785 to 1789, a taxable "Mulattoe" in 1797 and 1798. By his 10 November 1814 Kent County will, proved two weeks later on 26 November, he divided his estate between his sister Emela (Amelia) Hanser and his brother William Sisco. Jacob Trusty paid cash to the estate [RG 3845.000, roll 201, frames 819-24; WB P-1:59].

iv. William, devised half the estate of his brother George Sisco in 1814.

 

10.    Charles Sisco, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1765 to 1785. He was granted administration on the estate of (his father?) John Francisco on 24 October 1791 [WB N-1, fol. 5]. By his 20 January 1798 Little Creek Neck, Kent County will, proved 9 February 1798, he gave his sister Lydia his part of his father's estate and all his own estate to his sister Lydia's daughter Elizabeth Francisco [WB N-1, fol. 195-6]. Charles was the father of

i. John4, born say 1764, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1785 and called "son of Chrls." in the list for 1787.

 

11.    Lydia Francisco, born say 1743, was charged in Kent court in February 1770 with having an illegitimate child [DSA, RG 3805.002, 1734-79, frames 547, 551]. She was named in her brother Charles' 20 January 1798 Kent County will. By her 7 November 1798 Little Creek Neck, Kent County will, proved 18 December 1798, she left her daughter Elizabeth all her interest in her father's estate [WB N-1, fol. 221-2]. She was the mother of

i. Elizabeth, born say 1770.

 

Other Delaware descendants were

i. Comfort, head of a Little Creek, Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:37].

ii. Isaiah, husband of Rachel Sisco who died before 13 February 1826 when John Carney, Jr., of New Castle County was granted administration on her Kent County estate [WB Q-1:78].

 

FRIEND FAMILY

Members of the Friend family were

1        i. Job, born say 1750.

2        ii. John, born say 1765.

iii. Isaac, "negro" head of a Caroline County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:197]. He was called a "negro" in the 7 February 1814 deed by which he purchased 130 perches of land in Caroline County near Brown's Saw Mill on 7 February 1814, 8-1/2 acres called Alcock's Fancy on the northeast side of Robins Saw Mill Branch and 6-1/2 acres called Holb's Folly on 1 August 1817 [DB L:166-7; M-6, 7]..

iv. Pattey, born say 1780, mother of Charles Friend who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 16 November 1827: of a chesnut colour, was born free, raised in Dorchester County and is the son of Pattey Friend who was also born free, aged about 24 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 57].

 

1.    Job Friend, born say 1750, married Patience Jackson, "Melattoes" in Sussex County, Delaware, on 8 June 1772 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 284]. They were the parents of

i. Jackson, born 19 September 177_, "mulatto" son of Job and Patience Friend, baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. He was head of a Mispillion, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:92], 3 in 1810 [DE:46], and a Dover household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:32].

 

2.    John Friend, born say 1765, was head of a Caroline County household of 4 "other free" in 1790. He may have been the father of

i. Henry, born 4 April 1781, a free born "coloured man" who obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 29 April 1826 [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 192]. He purchased 33 acres in Caroline County on the road from Hunting Creek Mill to Fowling Creek Mill, called Harris's Hazard and Edmondson's Desire, for $218 on 27 February 1821. On 3 January 1833 John Friend "(negro)" sold this land which descended to him by the death of Henry Friend, for $50 [DB N:216-7; R:333-4].

 

FROST FAMILY

1.    Sarah Frost, born say 1746, was the servant of James Wilson on 23 August 1766 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by "Bristo a Negro man belonging to Betty Waters." The court ordered her sold for seven years and sold her son Planner to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judicial Record 1766-7, 9-10]. Sarah and Bristo were the parents of

i. Planner, born about 1766, head of a Somerset County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:467].

 

GALE FAMILY

1.    Ann Gale, born say 1740, was the servant of Susannah Cox of Cecil County in March 1760 when the court convicted her of having a "Molata" child [Judgment Record 1759-61, 92]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Capn, head of an Octararo, Cecil County household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Ben, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Robert, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:75].

iv. T., head of a Frederick County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:610].

 

GAME FAMILY

1.    Sambo Game, born say 1670, was the slave of Peter Douty of Somerset County. While still a slave, Sambo may have had a child by a white woman named Mauldlin Magee. Her daughter Fortune Game/ Magee was the servant of Mrs. Mary Day on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered her to serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. Sambo and his wife Betty were "Negro" slaves freed by Peter Douty's 1709 Somerset County will. Douty also allowed them the use of his 150 acre plantation, called Paris, in the Nanticoke Hundred of Somerset County during their lives [Wills Liber 5:142; Land Records Liber CD:416]. They were free by 1713 when they petitioned the Somerset County court to allow Betty to be tax free [Liber AC:17]. He was called "Sambo Gam a Negro" when he was paid 5 pounds, 19 shillings by the executor of Peter Douty's estate [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Vol. 36B, 245]. He was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, from 1724 to 1733, listed in a household adjoining Fortune Game in 1728. "Negro" Grace, a taxable in his household in 1724 and 1727, may have been his slave; and Robert Game, a taxable in his household in 1728, was probably his son. Patrick Makeala and Samuel Clark, who were probably white, were taxables in his household in 1727 [List of Taxables, 1724-33]. He probably died before 1735 when Betty paid quit rents on their land [Somerset County Debt Book 1734, 79; 1735, 47 cited by Davidson, Free Blacks on the lower Eastern Shore]. Sambo may have been the father of

2        i. Fortune Magee, born say 1687.

3        ii. Robert, born say 1710.

4        iii. Harry, born say 1720.

 

2.    Fortune Game, born say 1687, was called Fortune Magee, the servant of Mrs. Mary Day, on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County, Maryland who was married to George Magee at the time [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251]. In 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1702-5, 251; 1711-3, 220]. She was called Fortune Game, a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household from 1728 to 1735, with Betty Game in 1728 and 1731, and with Betty and Rose Game in 1733. She was the mother of

5        i. Rose, born March 1703.

6        ii. Sue Magee, born in April 1705.

7        iii. Perlina, born in April 1707.

8        iv. ?Betty, born say 1712.

vi. ?Sarah Fortune, born say 1715. See the Fortune family history.

v. ?Anville, born say 1722, taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1738 and 1740 and taxable in Isaac Bebbings' Nanticoke Hundred household in 1744.

 

3.    Robert Game, born say 1710, was taxable in the Somerset County household of Sambo Game in 1728. He was head of his own Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1733 with (his wife?) Ellender Game until 1749 and taxable by himself in 1750. He was in Murderkill Hundred, Delaware, when he made his September 1782 will, proved 17 October 1782. He left his wife Elizabeth his largest bed which was to go to her daughter Mary Lanthorn after her death and left his wife a cow which was to go to her daughter and Sarah Lanthorn (Lantern) after her death. His inventory included two mares, a colt and corn in the field [RG 3545, roll 82, frame 425; DB L-1, fol. 267-8]. Robert may have been the father of

i. Levin1, born say 1740, convicted of murder in May 1767. Betty and Sarah Game/ Tompson/ Fortune testified against him. The Governor issued a death warrant for him on 13 June 1767 [Provincial Court Judgments, May Term 1767, 648-52; Archives of Maryland 32:200].

ii. Ephraim1, taxable in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759. He was a recruit from Dorchester County in the Revolutionary War on 25 July 1780 [Archives of Maryland 18:339].

iii. Henry2, head of a St. Mary's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free' in 1800 [MD:340].

 

4.    Harry1 Game, born say 1720, was probably identical to "Harry Negro," a taxable slave in the Nanticoke Hundred household of Priscilla Dashiell in 1738. He may have been related to Sambo Game since Priscilla Dashiell was one of Peter Douty's heirs [Land Records, Liber A-2, 150]. He was probably the "negro physician," "Doctor Harrey," whose services were advertised in the 7 November 1750 issue of the Maryland Gazette. He, called Henry (Doctor) Game, and his wife Rose were free before 10 August 1751 when they registered the birth of their son Daniel at Stepney Parish, Somerset County. They were taxable in Somerset County in 1752. In 1757 Harry purchased for 70 pounds a 150 acre plantation called Covington's Choice in Wicomico Hundred and petitioned the Somerset County court to have his slave, Tite, tax exempt [Land Records, Liber B:173; Judicial Records 1757-61, 18]. Harry left a will in 1781 naming his sons, Daniel and Jeremiah [Wills, Liber EB 1:144]. His children were

i. Daniel, born 10 August 1751 in Stepney Parish [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42]. He sued Stephen Adams in 1785 in Somerset County for 12 pounds for "attending, curing and healing a negro woman slave of said Stephen of divers diseases and infirmities" [Judicial Record 1786-88, 87].

ii. Bridget, daughter of Doctor Henry and Rose Game, born 20 February 1754 [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 3:42].

iii. Jeremiah, born say 1758, taxable on 60 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County in 1783.

iv. ?Samuel, taxable on 55 acres of Covington's Choice in Rewastico, Wicomico Hundred in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.42].

 

5.   Ross/ Rose Game, born in March 1703, child of Fortune Game, a taxable in Fortune Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1733. She owed 9 pounds, 11 shillings to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Her children, whose births were registered in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, were

i. Joe Magee, a "molatto" bound by Rose Magee to Edward Rownds on 19 March 1722/3 [Judicial Record 1723-5, 3].

ii. Stephen Magee, born 25 June 1737, alias Game of Mulatto Rose or Rose Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 143] and a "Free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Isaac1 Magee Game, born 25 June 1741, son of Mullato Rose or Rose Game alias Magee [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:128]. He owed a shilling to the estate of Day Scott of Somerset County on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:36-44]. He may have been identical to Sax Game, a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1759. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777.

