GRACE FAMILY

1.    Joan Grace, born say 1714, an indentured servant to William Penn, admitted in Charles County, Maryland court on 8 June 1731 that she had a "Mullatto" child "by a Negroe." And she admitted to a second mixed-race child on 13 March 1732/3. Her son William Grace, born 6 November 1732, was bound to serve Penn until the age of thirty-one. On 10 June 1735 her "Mullatto" son Thomas was bound to serve Penn for thirty-one years and on 10 August 1736 the court ordered that she be sold for twenty-one years as punishment for having three "Mullatto" children [Court Record 1727-31, 521; 1731-4, 297-8; 1734-9, 2, 37-38, 220]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Amie2, born about 1765, head of a Stafford County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:130]. She registered in Fauquier County in July 1807: age 42, 5'4-1/4", a Mulatto woman, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 114].

ii. Thomas2, head of a Stafford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:136].

iii. Rachel, head of a Stafford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:136].

iv. William2, head of a Stafford County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:135].

v. Polly, born about 1767, registered in Stafford County on 13 August 1804: a black woman aged about thirty seven years ... appearing to the satisfaction of the Court to have been born free and registered a copy in King George County [King George County Register of Free Persons, no.39].

vi. Winny, a "Mulatto" living in Fauquier on 25 November 1782 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Hamilton Parish to bind her to George Crosby [Minutes 1781-4, 79].

vii. Phebe, living in Fauquier County on 25 May 1784 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Hamilton Parish to bind her and Winny Grace to James Routt [Minutes 1781-4, 307].

 

GRAHAM FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Graham, born say 1696, appeared in Prince George's County, Maryland court on 26 June 1716 with her child who was adjudged to be a "Mallato." She was ordered to serve Thomas Wells, Sr., until November court. Later that year on 27 November the court sold her and her child to Thomas Clagett for 3,000 pounds of tobacco. She was called the "Servant woman of Thomas Wells" (no last name) on 25 November 1718 when the court bound her seventeen-month-old daughter Margaret to Edward Marlow. On 24 March 1718/9 she confessed to having another illegitimate child [Court Record 1715-20, 87, 143; 1715-20, 721, 814]. She was the ancestor of

i. James, born in March 1757, son of Sarah1 Graham, a "Malato Wench Liveing in Mount Calvert Hundred" on 23 August 1757 when the court ordered her sold for seven years and bound her five-month-old son James to Thomas Clagett until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1754-8, 490, 495]. He was head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Moses2, born in September 1763 in Prince George's County, Maryland, son of Eleanor Graham, bound to Zachariah Lyles until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1763-4, 8-9], ordered by the Frederick County, Virginia court in April 1792 to serve his master Ignatius Perry an additional two years and four months for time lost and expenses in taking him up [Orders 1791-2, 430]. He and his wife Flora were in a "List of Free Negroes and Molattoes" in William Kircheval's district of Frederick County, Virginia, living on John Rhodes' land in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 827] and he was a "Negro" taxable in Loudoun County in 1801 and 1804 [PPTL 1798-1812].

iii. Sandy, born in November 1765, head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:511] and 3 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. ?Lethy, head of a Wilkes County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:524].

 

GRANT FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Grant, born say 1700, was the servant of Ann Fitzhugh of King George County, Virginia, on 1 December 1721 when she was presented for having a "mulatto" child within the previous six months. And she had a second "mulatto" child before 4 September 1725 [Orders 1721-34, 27, 277, 280]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. John, born say 1739, living in Fairfax County on 17 July 1760 when (his master?) John Dalton acknowledged a certificate of his age and that of Elizabeth Grant, "two Mulatto servants," which was recorded by the court on motion of John Grant [Orders 1756-63, pt. 2, 502]. He was a "molatto" who was taxable with his wife Joan in Shelburne Parish of Loudoun County in the list for 1762, 1769 and 1771 [Tithables 1758-1799, 71, 500, 588, 1354], perhaps the John Grant who was head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1740, a "Mulatto" servant living in Fairfax County on 17 July 1760 when John Dalton acknowledged a certificate of her age [Orders 1756-63, pt. 2, 502].

iii. Margaret, born about 1750, a twenty-year-old "mulatto" who ran away from her master in Baltimore with an English convict servant man named John Chambers. Her master advertised a reward for her return in the 5 April 1770 issue of the Virginia Gazette stating that she had been in Barbados, Antigua, Granada, and Philadelphia and that she said she was born in Carolina [Virginia Gazette (Purdie & Dixon)].

iv. Gideon, a "Mulato" taxable with James Ivey in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1772, one of the "free Negors and Mullatus living upon the Kings Land" in Bladen County on 13 October 1773 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:79; G.A. 1773, Box 7], taxable in Bladen County in 1784, perhaps the father of J. Grant who was head of a Brunswick County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:234].

v. Hugh, head of a Bohemia Manor, Cecil County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

GRANTUM/ GRANTHAM FAMILY

1.   David1 Grantum, born say 1710, petitioned James Christian in Goochland County court on 3 December 1731 but failed to prosecute when the case came to trial in March 1731/2 [Orders 1728-31, 21, 56]. He was a tithable overseer on the St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County estate of John Christian of Charles City from 1746 to 1755: taxable on his own tithe and slaves Mureer and Bess in 1746 and 1747; on his own tithe, Will Grantum and slaves Primos and Murrer in 1753; on his own tithe, Will Grantom, Samuel Grantom and slaves Primoss and Murreer in 1754 and 1755; on his own tithe, Will Grantum, Sam Grantum, and slaves Primus and Murrear from 1756 to 1762; overseer of slaves Murear, Will, Talf, and Suck in 1763; taxable in his own household on 30 acres in 1764; taxed on his own tithe, Murrear and 35 acres in 1765; his own tithe and Murrear from 1767 to 1770; Murrear and Suck in 1771 and 1772; "his Daughter" Susanna in 1773; Suckie in 1774, and taxable on his own tithe in 1775 and 1776 [Goochland County List of Tithables, 1730-1755, frames 77, 169, 253, 298, 334; 1756-1766, frames 1, 42, 121, 149, 175, 253, 276, 318; 1767-1780, frames 70, 171, 200, 212, 253, 308, 340, 367]. He attached household items of Edmund Daniel for a 3 pound debt due by account in Goochland County court in March 1747/8 and sued Obediah Patterson for 3 pounds, 12 shillings in May 1752. In 1758 he purchsed 35 acres on the south fork of Wild Boar Creek in Goochland County from John Christian of Charles City County for 15 pounds. He brought suit against William Christian, executor of John Christian, deceased, in chancery in February 1765 stating that he was the "Mollatto" servant of Charles Christian of Charles City County who promised him 100 acres in the fork of Wild Boar Creek in Goochland County and a mare when he became free as a legacy or part of the estate of his deceased mother which Charles Christian held since David's infancy. John Christian, Charles's oldest son, at first agreed to transfer the land but later refused to sign the deed unless his brothers would give security not to challenge it. For seventeen to eighteen years up to this time David had lived on John Christian's land as overseer in a profit-sharing arrangement. William Christian responded to the complaint on 7 March 1771 that his father John Christian had employed David on the land as an overseer some twenty years prior--at first with three slaves which were later increased to six or seven, that David (a "Mulatto") kept one of the slaves as a wife and had several children by her, and that John Christian agreed to sell David 30-40 acres of land for 17 pounds. The court found that David had given a bond for the payment of the 17 pounds but never paid it [Orders 1741-4, 409; 1750-7, 132; DB 7:339; 1761-5, 466; LVA chancery case 1771-006; Orders 1779-83, 24]. He was "an aged and poor person" on 20 March 1780 when the Goochland County court exempted him from paying taxes. The following day he sued William Christian, executor of John Christian in a chancery suit. The suit was dismissed on 17 June 1782. He was again exempted from taxation on 21 April 1783 [Orders 1779-83, 17, 24, 115, 172; chancery case 1782-004]. He was the father of

i. Susanna, born say 1747, taxable in 1763.

2        ii. ?David2, born say 1730.

iii. ?William, born say 1733, taxable in Goochland County in 1755.

iv. ?Samuel, born say 1734, taxable in Goochland County in 1755.

 

2.   David2 Grantum/ Grantham, born say 1730, married Elizabeth, "Mulattoes," in Goochland County on 2 October 1778 [Jones, Douglas Register, 18]. He was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1782 to 1799: taxable on 3 horses and 6 cattle in 1782, levy free by 1790, charged with Samuel Mealey's tithe in 1797, with James Mealey's tithe in 1798 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 17, 151, 177, 237, 281, 296, 341, 422, 477, 481, 527]. By his 17 October 1801 Goochland County will, proved 18 June 1804, he lent most of his property to his wife Elizabeth and mentioned his son David, other unnamed children, and his granddaughter Jenny Mealy. His land was to revert to his wife's son James Mealy, after her decease [DB 19, part 1, 64]. Elizabeth was a "Mulatto" midwife taxable on a horse and living near Joseph Shelton's in the upper district of Goochland County from 1806 to 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 782, 824, 867; 1810-32, frames 8, 73, 99, 193]. She was head of Goochland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:693]. David was the father of

i. David3.

 

A member of the Grantum family may have had a common-law marriage with a slave. A slave named Kate received her freedom and the use of her master's land during her lifetime by the 17 July 1797 Goochland County will of Gideon Cawthon [DB 17:515]. Kate called herself Catherine Grantham on 17 February 1800 when she manumitted her son Woodson Grantham [DB 17:553]. On 13 March 1802 she sold land in Goochland County to James Holman for seventy-five pounds and set free her husband Phil Grantham, who she purchased from Holman [DB 18:356, 374]. Catherine left a will in 1802 which mentioned her sons Gideon and Woodson and left her land to her husband as long as he remained single [DB 20, pt. 1, 53]. Philip Grantum was head of a Goochland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:693] and a "Freed Negroe" living on William M. Holman's land in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List]. Gideon Grantum, born about 1798, registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 11 October 1821: twenty three years of age, five feet seven inches high ... free born [Register of Free Negroes, p.126].

 

GRAVES/ GROVES FAMILY

1.    Sarah Graves, born say 1728, was presented by the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish in Brunswick County, Virginia court in November 1747 for having a bastard child, and in January 1747/8 her son Ezekiel was ordered bound out [Orders 1745-49, 303, 323]. Her son was

2        i. Ezekiel, born about 1747.

 

2.    Ezekiel Graves, born about 1747, was sued for debt by Thomas Wallton in Brunswick County, Virginia court on 30 September 1767 [Orders 1765-8, 500]. He was taxable on a horse in Greensville County, Virginia, in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 778] and head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72] and 3 in 1800 (called Ezekiel Graves) [NC:447]. On 22 November 1787 he applied for compensation for twelve months service as a soldier in Captain Troughton's North Carolina Company [NCGSJ V:161]. He may have been the father of

i. Sally Greaves, born say 1775, head of a Franklin County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1800.

ii. James3 Groves, born 22 March 1780 in North Carolina, traveled to Natchez, Mississippi with the Dial family. He married Mary Nash, born 6 June 1781, daughter of Thomas Nash.

iii. B. Graves, born say 1785, head of a Brunswick County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:228].

iv. Mary Graves, head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:222].

