IVEY FAMILY

George Ivie of Norfolk County petitioned the Assembly against the passage of the law against racial intermarriage in 1699 [McIlwaine, Legislative Journals of the Council, I:262]. Perhaps he petitioned on behalf of another member of the Ivey family. He was the son of a planter of the same name from whom he inherited 100 acres in 1689 [Norfolk Deeds 5-2:86a; 6:94, 105, 181, 188]. He died before 31 December 1710 when the inventory of his estate was recorded in Norfolk County court. The inventory was signed by his wife Elizabeth Ivey and included a note that seven sheep were given to his son William by his grandmother Elizabeth Thelaball [DB 9:36, 267, 384]. She may have been related to Margaret Theloball who paid a fine for having a "Mulatto" child in Princess Anne County on 2 July 1735 [Minutes 1728-37, 272].

 

1.    Adam1 Ivey, born say 1675, was the son of Adam Ivey of Prince George County, Virginia. He was the executor of the 26 April 1718 Prince George County will of his mother Elizabeth Ivey [Deeds, Etc. 1713-28, part 2, 443]. He received two patents on 21 February 1720/1 for land in the part of Isle of Wight County which is present-day Greensville County: one for 150 acres on the south side of the Meherrin River and another for 100 acres in the same area [Patents 11:56]. On 24 December 1725 he posted bond to Nicholas Hatch of Prince George County, Virginia, recorded in Isle of Wight County on 6 April 1725 for one Negro woman named Phillis and 100 acres where he then lived [Isle of Wight Deeds, Wills - Great Book vol. 2, 704]. He was living in Onslow Precinct, North Carolina, in 1736 when he sold this land by Brunswick County, Virginia deed [Deeds, Wills, etc., #1, 303]. The Onslow County court listed him among thirteen people to lay out a new road from the King's Road to Chapel Spring in April 1734 [Onslow County Minutes 1732-43, 4]. He was the father of

i. Elizabeth1, named in the Prince George County will of her grandmother Elizabeth Ivey.

2     ii. ?Adam2, born say 1710.

3     iii. ?Thomas1, born say 1715.

4     iv. ?Joseph1, born say 1717.

 

2.    Adam2 Ivey, born say 1710, was called "Adam Ivie melottoe" in July 1741 when he was presented by the Onslow County, North Carolina court for an unstated offense [Onslow County Minutes 1732-43, 25]. He was listed in the Edgecombe County, North Carolina militia in the 1750s [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 672]. He received a grant for 285 acres in Edgecombe County on 23 October 1754 [referred to in DB 2:154]. His 10 June 1762 Edgecombe County will was proved in September 1762. He named his sons Francis and Adam Ivey, daughters Elizabeth, Sarah, and Martha Ivey, left his son Lewis a plantation of 200 acres which he had purchased from William Register when he reached the age of twenty-one, left the use of his house and land for five years to his unnamed wife, left twenty-five pounds each to his son George and daughter Mary Ivey when they reached the age of twenty-one and left son Benjamin his 285 acre plantation [WB A:107]. When Benjamin sold his land, he identified it as a Granville grant to Adam Ivey of 23 October 1754 [DB 2:154]. He was the father of

i. Francis, born say 1733, sold his land in Edgecombe County while resident in Bladen County in 1763. He purchased 300 acres on the south side of Drowning Creek on 15 June 1784 and sold it on 27 February 1786 [DB 1:151]. He was a white Bladen County taxable in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:69, 82, 118, 182].

ii. Adam3, born say 1735, a "Mulato" taxable in Simon Cox's Bladen County household in 1768 and a "Molato" taxable head of his own Bladen County household from 1770 to 1774 when he was taxable on his unnamed brother. He was a white taxable with his brother George in 1776 and was counted as white in 1786, head of a household of one male 21-60 years old, two under 21 or over 60, and eight females [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:4, 34, 78, 124, 135; II:68, 82, 184]. He purchased 200 acres on Hog Swamp on 4 April 1772, sold 200 acres on Indian Swamp east of Ashpole Swamp on 31 July 1775 and was taxable on 450 acres in Bladen County in 1784 [DB 23:286, 509]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 12 whites in 1790 [NC:49]. He purchased land from Josiah Ivey by deed proved in Robeson County court on 1 July 1805 [Minutes I:329].

iii. Elizabeth2.

iv. Benjamin, received 285 acres by the Edgecombe County will of his father. He and his wife Edey sold this land while resident in Bladen County in 1773 [Edgecombe County DB 2:154]. He was a white taxable in Bladen County from 1768 to 1772 (taxable on "Mulato" John Phillips in 1770), a "Mixt Blood" taxable in 1774 and a white taxable in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:4, 34, 81, 110, 124, 136; II:69, 82]. Edey was counted as white in 1790 with four females and one male over sixteen years [NC:49]. She was head of a Lumberton, Robeson County, household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:218].

v. Sarah.

vi. Martha, perhaps the Martha Ivey who was counted in the 1810 census for Grainger County, Tennessee, as a white woman over the age of 45 with an "other free" person in her household.

vii. Lewis, who was to inherit a plantation of 200 acres in Edgecombe County when he reached the age of twenty-one. He sold this land while resident in Bladen County in 1775 [Edgecombe County DB 3:232].

viii. George, taxable in the Bladen County household of his brother Adam in 1776.

ix. Mary.