 

6.    Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, was a "mulatto" woman living in Somerset County, Maryland, from 1741 to 1754 when the births of her "mulatto" children, Belindor, Davey, James, Jenney, and Nelly Magee were registered at Stepney Parish. Her children were

i. ?Ned, born say 1737, a "Mullatto" (no last name) with eleven months to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74].

ii. Belindor Magee, born September 1741, "otherwise Belinder Game dau of Mollatto Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." She was probably the "Mullatto" Belinda listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with fourteen years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74]. She may have been identical to "Blinda" (no last name) who was a taxable with Ephraim Game and James Right in George Scott's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1759.

iii. Davey Magee, born 14 March 1745, "otherwise Davey Game son of mollato Sue otherwise Sue Magee or Game." He was probably the "Mullatto" David listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 with sixteen and one half years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:562-74].

iv. Janney Magee, born 13 October 1746, "otherwise Janney Game son of mollato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game."

v. James Magee, born 28 July 1750, "otherwise James Game son of mullato Sue other wise Sue Magee or Game."

vi. Nelly Magee, born 9 _ , 1754, alias Game (dau of Mullato Sue) [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 2:126; 3:42].

 

7.    Perlina Game, born in April 1707, was five years old "next April" in March 1712 when she was bound apprentice in Somerset County court. She was probably identical to "Ner Game," a taxable in Nanticoke Hundred in 1734 and to Polina Gam who was a taxable head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household with Sarah Gam in 1759. She may have been the mother of

9        i. Sarah, born say 1730.

 

8.   Betty Game, born say 1712, was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Fortune Game from 1728 to 1731. She had an illegitimate child in Stepney Parish on 1 September 1732 for which she received ten lashes. Stephen Winwright was her security for payment of the court costs [Judicial Record 1730-3, 262-3]. She was identical to Betty Fortune who was a taxable head of household in Nanticoke Hundred with (her daughter?) Fortune Fortune in 1757. On 22 October 1754 Betty Game purchased 50 acres called Georges Pleasure on the southside of the Nanticoke River in Somerset County from Day Scott for 5 pounds, and on 5 December 1772 Betty sold this land for 33 pounds [DB B:42-3; O:26-7]. By his 14 June 1753 Somerset County will, proved 17 August 1757, George Day Scott left Betty Fortune the 50 acre tract where she was then living if she paid the balance due [WB 1756-61, 58]. Bess Fortune owed 9 shillings to the Somerset County estate of Day Scott on 8 September 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 77:42-44]. Betty was probably one of "Two Women of a Dark Complection Live a the Head of Tippin(?)" listed by the constable as having refused to pay the discriminatory tax on free African American women in 1743. The constable reported further that "they are full as Dark as most Mallatos. They are of the Breed of old fortune and Robt. Game" [List of Taxables, 1743]. She was head of a taxable household in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1777 and 1790. She may have been the mother of

i. George1 Game, born say 1733, taxable in Betty Game's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1749.

ii. "Negro Patience Thomson," a taxable in Betty Game's Nanticoke Hundred household in 1756, called Patience Game in 1783, taxable in Nanticoke Hundred [MSA S1161-9-10, p.45].

iii. ?Fortune Fortune, born say 1740, taxable in Betty Fortune's household in Nanticoke Hundred in 1757.

iv. Levin2, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1777 to 1791.

v. John Game, taxable in Indian River, Sussex County in 1789, called a "Mulato" in the list of delinquents: "not Settled anywhere," and taxable there in 1790 and 1791.

 

9.    Sarah Game, born say 1730, was taxable in Perlina Game's Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1759. She was living in Stepney Parish in March 1762 when she confessed to having a child by by an unnamed "Negro slave." The court sold her son Ephraim to her master George Scott for thirty-one years and ordered her master to return her to court at the completion of her indenture so she could be sold for seven years. In June 1762 Scott was the highest bidder for her servitude at 3,150 Pounds [Judicial Records 1760-3, 130b, 151]. She was the mother of a "Melatto" son Lovewell who was baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church in Indian River Hundred in May 1770 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex County, 100]. She had another illegitimate child in Stepney Parish before 15 March 1768 and paid a double fine to avoid naming the father [Judicial Records 1767-9, 70, 146]. She was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:309] and 1 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:408].She was the mother of

i. Ephraim2, born in January 1762.

ii. Lovewell, baptized in May 1770.

 

Other Delaware Game descendants were

i. George2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b]. He married Leah Noble, 6 December 1799 Worcester County, Maryland bond. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:410]. Leah may have been related to Mark Noble, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:17].

ii. Isaac2, an orphan bound by the Somerset County court until the age of twenty-one with his own consent as an apprentice to Mathias Hobbs to be a cordwainer in March 1763 [Judicial Records 1760-3, 198b].

iiu. Levin3, born 1776-1794, sold (signing) 50 acres called Pembertons Goodwill in Somerset County on 14 February 1818 for $50 [DB JD-3:336-7]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:412], obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 27 May 1825: born free in Somerset County ... bright Mollatto Complexion ... about thirty nine years of age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 48].

 

GANNON FAMILY

1.    Charles Gamon, born about 1694, petitioned the Charles County court for his freedom on 9 March 1724/5 saying that he was born of a free white woman and a "Mallatto" and served Mr. Lynes and his executor, John Marten, more than thirty-one years. The court ruled that he was free [Court Record 1723-4, 443-4]. A "Mullatto boy abt 16 years old" was listed in the inventory of the Charles County estate of Madame Ann Lynes on 1 January 1711/12 [Prerogative Inventories 1711-12, 71]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Absalem Gannon, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1790, perhaps identical to Abraham Gannon, head of a Talbot County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:532].

ii. Abner Gannon, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Rachel Gannon, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:215].

iv. Noble Gannon, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 1 November 1809: a Mulatto Man ... Noble Gannon between twenty & twenty one years of age, about five feet nine inches & an eighth ... is a free born Mulatto Man [Certificates of Freedom 1807-28, 38].

 

GATES FAMILY

1.    Margaret1 Gates, born say 1692, was a "free Mulatto Woman" living in Charles County on 9 November 1742 when the court exempted her from paying levy because she was infirm and "Distempered." She may have been identical to "a Certain Margrett a Mallatto Liveing with Wm Boarman" who was presented by the Charles County court on 13 August 1728 for having an illegitimate Child by information of William Chapman, constable. She was called Margaret Yates, the "Mullatto" servant of William Boarman, on 12 November 1728 when she confessed in Charles County court that she had an illegitimate child. The court ordered that she receive fifteen lashes [Court Record 1727-31, 147, 196; 1741-3, 563]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. James, born say 1735.

 

2.    James Gates, born say 1735, was a taxable "Malata" head of a Trinity Parish, Upper Hundred, Charles County household in 1758 and a "mulatto" taxable in the 3rd District of Charles County in 1783 [MSA 1161-4-10, p.6]. He may have married Elizabeth Thompson. On 8 March 1768 the Charles County court excused her from her presentment for having an illegitimate child because she had married James Gates. No race for either was indicated in the records [Court Records 1767-70, 60]. He may have been the father of

i. Sam, "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:303].

ii. Eliza, "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:305].

iii. Edward, "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:304].

iv. Benjamin, head of a Washington County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [MD:457].

v. Margaret2, born say 1765, had a daughter named Elizabeth (born 29 December 1782) who was born before her marriage to Caleb1 Overton (born 14 July 1750). Caleb obtained certificates of freedom for their children in Washington, D.C., in October 1814 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 378-9].

 

GEORGE FAMILY

The George family originated in Virginia with Peter George who was the "Negro" slave of Nathaniel Littleton of Northampton County in 1640. See the Virginia section of this web site for the entire George history. About 1676 Peter received his freedom from Captain Francis Pigot on the promise to pay 10,000 pounds of tobacco. He completed the last payment in 1682 [DW&c 1680-92, 53, cited by Deal, Race and Class, 444]. He must have been a free man when he was a witness to the will of King Tony, "Negro," proved 28 February 1677/8 [Orders 1674-79, 247]. In 1679 he rented land near Emmanuel Driggers [OW 1683-9, 150-1]. In March 1687/8 he was duped into thinking that "free Negroes should be slaves againe" by one of his white neighbors, Robert Candlin. He left all his household goods and livestock with Candlin and fled to Somerset County, Maryland, with his neighbor, Sarah Driggers, and several other unidentified free African Americans. He was called Peter George of Wiccocomoco Hundred Negro" on 23 April 1688 when he posted 5 pounds surety and he and (his wife?) Mary George were witnesses in a Somerset County court case for "Sarah Driggers Negro woman wife of Thomas Driggers Negro" [Archives of Maryland 91:47]. Perhaps (his wife?) Mary was Mary Rodriggus whose Northampton County tax was paid by the parish in 1674 [DW 1664-74, 273]. He and Sarah Driggers returned to Northampton County about three years later and successfully sued Candlin's widow for the recovery of his livestock [OW 1689-98, 106, 115-116]. Likely descendants in Maryland were

i. America, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 15 "other free" in 1800 (called George America Negro) [MD:735]. He made a deed of manumission in Worcester County on 13 January 1800 by which he set free a "certain Negro woman called Jib" [DB T:43].

ii. Martha, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161].

iii. America2, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 (called George America) [DE:718].

iv. Patience, Negro head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:725].

v. Betty, Negro head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:718].

vi. Mary, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:738].