 

South Carolina

1.    John Graves, born say 1745, may have been the John Graves who was listed in the Muster Roll of Captain Alexander McKintosh's Company in Gabriel Powell's South Carolina Battalion in the expedition against the Cherokees from 11 October 1759 to 15 January 1760, in the same list as Thomas Sweat [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 893]. According to the 1858 Johnson County, Tennessee trial of his great-grandson, Jacob F. Perkins, his wife's name was Susan [The Perkins File in the T.A.R. Nelson Papers in the Calvin M. McClung Collection at the East Tennessee Historical Center, deposition of Elizabeth Perkins]. In 1787 he was taxable on 92 acres and one free poll in Washington County, North Carolina (which became Tennessee in 1796) [Creekmore, "East Tennessee Taxpayers," East Tennessee Historical Society's Publications, (1963): 108], 192 acres and one free poll in Washington County in 1788, 75 acres and one free poll in Washington County in 1789 [Creekmore, Tennessee Ancestors, 5:38, 82] and 60 acres in Carter County, Tennessee, in 1798 but not subject to poll tax since he was over fifty years old [Carter County Tax List]. In the previously mentioned Johnson County, Tennessee trial, several persons deposed that John Graves had been a constable. Mary Wilson described him as a dark-skinned white man and his wife Susan as a dark white woman [The Perkins File, depositions of Elizabeth Cook, John J. Wilson]. They were the parents of

i. Ann, born say 1763, married Jacob Perkins about 1790.

ii. Benjamin2, born about 1765, an eighty-eight-year-old resident of Monroe County, Tennessee, on 12 May 1853 when he testified on behalf of Jacob Perkins to obtain a pension. He testified that his sister Ann was married by Parson Mulkey [Pension File R-8105]. He was taxable in Carter County, Tennessee, on one poll in 1798, 1799, and 1805 [Carter County Tax List].

iii. ?James2, born say 1771, taxable on one free poll in Washington County, Tennessee, between 1792 and 1795 [Creekmore, Tennessee Ancestors, 5:95, 100, 132, 149] and taxable in Carter County in 1796 [Carter County Tax List].

iv. ?Thomas, born say 1772, taxable in Washington County in 1793 [Creekmore, Tennessee Ancestors, 5:115].

v. ?William, born say 1784, purchased 50 acres in Carter County on Roan's Creek from his father-in-law, George Perkins, on 26 August 1805 and another 50 acres in the same area on 10 April 1807 [DB B:16, 108].

vi. ?Peter2 Graves, born say 1780, married Sarah Tann, 15 September 1801 in South Carolina [Holcolm, South Carolina Marriages].

vii. ?Hardy, born about 1794, sixty-four years old in 1858, living in Kentucky when he made a deposition for Jacob F. Perkins' Johnson County, Tennessee trial.

 

Endnotes:

1.     Perhaps the families became acquainted when Ezekiel Groves and William Dales (Dial) were "other free" heads of Northampton County, North Carolina households in 1790 [NC:72; 76].

2.    John J. Wilson's statement, "John Graves ... Was a constable. Sent to South Carolina for a certificate," may indicate that he was born there.

 

GRAY FAMILY

The Gray family of Virginia may have descended from Priscilla Gray, a "Mollatto Woman born of a white Woman," who had seven illegitimate children in Prince George's County, Maryland, between 1727 and 1745 [Court Records 1726-7, 626; 1730-2, 2, 5; 1732-4, 118; 1734-5, 357; 1738-40, 199; 1744-6, 298-9; 1749-50, 244].

Members of the family in Virginia were

1        i. Winney, born say 1746

ii. Benjamin, born 20 November 1755, son of "Mollatto" servant Hannah Gray who confessed to the Prince George's County, Maryland court that she had an illegitimate child named Benjamin who was bound by the court to her master Enoch Magruder on 23 March 1756 until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1754-8, 218]. He was a "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:271], 4 in 1810 [MD:40] and 3 "free colored" in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1830.

 

1.    Winney Gray, born say 1746, a "mulatto," was living in Fauquier County, Virginia, on 25 November 1766 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Hamilton Parish to bind her to Elizabeth Tennill [Orders 1764-8, 239]. She may have been the mother of

i. Forester, "f. negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:258].

ii. Davey, head of a Fairfax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:257].

iii. James, "other free" head of a Frederick County, Virginia household in 1810 [VA:507].

iv. Rachel, head of a Lenoir County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:35].

 

GRAYSON FAMILY

1.    Ann Grayson, born say 1700, the servant of William Harris, confessed to the Prince George's County, Maryland court on 23 August 1720 that she had a "Mallatoe" child by Clement Brooke's "Negro man" John. John confessed to the charge when he appeared in court on 28 March 1720/1, and the court ordered that he receive twenty-five lashes [Court Record 1715-20, 1032, 1040-1; 1720-2, 91-2]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. William, head of a Stafford County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:128].

ii. Matilda, head of a Stafford County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:127].

iii.. Ursula, born about 1774, registered in Fauquier County, Virginia, on 25 June 1821: age 47, 5'7", a dark Mulatto [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 44].

iv. Winney, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:355].

v. Nice, head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:113b].

vi. David, head of a Prince William County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:498].

 

GREGORY FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Gregory, born say 1670, was called "my Christian Negro Elizabeth" in William Thornbury's 5 November 1697 Essex County will by which he left her his estate consisting of farm animals and household goods to be divided amongst herself, her daughter Sarah, son William, her "Irish Girle" Katherine, and a motherless child named Ann. He called William his godson. Elizabeth was his executrix [DB 9:158]. She was called Elizabeth Christian on 13 July 1698 when her petition for probate on the will was granted after being delayed from the 10 March 1697/8 court [Orders 1695-9, 99, 110]. She was called "Elizabeth Gregory Exec'x of William Thornbury" on 23 June 1699 when she sued John Jones for 930 pounds of tobacco in Northumberland County court and called "Elizabeth a Christian Negro Exec'x of Wm Thornbury" on 25 September 1699 when the case was dismissed [Hamrick, Northumberland County Court Order Book 1699-1713, 34, 57, 47, 72]. She was called "Eliza a Christian Negro" on 20 June 1699 and 11 August 1699 and called "Eliz. Gregory Negro" on 11 June 1701 when her assignees brought suit in Essex County court [Orders 1695-99, 157; 1699-1702, 4, 93]. She may have been the Elizabeth Gregory who made an Essex County deed of gift of a cow, calf, and mare to her grandson Benjamin, son of John Acres, on 10 October 1700 [D&W 10:59]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah.

ii. William, godson of William Thornbury.

iii. Katherine, "her Irish Girle."

 

Another Gregory family:

1.    Christian Gregory, born say 1738, a white servant woman of John Hooe, was living in Prince William County on 27 October 1755 when the court ordered her to serve her master additional time for running away for sixteen days. On 24 November the same year she agreed to serve Hooe an additional two years and to forego her freedom dues in exchange for his curing her of "the French Disease" [Sparacio, Prince William County Orders 1753-57, 81, 83]. She was the mother of Thomas and Presley Gregory, "mulatto" bastard children born in Prince William County, Virginia [Historic Dumfries, Records of Dettingen Parish, 112, 114]. Her children were

i. Thomas, born 21 September 1762, bound to John Hooe on 5 September 1763.

ii. Presley, born about September 1763, bound to John Hooe on 3 September 1763. He was head of a Frederick County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:555].

iii. ?John, born about 1758, head of a Craven County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:130] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:65]. He was seventy-four years old on 15 August 1832 when he made a declaration in Craven County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was living in Brunswick County, North Carolina, when he was drafted, and had two severe cuts from a sword which extended from his eyelid to the crown of his head [NCGSJ XII:186 (CR 28.301.29)].

iv. ?Adam, born say 1768, head of a Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [PA:199].

v. ?Charles, born say 1785, head of a Charles City County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:939].

vi. ?Ann, born say 1780, married James Ligon, 14 November 1798 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond.

 

GRICE FAMILY

1.    Moses Grice sold 180 acres in Halifax County, North Carolina, joining Elk Marsh by a deed registered in October 1767 [DB 10:44] and moved to Bladen County where he was a white taxable from 1768 to 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:9, 59, 95]. On 27 April 1770 he purchased 300 acres in Bladen County which he and his wife Mary sold by deeds of 8 January and 15 January 1774 [DB 23:126, 359, 360]. He purchased 100 acres in Robeson County on the south side of Drowning Creek in 1784 [DB 1:246]. His 1789 Robeson County will named his wife Mary, and children: Benjamin, Patty, Tabby, Fathey, John, and Jonathan Grice. Mary was head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:49].

 

GRIFFIN FAMILY

1.    Catherine Griffin, born say 1704, was a white woman living in Henrico County in November 1722 when she was presented by the court for having an illegitimate child by a "mulatto man" [Orders 1719-24, 220]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. John, born say 1722.

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1725, living in Goochland County in November 1747 when the court ordered the churchwardens of King William Parish to bind out her "Mulatto" child [Orders 1744-9, 392].

 

2.    John Griffin, born say 1722, was taxable in Fishing Creek District, Granville County, North Carolina, in 1761 with his wife Miles and Fanny Bunch (one Black male and two black females over sixteen years of age) and taxable with Miles in 1762. Miles may have been related to Fanny Bunch. He may have been the John Griffin who recorded a plat for 250 acres on the Santee River near the Wateree River in South Carolina on 19 September 1764 [S.C. Archives series S213184, vol. 7:413]. He was head of a Camden District, Richland County, South Carolina household of 4 white males and 4 females in 1790 [SC:26]. Perhaps John and Miles were the parents of

i. Patty, married Council Bass, 4 May 1782 Bertie County, North Carolina bond, Cader Bass witness.

3        ii. Gideon1, born about 1760.

iii. Morgan, recorded a plat for 200 acres on Horse Range Swamp in Orangeburgh District, South Carolina, on 20 September 1785. He was head of a white household of 4 males and 4 females in the north part of Orangeburg District in 1790 [SC:96] and head of a Richland District household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. On 25 November 1819 he petitioned the South Carolina Legislature (signing) while in Richland County for compensation for his service in the Revolution. His daughter and only heir Martha Coon testified in Richland County on 22 November 1849 that his wife died about 1809 and he died 28 March 1837 [S.C. Archives S213190, vol. 14:250; series S108092, reel 61, frame 104].

 

3.    Gideon1 Griffin, born about 1760, recorded a plat on Spears Creek in Camden District, South Carolina, on 28 November 1785 [S.C. Archives series S213019, Vol. 12:543]. He was counted as white in 1790, as were all mixed-race heads of families in Camden District, Richland County, South Carolina: head of a household of a white male and a white female in 1790 [SC:26], 7 "other free" in 1810 [SC:175a] and 6 "free colored" in 1830 [SC:409]. He was living in Richland District on 29 November 1826 when he petitioned the legislature for a pension for his services in the Revolution, stating that he was old and indigent and had a large family. Morgan Griffin testified that he knew Gideon and saw him in the service. He died on 10 July 1837, and on 22 November 1849 his thirty-seven-year-old son Stephen appeared in Richland County court to claim a survivor's pension. He stated that he was the son of Gideon and his wife Patience Griffin who were both deceased and that they were married in 1790 or 1791. R. T. Wynne, a niece of Patience, testified that she was a near neighbor of Gideon and was a playmate of his children: Sophia Griffin (who married a Chavers) and Gideon Griffin, Jr. On 1 January 1850 James Rawlinson testified that he was about eighty-seven, Patience was his sister who died about seven years previous, that she was about two years older than him and that she and Gideon were married at his father's house [S.C. Archives S108092, reel 61, frame 18 and National Archives Pension file W8877 on http://www.fold3.com]. Gideon and Patience were the parents of

i. Sophia Chavers, a "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Richland County [SC:357, family no. 357], probably the wife of Robert or James Chavers who were "free colored" heads of Columbia, Richland County households in 1820 [SC:11].

ii. Gideon2.

iii. ?George, born about 1794, made an affidavit (signing) in Richland County court for the pension application of Edward Harris [National Archives Pension file no. R4649, http://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Richland District household of 8 "free colored" in 1830 [SC:411] and a fifty-six-year-old "Mulatto counted in the 1850 Richland County census with (wife?) Patsy and $100 real estate [SC:116, family no. 341].

iv. Stephen, born about 1812.