 

3.    Thomas1 Ivey, born say 1715, entered 150 acres including his own improvements on the Five Mile Branch in Bladen County, North Carolina, on 20 February 1754 and another 300 acres on Drowning Creek where James Roberts formerly lived on 26 September 1755 [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, nos. 974, 1048]. He was taxable with his two unnamed sons in Bladen County in 1763. He may have been the father of

5     i. Thomas2, Jr., born say 1738.

ii. James, born say 1740, purchased 200 acres in Bladen County in the fork of the Little Peedee on the east side of Mitchell's Creek on 26 July 1766 and sold this land on 15 September 1769. It had originally been patented by Jordan Gibson (a relative of Gideon Gibson) on 1 July 1758 and sold by Jordan on 25 September 1761 [DB 23:85]. James was a white taxable in Bladen County in 1770 and taxable on himself and Gideon Grant in 1772 ("Mulatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:45, 79]. He was called Captain James Ivey in a list of "free Negors and Mullatus" living in Bladen County on 13 October 1773 [G.A. 1773, Box 7].

iii. Joseph2, born say 1742, a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County in 1768, taxable as white in 1770, and a "Mulato" taxable in 1772 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7, 45, 79]. He was in a list of "free Negors and Mullatus" living in Bladen County on 13 October 1773 [G.A. 1773, Box 7]. He patented 100 acres on the south side of Cow Branch west of the Great Shoe Heel in Bladen County and sold this land on 26 February 1785 [DB 1:129, 175]. He was a "Mulatoe" head of a Cheraws District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" males over the age of 16 and 3 "other free" females in 1790 [SC:376], perhaps identical to Joseph Ivery, head of a Greenville County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:31].

iv. Isham, a white taxable in Robeson county in 1772, 1774 and 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:78, 110, 130; II:65, 82]. He made gifted 300 acres to Jesse Ivey by deed proved in Robeson County court on 7 January 1801 [Minutes 1797-1806, 136].

v. David1, born about 1760, "man of color," a musician and waggoner, enlisted for a 3-year term in 1777 in the company commanded by Captain James Wilson in Abraham Sheppard's 10th North Carolina Regiment and was transferred to the 1st Regiment at Valley Forge. He married Nancy Kelly in November 1814 in Anderson County, Tennessee, and died in Davidson County, Tennessee, on 27 November 1828. Nancy, born about 1764, applied for a widow's pension and bounty land from Perry County, Tennessee, in September 1855 at the age of ninety-one. She had a daughter Lydia Kelly, born about 1795 [NARA, W.26156, M804-1396, frame 0486].

 

4.    Joseph1 Ivey, born say 1717, died before 28 March 1750 when the Brunswick County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out his orphans Frederick and John Ivey [Orders 1749-50, 55]. He was the father of

6     i. Frederick1, born say 1745.

ii. John1, born say 1748.

 

5.    Thomas2 Ivey, Junior, born say 1738, was granted a patent for 208 acres in Bladen County on the east side of Saddletree Swamp on 23 October 1761 [Hoffman, Land Patents, I:416]. He was a white taxable in Bladen County from 1768 to 1772, a "Mixt Blood" taxable in 1774, and a white taxable in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:6, 16, 45, 71, 78, 110, 124, 130; II:65, 82]. In 1784 he was assessed tax on 640 acres and one poll in Captain Regan's District of Bladen County. This part of Bladen County became Robeson County in 1787. He sold land in Robeson County by deeds proved on 4 October 1797, 1 July 1799, and 2 April 1804 (called Thomas Ivey, Senr.) [Minutes I:16, 76, 280]. He was counted as white in 1790 with 4 males over 16, 2 under 16, and 5 females in his Robeson County household [NC:50]. On 14 August 1809 his grandson Thomas Hagans refused to pay the tax on "all Free Negros Mulatoes and Mestizos," claiming that he was white. Two white men, Robert Coleman and John Regan, who were acquainted with Thomas Ivey when he had been living on Drowning Creek in Bladen (Robeson) County, testified before the Marion District, South Carolina court that he was of Portuguese descent, that his complexion was swarthy, his hair black and strait - that his wife Elizabeth was a free white woman, very clear complection. They testified further that his daughter Kesiah Ivey married Zachariah Hagans, and they were the parents of Thomas Hagans [NCGSJ IX:259]. He was called Thomas Ivey, Sr., on 26 August 1811 when he appeared in Robeson County court and proved by the oath of Joseph Wood, Esq., that he had "sometime ago" proved in Bladen County court that he was a white man [Minutes II:270]. Thomas Ivey's children were

i. Kesiah, married Zachariah Hagins.

ii. ?Josiah, head of a Robeson County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:238]. He sold land in Robeson County to Adam Ivey by deed proved on 1 July 1805 [Minutes I:329].

iii. ?Joshua, head of a Robeson County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:237].

iv. ?Jesse, head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:241]. He purchased land by deed proved in Robeson County on 6 January 1806 [Minutes I:347].

v. ?Thomas3, head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:219].

vi. ?Mary, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:238].

vii. ?Sarabl, head of a Cumberland County household of 2 "other free" in 1800.