 

GIBBS FAMILY

John Gibbs, a white resident of Queen Anne's County, Maryland, purchased 200 acres which was part of a tract called Killmannin's Plain on Unicorn Branch of the Chester River on 6 February 1712. And he purchased another 244 acres in the same area, called Knowles' Range, adjoining Rothbottom's Park on 19 February 1740 [DB IK, no. A, fol. 15; RT, no.B, fol. 323]. By his 26 August 1747 Queen Anne's County will, proved 22 October the same year, he set his slaves free and divided the land between them in lots of one fourth to four groups, perhaps different family units. They were

 

1        i. Richard1, Absalom1, Thomas, and Elizabeth Jr.

2        ii. Hannah, Alice, Martha, and Sarah.

3        iii. Ann, Peter, Abraham1, Isaac1, and Jane.

4        iv. Wealthy, William, Jacob, and Rachel [WHN #1:420-423, MdHR 8878-784].

 

Absolem, Thomas, Bethia, Nan, Alce, Peter, Abraham, William, Isaac, Jacob, Rachel, Jane, and Martha Gibbs sold the 244 acres called Knowles' Range twelve years later on 20 March 1759 for 195 pounds [DB RT, no.F:24]. William Gibbs, one of the heirs, sold 12-1/2 acres of Killmannin's Plains on 18 June 1768 (leaving about 187 acres), and Absolem and Isaac Gibbs were each taxable on 50 acres of Kilmannin's Plain in 1783.

 

1.    Richard1 Gibbs, born say 1705, was freed by the 26 February 1740 Queen Anne's County will of John Gibbs. He may have been deceased by 20 March 1759 when the Gibbs family sold the land devised to them by John Gibbs, and he may have been the father of

5        i. Absolem1, born say 1735.

ii. Thomas, a "Negro," confessed judgment in Queen Anne's County court to Joseph Bennett for 6 pounds, 9 shillings in June 1756. Henry Lowe accused him of killing his mare with a knife, but the court found Thomas not guilty in March 1757. In June 1757 he (called Free Negro) admitted that he owed Giles Cooke 8 pounds, 10 shillings [Judgment Record 1755-6, 204; 1756-7, 221, 316]. He was living in Kent County, Delaware, on 2 August 1766 when he sold 15 acres, his rights to Kilmannin's Plain, to Absolem Gibbs for 18 pounds [Liber RT-G:281]. He was a taxable "Negro" in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1770, head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:345].

iii. Bethia (Elizabeth, Jr.).

 

2.    Hannah Gibbs, a "free Negro," was sued by Thomas Ringgold for 9 pounds, 9 shillings due by account in Queen Anne's County court in November 1754 [Judgment Records 1755-6, digital images 14-16]. On 16 February 1785 she made a Queen Anne's County deed to James Tilghman of Chester, Kent County, by which her one-fourth part of Kilmannin's Plain and Knowles' Range would pass at her death to her common-law husband Benjamin Dublin and her children Rebecca, Alice, Martha and Sarah [Liber CD-2:317]. Benjamin Dublin was taxable on 50 acres of Killman's Plains in 1783 [Assessment of 1783, MSA S1437, p.2]. Hannah was the

i. Rebecca.

ii. Alice.

iii. Martha.

iv. Sarah1.

 

3.    Ann Gibbs made a Queen Anne's County deed of gift/ will for her rights to Kilmannin's Plain and Knowles Range to her son Isaac Gibbs on 2 November 1796 [Liber STW-4: 97-8]. She was the mother of

i. ?Peter, a tithable "free Negro" in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1771 to 1783, a "Negro" charged with assaulting Sarah Clarke in Kent County in November 1785 [DSA, RG 3805.002, 1787-1803, frames 4, 147, 152].

ii. ?Abraham1, a "Negro," admitted in Queen Anne's County court in August 1765 that he owed Benjamin Jacobs 8 pounds, 16 shillings due by note [Judgment Record 1765, 61-2]. He sold his rights to Kilmannin's Plain to Isaac Spencer by Queen Anne's County deeds of 16 February 1785 [Liber RT-K:34; CD-1:189-90], head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [MD:100].

6        iii. Isaac1, born say 1740.

iv. Jane.

 

4.    Wealthy Gibbs, born say 1710, was freed by the 26 February 1740 Queen Anne's County will of John Gibbs. She was probably deceased by 20 March 1759 when the heirs sold part of their land, and she may have been the mother of

i. William, "one of the Free Negroes and Heirs or Legatees of John Gibbs," who sold 12-1/2 acres, called Killmannings Plains by Forge Road to William Clark on 18 June 1768 [DB RT-H:266]. On 9 February 1767 he called himself "William Trusty, otherwise called William Gibbs of Kent County in Delaware" when he sold to Richard Jeffereys, "free Negroe formerly servant to John Willson of Kent County in Maryland," for 10 pounds whatever remaining interest he had in 12-1/2 acres called Kilmannin's Plain sold by him to William Clark [DB RT-H:56-7], perhaps the William Gibbs who was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Maryland, from 1779 to 1780, called a "Negro" in 1780 [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc. , Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781].

ii. Rachel.

 

5.    Absolem1 Gibbs, born say 1735, was among thirteen members of the Gibbs family who sold land on 20 March 1759 which had been devised to them by John Gibbs' will. He was called "Negro Absalom" in June 1761 when he petitioned the Queen Anne's County court that he had property called Killmanams Plains whose boundaries had decayed and required depositions to certify where the boundaries had been. One person testified that it was on the east side of "Unichorn Branch" [Land Commissions 1756-68, digital images 61, 75 of 269]. He purchased land called Discord on a branch of the Chester River adjoining Killmanins Plains from John Seale for 5 shillings on 3 February 1767. On 9 February 1767 he made a deed of emancipation to his wife Judith, sons Nathan and Richard and daughter Elizabeth whom he had purchased from Thomas Burroughs late of Kent County, Delaware. He mortgaged his 58-1/2 acre portion of Kilmannin's Plain to Eleazar Massey for 3-1/2 years, and Massey foreclosed on the land on 7 February 1786 [Liber RT H:34, 54, 56; CD-1:440]. He was taxable on 50 acres, called Kilman Plains, in the Upper District of Queen Anne's County in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-1, p.3] and head of a Queen Anne's County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:100]. He was also a tithable "N." (Negro) in adjoining Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1783 to 1787, head of Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:106] and 4 in 1810 [DE:17]. He was granted administration of the estate of Absalom Gibbs, Jr., "free Negro," in Kent County, Delaware, on 15 May 1809 [Brewer, Probate Records of Kent County, 1801-1812, 172]. He was the father of

i. Nathan, a "free negroe" sold (signing) a horse, six pigs, a heifer, six rush-bottomed chairs, two tables, a cupboard, chest, drawers, and bedstead to William Knock, Jr., in Queen Anne's County on 17 December 1793 [DB STW-2:484-5].

ii. Elizabeth.

iii. Absolem2, born before 1776, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:19] and 2 "free colored" in Dover Hundred in 1820 [DE:40]. He was called a bricklayer on 26 February 1790 when he purchased 75 acres adjoining Charles Emory in Kent County, Delaware, for 200 pounds currency [DB B-2:83], perhaps the Absalom Gibbs (free Negro) who purchased 5 acres called Harris's Ramble in Queen Anne's County for 25 pounds on 5 February 1814 [DB JB-2:250].

iv. Jacob, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1779 to 1788, called a "Negro" starting in 1780 [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc. , Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781]. Esther and John Rees sued him and Andrew Gibbs in Kent County court for a debt of 29 pounds which they confessed judgment to in August 1770, and Thomas Murphy sued him and Andrew Gibbs for a debt of 30 pounds which they confessed judgment to in November 1770 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-1771, frames 275, 291, 323, 332]. He married Elizabeth Beckett sometime between 9 February 1769 when she had an illegitimate female child by Rike Miller in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, and November 1771 when Miller was charged in court [DSA, RG 3805, MS case files, November 1771 indictments]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:345].

v. Stephen, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1783 to 1798, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:21] and 4 in 1810 [DE:45]. He died before 17 February 1809 when letters of administration were granted on his estate to Cornelius Comegys and Lucy Gibbs [Brewer, Probate Records of Kent County, 1801-1812, 169].

vi.Richard2, a tithable "Negro" in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1783, taxable on 75 acres in Duck Creek Hundred in 1798, living that year on 3/8 of an acre and a log dwelling house in good repair [1797 Levy Assessments, frames 354, 394]. He was head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:21]. He and Absalom Gibbs petitioned the Kent County court on 23 February 1809 stating that their brother Stephen died intestate seized of 60 acres in Duck Creek Hundred leaving a widow, two brothers, children of another brother Jacob and three sisters then deceased. He asked that the court assign the lands to him because his brother Absalom, to whom the right of acceptance belonged, had refused to accept the lands. He died before 17 August 1815 when his widow Mary Gibbs renounced her right to administer the estate. He owned about 140 acres in Duck Creek Hundred when he died and his estate was valued at $1,238, but his land was sold for $1,080 to pay his debts [DSA, RG 3545, reel 83, frames 791-8; Brewer, Kent County, Delaware, Guardian Accounts, Edmonson to Hopkins, 66-7].

 

6.    Isaac1 Gibbs, born say 1740, was born before 26 August 1747 when he was named in John Gibbs' will. He admitted in Queen Anne's County court in August 1766 that he owed John Vansant 17 pounds, 19 shillings. In March 1774 the court fined him 6 shillings for assaulting Isaac Scrivener and fined his wife Catherine 1 shillings for assaulting Christopher Simmons [Judgment Record 1766-7, digital images 77, 137-40]. He was taxable on 50 acres, called Kilman Plains, in the Upper District of Queen Anne's County in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-1, p.3], head of a Queen Anne's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [MD:100], and 3 in 1800 [MD:345]. He received a deed of gift from his mother Ann Gibbs for her right to Kilmannin's Plain and Knowles Range in 1796 and made a deed of gift returning the land to her on 2 September 1796. He sold property by deed recorded in Queen Anne's County in 1805 [Liber STW-4:54, 56, 97-8; STW-8:339]. He may have been the father of

i. Isaac2, born before 1776, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:45] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:11].

ii. Joseph1, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:106]. He died before 9 May 1804 when administration was granted on his Kent County estate to (his wife?) Priscilla Gibbs with Absalom Gibbs as security [Brewer, Probate Records of Kent County, 1801-1812, 169].