 

Pasquotank County, North Carolina

1.    Jemima Griffin, born say 1730, (no race indicated) was living in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, on 22 March 1757 when the court ordered her "Mallatto" daughter Patience bound to James Hodges until the age of thirty-one. On 26 March 1759 the court bound Patience to Hodges' widow Merriam Hodges. And on 14 October 1766 the court ordered that her orphan children be bound to Daniel Bray as apprentice coopers until the age of twenty-one, the children being about seven at the time [Minutes 1755-77, March Court 1757, n.p., March Court 1759, n.p.; 1765-8, 34]. She was the mother of

i. Patience, born say 1757.

ii. ?Sam, born say 1759, head of a Pasquotank County household of 19 "other free" in 1810 [NC:901].

iii. ?Ned, head of a Pasquotank County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:900].

 

Other members of a Griffin family were

i. Aaron, born about 1748, a twenty-two-year-old "Mulatto" slave who brought suit for his freedom from Henry Randolph of Chesterfield County in the General Court under the name Aaron Griffin in October 1770. He lost his suit and ran away, but "many of his Colour got their Freedom that Court" according to an advertisement placed in the Virginia Gazette by John Randoplh, son of Henry [Virginia Gazette (Purdie & Dixon edition)].

ii. Amea, a "Molatto" girl listed in the 21 November 1766 Northumberland County estate of Stephen Chilton, valued at 100 shillings [RB 1766-70, 56-7]. She may have been the mother of Sukey Griffin who was in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Northumberland County in 1813 [PPTL 1813-49].

iii. Edward, a man of "mixed blood" who was promised his freedom when he was sold to William Kitchen to serve in his place in the Revolution. The North Carolina General Assembly passed a bill to give him his freedom on 15 May 1784 [NC Archives GASR Apr-June 1784, Box 3, location 3A-464]. He was a "Mulatto" head of an Edgecombe County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 1800 [NC:202].

 

GRIMES FAMILY

1.    Susanna1 Grimes, born say 1670, ran away from Prince George's County, Maryland, to Anne Arundel County with her "Malatta" child Elizabeth in 1704 after the death of her master, Colonel Hollyday. She was arrested and returned to Prince George's County court on 23 August 1704 when the court sold her and her four-year-old daughter to Edward Willett [Court Record 1699-1705, 321a]. She may have been the ancestor of

2        i. Charity, born say 1700.

3        ii. Benjamin1, born say 1742.

4        iii. George, born say 1746.

iv. Nace, head of a Loudoun County, Virginia household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:258].

v. Andrew, married Molley Goins, 11 April 1810 Loudoun County, Virginia bond. He was head of a Loudoun County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:258].

vi. Juda, married James Lucas, 12 September 1814 Loudoun County bond.

 

2.    Charity Grymes, born say 1700, was set levy free in King George County on 7 July 1763. She may have been identical to Charity Boyd whose grandsons William and Moses Grymes were bound out by the King George County court on 5 July 1759 [Orders 1751-65, 586, 1073]. She was probably the Charity Grymes who petitioned the Spotsylvania County court for the freedom of (her daughter?) Averilla Grymes in September 1747. She may have been the ancestor of

5        i. Averilla, born say 1726.

ii. Moses, born say 1740, ordered bound as an apprentice carpenter to Charles Carter, Jr., in King George County until the age of twenty-one on 5 July 1759. He was a "mulatto" who served in the Virginia Regiment commanded by Colonel Gibson and waited on Colonel Brent during the Revolution. He was married to a forty-five-year-old "mulatto" woman named Jane Wilson on 2 October 1779 when Cuthbert Bullitt of Dumfries, Virginia, placed an ad in the Maryland Journal and Baltimore Advertiser which stated that she had run away, perhaps to her husband or to the plantation of her former master Colonel George Mason or to Mrs. Page, among whose slaves she had a number of relations [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements, II:232-3].

iii. Nancy, born say 1775, niece of David Pinn, married David Pinn, Jr.

 

3.    Benjamin1 Grimes, born say 1742, was sued for debt by Francis Willis, Jr., in York County court on 19 March 1764. John Robinson, Gentleman, of Middlesex County was his security [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 184]. He and his wife Elizabeth Grymes, "free Mulattas," registered the birth of their daughter Frances in Bruton Parish, James City County, Virginia, on 11 February 1765 [Bruton Parish Register, 26]. Benjamin's children were

i. Frances, born 11 February 1765.

ii. ?John, born say 1767, taxable in York County from 1788 to 1804, taxable on a slave in 1800 and 1801. Perhaps his widow was Peggy Grimes who was taxable on one free male tithable in York County in 1812 and head of a household of two "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16," one of whom was tithable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 140, 172, 182, 201, 220, 229, 244, 255, 265, 296, 375, 388]. She was head of a York County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:889].

iii. ?Daniel, born about 1777, taxable in York County from 1801 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 265, 286, 327, 339, 364, 389], head of a York County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:889], registered in York County on 21 September 1812: a person of light complexion about 35 years of age ... short hair, large nostrils & very fierce Eyes ... Born of free parents on Queens Creek in the parish of Bruton [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no.67]. He may have been identical to the Daniel Grimes who was head of a Norfolk County, Virginia household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:814].

iv. ?Benjamin2, born 1776-94, head of an Ash County, North Carolina household of one "other free" in 1800 [NC:79] and 3 "free colored" in Salisbury, Rowan County, in 1820 [NC:283].

v. ?Thomas, head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:625] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:224].

 

4.    George Grymes, born say 1746, and his wife Elizabeth, "Boath free mulattoes," were the parents of Philip whose birth and baptism were recorded in Bruton Parish, James City County. They were the parents of

i. Philip, born 7 April 1769, baptized 14 August [Bruton Parish Register, 33].

ii. ?James, a "free man of colour" who purchased a lot on South Street in the Borough of Norfolk for $120 in 1818 [DB 48:332-3].

 

5.    Averilla Grimes, born say 1726, petitioned the Spotsylvania County court for her freedom from James Steven and wife Alice, executrix of Ambrose Grayson, deceased, on 2 June 1747. When the case was called for trial in September 1747 it was styled "Charity Grymes & others vs. James Stevens &c." And the plaintiffs were called Averilla Grymes, William Grymes and Elizabeth Grymes when the court dismissed their petition in February 1747/8 [Orders 1738-49, 420, 430, 439, 453]. The court dismissed their petition in February 1747/8 [Orders 1738-49, 420, 430, 439, 453]. She may have been the mother of

i. William, born say 1742, petitioned the Spotsylvania County court in February 1747/8, perhaps the William Grimes who was ordered bound as an apprentice carpenter to Charles Carter, Esq., in King George County on 5 July 1759 [Orders 1751-65, 586].

ii. Elizabeth, petitioned the Spotsylvania County court in February 1747/8.

 

GROOM FAMILY

1.    John Groom, born say 1720, entered 200 acres in Bladen County, North Carolina, on Drowning Creek near a place called Errington's Cowpen on 3 October 1748 [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, no. 448]. He was probably related to Thomas Groom who was granted 200 acres on the Peedee River in Craven County, South Carolina, on 29 May 1745 [South Carolina Archives, Royal Grants 24:23]. And he was probably related to Recher Groom who was one of the "Harbourers" of the "free Negors and Mulattus" who were "Raitously Assembled together in Bladen County on 13 October 1773": Richard Groom, William Groom, William Groom, Jr., Thomas Groom, and members of the Locklear, Sweat, Chavis, and Ivey families [G.A. 1773, Box 7]. John was a "mulatto" taxable in New Hanover County in 1763 [SS 837] and head of a household of 7 "other free" in Marlboro County, South Carolina, in 1800 [SC:59]. John was probably the father of

2        i. Richard, born say 1745.

ii. William1, Sr., listed among the "free Negors and Mulattus" in Bladen County in 1773. He recorded a memorial for 100 acres in Craven County, South Carolina, on 4 January 1771 [South Carolina Archives, Memorials 10:300]. Perhaps his widow was Charity Groom, head of an Orangeburgh District, South Carolina household of 3 white females and 1 white male under 16 in 1790 [SC:96].

iii. Isaac, a "Molato" taxable in Bladen County from 1772 to 1774 and listed with a female "Mixt Blood/ free Negro" taxable in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:79, 107, 135; II:64, 80], head of an Orangeburgh District household of 1 white male over 16 and 2 white females in 1790 [SC:96].

iv. Thomas, taxable in Bladen County as white in 1769 and a "Mulato" taxable in 1770 and 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:14, 45, 61].

 

2.    Richard Groom, born say 1745, was living on land on the southwest side of the Little Peedee River in Craven County, South Carolina, on 6 April 1762 when the area was surveyed for a memorial of Hugh Thompson [South Carolina Archives, Memorials 6:24]. This area is located just across the border with Robeson County, North Carolina. He was in present-day Robeson County on 13 October 1773 when he was among the "free Negors and Mulattus" who were "Raitously Assembled together in Bladen County" [G.A. 1773, Box 7]. Richard was head of a household of 3 white males over 16, 2 under 16, and 4 white women in the north part of Orangeburgh District, South Carolina, in 1790 [SC:96] and 8 "other free" in 1800 [SC:935]. He may have been the father of

i. Richard2, head of an Orangeburgh District household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:935].

ii. William2, ("Jr."), a white taxable in Bladen County in 1774 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:107], head of an Orangeburgh District household of 1 white male over 16, 1 under 16, and 2 white females in 1790 [SC:96].

iii. Nancy, a resident of Richland District who petitioned the South Carolina legislature in 1806 asking to be exempted from the tax on free Negro women [S.C. Archives series S.165015, item 01885].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Benjamin Sweat, Gideon Bunch, Jr., and Gutridge Locklear were also counted as white in the Orangeburgh census in 1790 [SC:96].

 

GUY FAMILY

1.  Daniel1 Guy, born say 1725, was sued by John Underwood in a Brunswick County, Virginia chancery case on 27 January 1767. He was paid 6 pounds, 17 shillings by the Brunswick County court for Adam Sims, Jr.'s building a bridge over Fountain Creek at Proctor's Ford on 23 February 1767 [Orders 1765-8, 207, 212, 340, 493]. On 13 March 1769 he and his wife Sarah sold 100 acres where they were then living on Fountain Creek in Meherrin Parish (present-day Greensville County), and he sold 220 acres bounded on the north by Fountain Creek on 27 January 1773, explaining in the deed that it was land he had purchased from Katherine Gusses [DB 9:459; 11:39]. He was sued in Brunswick County court for a 10 pound debt on 26 July 1773 [Orders 1772-4, 235, 334]. He was in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, by 14 September 1778 when the court ordered that he, William and John Guy be added to the list of tithables. On 12 May 1783 the court ordered that he be exempt from paying taxes, "he being old and infirm" [Orders 1773-9, 425; 1779-84, 308]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 8 white (free) persons in 1782 [VA:34]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County on his own tithe, a horse and 7 head of cattle in 1782 and 1783. His estate was taxable on a horse and 8 cattle from 1784 to 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 15, 46, 137, 193]. He and John Guy were sued in Mecklenburg County for 14 pounds by Charles Gilmour on 14 July 1783, and on 10 May 1790 the court ordered that he have taxes on 2 horses and 4 head of cattle remitted for the year 1786 [Orders 1779-84, 388; 1787-92, 220, 231, 496]. He was probably the father of

2        i. John1, born say 1758.