 

6.    Frederick1 Ivey, born say 1745, was taxable on 175 acres in Lunenburg County in 1769 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 275] and had removed from the county by November 1770 when he was listed among Anthony Street's list of insolvents for 1769 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 34:24-5]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 6 free persons in 1782 [VA:34]. He may have been related to Rebecca Ivey who was ordered by the Lunenburg County court on 9 July 1773 to be paid as a witness for Anthony Gresham in his suit against John Hightower for 5 days attendance and coming and going 30 miles [Orders 1769-77, 339]. On 8 June 1776 the Mecklenburg County court ordered him to work on the road leading from the courthouse to the fork of Cook's old road [Orders 1773-9, 414]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1782 to 1820: taxable on a slave in 1785, 1786, 1794-1797, and from 1801 to 1820. His sons Jordan and Henry were taxable in his household from 1791 to 1795; Miles Dunson was taxable there in 1797, John Chavis in 1798 and Henry Avery in 1811. He was issued a retail merchant's license in 1806 and 1813 and was head of a Mecklenburg County household of a "free Negro" man and woman in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 12, 76, 100, 124, 170, 376, 446, 521, 548, 616, 639, 851, 891, 977, 1002, 1082; 1806-28, frames 11, 22, 310, 319, 579, 687]. He purchased 60 acres at the head of Mayes Branch in Mecklenburg County on 13 December 1783, 96 acres in 1795, 172 acres on the southside of Sandy Creek on 28 February 1796, and 242 acres on Sandy Creek from Edmund Gowen on 9 December 1799. He was taxable on 666 acres in 1801, 941 acres on Sandy Creek in 1812, 1,041 acres in 1813, 1,187 acres in 1813, and 1,364 acres in 1816 [DB 5:388; 9:287, 367; 10:188-9; Land Tax List 1782-1811A, 1811B-1824A, A lists]. He married (second) Prissy Stewart, 14 December 1795 Mecklenburg County bond, William Willis security. Frederick was security for the 9 March 1789 Mecklenburg County marriage of Frederick Goen and Suckee Chavous. His estate was taxable on 1,284 acres in 1821 and his widow Priscilla was taxable on a life estate of 1,304 acres in 1822 [Land Tax List 1811B-1824A, A lists]. Frederick's estate was the subject of four chancery cases from 1830 to 1893 [LVA Chancery Cases 1830-018; 1834-048; 1869-050; 1893-005]. Priscilla was a seventy-year-old "Black" woman counted in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census [VA:137b]. She left an 1856 Mecklenburg County will. Frederick was the father of

i. Jordan, born say 1774, over the age of 16 years from 1791 to 1794, called the son of Frederick when he was listed as a taxable with his father from 1791 to 1794. He was charged with his own tax in 1795 but was not listed again in the county [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 376, 446, 466, 521, 548].

ii. Henry, born say 1776, over the age of 16 years from 1793 to 1795 when he was listed as a taxable with his father from 1793 to 1795. He was not mentioned in Mecklenburg County records after 1795 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 466, 521, 548].

iii. ?John2, born say 1780, taxable in Mecklenburg County in the same district as Frederick Ivey in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 851].

iv. Elizabeth3, born say 1800, married William Chavous, 6 March 1819 Mecklenburg County bond, Edward Brandom security.

v. Olive, born say 1801, married John Naish, 18 December 1823 Mecklenburg County bond.

vi. Margaret, born say 1803, daughter of Frederick and Priscilla Ivey, married William H. Kersey, 5 December 1822 Mecklenburg County bond.

vii. George, left a Mecklenburg County will in 1839.

viii. William, born about 1815.

ix. Frederick2, born about 1820, a thirty-year-old "Black" man counted in the household of Priscilla Ivey in 1850 [VA:137b].

x. Catherine, born about 1820, married William H. Mitchell, 1836 Mecklenburg County bond.

 

Other members of the Ivey family were

i. Adam4, born about 1761, head of a Sumter District, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [SC:605] and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [SC:211], counted as white in Sumter District, South Carolina census in 1830. He was about seventy-four on 14 August 1835 when he appeared in Montgomery County, Alabama court to apply for a pension for services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Lumberton, on Drowning Creek, in Robeson County, North Carolina, in 1761 and moved to Marion District, South Carolina, near Marrs Bluff at the age of nine or ten. At the age of fifteen he entered the service as a volunteer [NARA, R.5507, M804, https://www.fold3.com/image/246/24167357].

ii. Amos, head of a Marlboro District, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [SC:54a]. He owned land in Marlboro District near Beaver Dam, Phils and Naked creeks on 21 July 1804 when Drury Roberstson was granted land adjoining his [South Carolina Archives, Series S213192, 40:281].

iii. Elizabeth, born about 1760, a "Mulatto" woman counted in the 1850 census for Chesterfield District, South Carolina, in 1850 in the household of William and Ann Grooms.

iv. Elizabeth, born say 1769, married Jesse Harris, 29 November 1790 Wake County, North Carolina bond, Reuben Embry bondsman.

v. Molly, head of a Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:905].

vi. Polly, head of a Grainger County, Tennessee household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

 

Endnotes:

1.    See Robert Baird's article on the Adam Ivey family: http://www.genfiles.com/ivey-files/adam-ivey.pdf

 

JACKSON FAMILY

1.    Thomas Jackson, born say 1685, was a "Free Negro" who was "Old and infirm" by 18 April 1746 when the Amelia County court exempted him from paying taxes. Perhaps his wife was Eliza Jackson, a "mulatto" taxable in Amelia County in Charles Irby's District in 1747. On 24 August 1758 the court ordered the churchwardens of Raleigh Parish to bind out his children: Will, Tom, and Hannah Jackson [Orders 1735-46, fol. 362; List of Tithables, 1747; Orders 1757-60, 135]. His children were

i. Will.

ii. Tom.