 

Their descendants in Maryland and Delaware were

i.  Andrew, a taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1779 to 1781, called a "Negro" in 1780 [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc., Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781]. Thomas Murphy sued him and Jacob Gibbs for 30 pounds debt in Kent County which they confessed judgment to in November 1770 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-1771, frame 323, 332].

ii. John, a "Negro" taxable in Kent County, Delaware, in 1780 and 1781 [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc. , Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781], head of a Cecil County, Maryland household of one "other free" in 1790, 4 "other free" in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1800 [DE:113] and a "Coloured" head of a New Castle County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:253].

iii. Ned, a taxable "Negro" in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1779 to 1781 [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc., Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781].

iv. Abraham2, born say 1752, discharged from the service of William Newnam by the Queen Anne's County court in March 1774 [Surles, and they Appeared in Court, 1770-1777, 17].

v. Coffer/ Coffee, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:83] and 6 in 1800 [MD:149].

vi. John, head of a Cecil County, Maryland household of one "other free" in 1790, 4 "other free" in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1800 [DE:113] and a "Coloured" head of a New Castle County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:253].

vii. James, a "Negro" charged with felony in Kent County, Delaware court in August 1785 [DSA, RG 3850.002, 1787-1803, frames 4, 152], head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:131], perhaps identical to the James Gibbs who was a laborer counted in the 1800 census for Alexandria, Virginia, with his wife Ustley and six children, "free Negroes" [Virginia Genealogist 4:58].

viii. Solomon, head of a Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:412].

ix. Absolem3, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:17] and 6 "free colored" in Murderkill Hundred in 1820 [DE:15].

x. Jo2, a "Coloured" head of a New Castle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:257].

 

GIBSON FAMILY

1.    Mary Gibson, born say 1699, was the servant of Carpender Lillington on 10 May 1719 the Queen Anne's County court convicted her of having an illegitimate "molatto" child. The court ordered that she serve her master additional time after her servitude for sixty-six days runaway time [Judgments 1718-19, images 219-20 of 252]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Ben, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 4 "other free" in Kent County in 1800 [MD:173].

ii. Richard, 5 "other free" Cecil County in 1790 and 2 "other free" in New Castle County, Delaware, in 1810 [DE:266].

iii. Joe, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:531].

iv. Jacob, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:522] and 2 "free colored" in Newark, Delaware, in 1820 [DE:102].

v. Robert, "N" head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:79].

 

GRACE FAMILY

1.    Joan Grace, born say 1714, an indentured servant to William Penn, admitted in Charles County, Maryland Court on 8 June 1731 that she had a "Mullatto" child "by a Negroe." And she admitted to a second mixed-race child on 13 March 1732/3. Her son William Grace, born 6 November 1732, was bound to serve Penn until the age of thirty-one. On 10 June 1735 her "Mullatto" son Thomas was bound to serve Penn for thirty-one years and on 10 August 1736 the court ordered that she be sold for twenty-one years as punishment for having three "Mullatto" children [Court Record 1727-31, 521; 1731-4, 297-8; 1734-9, 2, 37-38, 220]. She and her "2 Molatto children" were valued at 28 pounds in the inventory of the Charles County estate of William Penn on 12 May 1737 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1736-1739, 271]. She was the mother of

i. William1, born 6 November 1732, perhaps the William Grace who was a "negro" head of a Caroline County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:219].

ii. Thomas1, born about March 1735, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1800 [MD:736].

iii. ?Ann1, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161].

iv. ?Betsey, head of a Baltimore City household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:215].

 

Descendants living in adjoining Stafford County, Virginia were

i. Annie2, head of a household of 6 "other free" in 1810.

ii. Thomas2, head of household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

iii. Rachel, head of a household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

iv. William2, head of a household of 3 "other free" in 1810.

v. Polly, born about 1767, registered in Stafford County on 13 August 1804: a black woman aged about thirty seven years ... appearing to the satisfaction of the Court to have been born free and registered a copy in King George County [King George County Register of Free Persons, no.39].

 

GRAHAM FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Graham, born say 1696, appeared in Prince George's County, Maryland Court on 26 June 1716 with her child who was adjudged to be a "Mallato." She was ordered to serve Thomas Wells, Sr., until November court. Later that year on 27 November the court sold her and her child to Thomas Clagett for 3,000 pounds of tobacco. She was called the "Servant woman of Thomas Wells" (no last name) on 25 November 1718 when the court bound her seventeen-month-old daughter Margaret to Edward Marlow. On 24 March 1718/9 she confessed to having another illegitimate child [Court Record 1715-20, 87, 143; 1715-20, 721, 814]. She was probably the mother of

2        i. Catherine, born about 1715.

ii. Margaret, born about June 1717.

 

2.    Catherine Graham, born about 1715, appeared in Prince George's County court on 28 June 1732 and admitted that she had a child by "negro or Mallatto Nasy" belonging to Henry Darnall, Jr. The court sold their six-week-old daughter Hannah to Sarah Clagett until the age of thirty-one. Nasy was convicted of the offense on 22 August the same year [Court Record 1732-4, 13, 544]. She was listed in the inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Thomas Clagett on 26 June 1733: "1 Mulatto Woman named Kate 12 years to serve" [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1732-1734, 277-8]. Catherine appeared in court again on 25 March 1735 and admitted that she had an illegitimate child by "Negro Taff Belonging to Daniel Carroll of Upper Marlborough Town." She was ordered to serve an additional seven years after completing her indenture, and her child was bound to Mary Clagett until the age of thirty-one. The court ordered that Taff be whipped. She was called "Yellow Cate" on 22 November 1737 when the court ruled that her son Moses was "Begotten by a Negro" and ordered that the child be sold to Mary Clagett. And on 28 November 1738 she confessed that she had a child by Yarrow, a "Negro" slave of Thomas Gantt. The court sold her and her four-year-old son Dick to Doctor John Haswell. In March 1738/9 she confessed to having two illegitimate children: Ann, born on 28 February 1736/7, and Charles, born in October 1738. On 25 August 1747 the court sold Catherine to the Sheriff, Osborn Sprigg, for twenty-eight years [Court Record 1734-5, 357; 1735-6, 11; 1736-8, 597-8; 1738-40, 198, 286-7, 662; 1747-8, 108]. She was called a "Mulatto Woman Cate about 31 years old supposed to have 21 years to serve" when she was listed in the inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Doctor John Haswell on 31 May 1750 [Prerogative Inventories 48:226-230]. She was the mother of

i. Hannah, born in May 1732.

ii. Dick, born in 1734, sixteen years old on 31 May 1750 when he was listed in the Prince George's County estate of Doctor John Haswell..

iii.  Ann, born 28 February 1736/7, fourteen years old on 31 May 1750 when she was listed in inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Doctor John Haswell.

iv. Moses1, born about November 1737.

v. Charles, born in October 1738, a twelve-year-old "Mulattoe" boy bound until the age of thirty-one who was listed in the inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Osborn Sprigg in 1750 [Prerogative Inventories 48:190-6].

3        vi. Sarah1, born in April 1740.

4        vii. ?Eleanor, born say 1742.

 

3.   Sarah1 Graham, born in April 1740, was the two-month-old "Mallatto" child of Catherine Graham who was bound to John Clagett of Rock Creek on 24 June 1740. She was apparently the ten-year-old "Mulattoe" girl bound until the age of thirty-one who was listed in the inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Osborn Sprigg in 1750 [Prerogative Inventories 48:190-6]. She was called a "Malato Wench Liveing in Mount Calvert Hundred" on 23 August 1757 when the court ordered her sold for seven years and bound her five-month-old son James to Thomas Clagett until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1738-40, 662; 1754-8, 490, 495]. She was the servant of John Clagett of Frederick County, Maryland, in August 1762 when he presented a bill to the county court "for expenses for support of Sarah Graham's bastard Mulatto Child" from 29 November 1761 to 18 August 1762. Sarah admitted in court that the child was "begot by a Negro." The court bound the child to Clegatt for thirty-one years. She appeared in court again on 21 August 1764 and confessed to having a female "Mullatto Bastard Child" who was also bound to Clagett [Judgment Record 1763-6, 277, 279; Court Minutes 1763-8, August 1764 (n.p.)]. She was the mother of

i. James, born March 1757, head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. ?Amos, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:149].

iii. ?Roger, head of a Dover, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:42].

iv. ?Lethy, head of a Wilkes County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:524].