3        ii. William, born about 1763.

iii. Lucy, born say 1768, mother of Betsy Guy who married Robert Jones, 6 August 1809 Mecklenburg County bond, with a note from her mother Lucy. Perhaps she was also the mother of Susan Guy and four-year-old Lewis Guy who were bound apprentices by the Mecklenburg County court to Samuel Holmes and his wife on 8 January 1810. On 21 September 1812 James and David Thomas and Susan and Lewis Guy complained that Holmes was illegally detaining them in slavery, but the court found that their indentures were legal. They complained again on 15 November 1813 that they were being held in slavery, and the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind them to Holmes, giving Susanna's age as twelve and Lewis' age as eight on 21 March 1814 [Orders 1809-11, 114; 1811-13, 317, 328; 1813-15, 116].

4        iv. Christopher, born say 1766.

 

2.    John1 Guy, born say 1758, was added to the list of tithables in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 14 September 1778 [Orders 1774-9, 425]. He was bondsman for the 23 December 1794 Mecklenburg County marriage of Thomas Maclin and Delilah Evans. He purchased 130 acres on Flat Creek for 156 pounds by deed proved in Mecklenburg County on 11 September 1797 [DB 9:425]. On 14 July 1783 the Mecklenburg County court ordered that a slave over the age of 16 named Israel be added to his list of taxables [Orders 1779-84, 387]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County on his own tithe and 6 horses and 3 cattle in 1783, taxable on a slave named Hannah in 1784, and a slave named Phillis in 1791 and 1792. He was a "Mulattoe" taxable from 1806 to 1820: taxable on a slave and 4 horses in 1806, counted with 4 free "Mulattoes" and 2 slaves in his household in the list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1813, over the age of 45 in 1815 and exempt from personal tax in 1819 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 42, 66, 137, 193, 204, 291, 345, 403, 425; 1806-28, frames 340, 390, 506, 537, 596, 637, 654, 703] and head of a Mecklenburg County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:154b]. He purchased land in Mecklenburg County by deed proved in 1797. This land was sold by his estate in 1843 [DB 9:245; 30:168]. He died before 1827 when his sons Spencer and Asa Guy executed a deed of trust on their father's estate. A Mecklenburg County chancery suit in 1844 named his children [LVA chancery file 1844-023]. He was the father of

i. George, born say 1778, over the age of 16 years when he was listed as a tithable in his father's Mecklenburg County household from 1795 to 1798. He was head of his own household in 1799 when he was taxable on a horse [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 573, 659, 686, 762]. He married Nancy Drew, 11 December 1799 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1806 to 1814: listed with 2 "Mulattoes" over the age of 16 (probably himself and his wife) and a slave in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frames 35, 62, 136, 235, 260, 390]. He may have been identical to the George W. Guy who married Nancy Hailstock (Ailstock), 20 July 1815 Warren County bond. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 4 "free colored" and 3 slaves over 45 years of age in 1820 [VA:162b].

ii. Spencer, born say 1785, over the age of 16 years when he was listed as a taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household from 1802 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 919, 946, 1025, 1056]. He was a taxable a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1809 to 1820: counted in the list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frames 135, 163, 235, 340, 537, 596, 703]. He married Sally Barnard, 1815 Mecklenburg County bond and was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:154b].

iii. Polly, born about 1786, married Hardaway Drew, 1813 Mecklenburg County bond.

iv. Asa, a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1813 to 1820 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frames 340, 389, 537, 703]. He married Nancy Robards, 9 February 1824 Warren County bond, Hardaway Drew surety.

v. Lucinda, born say 1795, married Willis Guy, 1815 Mecklenburg County bond. Willis was a "Mulattoe" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1818 to 1820 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frames 637, 654, 703].

 

3.    William Guy, born about 1763, was added to the list of tithables in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 14 September 1778 [Orders 1773-9, 425]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 4 white (free) persons in 1782 [VA:34] and taxable there from 1782 to 1791 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 15, 46, 117, 193, 292, 403]. He was sued in Mecklenburg County court on 13 September 1784 for debt due by account, and on 14 November 1803 he was charged with retailing liquor without a license at the house of Thomas Booth, but the presentment was dismissed when the witness against him failed to appear [Orders 1784-7, 119; 1803-5, 53, 128, 165-6]. He was head of a Granville County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free," one white woman over forty-five years of age, and one white woman 16-26 years old in 1810 [NC:890]. He called himself "a free man of Color" on 5 February 1833 when he made a declaration in Granville County court in order to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He testified that he was about seventy years old, was born in Brunswick County, Virginia, and lived in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, when he enlisted as a substitute for Jack Goode at Mecklenburg courthouse. He moved to Granville County about 1803. On 8 November 1842 his widow Abigail Guy, aged eighty years, testified in Granville County in order to obtain a widow's pension. She stated that she and William Guy were married on 12 June 1780, and her husband died on 30 January 1837. Her application included a copy of their 10 January 1780 Halifax County, North Carolina marriage bond: William Guy to Abigail Chavers (Chavis). It stated that William Guy and Charles Chavers provided the bond, but it was signed William Guy and Samuel Chavers (by mark) [M804-1149; M805-384, frame 0381]. They may have been the parents of

i. Daniel2, born say 1784, taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1802 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 919, 1056]. He married Nancy Erle, 26 February 1806 Mecklenburg County bond, William Chandler security. Nancy Erle may have been identical to Nancy Bigers Earl who received land by the 19 January 1789 Henry County will of her father Menoah Chavis [WB 1:180]. Daniel was taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1806 to 1814, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814. The second "Mulatto over the age of 16" in his household in 1813 was probably his wife [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frames 35, 136, 235, 260, 340, 389]. He was taxable in Hawtree District of Warren County, North Carolina, in 1815 [Tax List Papers, Vols TC 8, 1795-1815] and head of a Warren County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:804].

ii. Vines, married Elizabeth Jeffries, 8 January 1805 Orange County, North Carolina bond, Jesse Blalock bondsman. Vines was head of an Orange County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:795] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:61].

 

4.    Christopher Guy, born say 1766, was taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1783 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 46] taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, in 1787, 1792 and 1793 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1807, frames 63, 136, 162], taxable in Mecklenburg County on his son John in 1804, and taxable on sons John and Buck in 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 137, 685, 798, 919, 1025, 1056]. Richard Evans was his security in Mecklenburg County court when he was sued for a debt of 5 pounds on 13 May 1783, and Daniel Guy was his security on 14 August 1786 when he was sued for a debt of 10 pounds [Orders 1779-84, 315, 343; 1784-7]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1806 to 1817 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frames 35, 135, 163, 235, 341, 390, 596] and head of a household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:159b]. He was the father of

i. John2, born say 1787, over the age of 16 years when he was listed in his father's Mecklenburg County household in 1804. He married Aggy Whitmore, 21 February 1814 Orange County bond. Aggy was probably the daughter of Charles Whitmore, born before 1776, head of an Orange County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:A:412]. Charles was deposed in Orange County on 22 November 1832 and 27 May 1833 for the Revolutionary War pension application of John Jeffries. He stated that he was born in Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1765, moved to North Carolina about 1798, and was acquainted with John Jeffries in 1780 when he left home to serve in the war [M804-1409, frames 0406, 0425]. Charles was called the "natural son of Agathy Whitmore" on 22 December 1777 when the Brunswick County court ordered the churchwardens of Meherrin Parish to bind him out as an apprentice [Orders 1774-82, 177]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, in the same district as the Guy family in 1795 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 585] and taxable in Nutbush District of Warren County in 1798 [Tax List 1781-1801, 364].

ii. Buck/ Buckner, born say 1789, over the age of 16 years when he was listed in his father's Mecklenburg County household in 1805. Buckner married Sylvia Jeffries, 16 July 1810 Orange County bond, Merriday Chavis bondsman.

iii. Fanny, married Benjamin Manning, 5 May 1796 Mecklenburg County bond. And a Frances Guy was counted as a "Mulatto" in Mecklenburg County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frame 340].

iv. Miles, head of a Caswell County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:61].

v. Wilson E., head of a Caswell County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:352].

vi. Jesse, head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:342].

 

GWINN FAMILY

1.    Mary Gwinn, born say 1686, was the "Covenant Servant" of Joseph Pleasants on 21 August 1704 when the Henrico County court bound her illegitimate "Mulatto" child named Beck to her master [Oprhans Court 1677-1739, 46]. Her children were

2        i. Rebecca, born about February 1704.

ii. ?Thomas Quinn, born say 1710, presented by the York County court on 21 August 1738 for failing to list his wife Betty as a tithable [OW 18:440].

3        iii. ?Edward1, born about 1715.

4        iv. ?Joseph, born say 1720.

 

2.    Rebecca Gwinn, born about February 1704, was about six months old when she was bound to Joseph Pleasants in Henrico County on 21 August 1704 [Orphans Court 1677-1739, 46]. Her children may have been

i. John, born say 1722, a "Mulatto" brought before the Chesterfield County court on 4 December 1767 on suspicion of burning the house of Joseph Bass. He was sent for further trial at the General Court [Orders 1767-71, 156].

ii. William, born say 1727, presented by the court in Henrico County on 6 November 1752 for failing to list his "Mulatto" wife as a tithable. He was fined 500 pounds of tobacco [Minutes 1752-5, 19, 27].

5        iii. Ann1, born say 1730.

 

3.    Edward1 Gwinn, born about 1715, "a Negro," petitioned the Henrico County court for his freedom from Martha Bennett in April 1746, but the court ruled that he had to serve until December that year. He was called a "free negroe" on 7 April 1789 when the court exempted him from payment of taxes [Orders 1737-46, 367; Orders 1787-9, 569]. He, called Edward Daniel alias Gwinn, died intestate before 15 April 1790 when the Powhatan County court ordered the sheriff to dispose of his estate because it was so small that no one would administer it [Orders 1786-91, 528]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Edward3, born about 1759, purchased property from Frederick Woodson by Powhatan County bill of sale on 1 December 1801 and made a deed of mortgage to Frederick Woodson on 5 December 1801 [Orders 1798-1802, 572]. He was a "Mo" taxable on a horse in Powhatan County from 1801 to 1815: taxable on 2 slaves in 1807, 3 horses in 1809, and 2 "free negroes & mulattoes over the age of 16" in 1813 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 223, 257, 295, 342, 380, 421, 483]. On 16 May 1804 the Powhatan County court ordered the clerk to furnish "Ned Gwinn and Esther" certificates that they were liberated by decree of the High Court of Appeals [Orders 1802-4, 491]. He was a "Free Black" head of a Powhatan County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:11]. He may have been identical to or the father of Ned Gwinn who married Chloe Gwinn, 25 January 1811 Powhatan County bond. He registered in Powhatan County on 19 December 1822: Age: 63; Color: Dark yellow; Stature: 5'6"; Emancipated by decree of the Court of Appeals in virtue of the wills of John & Jonathan Pleasants [Register of Free Negroes, no. 49].

ii. William, bound by the Powhatan County court to Francis Cousins on 19 November 1789 [Orders 1786-91, 479].

 

4.    Joseph1 Gwinn, born say 1720, was presented by the York County court on 19 January 1746/7 for not listing his wife as a tithable [W&I 19:486]. Perhaps his wife was identical to Jane Gwinn who sued William Lyon, Jr., in York County court on 17 May 1762. The case was dismissed because neither party appeared [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 361]. Joseph's orphan son Joseph Gwin was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Dale Parish in Chesterfield County on 4 April 1775 [Orders 1774-84, 129]. He was the father of

i. ?Anne2, an infant on 16 May 1763 when she, by her "next friend" Jane Savy (Savoy), sued Elizabeth and Martha Armfield in York County court for trespass, assault and battery. Martha was found not guilty, but Elizabeth was ordered to pay her 20 shillings [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 14, 37].

ii. Joseph2, bound out on 4 April 1775, called son of Martha Harris when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him out on 6 August 1779 [Orders 1774-84, 246].

iii. ?Nancy, born about 1777, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a mulatto about 45 years old 5 feet 1-1/4 inch high...Born free [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no.172].