2    iii. Hannah, born say 1745.

 

2.    Hannah Jackson, born say 1745, may have been the Hannah Jackson whose son Peter (no race indicated) was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Raleigh Parish in Amelia County on 22 March 1764 [Orders 1764-5, 46]. She may have been the mother of

i. Peter, born say 1763, taxable in Charlotte County in 1795, a "f. negroe" taxable from 1800 to 1806, a ditcher listed with wife Rachel in 1805 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 317, 468, 580, 607, 642, 675, 682] and head of a Jefferson County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:67].

ii. Edy, born about 1771, registered in Amelia County on 26 September 1816: a Negroe woman of a light complection, aged about forty five years, five feet high, born free as appears by a certificate from Obedience Hammm with whom she served her apprenticeship [Register of Free Negroes 1804-35, no. 113].

 

Hanover, Prince Edward, Lunenburg, and Charlotte counties

1.    Dorcas1 Jackson, born say 1730, petitioned the Prince Edward County court in November 1756 for release from her indenture to Samuel Wallace. The case was dismissed after hearing witnesses, and in August 1757 the court bound her daughter Abby to her master. Dorcas petitioned the court again in August 1758, and this time the court ordered her release because her indenture was not legal. She had been bound out by the churchwardens of St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, to one Edward Wade, and there was no record of his having transferred the indenture to Wallace. John Coldwell, Letitia Coldwell and William Crocket were witnesses for Dorcas [Orders 1754-8, fols. 97, 104, 121, 159, 163]. She was living in Lunenburg County (no race indicated) when the court ordered the churchwardens of Cornwall Parish to bind her daughter Susannah to Godfrey Jones on 13 October 1763 and her daughter Hannah to William Rivers on 14 February 1765 [Orders 1763-4, 257; 1764-5, 203]. In April 1769 (her children) Dorcas and Isaac Jackson complained to the Prince Edward County court about Wallace, and (her daughter) Nancy Jackson brought complaint against him in May 1769. The complaints were dismissed in March 1770 [Orders 1767-70, 195, 204, 263, 270]. Her children were

2     i. Isaac, born about 1748.

3     ii. Abby1, born say 1755.

iii. Dorcas2, born say 1757.

iv. Nancy, born say 1756, brought complaint about Samuel Wallace in 1769. Her son Samuel was bound to Wallace on 19 October 1772 [Orders 1771-81, pt.1, 174].

v. Susannah, born say 1760, bound to Godfrey Jones in Lunenburg County in on 13 October 1763.

4     vii. ?Burwell, born about 1761.

vi. Hannah, born say 1762, bound to William Rivers in Lunenburg County on 14 February 1765, perhaps the Hannah Jackson, a "Negro woman," who was taken up as a runaway in Botetourt County sometime before 13 July 1780 and placed in the custody of Captain Lockham until it could be determined whether or not she was free. On 12 May 1784 the Botetourt County court ordered the sheriff to hire her out to the highest bidder for one year and to advertise her in the Virginia Gazette, but the following day she petitioned the court for her freedom, saying she had been detained by the sheriff for several years as a slave, and the court ruled that she was free after hearing testimony of Reverend Adam Smyth and Mr. James Norvill [Orders 1780-4, 42, 541, 542].

5     viii. ?Berryman, born about 1769.

 

2.    Isaac Jackson, born September 1748, complained to the Prince Edward County court against his master Samuel Wallace in April 1769. He married Catherine Byrd, 22 September 1797 Lunenburg County bond. He was taxable in Stephen Bedford's list for Charlotte County from 1806 to 1812: called "Isaac Jackson, Sr., fn" in 1807 when he was listed as a carpenter with his wife Caty, a male child and 3 female children, levy free in 1809 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 675, 711, 717, 745, 751, 783, 814, 846]. He was a "free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:68]. He registered in Charlotte County on 18 August 1815: a Black looking man, five feet six & half inches high 67 years of age Sep. 1815. Son of Dorcas Jackson a free Mulato born free & Lived in Prince Edward & Charlotte and has lately Removed to Halifax, a Carpenter & Weever by trade. (His widow) Catherine registered on 16 October 1819: Catherine Jackson a mulatto woman & Laborer formerly the Wife of Isaac Jackson five feet one inch high, supposes herself to be about 50 years of age, daughter of Mary Bird a free Woman residing in the County of Charlotte...about 28 years [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, nos. 21, 29]. . He may have been the Isaac Jackson who received a discharge from Lieutenant Samuel Baskerville and General P. Mulhlenberg at Winchester Barracks on 11 June 1783, stating that he had served since August 1777 [Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Jackson, Isaac, 1783, Digital Collections, LVA]. Isaac and Dorcas were the parents of

i. Nancy Chavous, born about 1796, registered in Charlotte County on 21 October 1831: the wife of Isaac Chavous & daughter of Caty Jackson, was born free in this County, is about 35 years of age, of bright Complexion, 5 feet 2 3/4 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 115].

ii. Melchijah, born about 1812, registered in Charlotte County on 21 October 1831: the son of Caty Jackson, was born free in this County, is of very bright Complexion nearly white about 19 years of age, 5 feet 7 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 116].