 

4.    Eleanor Graham, born say 1742, confessed in Prince George's County court on 24 November 1761 that she had a Mulatto" child. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and sold her one-month-old son Aaron to her master, Zachariah Lyles, until the age of thirty-one. On 22 November 1763 the court ordered that she be sold for a second seven year term and ordered her two-month-old "Mulatto" son Moses bound to Zachariah Lyles until the age of thirty-one. On 25 March 1766 the court ordered that she be sold for a third seven year term and bound her five-month-old "Mulatto" child Sandy to Lyles until the age of thirty-one. On 25 August 1767 the court ordered that she be sold for a fourth seven year term and sold her six-week-old daughter Sarah to her master until the age of thirty-one. On 27 June 1769 the court ordered her sold for a fifth seven year term and ordered her five-week-old daughter Kitty sold to Margery Lyles until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1761-3, 140; 1763-4, 8-9; 1765-6, 385; 1766-8, 322; 1768-70, 286]. Nell, Aaron, Moses, Sandy and Sarah were listed in the 20 April 1768 Prince George's County estate of Zachariah Lyles [Prerogative Inventories, 96:339-40]. She was the mother of

i. Aaron, born in October 1761.

ii. Moses2, born in September 1763,  ordered by the Frederick County, Virginia court in April 1792 to serve his master Ignatius Perry an additional two years and four months for time lost and expenses in taking him up [Orders 1791-2, 430]. He and his wife Flora were in a "List of Free Negroes and Molattoes" in William Kircheval's district of Frederick County, Virginia, living on John Rhodes' land in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 827] and he was a "Negro" taxable in Loudoun County in 1801 and 1804 [PPTL 1798-1812].

iii. Sandy, born in November 1765, head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:511].

iv. Sarah2, born in July 1767.

v. Kitty, born in July 1769.

vii. Thomas, born about 1773, registered in Prince George's County, Maryland, on 6 May 1811: has a yellow complexion, is about 38 years old ... has pale eyes, thick lips ... was raised in Prince George's County in the family of Ignatius Perry and is free, being descended from a free woman named Elenor Graham [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 7].

 

GRANT FAMILY

1.    Margaret Helen Grant, born say 1740, was the servant of James Elgin on 11 March 1760 when the Charles County court presented her for bearing a "Mollatto Child." She may have been identical to Eleanor Grant who was presented by the grand jury of Charles County on 12 March 1765 for bearing a "Molatto" child by information of Constable John Moran [Court Record 1759-60, 425; 1764-6, 181]. Her children may have been

i. John, head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Hugh, head of a Bohemian Manor, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

 

GRAVES FAMILY


1.     Mary Graves, born say 1724, the "free Mollatto" servant of Arthur Miller, confessed to the Kent County, Maryland Court that she bore two illegitimate "Mullatto" children, one about six weeks old and the other about two years old. The court ordered her sold for seven years and sold her children to her master until the age of thirty-one [Criminal Proceedings 1728-34, 465, 478-9, 481]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Abigail, born about March 1741, a "Mullatto Woman" with about thirteen years and seven months to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the Kent County estate of Samuel Miller on 7 August 1758 and the 28 April 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 66:42-8; 76:211-4].

ii. Moses, born about 1745, a twenty-six-year-old "Mulatto" who escaped from jail in Newtown on the Chester River in Maryland according to the 17 October 1771 issue of the Virginia Gazette. He was jailed in Lancaster County, Virginia, according to the 12 March 1772 issue (Rind) [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 141].

iii. Harry, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:173].

iv. Elizabeth, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 and 2 in Cecil County in 1800 [MD:584].

v. Henny, head of a Kent County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:173].

vi. Stepney, head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:173].

vii. Judy, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:212].

viii. Stephen, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:539].

ix. George, born about 1764, a ten-year-old "Molatto" boy who was bound by the Kent County, Maryland Court by indenture to Elizabeth Williamson on 25 November 1774 [Court Minutes 1774-1782, n.p.]. He was head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:160].

x. Nancy, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County, Virginia household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:343].

 

GRAY FAMILY

1.   Priscilla Gray, born say 1708, was a "malatto" servant of Mrs. Sarah Magruder, Sr., of Prince George's County in November 1727 when she confessed to the court that she had an illegitimate child by a "negroe." On 23 March 1730/1 the court presented her for having another child by information of the constable for Mount Calvert Hundred. She admitted her guilt, and the court ordered that she receive five lashes and serve her mistress an additional nine months. The court called her "Priscilla Gray alias Malatto Priscilla" when it bound her son Dick, aged about three months, to Lingaw Wilson until the age of twenty-one years. In November 1732 she was called a "Mollatto Woman born of a white Woman" when she confessed to having a child by "Malatto George belonging to Mr. William Digges." The court ordered her to serve an additional seven years and bound her son William for thirty-one years [Court Record 1726-7, 626; 1730-2, 2, 5; 1732-4, 118]. She and her two sons were listed in the inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Sarah Magruder on 3 September 1734 (not identified as free):

1 Molattoe woman Priss - 15 pounds

1 Do Boy 6 years old - 10 pounds

1 Do Do Boy 2 years old - 2 pounds

[Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1734-1735, 54-9]. She was presented for the same offense in March 1735, and on 28 November 1738 the court bound her "Mallatto" son Joseph, born 9 August 1738, to her master William Magruder until the age of thirty-one. She may have had a common-law marriage with a member of the Grimes family since she was called "Priscilla Grimes Als Gray" on 26 November 1745 when she confessed to having an illegitimate child named Kate who was bound to William Magruder until the age of thirty-one. On 27 November 1750 she confessed to "Mollatto Bastardy," and the court ordered that she serve seven years and bound her daughter Ann to William Magruder until the age of thirty-one [Court Records 1734-5, 357; 1738-40, 199; 1744-6, 298-9; 1749-50, 244]. She was the mother of

i. Richard, born about December 1730, "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:281] and 5 in 1810 [MD:8].

ii. William, born 3 August 1732, bound apprentice for thirty-one years. He was probably the William Gray, a "Mulatto," who was presented by the Charles County court in November 1770 for killing one of John Butler's unmarked hogs [Court Records 1770-2, 130]. He was a "Mulatto" who owed 11 shillings to the Prince George's County estate of Henry King on 29 November 1770 [Prerogative Inventories 104:253-4], perhaps identical to William Gray "a Mulatto" who was one of James Lewis's tithables in Loudoun County, Virginia, in 1782 [Tithables 1758-1799, 1110].

2        iii. ?Hannah, born say 1735.

iv. Joseph, born 9 August 1738, bound to William Magruder until the age of thirty-one. He was head of a Montgomery County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:202].

3        v. Catherine1, born about August 1745.

vi. Ann, born in 1750.

 

2.    Hannah Gray, born say 1735, was the "Mollatto" servant of Enoch Magruder, merchant, on 23 March 1756 when she confessed to the Prince George's County court that she had an illegitimate child named Benjamin who was bound by the court to her master until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1754-8, 218]. She was the mother of

i. Benjamin, born 20 November 1755, "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:271], 4 in 1810 [MD:40] and 3 "free colored" in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1830.

4        ii. ?Elizabeth, born say 1760.

 

3.    Catherine1 Gray, born about August 1745, was the three-month-old child of Priscilla Grimes, alias Gray, who was bound to William Magruder by the Prince George's County court on 26 November 1745. She was called "Catherine Gray a Mullatto Woman" on 22 August 1769 when she was presented by the court for having an illegitimate child on information of George Magruder [Court Record 1768-70, 385, 528-9]. She was a "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:303]. She was the mother of

5        i. Catherine3, born about 1778.

6        ii. ?Mary, born about 1781.

iii. Rezin, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 7 April 1807: a dark mulatto lad, about 20 years old ... a free man and the son of Cate Gray of Prince George County, a free woman of color.

 

4.    Elizabeth Gray, born say 1760, was head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:221]. She may have been the mother of

i. Phillis, mother of a child named Ruth Gray by Ezekiel Williams ("free mulattoes"). Ruth was born in October 1803, baptized by her parents on 12 March 1804 in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, II:27].

 

5.    Catherine3 Gray, born about 1778, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 21 September 1809: a dark mulatto woman, about 31 years old ... a free woman, being the daughter of Cate Gray, a free woman of color. She was the mother of

i. Eliza, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom on 28 April 1818: a dark mulatto girl, about 25 years old ... daughter of Catherine Gray, who was the daughter of Cate Gray.

ii. Erasmus, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom on 22 March 1819: a black man ... about 22 years old ... son of Catharine Gray Jun.

 

6.    Mary Gray, born about 1781, was a "free negro" head of a Prince George's County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:302]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 19 June 1821: a colored woman, about 40 years old ... the descendant of a white woman. She was the mother of

i. John, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom on 19 June 1821: a black man about 21 years old ... son of Mary Gray, a free woman of color [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 1, 5, 24, 28, 38].

 

Other members of the Gray family were

i. Isaac, head of a Talbot County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:526].

ii. Henry, head of a Charles County household of 10 "other free" in 1800, with Edward Butler in his household [MD:568].

iii. Cate2, head of a Montgomery County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:194].

iv. Milly, head of a Prince George's County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:281], perhaps identical to Milby Gray, head of a Prince George's County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:4].

v. Thomas, head of a Prince George's County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:281].

vi. Peter, head of a Prince George's County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:271].

vii. Simon, head of a Prince George's County household of 3 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [MD:4].

 

GRAYSON FAMILY

1.    Ann Grayson, born say 1700, the servant of William Harris, confessed to the Prince George's County, Maryland Court on 23 August 1720 that she had a "Mallatoe" child by Clement Brooke's "Negro man" John. John confessed to the charge when he appeared in court on 28 March 1720/1, and the court ordered that he receive twenty-five lashes [Court Record 1715-20, 1032, 1040-1; 1720-2, 91-2]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. William, head of a Stafford County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810.

ii. Matilda, head of a Stafford County household of 3 "other free" in 1810.

iii. Winney, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:355].

iv. Nice, head of a Spotsylvania County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

v. David, head of a Prince William County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:498].