 

5.    Ann1 Guin, born say 1730, was the mother of Hannah, a child bound out by the Henrico County court on 1 December 1766, no race indicated [Orders 1763-67, 644]. She was the mother of

i. ?Obedience, a "Mulatto" bound out by the Henrico County court on 1 November 1756, no parent named [Orders 1755-62, 53].

ii. ?Phil, a "Mulatto" bound by the churchwardens of Henrico County in December 1763, no parent named [Orders 1763-67, 171]. He was a "F.N." taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1801 to 1807 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 446, 487, 532; Land Tax List 1799-1816].

iii. Hannah, bound out on 1 December 1766 [Orders 1763-67, 644].

6        iv. ?Edward2, born say 1755.

 

6.    Edward2 Gwinn, born say 1755, was taxable in the lower district of Goochland County from 1787 to 1815: taxable on 2 horses in 1790, called a "Mulatto" in 1793, exempt from taxation in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 165, 253, 281, 327, 451, 509, 581, 636, 723, 805; 1810-32, frames 53, 121, 240]. He may have been the father of

i. Aggy, married Jacob Cooper, 10 May 1799 Goochland County bond.

ii. Jesse, a "free negroe" taxable in Goochland County in 1813 [PPTL 1810-32, frame 140].

 

HACKET FAMILY

Members of the Hacket family were

i. Peter, born say 1760, a Revolutionary soldier from Campbell County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 36]. He may have been the father of Peter Hacket, a slave emancipated by Micajah Teawell by deed proved in Campbell County on 5 September 1782. He was one of the hands ordered by the Campbell County court to work on the road from Lynches Ferry on the James River to the main road near the water lick on 4 August 1785 [Orders 1782-5, 89; 1785-6, 137; 1782-5, 89]. He was a "Free Negro" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1787 to 1807, listed the same day as Peter Hacket, Jr., in 1807 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 85, 119, 331, 459, 697]. He was head of a Campbell County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:869].

ii. Joseph, born say 1764, married Winney Roberts, "fn's," 4 December 1785 Campbell County bond, consent of John Lynch. He was a "free Negro" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1787 to 1795 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 85, 120, 331].

iii. Isaac, born say 1770, married Lucy Napier, "daughter of Charles who consents," 4 January 1792 Campbell County bond. He was a "f. negro" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1790 to 1791 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 150, 190].

iv. Lucy, born say 1777, married David Ellis, "f.n's," 12 February 1798 Campbell County bond.

 

HAGINS FAMILY

The Hagins family probably came from Hanover County, Virginia, where the "Widow Hagin & son Zachariah" were listed in a merchant's account book for 6 April 1744 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 34:196].

Three mixed-race Hagin/ Hagins children, "Base Born Malatas," were bound apprentice to Arthur Due in October 1760 by the Johnston County, North Carolina court [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, I:46]. They were

1        i. Obediah, born say 1754.

2        ii. Zachariah, born say 1756.

iii. Malachiah, born say 1758, head of a Sumter County, South Carolina household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [SC:935]. He may have been the "Free man of color" Malachi Hagins who made an undated Jefferson County, Mississippi petition stating that his grandmother was a white woman and his father had served in the Revolution. He had moved to Mississippi twenty years previous, married a white woman, fathered nine children, acquired land, cattle and nine slaves but was subject to being driven from the county for lack of a guardian [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 42].

 

1.    Obediah Hagins, born say 1754, was bound apprentice in Johnston County in 1760. He was head of a Wayne County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:245] and apparently moved to Sumter County, South Carolina, that same year when he was head of a household of 4 "other free" [SC:935] and 6 in 1810 [SC:217a]. He may have been the father of

i. Flavd, head of a Sumter District household of one "other free" in 1810 [SC:217a].

 

2.    Zachariah Hagins, born say 1756, may have been the Rias Heagin, a "Malatto," who was in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on 14 January 1797 when the court ordered that he receive thirty-nine lashes [Minutes 1791-97, n.p.]. He was taxable on 100 acres in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 119]. His son Thomas Hagans was living in Marion District, South Carolina, on 14 August 1809 when he refused to pay the levy "upon all Free Negros Mulatoes and Mestizos," claiming that he was a white man. Robert Coleman and John Regan testified at the October 1812 session of the Marion District Court of Common Pleas that Thomas was the son of Zachariah Hagans and his wife Kesiah Ivey, who was the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Ivey of Drowning Creek, Bladen (Robeson) County. The court ruled that Thomas Hagans was of Portuguese descent and acquitted him [NCGSJ IX:259]. Zachariah and Kesiah were the parents of

i. Thomas, born say 1785.

 

Other members of the family in North Carolina were

i. Amy, head of a Martin County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:67] and 3 in 1800 [NC:395].

ii. Mary, head of a Wayne County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:150].

iii. Penny, head of a Martin County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:437].

iv. Priscilla, head of an Edgecombe County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:764].

 

HAILEY FAMILY

1.    John Hayly, born say 1670, was living in York Parish when he made his 5 February 1702/3 York County will, proved 24 May 1703, by which he gave fifteen pounds to an eight-year-old "Mullatta" boy named William who had been given to him by Major Buckner. Hayly left William the sum of fifteen pounds sterling when he reached the age of twenty-one for transporting himself out of the colony. He indicated that William was to live with Major Buckner who was to care for his schooling [DOW 12:136]. He was probably the father of

2        i. William, born December 1694,

 

2.    William Hayly, born December 1694, may have taken the name Haley and been the husband of Mary Haley who was presented by the York County court on 20 November 1727 for not listing herself as a tithable [OW 16:489]. She was probably the ancestor of

3        i. Peter, born about 1757.

ii. Acquila, married Sarah Gallimore, "dau. of William Gallimore," 13 December 1790 Charlotte County bond, Thomas Hayes surety, 16 December marriage.

 

3.    Peter Haley, born about 1757, registered as a "free Negro" in York County on 28 April 1802: a bright mulatto with woolly hair high forehead ... 5 feet 6-1/2 Inches high ... about 45 years of age ... addicted to the intemperate use of ardent Spirits [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.19]. He was taxable in York County on 2 tithes and 2 horses in 1782, a slave named Jack in 1784, slaves Jack and Naney, 3 horses and 2 cattle in 1786, and taxable on a slave in 1788, 1789, 1794 to 1802, 1805, and 1807 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 69, 91, 128, 141, 162, 193, 227, 276, 297, 327, 340, 354]. He was head of a York County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:875]. (His widow?) Rebecca Hailey was tithable on two free males over the age of 21 in 1811 and one in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 354, 364]. Peter was the father of

i. ?Fanny, born about 1776, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a bright Mulatto about 46 years of age 5 feet 4-1/4 inches high [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.185].

ii. Sarah Scott, born about 1781, registered in York County on 17 June 1805: late Sarah Haley Daughter of Peter Haley a free Woman of a dark complexion about 24 years of age 5 feet 3-3/4 Inches high her hair resembling long Wooll [Register, no.29].

iii. ?Richard, born about 1783, registered in York County on 18 February 1805: yellow complexion about 22 years of age 5 feet 4-1/4 Inches high has long woolly Hair ... born of free parents on Queens Creek in the Parish of Bruton [Register, no.30]. He was taxable in York County from 1805 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 307, 327, 354, 365, 390] and head of a York County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:876].

iv. ?Thomas, born about 1795, registered in York County on 18 November 1822: a mulatto fellow about 27 years of age 5 feet 9-3/4 Inches high ... high forehead, tolerable long hair [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.135]. He was taxable in York County in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 406]. He registered in Henrico County on 5 December 1831: age 45, a dark mulatto man, 5 feet 9-3/4 inches, Born free as per register of York County Court and identified by George W. Banks. His wife may have been Sally Hailey who registered the same day: age 49, bright mullatto woman, 5 feet 1-1/2 inches [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.12, nos. 691, 692].

 

HAITHCOCK/ HATHCOCK FAMILY

The Haithcock family may have been related to Mary Hathcock who was presented by the Essex County on 10 June 1695 for having an illegitimate child. On 10 July 1695 the court ordered the sheriff to bring her to the next court. Nothing further was recorded about the case, so she probably left the county [Orders 1692-5, 237, 251]. Edward Heathcot was a resident of Henrico County in November 1712 when the court noted that Elizabeth Sproson had lately come out of New Kent County and had delivered a bastard child at his house. The court called him Edward Heathcocke in November 1721 [Orders 1710-4, 85, 198; Minutes 1719-24, 142]. Other members of the Haithcock family were

1        i. Joseph1, born say 1708.

2        ii. Edward1, born say 1710.

         iii. Mary2, born say 1740, head of a Halifax County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:318].

iv. Edward2, born say 1742, living in Southampton County on 10 December 1762 when John Byrd charged John Little 2 pounds, 6 pence for Edward's hire for two days and 2 pounds, 6 pence for the hire of Richard Bowser for two days [Judgment Papers 1763-4, frame 140].

3        v. Sarah, born say 1744.

 

1.    Joseph1 Heathcock, born say 1708, received three patents for land in Brunswick County, Virginia: 200 acres on the south side of Galling Run on 28 September 1732, 254 acres on the north side of Fountain Creek on 12 January 1747, and 269 acres on the south side of Fountain Creek on 7 July 1763 [Patents 14:506; 26:165; 35:216]. On 13 June 1748 he voted in the Brunswick County election. In December 1753 his Brunswick County case against John Willis was dismissed because it was agreed to by both parties [DB 1:168; 3:510; Orders 1753-56, 94]. And he was a resident of Brunswick County on 23 June 1763 when he sold 50 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, adjacent to Drury Jordan, a former neighbor of Edward Haithcock [DB 3:303]. His 11 October 1782 Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County will was proved 26 April 1784, John Haithcock, executor. He lent 116 acres to his wife Elizabeth during her lifetime and then to his son John, gave 100 acres to his grandson David Haithcock adjoining 35 acres which he gave to his granddaughter Elizabeth Haithcock, gave furniture to his grandson Howell Haithcock, gave a total of 216 acres to his son Charles, gave 100 acres to his son Jesse Haithcock, gave 100 acres to his son William, and mentioned his daughter Mary Haithcock [WB 2:295]. His wife Elizabeth was a widow in Brunswick County in 1787, taxable on a free male tithe and a horse [Property Tax List 1782-1807, frame 203]. Joseph's children were

4        i. Mary1, born say 1730.

ii. Charles, born say 1736, received 216 acres by his father's will. He had 6 persons in his Greensville County household in 1783 [VA:55]. On 28 October 1784 the Greensville County court appointed him to appraise the estate of Nathaniel Mitchell [Orders 1781-9, 166]. He purchased 34 acres adjoining his land on the southside of Fountain Creek on 20 September 1801 [DB 3:248]. By his 23 October 1806 Greensville County will, proved in December 1806, he left his land and four slaves to his wife Frances and sons Roland and Charles when they came of age and named his daughters Anny, Patsy, Julia and Lucy Heathcock [DB 2:26]. Frances was one of the heirs of her brother Robert Hill on 8 March 1807 when she sold 11 acres in Greensville County [DB 4:229]. Her son Charles was head of a Greensville County household of 2 whites and 3 slaves in 1820 [VA:262].