 

3.    Abby1 Jackson, born say 1755, was bound to Samuel Wallace by the Prince Edward County court in 1757. She may have been the mother of Nutly(?) Jackson whose indenture was voluntarily delivered to the Prince Edward County court by John Gilcrist together with the indenture of Berryman Jackson on 19 June 1780. The court cancelled the indentures and ordered the churchwardens to bind Nutly to John Davison and Berryman to William Ewing [Orders 1771-81, part 2, 79]. She was the mother of

i. Dorcas3, bound to Samuel Wallace by the Prince Edward County court on 19 October 1772 [Orders 1771-81, pt.1, 174].

ii. ?Nutly, bound to John Davison on 19 June 1780. She may have been the Nettie Jackson who married Joseph Byrd, 20 August 1790 Charlotte County bond, Burwell Jackson surety.

iii. John, son of Abbe Jackson, bound to Matthew Davenport by the Charlotte County court on 2 April 1793 [Orders 1792-4, 74a].

iv. Abby2, born about 1791, listed in Charlotte County as a planter in the same household as Joshua Gallimore in 1811, listed in her own household in 1812, a spinner with a male child in 1812 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 814, 846]. She registered in Charlotte County on 2 May 1831: a woman of dark complexion aged about forty years was born free in the County of Charlotte five feet one inch high. Her son William, born about 1807, was bound apprentice to Richard Stone by the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court on 12 February 1810 [Orders 1809-10, 127]. He registered in Charlotte County on 6 June 1831: of dark complexion about twenty four years of age was born free in the County of Mecklenburg is the son of Abby Jackson...five feet seven inches high. His wife Dosha registered the same day: the wife of William Jackson is the daughter of Hannah Richardson of dark complexion about twenty five years of age,...five feet five inches high. She was married to a member of the Byrd family (perhaps Stanfield Bird) by 4 May 1841 when her daughter Martha registered [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, nos. 82, 85, 89, 187].

 

4.    Burwell Jackson, born about 1761, was surety for the 20 August 1790 Charlotte County marriage of Nettie Jackson and Joseph Byrd. He was taxable in Nelson County from 1809 to 1817: listed as a fifty-two-year-old blacksmith in the list of "free negroes & Molattoes" in 1813 with forty-seven-year-old Ally Jackson, Hezekiah/ Kiah (11), Nancy (21) and Sally (18); listed with William Jackson (12) and James Jackson (8) in 1817 [PPTL 1809-45, frames 8, 24, 39A, 77, 79, 98, 119, 166] and head of a Nelson County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:705]. He and his wife Alley were the parents of

i. Nancy Cousins, born about 1794, registered in Charlotte County on 15 December 1814: Nancy Cozens a mulatto woman five feet three and a half inches high Twenty four years old daughter of Burwell Jackson and Alley his wife free persons of Colour [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 27].

ii. Sally, born about 1795.

iii. Hezekiah1, born about 1802.

iv. William, born about 1805.

v. James, born about 1809.

 

5.  Berry1 Jackson, born about 1769, was called Berryman Jackson on 19 June 1780 when the Prince Edward County court cancelled his indenture to John Gilcrist and bound him instead to William Ewing [Orders 1771-81, part 2, 79]. He was taxable in William Ewing's Prince Edward County household in 1789 and 1790 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 254, 268]. He was taxable in Charlotte County in 1791, 1792 and a "f. Mulattoe" taxable there from 1800 to 1806: a ditcher living with wife Clary and son Booker in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 230, 279, 468, 505, 538, 542, 580, 607, 648, 675, 682]. He purchased 100 acres in Prince Edward County on the north side of the Roanoke Road for 50 pounds on 20 March 1797, sold this land for a horse worth 50 pounds on 9 October 1798 and purchased a half acre lot in the town of Farmville near Rutlidges Bridge in Prince Edward County on 4 October 1798 [DB 11:118-9, 252, 263]. He purchased 110 acres in Charlotte County from Alexander and Levinia Flood on 4 November 1799 [DB 7:212]. He registered in Halifax County, Virginia, on 17 September 1813: aged forty three years, about five feet 9 inches high, of a yellow complexion [Register of Free Negroes, 1802-31, no. 38]. And he registered in Charlotte County on 6 June 1831: of bright complexion was born free in the County of Hanover and removed to this County when he was about ten years of age. he is now about sixty two years of age...five feet nine and a half inches high. He died before 2 June 1834 when his widow Betsy Jackson, daughter of Sally Gash, registered in Charlotte County: was born free in this County is the daughter of Sally Gash and the widow of Berry Jackson is thirty nine or forty years of age, is of dark complexion & is five feet six & a half inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, nos. 84, 151]. Berry was the father of

i. Booker, born about 1801, registered in Charlotte County on 7 January 1823: bright yellow complexion the son of Berry Jackson and Clarissa his wife free persons aged about twenty two years five feet eight inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 46].