 

GREEN FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Green, born say 1717, was convicted in Queen Anne's County court in March 1731 for delivering a "mullatto" child on 1 November 1730 begotten by a "negroe." The court sold her daughter Sarah to Mr. Thomas Hynson Wright for 600 pounds in March 1731 and sold her to Wright for 50 pounds in November 1731 [Judgment Record 1730-2, 161-2, 264]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Sarah, born 1 November 1730, petitioned the Queen Anne's County in August 1772 to be levy free for the future [Judgments 1771-80, 64].

ii. Edward, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:345].

iii. Solomon, born say 1760, married Mary Protase, "free Negroes," by 4 November 1783 banns [Parsons, Marriage Register of Rev. Joseph Mosley, 133]. He was head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161].

iv. Robert, head of a Baltimore City household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:221].

v. Elisha, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:345].

vi. Henry, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:343].

vii. Valentine, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:345].

viii. Isaac, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:345].

ix. John, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:216].

x. James, head of a Harford County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

GREENWOOD FAMILY

Members of the Greenwood family in Maryland were

i. Jacob, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1790 and 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:160].

1        ii. Perry1, born say 1768.

 

1.    Peregrine1 Greenwood, born say 1768, and his wife Henrietta, "both free mulattoes," buried their two-year-old son Jonathan in the Catholic Church Yard at the head of Little Bohemia, Cecil County, Maryland, on 6 March 1792. They were probably identical to Peregrine and Henny Wood, "free mulattos," whose son Peregrine was born in Bohemia on 1 January 1793 [Wright, Vital Records of the Jesuit Mission, Warwick, 39, 50]. Their children were

i. Jonathan, born about 1790, died in 1792.

ii. Peregrine2, born 1 January, baptized 31 March 1793.

 

GRIFFIN FAMILY

Members of the Griffin family in Maryland and Delaware were

i. Peter, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:161].

ii. Ann, born say 1755, had an illegitimate male child by Nehemiah Hanser in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, about January 1774 [DSA, RG 3505, MS case files, February 1775 indictments].

1        iii. Robert, born say 1775.

iv. Joseph, head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161].

v. Catherine, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:172].

 

1.    Robert Griffin, born say 1775, was free and married to Priscilla Griffin on 10 March 1821 when his son Matthew obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County. Robert and Priscilla were the parents of

i. Matthew, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 March 1821: of a yellow complection ... free born, was raised in Dorchester County and is the son of Robert and Priscilla Griffin who were both free, aged about 22 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 43].

 

GRIMES FAMILY

1. Susanna1 Grimes, born say 1670, ran away from Prince George's County, Maryland, to Anne Arundel County with her "Malatta" child Elizabeth in 1704 after the death of her master, Colonel Hollyday. She was arrested and returned to Prince George's County court on 23 August 1704 when the court sold her and her four-year-old daughter to Edward Willett [Court Record 1699-1705, 321a]. She was the mother of

2        i. Isabella, born say 1690.

3        ii. Elizabeth, born 15 October 1700.

 

2.    Isabella Grimes, born say 1690, completed her indented time by 27 November 1711 when her mistress Sarah Magruder delivered her to the Prince George's County court. The Court sold her to Major Thomas Spriggs for seven years as punishment for a prior conviction of "Mulatto Bastardy." She had another child before 25 August 1713 when the court punished her for having an illegitimate child and running away from her master for eleven days. On 23 March 1713/4 the court sold her "Mallatto" child to John Henry until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1710-5, 124, 386, 388, 540, 542]. She may have been the mother of

i. a son, born about 1713, may have married Priscilla Gray who was called "Priscilla Grimes Als. Gray" when she confessed to the Prince George's County court that she had an illegitimate child [Court Record 1744-6, 298-9].

4        ii. Susanna2, born say 1719.

 

3.    Elizabeth Grimes, born 15 October 1700, was sold to Edward Willett, her mother's master, by the Prince George's County court on 23 August 1704. She was called a "Mallatoe woman belonging to Edward Willett" on 27 June 1721 when she confessed to having two illegitimate children. The court ruled that the oldest child was "begotten by a Negroe," ordered the child sold to her master until the age of thirty-one and sold the youngest, called a "white" girl, to Willett until the age of sixteen. She was called "Malatto Bess" on 24 June 1729 when she confessed to having a child by "a Certain Negro or Malatto Frank at William Digges'." Their child, born on 25 March 1728/9, was bound to Willett until the age of thirty-one. She had another child by a free person before 28 March 1731/2 when the court ordered that she serve twelve months and bound her illegitimate child Rachel to her master until the age of sixteen. And she had a child by a free person before 22 November 1737 when the court ordered that she receive ten lashes. On 23 March 1737/8 John Smith Prather, innholder, was security for her presentment for selling liquor without a license. The case was postponed several times until 26 June 1739 when Edward Willett became her security. On 26 August 1740 she was called "Elizabeth Grimes alias Malatto Bess" when James Russell had a case against her which was agreed between the parties before it came to trial. On 24 March 1740/1 she confessed to having an illegitimate child (by a free person), and the court ordered that she receive ten lashes [Court Record 1699-1705, 321a; 1720-2, 264-6; 1729-30, 9, 401; 1730-2, 301; 1736-8, 415, 595-6, 659, 660; 1738-40, 444, 518; 1740-2, 76, 93, 203]. She was the mother of

5        i. Catherine, born say 1717.

6        ii. ?Lettice, born say 1728.

iii. Rachel, born about 1732.

iv. ?John, born 25 March 1736/7, seven years old on 25 March 1743/4 when the Prince George's County court bound him as an apprentice to William Willett until the age of twenty-one. The court ordered that his master teach him to read the bible and give him a suit of clothes at the completion of his indenture [Court Record 1743-4, 275].

v. ?Philip, born about 1740, a three-year-old orphan bound to William Willett on 22 November 1743. The court ordered that he serve until the age of twenty-one and receive one year of schooling [Court Record 1742-3, 156].

 

4.    Susanah2 Grimes, born say 1719, admitted in Prince George's County court on 28 August 1739 that she had a "Mallatto" child. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and bound her daughter Nelly, born 25 June 1739, to Edward Willett until the age of thirty-one. In March 1742 she confessed that she had an illegitimate "Molatto" child named John who was bound as an apprentice until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1738-40, 442; 1742-3, 375]. Her children were

i. Nelly, born 25 June 1739.

ii. John, born about January 1742, 2 months old in March 1742 when he was bound apprentice by the Prince George's County court. He was said to have been eighteen years old (born 20 December 1744) on 22 June 1762 when the court bound him to Charles Pearl until the age of twenty-one [Court Record 1761-3, 188]. He was head of a Washington County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1790.

 

5.    Catherine Grimes, born say 1717, was the "Molato" servant of William Bowie of Mount Calvert Hundred on 26 November 1745 when she was convicted by the Prince George's County court of having an illegitimate child by a free person. The court bound her six-week-old child Ann to William Bowie until the age of sixteen. She may have had a common-law marriage with a member of the Graham family. She was called "Mulatto Kate belonging to William Bowie" on 28 June 1748 when she confessed to having another illegitimate child. The court ordered that she serve seven years and ordered her two-month-old "Mulatto" son Philip Graham bound to her master until the age of thirty-one. She was called "Mollatto Cate" on 26 November 1751 when she confessed to having an illegitimate child and was fined thirty shillings - the penalty for having a child by a free person. On 27 November 1753 she was called "Molatto" Catherine Graham, "servant to William Bowie," when the court ordered that she serve seven years and bound her one-year-old son Charles until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1744-6, 248, 278, 298-9; 1746-7, 434; 1747-8, 168; 1751-4, 72, 174]. She was the mother of

7        i. Ann, born in October 1745.

ii. Philip Graham, born in April 1748.

iii. Charles Graham, born 29 October 1752, "free negro" head of a Prince George's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:281].

 

6.    Lettice Grimes, born say 1728, was called "Negroe Lettice" in Prince George's County court on 23 June 1747 when the court ordered her daughter Dido sold to Thomas Willett until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1746-7, 620]. She was a "Free-Born Mulatto" listed in the inventory of the Frederick County estate of Thomas Willett on 18 September 1751 [Prerogative Inventories 48:325]. She was a "free-born Mullatto woman" who claimed to be close to forty years old in August 1764 when she petitioned the Frederick County, Maryland Court for her freedom from her indenture to Isabella Willet. She stated that she was born of a white woman and should have been entitled to her freedom at the age of thirty-one. Three months later on 20 November 1764 the court ordered her released from Willet's service but also convicted her of "Mullatto Bastardy" and ordered her sold to Samuel Beall for two years and four months. The same court ordered her daughter Lucy and (her daughter?) Lydia Grimes sold to Samuel Beall until the age of thirty-one. On 18 March 1766 she confessed to having another illegitimate child. Samuel Beall paid her fine and court costs [Judgment Record 1763-6, 285, 320, 323, 324, 503, 639]. She was the mother of

8        i. ?Benjamin1, born say 1744.

ii. Dido, born about August 1747, a "Free-Born Mulatto" girl listed in the inventory of the Frederick County estate of Thomas Willett on 18 September 1751 [Prerogative Inventories 48:325].

iii. Lydia, born about 1754, a ten-year-old "Mullatto" girl (no parent named) sold by the Frederick County court to Colonel Samuel Beall in November 1764 for thirty-one years [Judgment Record 1763-6, 324].

iv. ?William, head of a Frederick County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:538].

v. Lucy, born about 1760, a five-year-old child "begott on the body of Lettice Grimes, a Free born Mullato Woman by a Negro," who was sold to Samuel Beall on 20 August 1765 to serve until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1763-6, 324, 503].

vi. ?Nace, head of a Loudoun County, Virginia household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:258].