5        iii. Jesse, born say 1738.

iv. William1, born say 1740, received 100 acres by the Greensville County will of his father Joseph Heathcock. He had 5 persons in his Greensville County household in 1783 [VA:55]. He and James Going were sued in Greensville County court for a debt of 10 pounds on 28 October 1784. On 8 August 1785 he and his wife Ann Heathcock sold 125 acres on Fountain's Creek in Maherrin Parish, Greensville County, being the land his father Joseph Heathcock gave him by his will [DB1:123]. He was taxable in Greensville County in 1782 and 1783 and from 1790 to 1793 [PPTL 1782-1807, frames 3, 13, 108, 127, 137, 161]. He was probably identical to William Hathcock, Sr., who was head of a Northampton County household of 2 white males and 2 white females in the Captain Williams' district for the 1786 North Carolina state census.

v. John2, born say 1746, and his wife Peggy sold 164 acres on Fountain Creek in Greensville County for $410 on 15 February 1805 while residing in Warren County, North Carolina [DB 3:436]. He was head Warren County household of 8 whites and 2 slaves in 1790 [NC:77].

vi. ?Jemima, born say 1750, chosen in Greensville County court by David Heathcock as his guardian to rent out his plantation and to maintain him until he came of age, so she may have been his mother [Orders 1781-9, 389-90]. She was taxable on a free male tithable and a horse in Greensville County from 1788 to 1790; taxable on a slave and a horse in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1807, frames 64, 83, 108, 127]. David was taxable on a horse in Greensville County from 1792 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1807, frames 137, 162, 179, 188, 202, 218, 232, 245, 260, 321, 353]. He and his wife Patsey sold 53 acres in Greensville County to Henry Stewart for 53 pounds on 16 January 1807 [DB 4:49].

 

2.    Edward1 Hathcock, born say 1710, sold 100 acres of the land he patented near Arthur's Creek in Northampton County, North Carolina, to his son-in-law, James Norton, on 26 November 1753. On 2 April 1757 he sold another 100 acres on the north side of Ragland's Road to Drury Jordan of Brunswick County, Virginia. On 15 May 1758 he made a Northampton County deed of gift of 100 acres on Turbyfield's Run near Ragland's Ferry Road to his son Thomas, and two days later on 17 May 1758 he sold 20 acres on Turbafield's Run for 2 pounds 10 shillings to (his son?) John Heathcock [DB 2:129, 387, 475-6]. He was co-defendant in a suit with John Brooks, probably as his security, for a debt of 4 pounds, 2 shillings which the Southampton County court ordered him to pay Samuel Sands on 13 May 1762 [Orders 1759-63, 219]. He entered 400 acres on both sides of Black Creek below the mouth of Mirey Branch in Johnston County on 11 August 1778 [Haun, Johnston County Land Entries]. His plantation where he formerly lived on Little Crooked Creek in Franklin County was mentioned in a Franklin County deed on 29 October 1779 [DB 1:52, 124, 360]. In May 1782 Edward, Holiday, and Joseph Hathcock were ordered to work on the road from the head of Gum Swamp in Johnston County to the Cumberland County line. He may have been living on land of (his son?) Isam Hathcock when he was counted in Halifax County, head of a household of 4 free males and 7 free females in district 3 for the 1786 North Carolina state census. He died before November 1786 when the Johnston County court ordered his orphans Stephen, Amos, and Mary brought to court to be bound out [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:206, 336]. And on 22 August and 21 November 1786 the Halifax County court bound out Hathcock "base born children," no race mentioned: David (nine years), Nancy, and Mark (eight years old) [Minutes 1784-87, 154, 164, 177]. Perhaps Edward's wife was Elizabeth Hathcock, head of a Johnston County household of 2 free males and 4 free females in the 1787 State Census. His children were

i. Thomas1, born say 1735, received a deed of gift of 100 acres in Northampton County from his father on 15 May 1758 [DB 2:476]. He sold this land on 30 January 1763 [DB 3:240]. He was an insolvent Bute County taxpayer in 1769 [NCGSJ XV:2431] and head of a household of 3 white males and 3 white females in Richmond County, North Carolina in 1790 [NC:46].

6        ii. ?John1, born say 1736.

iii. Martha, born say 1737, married James Norton before 26 November 1753 when James received a deed of gift from his father-in-law. He and his wife Martha sold this land on 2 April 1757. They were still in Northampton County on 23 August 1779 when James Norton, Sr., Martha, and (their children?) James, Jr., and Keziah Norton sold their remaining 250 acres in Northampton County [DB 2:129, 392; 6:363]. James Norton, Sr., was head of a Richmond County, North Carolina household of 4 white males and 3 white females in 1790 living nearby Thomas Hathcock [NC:46].

iv. ?Aney, born say 1743, purchased 50 acres on Arthur's Creek in Northampton County from James Norton on 22 June 1762 and sold it on 9 February 1787 [DB 3:202; 7:422].

v. ?James1, born say 1750, purchased 100 acres on Rocky Branch in Northampton County on 28 January 1778 [DB 6:320] and was taxed on an assessment of 590 pounds in 1780 [GA 46.1]. On 6 April 1787 he sold 100 acres on Jack Swamp as administrator of the estate of James Seaton [DB 11:184]. He was an insolvent Northampton County taxpayer in 1789 [Minutes 1792-96, 13] and sold his 100 acres on Rocky Branch on 2 January 1790 [DB 11:299].

vi. ?Joseph2, born say 1751, ordered to work on the road in Johnston County on May 1782 with Edward Hathcock so he may have been his son [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:206]. On 27 January 1779 he entered 150 acres in Johnston County on the north side of Black Creek [Haun, Johnston County Land Entries, no. 692] and was taxed on this land in 1784 [GA 64.1]. His wife may have been Sarah Haithcock who received $1 by the 20 December 1780 Johnston County will of her father Stephen Powell.

7        vii. ?Isham, born say 1754.

8        viii. ?Holiday, born about 1760.

ix. ?Lucy, born say 1766, mother of a ten-year-old "base born child" John Hathcock who was bound to John Eason by Johnston County court in February 1792 [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:190]. She was head of a Sumter District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [SC:222a].

x. Stephen2, born say 1768, one of the orphans of Edward Hathcock ordered brought before the May 1786 session of the Johnston County court [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:336]. He paid a bond of 250 pounds security in the September 1789 Johnston County court for begetting a bastard child by Nancy Powell. He married Sally Jones, 30 July 1799 Wake County bond, and was head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:767] and 7 in Chatham County in 1810 [NC:201]. He was a resident of Wake County on 4 September 1805 when he purchased 100 acres in Chatham County on the north side of Big Beaver Creek [DB O:262]. He died before August 1818 when the Chatham County court granted administration of his estate to Jordan Holleman on $500 security [Minutes 1811-18, 139].

xi. Amos, born say 1770, one of the orphans of Edward Hathcock ordered brought before the May 1786 session of the Johnston County court. He was ordered bound an apprentice farmer to John Dodd [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:336]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:728].

xii. Mary3, born say 1772, one of the orphans of Edward Hathcock ordered brought before the May 1786 session of the Johnston County court, perhaps the Mary Heathcock who married James Maclin, 5 October 1799 Wake County bond.

 

3.    Sarah1 Hethcock, born say 1744, the mother of John and Aaron Heathcock, indentured her children to Arthur Byrd in Southampton County on 5 October 1771. Arthur Byrd brought suit in court against Sarah, and she called Nat Freeman as her witness. Her children were called poor children, "orphans of ____ Heathcocke" on 11 June 1773 when the Southampton County court ordered their indenture to John Powell vacated and bound them instead to Arthur Byrd because their mother had indentured them to him [Orders 1772-7, 134, 213; Judgment Papers, 1773, frames 44-5, 461-2]. She was the mother of

i. John3, born about 1762, living in Southampton County on 5 October 1771 when he and his mother Sarah agreed to his indenture to Arthur Byrd for twelve years [Judgment Papers, 1773, frames 44-5]. On 11 March 1773 the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Luke's Parish to bind him and Aaron Heathcock, "poor children," and on 11 June 1773 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him to Arthur Byrd [Orders 1772-7, 134, 213]. He was living in Southampton County in 1779 when he enlisted in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 37]. He petitoned the Virginia Legislature on 9 October 1792 asking for pay as a solider from 1779 to 1782 [LVA Petitions Database, reel 184, box 234, folder 25]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 1 free white person in District 2 for the 1786 North Carolina census, 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:27] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151].

ii. Aaron, born about 1763, agreed to his indenture to Arthur Byrd in Southampton County on 5 October 1771 and was bound by the court to Byrd on 11 June 1773 [Orders 1772-7, 213; Judgment Papers 1773, frames 44-5, 461-2]. He sued Elijah Hunt in Southampton County for a debt of 16 pounds, 4 shillings and obtained an attachment on his estate on 14 October 1784 [Orders 1778-84, 505]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1784 to 1796: taxable on a horse and 3 cattle in 1784, taxable in Samuel Mecum's household in 1789, taxable on 2 horses in 1793 [PPTL 1782-92, frames 548, 635, 632, 710, 762, 818, 876; 1792-1806, frames 54, 82, 163, 190]. He was surety for the 8 February 1794 Southampton County marriage bond of Shadrack Demery and Charlotte Hicks. On 1 January 1796 he and Batt Chavis sold their household goods to John Walden by Northampton County, North Carolina deed [DB 11:42]. He was allowed pay until 5 June 1781 for his services in the Revolution [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, vol. II, Book 1, 273]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:449].

iii. ?Sarah, born say 1768, married James Byrd, 30 August 1789 Southampton County marriage [Ministers' Returns, 646]. She was called Sarah Bird on 12 October 1786 when the court bound out her "poor child" Michael Heathcock [Orders 1784-9, 215].

9        iv. ?Dorcas, born about 1770.

10      v. ?Reuben2, born about 1772.

 

4.    Mary1 Heathcock, born say 1730, was taxable on her son Howell Hathcock's tithe in Brunswick County in 1784 [PPTL 1782-1807, frame 90]. She testified for Chany Williams in his Brunswick County suit against Robert Stewart on 23 May 1786, and she emancipated her slave Daniel by deed proved in court on 23 September 1793 [Orders 1784-8, 341; 1792-5, 155]. She was "old and weak" when she made her 18 July 1785 Brunswick County will, proved 24 April 1788. She gave all her estate to her son Howell Heathcock and made her brother John Heathcock her executor [WB 1:118]. Her son was

i. Howell, born say 1767, married Mary Woodal/ Woodle, daughter of Sally Woodal, 30 January 1788 Greensville County bond, George Collier surety, married by Rev. William Garner [Ministers' Returns, 13]. He was taxable on his own tithe in Greensville County in 1788 and 1789, taxable on a horse from 1790 to 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1807, frames 64, 83, 108, 127, 137, 162, 179]. He may have been identical to Hall Heathcock who was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151] and 5 in 1830 [NC:296].

 

5.    Jesse, born say 1738, received 100 acres by his father's will. He had 6 persons in his Meherrin Parish, Greensville County household in 1783 [VA:55], and was taxable there from 1783 to 1796: taxable on 4 slaves in 1784; taxable on (son?) Daniel in 1789, taxable on (sons?) Daniel and Reuben Hathcock in 1792 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 13, 23, 27, 35, 42, 63, 83, 108, 127, 136, 161, 202]. He and his wife Molly sold 100 acres in Greensville County where they were then living for 60 pounds on 19 July 1796 [DB 3:5]. He was probably the Jesse Hathcock, over 45 years of age, who was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 whites in 1800 [NC:312]. He may have been the father of

i. Daniel, born say 1768, taxable in Jesse Hathcock's Greensville County household in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List 1791-1828, frame 83].

ii. Reuben1, born say 1771, taxable in Jesse Hathcock's Greensville County household in 1792, charged with his own tax from 1793 to 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1807, frames 162, 179, 188, 202]. He married Mary Jones, 6 August 1793 Greensville County bond, Braxton Robinson surety [Marriage Bonds, 28] and was head of a Northampton County household of 2 white males and 1 white female in 1790 [NC:75], 1 white male and 4 white females in Halifax County in 1800 [NC:312], and 9 "other free" in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:24].

iii. ?Colby, born say 1774, married Grief Jeffries, daughter of Andrew Jeffries, 24 July 1794 Greensville County bond, Shadrach Jeffries surety [Ministers Returns, 147]. He was taxable in Greensville County from 1795 to 1800 and from 1804 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1807, frames 189, 202, 218, 231, 245, 259, 321, 337, 462]. He was head of a Greensville County census of 8 whites in 1810 [VA:738]. Grief Haithcock, apparently his widow, was head of a Greensville County census of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:262].

iv. ?Silvey, married Thomas Jeffries, 8 October 1789 Greensville County bond, Rev. William Garner minister [Ministers Returns, 30]. Thomas Jeffries was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:817] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:406].