ii.Preston, born about 1803, registered in Charlotte County on 5 January 1829: of bright complexion who was born free in the County of Charlotte the son of Berry Jackson and Clarissa his wife five feet eleven inches high. His wife Betsey Chavous registered on 11 October 1847 [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 72, 604].

iii. George, born about 1805, registered in Charlotte County on 6 October 1828: a man of bright complexion the son of Berry Jackson and Betsey his wife free people of colour aged about twenty three years was born free in the County of Charlotte five feet seven and one fourth inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 63].

iv. John, born about 1815, registered in Charlotte County on 14 December 1843: was born free in this County, the son of Berry Jackson and Betsey his wife, both free persons, is about 28 years of age, 5 feet 2 inches high, 14 December 1843 [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 201].

v. Walker, registered in Charlotte County on 6 October 1828: a man of dark complexion the son of Berry Jackson and Clara his wife free people of colour was born free and raised in the said County six feet one inch high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 64].

vi. Berry2, born about 1818, registered in Charlotte County on 1 April 1839: of brown Complexion, twenty one years of age. He is the son of Berry Jackson and Betsey his wife free persons of Colour [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 175].

vii. Robert, born 23 February 1820, registered in Charlotte County on 5 April 1841: a free man of Colour, born of free parents in this County the son of Berry Jackson and Betsey his wife, twenty one years on the 23 February last, bright Copper Coloured Complexion, 6 feet 2-1/2 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 186].

viii. Hezekiah, born about 1822, registered in Charlotte County on 10 June 1845: a free man of Colour...dark Mulatto Complexion, was born free in this County is the son of Berry Jackson and Betsey his wife, free persons of Colour, five feet ten and one eighth inches high within shoes and is 23 years of age [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 211].

ix. Josiah Coleman, born 12 August 1831, registered in Charlotte County on 13 January 1846: of bright brown Complexion was born free in this County, the son of Berry Jackson and Betsey his wife...5 feet 6 inches high & was born 12 August 1831 [Register of Free Negroes, 1794-1865, no. 213].

 

Other members of a Jackson family in Virginia were

i. Henry, born say 1669, called "Harry a Maletto," the servant of William Sterling, in March 1689/90 when Francis Betteley deposed to the Northampton County court that he had been harrowing wheat in company with Harry when Harry told him where Mr. John Baron stored cloth and other goods (which Betteley later stole). Harry was called Henry Jackson, "maletto servant to William Sterling," on 29 September 1690 when he sued for his freedom. The case was resolved by the parties agreeing that Henry would serve one year and then be discharged from service with reasonable clothing. On 28 May 1697 he, called "the maletto," was presented for driving a cart on Sunday. He was discharged from the presentment on payment of the court fees [Wills, Orders, 1689-98, 46, 62, 64-5; 1698-1710, 427, 451].

ii. Stephen born say 1760, a "mulatto" (no age mentioned) who was bound as an apprentice hatter to Moses Doolittle in Spotsylvania County on 17 March 1774 [Deeds 1771-4].

iii. William, born about 1754, enlisted in the Revolution in King William County 18 months on 3 September 1780: age 26, 5'5-1/2" high, a groom, born in Hanover County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.9)].

iii. William, born about 1760, a "free man of Colour" or "blackman" who was about 65 years old in October 1825 when he appeared in Bedford County to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolution. He stated that he entered the war in 1780 or 1781 at Amherst Court House and served for three years as a waiter. He had living with him a wife, a free woman of color aged about 74 or 75, and a niece of his wife about thirty who had four small children. His widow Nicy Jackson was about 77 years of age when she appeared in Bedford County court on 27 February 1839 to apply for a widow's pension. She stated that her maiden name was Hill and that they were married in Bedford County about 1783 or 1784 [NARA, W.7877, roll 1401, frame 1064; https://www.fold3.com/image/24144820].

iv. Sarah, born say 1762, free-born mother of Polly Jackson, Sally Jackson and Sydnor Jackson who died in Louisa County before 10 September 1803 when her children obtained a certificate of freedom which was registered in Richmond City [Jackson, Polly: Free Negro Certificate, 1803, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

v. Charles, born about 1770, head of a York County household of 9 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:876]. He registered in York County on 17 September 1810: a bright mulato about 40 years of age ... long straight hair - Born free [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no. 53].

vi. Davis, head of an Amelia County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:237].

vii. Ned, "free Black" head of a Nottoway County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1017].

viii. Edward, head of a Goochland County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:699].

ix. John, head of a Nelson County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:705].

x. Edward, head of a Norfolk County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:927].

xi. Prissy, head of a Norfolk County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:906].

xii. Holley, head of a Chesterfield County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1062].

xiii. Jordan, head of a Rockingham County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:11].

xiv. John, head of a Richmond City household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:332].