 

7.    Ann Grimes, born in October 1745, confessed to "Mulatto Bastardy" in Prince George's County court in June 1761 and in March 1763. The court ordered that she serve seven years for each offence and bound her two-month-old daughter Catherine to her master, William Bowie, until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1761-3, 47-8, 414]. She was the servant of John Fletcher in March 1773 when the Frederick County court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro," sold her for seven years and sold her daughter eleven-month-old daughter Alice to Colonel Samuel Beall until the age of thirty-one for 4 pounds [Court Minutes 1773-5, 22, 41]. She was the mother of

i. Catherine, born January 1763.

ii. Alice, born about February 1772.

 

8.    Benjamin1 Grimes, born say 1744, and his wife Elizabeth Grymes, "free Mulattas," registered the birth of their daughter Frances in Bruton Parish, James City County, Virginia, on 11 February 1765 [Bruton Parish Register, 26]. Benjamin's children were

i. Frances, born 11 February 1765.

ii. ?Daniel, born about 1777, head of a Norfolk County, Virginia household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:538], registered in York County on 21 September 1812: a person of light complexion about 35 years of age ... short hair, large nostrils & very fierce Eyes ... Born of free parents on Queens Creek in the parish of Bruton [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no.67].

iii. ?Benjamin2, born 1776-94, head of an Ash County, North Carolina household of one "other free" in 1800 [NC:79] and 3 "free colored" in Salisbury, Rowan County, in 1820 [NC:283].

iv. ?Thomas, head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:625] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:224].

 

Other descendants of the Grimes family were

i. Andrew, married Molley Goins, 11 April Loudoun County, Virginia bond. He was head of a Loudoun County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:258].

ii. Juda, married James Lucas, 12 September 1814 Loudoun County bond.

 

GRINNAGE FAMILY

1.    Grinedge, born say 1670, was called the "Former Negroe" of Thomas Marsh (constable of the Lower Hundred of Kent Island) on 15 March 1697/8 when he and a white woman named Jane Shoare, daughter of William Shoare, were presented by the Talbot County court for "haveing Carnell Copulation" the previous October and for living together. Grinage was called a "planter" in March 1698/9 when he posted 2,000 pounds and Richard Kempton posted 1,000 pounds as security for his appearance in court. Perhaps he and Jane were married since he was acquitted of the charge on 20 June 1699 on the condition that he pay the court fees [Judgment Record 1696-8, 524; 1699, 37, 49, 54-5]. Jane and Grinage's children or grandchildren may have been those listed in the inventory of the Kent Island estate of Thomas Marsh, Gentleman, on 5 September 1716: One Mallatoe Garl named beck 4-1/2 years old, one Mallatoe Do named Kate 1-1/2 years old, one Do named Rachel 1 years old [Prerogative Inventories 1717-1718, 41-2]. Their descendants who used the last name Grinnage were:

2        i. Mary Grenidge, born say 1700.

3        ii. Rebecca, born about 1712.

iii. Catherine1, born about 1714.

iv. Rachel, born about 1715, a "black" head of an Upper Hundred, Kent Island, Queen Anne's County household of 3 Blacks in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 149] and head of a Queen Anne's County household of 1 white woman and 1 "other free" in 1790 [MD:103].

4        v. Elizabeth, born say 1717.

vi. Walter1, called Walter Greenwich, "very aged and decripit," in November 1735 when the Queen Anne's County court exempted him and his wife Mary from paying taxes in the future [Judgment Records 1735-9, part 1, digital images 13-14], called Walter Grinedge, Sr., on 3 April 1745 when he owed 11 shillings to the Kent Island, Queen Anne's County estate of Benjamin Elliott, called Walter Greenage when he owed 5 shillings to the Queen Anne's County estate of Mr. Jacob Winchester per John Elliott's book, called Walter Greenwich on 13 December 1746 when he owed 6 pence to the Queen Anne's County estate of Robert Wilson [Prerogative Inventories, 1745, 31:51-60, 243-4; 1746, 33:308-12]

vii. Sarah, sued by Nathan Williams in Kent County court in August 1754 in a case which was discontinued before coming to court [RG 3815.031 1754-7, frame 46].

viii. Walter2, called Walter Grinedge, Jr., when he owed 1 shilling to the Kent Island, Queen Anne's County estate of Benjamin Elliott, on 3 April 1745, called Walter Greenwith on 9 July 1751 when he owed 2 shillings to the Queen Anne's County estate of Joseph Evens and called Walter Greenwich when he owed 800 pounds of tobacco to the Queen Anne's County estate of Thomas Hampton on 3 April 1752 [Prerogative Inventories, 31:51-60; 48:414-8; 49:9-10], taxable in Island District of Queen Anne's County in 1783 [MSA S1161-8-10, p.65].

ix. Thomas, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [MD:100].

x. Cusby, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [MD:100].

xi. Jacob, taxable in Corsica District of Queen Anne's County in 1783 [MSA S1161-8-9, p.51], a "free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [MD:100], a "N" taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1798 RG 3535, reel 6, frame 208], 6 "other free" in Murderkill Hundred in 1800 [DE:132], and 4 in 1810, perhaps counted twice [DE:18 & DE:64]. He purchased 2 acres in Kent County for $12 by deed proved on 2 December 1808 [DB L-2:40]. He was probably related to Abraham Grinnage, "free Negro," who was ordered to be hanged for burglary in Kent County on 2 August 1803 [DSA, RG 3825.002, 1751-1939, frame 91].

xii. Catherine2/ Kitty, born say 1758, had an illegitimate child in Queen Anne's County on 10 March 1778 [Judgment Record 1771-80, images 106-7].

5        xiii. John1, born say 1750.

xiv. John3, born say 1770, perhaps the John Grinage who was head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:8]. His uncle Sherry Grinnage, by his 1 November 1790 Caroline County will, gave him 40 acres in Caroline County, called Stock Range, and a log house with feather-edged shingles when he reached the age of twenty-one [WB JR B:168-70]. He was living in Queen Anne's County on 19 August 1812 when he sold the land to Sherry's son John (senior) [DB K:610-1].

xv. James3, convicted by the Kent County, Delaware court of stealing a horse from Simon Hawkins. In November 1792 the court ordered that he pay double the cost 15 pounds assessed value of the horse, receive 39 lashes, stand in the pillory for an hour and have the soft part of his ear cut off [DSA, RG 3825.002, Oyer & Terminer, 1751-1939, frame 205].

xv. Sampson, head of a Stafford County, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810.

 

2.    Mary Grenidge, born say 1700, was a poor old woman who was allowed 800 pounds of tobacco by the Queen Anne's County for her support from 9 December 1772 to November court 1773 [Surles, And they Appeared at Court 120]. She testified in Queen Anne's County court on 11 April 1776 that she delivered the birth of twin sons to Ann Derochbrane, wife of Joseph Derochbrane, on Kent Island forty-eight years previous [DB RT L:353]. She may have been the mother of

6        i. Sherry, born say 1722.

7        ii. James1, born say 1725.

 

3.    Rebecca Grinnage, born about 1712, a "spinster," was convicted by the Queen Anne's County court in March 1734 for having an illegitimate child on 10 March 1733. She may have been living on the land of Arthur Emory, Gentleman, who gave bond of 10,000 pounds of tobacco that her child Benjamin would not become a charge to the county [Judgment Record 1732-5, 392-3]. She owed 530 pounds of tobacco to the estate of Benjamin Elliott of Kent Island, Queen Anne's County on 3 April 1745. [Prerogative Inventories 1745, 31:57-40]. She was a "black" head of an Upper Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 148]. She was the mother of

8         i. Benjamin1, born 10 March 1733.

 

4.    Elizabeth Grinnage, born say 1717, was a spinster living in Christ Church Parish, Queen Anne's County, in June 1737 when she was convicted of having an illegitimate child on 10 September 1736. She was not found by the sheriff when he went to arrest her in November that year, so she may have been living on the land of Robert Lloyd of Talbot County, Gentleman, who posted bond of 30 pounds that her child Rebecca would not become a charge to the county. John Flamer was the father of her child [Judgment Record 1735-9, 343-4, 382]. She may have been the mother of

i. Rebecca2, born say 10 September 1736, a spinster "free Negroe" woman living in Talbot County in November 1756 when she admitted to the court that she had a child by a white man. The court sold her for seven years to her master and mistress Philip and Rebecca Palmer for 11 pounds to commence after she completed her indenture to them [Criminal Record 1755-61, 69].

 

5.    John1 Grinnage, born say 1750, rented (making his mark) 2 acres of land in Queen Anne's County, from Richard Hall on 18 November 1785 [Liber CD no.2, fol.52], made a deed of gift in Queen Anne's County for a horse, mare, bed and furniture, gun and pots to his children Nicholas and Mary Grinage on 22 March 1788 and a bill of sale to William Hall for a mare for $60 in 1813 [Liber STW-1, 25; IB-2, 198]. His children were

i. Nicholas.

ii. Mary.