 

6.    John1 Haithcock, born say 1736, purchased 20 acres in Northampton County from Edward Haithcock for 2 pounds, 10 shillings on 17 May 1758. This was two days after Edward made a deed of gift to his son Thomas, so perhaps John was also Edward's son. John sold this land on 2 June 1761 for 5 pounds [DB 2:475; 3:132]. He paid 330 pounds for 160 acres on Jack Swamp in Northampton County on 18 November 1778, and he and wife Martha sold this land for 375 pounds on 4 January 1779 [DB 6:344, 339]. He was taxed in Northampton County in 1780 on 172 pounds cash and a total assessment of 1,737 pounds [GA 46.1]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 3 free males and 8 free females in Captain William's District for the 1786 state census, 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74] and 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:449]. His children may have been

i. Meshack, born say 1757, taxable in 1780 in Northampton County on an assessment of 161 pounds [GA 46.1]. He married Elizabeth Jones, 26 December 1789 Greensville County, Virginia bond.

ii. William2, Jr., born say 1758, head of a Northampton County household of 4 free males and 2 free females in Captain Williams' district for the 1786 state census, perhaps the William Hathcock who was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61] and 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].

11      iii. Frederick1, born say 1758.

iv. Newman, born say 1763, head of a Northampton County household of 1 free male and 2 free females in Captain William's District for the 1786 state census and 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73].

v. James, born 1776-1794, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:234].

 

7.    Isham Hathcock, born say 1754, was taxable on 10 pounds valuation in District 4 of Halifax County, North Carolina, in 1782 [Tax List, 1:12] and taxable on 193 acres and one poll in 1790. He was head of a Halifax County household of 4 free males and 3 free females in the 1786 state census. He was a buyer at the sale of the estate of Jordan Stafford in Northampton County on 29 October 1787 [Gammon, Record of Estates Northampton County, I:56]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" and a white woman in 1790 [NC:61]. Perhaps his wife was Lucy Mason. She and Thomas Mason may have been co-heirs when Isham and his wife Lucy and Thomas Mason sold land on Dogwood Branch in Halifax County in September 1790 [DB 17:333]. He may have been the father of

i. Surry, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:318], 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:24], and 2 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:293].

ii. Curtis, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:316].

iii. Jeffrey, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:24] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151].

iv. Rachel, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].

v. Henry, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].

 

8.    Holiday Haithcock, born about 1760, may have been Edward Haithcock's son since he was ordered by the May 1782 Johnston County court to work on the road with him. According to his application for a Revolutionary War pension he was born about 1760 in Northampton County, Virginia, but this is probably an error and should read Northampton County, North Carolina. In November 1782 he was charged in the Johnston County court with begetting a bastard child [Haun, Johnston County Court Minutes, III:206, 230], and he was an insolvent Sampson County taxpayer in 1785 [Minutes 1784-1800, 39]. He was head of a Johnston County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:142] and 6 in Orange County in 1800 [NC:569]. He had returned to Johnston County on 23 February 1836 when he made his application for a pension for his Revolutionary War service. He gave an account of his service in his application before the court and stated that he volunteered in Johnston County, spent about a year in Fayetteville, and spent about twenty years in Orange County. His application was not approved, but several prominent Johnston County citizens did their best for him. William Bryan, a Justice of the Peace, testified for him and Thompson Venable wrote to the Commissioner of Pensions in Washington,

On examining the case of Holliday Hethcock of N.C. for pension under act of June 7, 1832, we find that his services and identity are fully proven by three witnesses, and that his case has been suspended merely because he was a free man of color. As we understand that several cases of this sort have been admitted, you will oblige us by having it admitted.

He may have been the father of

i. Pattie, married Jesse Archer, 24 October 1807 Orange County bond, Holiday Heathcock bondsman.

ii. M., head of an Orange County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:876].

iii. Tattom, head of a Chatham County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:201].

 

9.    Dorcas Hathcock, born about 1770, was living in Southampton County on 17 March 1792 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Luke's Parish to bind out her illegitimate son John [Minutes 1793-9, 251]. She registered in Southampton County on 16 August 1810: age 40, Mulatto, 5 feet 1 inch, free born and registered there again on 13 June 1832: age 60, Yellow, 5 feet 1/2 inch, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 836, 2003]. She was the mother of

i. John4, born about 1788, head of a Northampton County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:234]. He may have been identical to John Hathcock who registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County on 10 October 1814: born free of a yellowish Complexion, about twenty six years old ... 5' 2-1/2 Inches high in Shoes [Register of Free Negroes, no. 48]. And he may have been the husband of Jane Hathcock who received a bed and furniture by the 27 January 1816 Greensville County will of her father Francis Stewart [WB 3:41].

ii. ?Thomas2, born about 1792, registered in Southampton County on 13 June 1832: age 40, Bright, 5 feet 6-1/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 2002].

iii. ?Hezekiah, born about 1792, registered in Southampton County on 22 January 1823: age 31, dark mulatto man, 5 feet 2-3/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1353]. He registered in Sussex County on 2 November 1826 at the age of 35 [Certificates Granted to Free Negroes & Mulattoes 1800-50, no. 532].

iv. ?Bartlet, born about 1793, registered in Southampton County on 11 February 1822: age 29, Mulatto of Brown complection, 5 feet 11-3/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1310]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:727].

v. Elijah, son of Dorcas Hethcocke, ordered bound out in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, on 23 November 1803 [Minutes 1803-4, unpaged].

 

10.    Reuben Hathcock, born about 1772, married Miriam Artis, 10 February 1791 Southampton County bond. He registered in Southampton County on 31 July 1810: age 38, Mulatto, 5 feet 5-1/2 inches, free born. (His wife) Miriam Hathcock registered the same day: age 40, Dark Mulatto, 5 feet 3-1/2 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 772, 773]. He was head of a Southampton County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:58]. He was taxable in Southampton County in Charles Birdsong's household in 1792, in James Edwards' household in 1794, in William Newton's household in 1795 and 1796, charged with his own tax from 1799 to 1803, a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse in 1804, taxable on 3 free male tithables in 1807, listed with his wife Mariam on Jacob Bailey's land in 1812 and 1813. Lemuel Archer was listed in his household in 1812 and Viney Archer was listed there in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frame 870; 1792-1806, frames 78, 167, 198, 382, 415, 518, 556, 625, 694; 1807-21, frames 73, 293, 319, 419]. Administration of his Northampton County estate was granted to Sterling Haithcock on a bond of 500 pounds on 6 September 1815. Later that year on 7 December, his widow Miriam successfully sued Sterling for one year's provisions [Minutes 1813-21]. Miriam was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:234]. Their children were

12      i. Sterling, born about 1792.

ii. ?Mills, born about 1800, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:234]. He and his wife sold land in Northampton County to Sterling Haithcock by deed proved on 1 December 1823 [Minutes 1821-25, 230]. He was counted in the Logan County, Ohio census in 1850 in District 87, Jefferson Township, household #283, a "Black" man born in Virginia about 1800, with Sarah Heathcock who was born in North Carolina about 1810. Their five children were all born in North Carolina.

 

11.    Frederick1 Haithcock, born say 1758, served in the Revolution from Halifax County, North Carolina [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 165]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 4 free males and 4 free females in Captain Winborn's District for the North Carolina state census in 1786 [Census p.29], head of a Halifax county household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:151]. Perhaps he was the father of

i. Fed2, born 1776-94, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:349]. He was found guilty of a minor offense and ordered to receive twenty-five lashes by the Halifax County court on 21 February 1833. The 16 November 1841 Halifax County court allowed him to carry his gun.

 

12.    Sterling Haithcock, born about 1792, married Charlotte Newsom, 24 November 1813 Northampton County bond. He was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:234]. He was surety for Drury Walden's Northampton County bond as guardian to David Byrd, orphan of Jesse Byrd, on 6 June 1822, and he was fined five cents on a charge of assault and battery on 6 June 1822. He purchased land in Northampton County from Mills Haithcock and his wife by deed registered on 1 December 1823 [Minutes 1821-25, 105, 111, 230]. His wife Charlotte was mentioned in the 31 July 1835 Northampton County will of her father Nathaniel Newsom [WB 4:137]. Sterling obtained free papers in Northampton County on 23 March 1830 and registered them in Logan County, Ohio [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 12]. His papers stated that he was thirty-eight years old, the son of Reuben Heathcock, dark complexion, husband of Charlotte, and father of eight children: Edwin, Mary, Reuben, Starling, Nathaniel, Joshua, William, and Ethelred Haithcock. He was head of a Rush Creek, Logan County, Ohio household in 1850 with his wife Charlotte and (his mother) ninety-five-year-old Mariam Heathcock. He was born in Virginia and his estate was worth $3,500 [Census p.245].

 

Other members of the family  were

i. Young, head of a Halifax County  household of 2 free males and 3 females for the 1786 North Carolina census.

ii. Ptolemy, born say 1763, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina   household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61], an insolvent taxpayer in district 4, Halifax County in 1798 [Minutes 1799-1802, 25 August 1799], perhaps identical to Toliver Hathcock who was head of a Halifax County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:318].

iii. Celah, head of a Halifax County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:318].

iv. Absalom Heathcock, born before 1776, brought suit for his freedom against Robert Paulen in Halifax County court on 20 February 1801. The jury ruled that Absalom was not a slave but a free man. He was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:530].

v. Barnabas, born before 1776, head of a Darlington District, South Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

 

HALL FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Hall, born say 1675, appeared in York County court on 25 June 1694 and confessed to having an illegitimate child. Samuel Snignall and Richard Nickson were security for the payment of her fine. She was Richard Nickson's servant on 26 August 1695 when she confessed to the York County court that she had borne a child by a "Negroe" [DOW 10:9, 195]. She was probably the mother of

i. Margaret1, born say 1706, presented by the Elizabeth City County court on 20 January 1726/7 for having a "Mulato Bastard" child. She did not deny the fact and was ordered to pay a fine of 15 pounds or serve for five years after the completion of her former servitude. She was presented again for a "Mulatto Bastard" on 16 November 1727 [Orders 1724-30, 191, 200, 211, 220].

2        ii. Joseph1, born say 1710.