 

Members of a Jackson family in North Carolina were

i. Daniel, head of a Richmond County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:45].

ii. Gabriel, head of a Burke County household of 11 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [NC:763].

iii. Frederick, born say 1775, a "Mulatto" head of an Edgecombe County household of 2 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [NC:212] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:127].

iv. Chloe, head of a Martin County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:388].

v. Matthew, head of a New Hanover County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [NC:308].

vi. Mourning, head of a Tyrrell County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:796].

 

Members of a Jackson family in South Carolina were

i. John, head of a Charleston District, St. Bartholomew's Parish household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [SC:36] and a Beaufort County household of 8 in 1800 [SC:98].

ii. Stephen, head of a St. Bartholomew's Parish, Charleston District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [SC:36] and 8 in 1800 [SC:98].

iii. Thomas, head of a St. Bartholomew's Parish household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:36].

iv. James, head of a Union District household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:244].

 

JACOB FAMILY

1.    Tabitha Jacob, born say 1732, an "Indian," was sued by Bartholomew Pettit for a 1 pound, 7 shillings debt in Northampton County, Virginia, on 15 April 1752 [Orders 1751-3, 89]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Tinsey, married Solomon Jeffrey, 16 January 1788 Northampton County bond, William Satchell security. Tinsey may have been identical to Tiney Jacob who was presented for bastard bearing in Northampton County on 13 May 1772 [Minutes 1771-7, 58].

ii. Polly, married William Francis, 30 December 1791 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security.

iii. James, married Patience Only, 23 December 1809 Northampton County bond, Cudjo Stephens security.

iv. Patience, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

 

JACOBS FAMILY

1.    Gabriel Jacobs, born say 1650, and (his wife?) Bab, called "Gabriel and Bab," were "Negroes" tithable from 1664 to 1667 in the Northampton County, Virginia household of Captain John Custis [Orders 1657-64, fol. 198; 1664-74, p.15, fol.42]. In 1668 he was called "Gabriell Jacob," and in 1677 Gabriel and Bab Jacob, Daniel Webb, Isbell Webb, and Fred Tucker were "Negroes" taxed in John Custis' household [Orders 1674-79, 191]. John Custis made a Northampton County will, proved 10 February 1695/6, by which he gave his slave Gabriel Jacob to his wife Tabitha for four years to work on their "sloope" and then to be free. Custis also gave slaves young Daniel and Bab to his grandson John Custis [OW 1689-98, 357]. Gabriel was the father of

2     i. Daniel, born say 1670.

ii. Jenny, "Gabriel's daughter," a slave John Custis gave his wife Tabitha Custis by his will [OW 1689-98, 355-60].

 

2.    Daniel Jacob, born say 1670, may have been identical to a "Negro man named Daniel" who was freed by the will of Thomas Harmonson, Sr., which was proved in Northampton County on 28 November 1702, after the death of his widow Elizabeth, on condition he pay 200 pounds of tobacco annually to someone whom his wife would assign payment or to his son-in-law William Waterson. He was called Daniel Jacob "Negro" on 30 May 1704 when a white woman named Joan Dauly was given twenty lashes for stealing goods from him [OW&c 1698-1710, 112, 205-206]. Edward Carter "Mullator" chose him as his guardian in 1707. He was called "Daniell Jacob Negro" on 28 July 1709 when he agreed to pay Jean Grimes's fine for bastard bearing [OW&c 1698-1710, 320, 485]. He sued Thomas Carter for a debt of 1,100 pounds of tobacco on 20 June 1716 and sued Edward Harmon for a debt of 600 pounds of tobacco in August 1727 [Orders 1710-16, 255-6; 1722-9, 299]. In September 1729 he was sued for planting corn and fencing-in an area which blocked Daniel Call's bridle path [Mihalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 150], 206]. He was a Northampton County taxable in his own household from 1720 to 1723 and was a "negro" taxable head of a household from 1724 to 1731 with (his wife) Elizabeth, and (children) Isaac, Frances, Abigail, and Elizabeth Jacob [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 2, 24, 36, 53, 75, 115, 129, 146, 161, 171, 190, 229]. He sued the estate of John Clay, deceased, for 100 pounds of tobacco and a side of sole leather on 10 January 1732/3. His suit against Ezekiel Warriner for trespass and assault was dismissed on 13 February 1732/3 due to Warriner's death. Daniel died before 10 April 1733 when his widow Elizabeth Jacob declared in court that he had died without making a will. His greatest creditor, Gertrude Harmonson, was granted administration on the estate. Harmonson accused Elizabeth Jacob and Isaac Jacob, "Negroes," of converting part of the estate to their own use. The jury found in favor of Harmonson for 2 pounds, 5 shillings. However, Elizabeth and Isaac won on appeal, arguing that the administrator was not entitled to the wheat in the estate since Daniel died before the first of March [Orders 1732-42, 38, 42, 45, 64, 67, 71, 76, 97, 120]. Daniel was probably the father of

3     i. Isaac1, born say 1705.

ii. Frances, born say 1706, married Daniel Webb about 1731 when he was taxable in her father's household and she was called Frances Webb.

iii. Abigail1, born say 1708, presented for bastard bearing by the August 1731 Northampton County court [Mihalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 249].

iv. Elizabeth, born say 1710, taxable in her father's household from 1727 to 1731.