 

6.    Sherry Grinnage, born say 1722, was owed 2 pounds currency due by note to the Queen Anne's County estate of Mr. Jacob Winchester on 28 August 1747 and owed the estate of Joseph Evens a little over a shilling on 9 July 1751 and owed 230 pounds of tobacco to the Queen Anne's County estate of Thomas Hampton on 3 April 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 31:243-4; 48:414-8; 49:9-10], allowed 600 pounds tobacco by the Queen Anne's County court for the annual support of his poor old mother in December 1775 [Surles, and they Appeared in Court, 1774-1777, 66], head of an Upper Hundred, Kent Island, Queen Anne's County household of 16 Blacks in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 148], taxable in Island District of Queen Anne's County in 1783, taxable on 103 acres called Copartnership and 52 acres called Streets Circumvention in River District of Caroline County in 1783 [MSA S1161-8-10, p.74; MSA S1161-3-5, p.28]. He was head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1790 [MD:37]. On 15 February 1785 he purchased 94 acres which was part of a tract called Copartnership and another tract of 48 acres called Street Circumvention for 620 pounds (called Sherry Greenwich). The following day he paid 7 pounds for 9 acres called Sherwood Friendship, adjoining Copartnership (called Sherry Greenwich) [DB A:848-9, 856-7]. He made a 1 November 1790 Caroline County will, proved 23 December 1790, by which he gave his daughter Susannah Greenage a "negro" girl Daffney, 2 beds and furniture, bedstead, horse, cow, heifer, calf, five sheep, a sow and pig, one-third his pewter, pots and pans, earthen ware, chairs and tables; gave son John Greenage all his lands except for 40 acres called Stock Range near Ann White's which his son John should make over to Sherry's nephew John Greenage when he should arrive at the age of twenty-one as well as build a log house for him about the size of the widow Ward's house and cover it with feather-edge shingles. He gave five pounds each to his daughter Sarah Flamour (wife of John Flamour), daughter Mary Flamour (wife of Solomon Flamour), Rachel Willson (wife of Solomon Willson, grandson Thomas Willson, son of daughter Ann Willson, decd, but if nephew John Greenage dies, Sherry Flamour son of ___ Flamour to receive the part of John Greenage. Also, nephew Sherry Wansey Willson one negro boy Dick, and to son John Greenage all my plantations, utensils, Negroes, stock and household furniture [WB JR B:169-70]. He was the father of

i. Sarah Flamour.

ii. Mary Flamour.

iii. Rachel Wilson.

iv. John2, taxable in River District Hundred of Caroline County in 1783 [MSA 1161-3-5, p.28], called a farmer of Caroline County when he purchased all the lands, improvements and personal estate of William Miller, including two horses, a yoke of oxen and other farm stock, and household furniture by two Caroline County deeds of 18 January 1798 for $400 pounds. He purchased 212 acres in Caroline County called Stock Range for 198 pounds on 14 October 1802 [DB F:198-200; H:223]. He was a "negro" head of a Caroline County household of 4 "other free" and a white woman over 45 years of age in 1810 [MD:168]. On 19 August 1812 he purchased for 35 pounds the 40 acres called Stock Range which his father had given his cousin John Grinage, Jr., of Queen Anne's County [DB K:610-1], and on 18 January 1823 he (signing) and William Hughlett sold parts of Streets Circumstance, Shearwood Friendship, Copartnership and Stock Range for $800, explaining in the deed that Hughlett had bought the property of John Grinage at a sheriff's sale. On 6 January 1823 John Grinage and William Hughlett sold Stock Range adjoining Honeysuckle and Neighbor Kindness for $160 [DB O:28-9; 62-3].

v. Ann Wilson.

 

7.   James1 Grinage, born say 1725, owed 500 pounds of tobacco to the Queen Anne's County estate of Thomas Hampton on 3 April 1752 [Prerogative Inventories, 49:9-10]. He was a "black" head of an Upper Hundred, Kent Island, Queen Anne's County household of 4 Blacks in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 149]. He, Sarah Grinage, Cassia Grinage and William Baxter were witnesses for the State against James Ringold who was fined for assault and battery and breaking and entering a house in Queen Anne's County in 1782 [Surles, And they Appeared at Court 1779, 1782, 1785, 1786, 1787, 37], perhaps the James Grinnage who was convicted by the Kent County, Delaware court of stealing a horse from Simon Hawkins. In November 1792 the court ordered that he pay double the 15 pounds assessed value of the horse, receive 39 lashes, stand in the pillory for an hour and have the soft part of his ear cut off [DSA, RG 3825.002, Oyer & Terminer, 1751-1939, frame 205]. He may have been the father of

i. Zachariah, "free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [MD:100] and 10 in 1800 [MD:345].

9        ii. James2, born day 1745.

 

8.   Benjamin1 Grinnage, born 10 March 1733, owed 300 pounds of tobacco to the Queen Anne's County estate of Thomas Hampton on 3 April 1752 and 1 pound, 18 shillings to the estate of Nathaniel Moore in 1763 [Prerogative Inventories, 49:9-10; 81:88]. He was called Benjamin Greenage, Sr, in March 1765 when the administrators of the Queen Anne's county estate of Edward Brown sued him for 36 pounds [Judgments 1764-5, 345-7]. He made a bill of sale in Queen Anne's County to Thomas Meloyd on 16 August 1773 for a black mare, cow and heifer to serve as security for his payment of his rent for a plantation belonging to William Ringgold, and he mortgaged a mare, horse, two cows, a steer and four rooms of tobacco hanging in a tobacco house to John Rosette for 30 pounds on 12 January 1785 [Liber RT-K, 172; CD-1, 163]. He a "free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County household of 6 "other free" in 1790. He may have been the father of

i. Benjamin2, served in the Revolution as a substitute from Queen Anne's County [Archives of Maryland 48:11]. He, a "molatto," and a white woman named Isabella Forbes alias Forbush were presented by the Queen Anne's County court in 1779 for marrying [Surles, And they Appeared at Court 1779, 1782, 1785, 1786, 1787, 9]. He was taxable in Island District of Queen Anne's County in 1783 [MSA S1161-8-10, p.65], a "free Negro" head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" and one white woman in 1790 and 5 "other free" and 2 white women in 1800 [MD:345]. He purchased two milk cows, hogs and household furniture from Greenberry Pritchett by Queen Anne's County deed recorded on 5 September 1822 [Liber STW-3, 40].

 

9.    James2 Grinnage, born say 1745, died before 29 September 1767 when the inventory of his Queen Anne's County estate was taken. James and Zachariah Grinage (making their marks) were nearest of kin. His inventory, signed by the administrator Sherry Grinage, totaled 13 pounds and included a bed, bedstead and other household furniture, two mares, two cows, a sow, ewe and lamb, and some shoemaker's tools. The account of his estate filed by Sherry Grinnage on 24 November 1768 called him James Grenage, Jr., and stated that he was survived by his widow Elizabeth, by then wife of Peter Bentley, and one child Ann Grenage [Prerogative Inventories 94:133-4; Queen Anne's County Administration Accounts 1756-69, 347-8 (MSA C1335-2)]. James and Elizabeth were the parents of

i. Ann, born say 1765.

 

A member of the family may have had a child by a slave. A "Negro Lad Named Grinage" was valued at 45 pounds in the inventory of the Queen Anne's County estate of Thomas Wilson on 31 May 1745 [Prerogative Inventories 1745, 31:245-6].

 

GURLEY FAMILY

Members of the Gurley family were

1        i. Francis, born say 1760.

ii. Bryan, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:425] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:218], probably the husband of Nancy Cornish.

 

1.    Francis Gurley, born say 1760, was taxable in Wicomico Hundred of Worcester County in 1783 [Assessment of 1783, MSA S1437, p.4]. He purchased 25 acres in Worcester County called Castle Fine for 12 pounds on 11 June 1793, 7 acres on 3 May 1794, and 50 acres on the north side of Aydolet's branch for 28 pounds on 12 September 1800. He sold 25 acres leading to Captain Winder's Mill at Salisbury for $250 on 14 April 1810 and he and his wife Nelly sold 156 acres called Hard Fortune, Gurley's Choice and Hazel Ridge for $300 on 1 April 1812 [DB P:31-2, P:372-3, AB:78, AC:282]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 9 "other free" in 1790, 9 in 1800 [MD:914] and 3 in 1810 [MD:486]. He left a 22 March 1830 Sussex County will naming his wife Ellender and sons William and Robert [DSA, RG 4545.9]. He was the father of

i. William.

ii. Robert.

 

GUY FAMILY

1.    Guy, born say 1660, was a "Negroe" who was living in Island Hundred, Talbot County, on 15 November 1687 when the court ordered that he serve James Downs for two years as punishment for begetting an illegitimate child by Downs' servant Elizabeth Vincent sometime before 15 March 1685/6. Their daughter Barbara Vincent was bound to Downs until the age of twenty-one. Downs gave Guy his freedom on 2 May 1690 [Judgment Record 1686-9, 68, 173; Chattel Records 1689-92, 320]. They may have been the ancestors of

2        i. Joseph1, born say 1702.

ii. Richard1, born say 1704, living in Queen Anne's County on 26 August 1735 when the court found in his favor in a suit brought against him by James Earle. He was called Richard Guy alias Williams in March 1738 when the court ordered him to serve James Earle another 5 years for running away for a total of 104 days in 1736 and 1737 [Judgment Record 1732-5, 541; 1735-7, 47].

 

2.    Joseph1 Guy, born say 1702, was a "free mulatto man begot by a Negro man on a white woman" living in Saint Paul's Parish on 10 August 1733 when the Queen Anne's County court convicted him of marrying a white woman named Bridget Jones and ordered them sold for seven years. Thomas Hynson Wright was highest bidder at 18 pounds, 10 shillings. He may have been identical to Joseph Williams alias Guy who John Emory won a suit against for 9,586 pounds of tobacco in June 1735. In November 1737 he confessed to running away for a total of 141 days in 1736 and 1737 and was ordered to serve an additional 1,410 days [Judgment Record 1732-5, 503-4, 513, 526]. They may have been the parents of

i. Joseph2, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:173].

ii. Richard2, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:47].

iii. John, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:118] and a "F.N." head of a Kent County household of 3 in 1810 [DE:64].

iv. Samuel, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:35].

v. George, "F. N." head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:19].

 

Go to Next Family Group: Hailey-Jones

Return to Maryland and Delaware