 

2.    Joseph1 Hall, born say 1710, was taxable with his wife Peg in Norfolk County, Virginia, in 1735 and taxable by himself in William Sivels' household in 1736 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1730-50, 157, 169]. His wife may have been identical to the Margaret Hall who was presented by the Elizabeth City County, Virginia court on 20 July 1727 for having a "Mulatto Bastard" child, "She appearing and not denying the fact" [DWO 1724-30, 211]. Joseph and his wife were in Bertie County, North Carolina, by 6 August 1748 when "Joseph Hall yeoman" purchased 200 acres at Chinkapin Neck on Wiccacon Creek. He sold this land six years later on 7 December 1754 [DB G:194; H:175]. Joseph, Mary, and Thomas Hall were "free mulato" taxables in the 1751 Bertie County summary tax list filed with the central government [CCR 190]. In 1757 he, his wife Margaret, and 3 children were taxables in the Bertie County list of Henry Hunter along with Gabriel Manly, who had been a neighbor of theirs in Norfolk County in 1735 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1730-50, 158]. In 1758 Joseph and his family were taxables in the list of John Brickell along with Thomas Archer who had also been one of their Norfolk County neighbors in 1735 [CR 10.702.1, box 1]. The family was not taxed in Bertie County after 1759 when Hertford County was separated from Bertie County. Joseph died before 22 January 1760 when his wife "Margaret Hall, Widow of Joseph Hall Deced., resigned her right of Admn. of Joseph Hall" in Bertie County court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:503-4]. Their children were

3        i. Thomas, born say 1738.

ii. ?Ebenezer, born say 1740, purchased two tracts of land from John and Elizabeth Bass near the head of Deep Creek in the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River in the Parish of Portsmouth in Norfolk County, one of 90 acres on 19 October 1763 and another of 50 acres on 14 May 1764. He sold the 90 acre tract on 18 March 1765 [DB 21:200A, 86B; 22:78 A&B]. He was taxable on himself and (his wife?) Mary Hall, "Muls" (Mulattos), and 50 acres of land in Western Branch District of Norfolk County from 1766 to 1769, with Joseph Bass in his household in 1770, and taxable by himself from 1771 to 1780, called a "Mulatto" in 1774 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 8, 45, 76, 87, 105, 149, 228, 267, 285].

iii. Stephen, born before 1746, taxable in 1757 in his father's Bertie County household in the list of Henry Hunter and taxable in Hertford County on two persons from 1768 to 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 55]. He may have been the Stephen Hall was taxable in Norfolk County in 1785 [PPTL, 1782-90, frame 485].

iv. ?Absalom, taxable on one person in Hertford County from 1768 to 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 9].

v. Naomi, born before 1746, taxable in 1757 in her father's Bertie County household in Henry Hunter's list, perhaps the Amy Hall who was taxable there in 1758. She may have been the Naomy Bass who was taxable in Norfolk County in 1765 with her husband William4 Bass [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 205].

vi. ?Jemima, born say 1750, taxable on the south side of Western Branch in Norfolk County in 1769 in the same district as Ebenezer Hall [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 87].

vii. ?Isaac, probably born after 1746 since he was not taxable in Bertie County in 1758. He was taxable in Hertford County on one person in 1769 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 39], was head of a Hertford County household of 5 "other free" in 1800, and he was over 45 and had 7 "free colored" in his Hertford County household in 1820 [NC:190]. Isaac, Allen, and Harvey Washington Hall were among "Sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in November- December 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free African Americans [NCGSJ XI:252].

viii. ?Mary, head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:27], 12 In 1810 [NC:106], and in 1820 as Polly Hall, an over forty-five-year-old head of a household of 3 "free colored" [NC:186].

 

3.    Thomas Hall, born say 1738, was a taxable "free mulato" in his father's Bertie County household from 1751 to 1757 but not in 1758. He was probably the Thomas Hall who indentured himself to James Wood of Norfolk County for four years (until the age of twenty-one years?) to learn the trade of bricklayer on 20 May 1757 [DB 18:40]. He was taxable in Norfolk County on 53 acres of land in 1763, taxable in Hertford County on two persons in 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 58], and was taxable in Norfolk County on the north side of the Western Branch District in 1773 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1751-65, 190; 1766-80, 197]. He was taxable on 2 horses in District 3 of Hertford County in 1779 [GA 30.1] and head of a Hertford County household of 7 "other free" in Captain Louis' District in 1800. Perhaps his wife was Rachel Hall, the daughter of Richard Nickens who mentioned her in his 1774 Currituck County will. Their children may have been

4        i. Joseph2, born say 1764.

5        ii. Lemuel, born say 1768.

iii. Margaret2, born about 1770, head of a Hertford County household of 12 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:190], an eighty-year-old "Mulatto" woman counted in the 1850 Hertford County census [NC:651].

iv.David, head of a Camden County household of 2 "other free" and one white woman in 1790 [NC:16]. He was awarded 5 pounds in his Norfolk County suit against Joseph Hall on 22 June 1787 [Orders 1786-7, 108b].

v. Anthony, a "free colored" man over forty-five years of age who was living alone in New Hanover County in 1820 [NC:222].

 

4.   Joseph2 Hall, born say 1764, married Elizabeth Bass, 7 May 1792 Norfolk County bond. He was taxable in Norfolk County from 1784 to 1817: not listed there in 1800; a planter in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" on Deep Creek with George Hall, Betsy, Sally and Mary Hall in his household in 1801; called a "M"(ulatto) in 1802 and 1804; a "B.M." (Black Man) taxable on Western Branch in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1791, frames 485, 626; 1791-1812, frames 106, 251, 383, 484, 743; 1813-24, frame 105]. On 1 January 1805 he leased land in Portsmouth Parish at the head of Broad Creek adjoining Willis Eastwood's, Elizabeth Creech's and Hollowell's old mill for ten years from Thomas Hobgood for $25 yearly with the requirement that he build a 8 foot by 8 foot smoke house, a 14 foot x 14 foot log house and plant 100 apple trees the cost of which would be allowed out of the yearly rents, and on 28 March 1814 he and his wife Elizabeth of Portsmouth Parish sold 16 acre which he had purchased from Benjamin Britton and had formerly been part of Farley's land to Thomas Brooks for $55 [DB 42:146; 46:103]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 and a Norfolk County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:815]. Perhaps one of his descendants was connected to retail merchants Hall & Read, "free persons of colour," who the Norfolk County court certified were of good moral character and entitled to a merchant's license on 16 November 1830 but rescinded the certification in the same court [Minutes 22:96-7]. Joseph and Elizabeth were probably the parents of

i. Sally, listed in Joseph Hall's household in 1801.

ii. George, born about 1792, a "B.M." (Black Man) taxable in Norfolk County from 1815 to 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 105, 139, 256]. He, a "free man of colour," married Rachel Pitt, a free woman of colour," 6 April 1816 Norfolk County bond, Dennis Pitt bondsman [Marriage Bonds, 1816-32]. He registered in Norfolk County on 21 November 1831: age 39, 5 ft 7, a mulatto, Born free. Rachel registered on 24 November 1831: age 31, 5 ft 5-3/4, a mulatto, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 825, 835]. On 23 October 1833 the Norfolk County court certified "on satisfactory evidence of white persons" that George was "not a free negro or Mulatto" but of Indian descent [Minutes 24:67].

iii. Mary, listed in Joseph Hall's household in 1801.

iv. Priscilla, a "free woman of colour," married James Ash, a free man of colour, 31 December 1814 Norfolk County bond, Nathan Mathews security.

 

5.    Lemuel Hall, born say 1768, was head of a Pasquotank County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:902]. He was called "a free man of mixed blood" in 1795 when the North Carolina General Assembly passed an act to allow him to free his wife, a slave named Jenny, and their three children: Seth, Milley and Tabitha [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 297]. His heirs sold 29-8/10 acres in Pasquotank County on Great Flatty Creek adjoining Lemuel Overton for $268 on 3 July 1822. The land adjoined one acre which Phillis, (a slave?) who belonged to the estate, was allowed to live on [DB W:273]. Lemuel's heirs were

i. Milley, married Burdock Overton.

ii. Rhody, married Robert Bow.

iii. Ephraim, who was underage on 3 July 1822.

iv. Mary, who was underage on 3 July 1822.

v. Rachel, who was underage on 3 July 1822.

 

Members of the Hall family of Lancaster County were

i. William1, born say 1694, a "negro," ran away from Christ Church Parish, Lancaster County, between 8 May and 12 June 1728 when the court charged him with "keeping a white woman and having children by her" [Orders 1721-29, 270, 278]. He was probably the William Hall who was living in Louisa County on 28 May 1745 when he, Thomas Collins, Samuel Collins, William Collins, George Gibson, Thomas Gibson, William Donathan, Benjamin Branham, and Samuel Bunch were presented by the court for failing to list a tithable (probably their wives) [Orders 1742-8, 152, 157, 172].

6        ii. Jane, born say 1695.

iii. Elizabeth, born say 1695, presented by the Lancaster County court on 11 November 1713 for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1713-21, 26].

 

6.   Jane Hall, born say 1695, was presented by the Lancaster County court on 11 November 1713 for having an illegitimate child for which she was ordered to pay a fine of 500 pounds of tobacco to the churchwardens of the parish. The churchwardens won a suit against her for the fine on 12 September 1722 [Orders 1713-21, 26; 1721-9, 62]. She was called a "free negro woman" when she was presented by the court on 14 November 1722 for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1721-9, 62, 71]. She was a "negro" living in Christ Church Parish, Lancaster County, on 8 May 1728 when the grand jury again presented her for having an illegitimate child. She was called a "free negro Woman" on 11 June 1729 when the court bound her daughter Ann as an apprentice to Ruth Sydnor in Lancaster County until the age of eighteen years at her daughter's request. On 14 October 1730 she complained to the court that her son Caleb was illegally bound to his master Andrew Donalson. The court agreed that the indenture was illegal but ordered Caleb to serve Donalson until the age of twenty-one years in consideration of his taking care of him since his birth. The court ordered Donalson to teach him to read and pay him freedom dues at the end of his indenture [Orders 1721-9, 270, 278, 326; 1729-43, 21-2, 25]. Her children were

i. Caleb, born say 1718, an apprentice of Andrew Donalson of Lancaster County in 1730.

ii. ?Abraham, born say 1720, a "Mulato boy" bound for twenty-one years when he was listed in the Lancaster County estate of John Turbervill on 16 December 1728 [DW 1726-36, 86-7]. He was sued in Westmoreland County, Virginia court on 28 February 1743/4 and appeared in court a number of times as plaintiff and defendant between 1744 and 1750. He was identified as a "free Molatto" on 24 February 1747/8 in his suit against John Crabb for which he was awarded 15 pounds damages by a jury and on 30 November 1749 when he sued William Cox [Orders 1743-7, 14a, 23a, 66a, 67; 1747-50, 57, 95a, 113a, 133, 174a, 198; 1750-2, 8a].

iii. Ann, born 16 July 1722.

 

Other members of the Hall family were

i. Joseph, born before 1776, head of a Bedford County, Tennessee household of 10 "free colored" in 1820, perhaps travelling there with the Bass family since John and James Bass were "free colored" heads of households there in 1830.

ii. Joseph, born after 1775, head of a Bedford County, Tennessee household of 9 "free colored" in 1820.

iii. Joshua, a "free man of color" living in Greene County, Tennessee, in 1817 when white residents of the county petitioned the legislature to allow him to prove his accounts in court by his own oath, he having paid taxes, performed military duty, and participated in the war with Britain [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 180].

iv. Sally, head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:125a].

 

HAMILTON FAMILY

1.    Isabell Hambleton, born say 1718, was living at Colonel George Dent's when the Charles County, Maryland court presented her for bearing a "Molatto" child by information of George Thomas, the constable for William and Mary Parish [Court Record 1734-9, 263]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Charles, head of a Hampshire County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:805].

ii. Dido, head of a Hampshire County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:793].

 

Norfolk County

1.    Elizabeth Hamilton, born say 1745, was living in Norfolk County on 16 November 1758 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind her illegitimate "Molatto" daughter Lydia Hamilton to George Chamberlain [Orders 1755-9, 209]. She was the mother of

i. Lydia, born say 1758, ordered bound apprentice to George Chamberlain on 16 November 1758 and ordered bound to Philip Carbery on 15 September 1768 [Orders 1768-71, 18].

 

HAMLIN FAMILY

1.    William Hamlin, born say 1728, and his wife Lucy were living in Henrico County on 1 November 1756 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out their "Mulatto" son Arthur [Minutes 1752-5, 52]. They were the parents of

i. Arthur, born say 1750.

ii. ?Joseph, born before 1776, head of a Charles City County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:957].

 

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