 

Their probable descendants in North Carolina were

4     i. Abraham, born say 1730.

ii. Matthew1, born say 1735, received a patent for 160 acres on Hickey Branch of Long Creek in New Hanover County on 23 October 1761 [Hoffman, Land Patents, I:417]. He received voucher no. 4998 in Wilmington District for nine pounds specie on 2 October 1783 for military service in the militia during the Revolution and voucher no. 6006 on 26 January 1785 for the same [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-P735, Jacobs, Matthew]. He was head of a New Hanover County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194]. His 13 September 1786 New Hanover County will was proved on 4 October 1791. He left his land and houses to his wife Margaret; brother John1 Jacobs; and 80 acres each to Zachariah and Primus Jacobs, sons of his unnamed sister. Primus was his executor [WB C:198; Minutes 1779-92, 428].

5     iii. an unnamed sister of Matthew1, born say 1736.

iv. Zachariah1, born say 1740, patented 100 acres on the east side of Black River in New Hanover County on 19 December 1763. On 3 December 1767 he appeared in New Hanover court upon recognizance returned by Hezekiah Doane, Esq., and was discharged from court because no complainant appeared [Minutes 1738-69, 327].

v. John1, born say 1745, brother of Matthew1 Jacobs. He was living in New Hanover County on the east side of Ryley's Creek on 13 September 1779 when Thomas Carter entered land bordering his [Pruitt, Land Entries: New Hanover County, 19] and was mentioned in the 13 September 1786 New Hanover County will of his brother Matthew1 Jacobs [WB C:198]. He was head of a New Hanover County household of 9 "other free in 1790 [NC:194] and 5 in Bladen County in 1800. He sold land by deed proved in New Hanover County in September court 1795 [Minutes 1792-98, 152] and sold 50 acres in New Hanover County on the east side of Rileys Creek on 10 December 1799 [DB N:217].

vi. Abigail2, born say 1750, a "Molattow" taxable in the Bertie County household of Benjamin James in the 1769 tax list of Josiah Harrell and the 1774 list of Samuel Granberry [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. She may have been Benjamin's common-law wife.

 

3.    Isaac1 Jacobs, born say 1705, was taxable in the Northampton County, Virginia household of (his father?) Daniel Jacobs from 1724 to 1731. He was called "Isaac Jacob Negro" in the March 1745 session of the Chowan County, North Carolina General Court in which Francis Pugh's executor had a case against him for debt [Chowan County General Court Dockets, 1742-45, March 1745 Reference Docket #4]. He or his son was probably the Isaac Jacobs who was counted as white in Camden District, Richland County, South Carolina, in 1790, head of a household of 4 males over 16, 4 under 16, and one female, living nearby Benjamin Jacobs, Henry Bunch, and Barney Sweat who were also counted as white [SC:26]. Mary Jacobs, Sarah Jacobs, and female members of the Harris, Rawlinson, Sweat, Wilson, Bottom, Grooms, Jeffers and Portie families were residents of Richland District who petitioned the South Carolina legislature in 1806 asking to be exempted from the tax on free Negro women [S.C. Archives series S.165015, item 01885]. Isaac's descendants were most likely:

i. Benjamin1, head of a household of 2 whites and a slave in Camden District, Richland County, in 1790 [SC:26], perhaps the Benjamin Jacobs who sold land by deed proved in South Carolina in 1770 [Lucas, Index to Deeds of South Carolina, Q-3:306].

ii. Nancy, head of a Richland District household of 7 "other free" in 1810, counted near John Webb [SC:176].

iii. Benjamin2, head of a household of 3 "whites" in Camden District, Richland County in 1790 [SC:26] and 6 "other free" in Richland District in 1810 [SC:175a].

iv. William, born before 1776, head of a Richland District household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:176] and 6 "free colored" in 1830.

v. John2, head of a Newberry District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:80] and a Richland District household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [SC:175a].

vi.Isaac2, head of a Richland District household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:175a]. He was living in New Hanover County on 11 April 1818 when he sold lot number 5 which ran parallel to Chestnut Street on the eastern boundary of the town of Wilmington. He sold two more lots in Wilmington on both sides of Chestnut Street near Fifth Street on 8 May 1820. According to the deed, this land was part of 33 acres patented by Isaac in 1809 and recorded in book O:305 [DB Q:191; R:104]. He may have been the Isaac Jacobs who was head of a Sumner County, Tennessee household of 11 "free colored" in 1820.

 

4.    Abraham Jacobs, born say 1730, patented 125 acres in Duplin County on the west side of "Six Run on the marsh branch of Rown" on 21 April 1764 [Hoffman, Land Patents, I:59]. Five months later on 18 September 1764 he bought 200 acres on the south side of Rowan Swamp [Duplin DB 1:474], and five years later he patented a further 60 acres in the same area of Duplin County [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:160]. This part of Duplin became Sampson County in 1784 and he was taxed there on 385 acres and one black poll in 1784 [L.P. 64.1 by N.C. Genealogy XIV: 2169]. He received a lease and release for land proved in South Carolina between 1767 and 1768 [Lucas, Index to Deeds of South Carolina, G-3:557]. On 18 August 1791 he bought a further 36 acres near his land in Sampson County [DB 9:132]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:52] and 5 in 1800 [NC:515]. His 13 February 1807 Sampson County will left all to his executrix Susanna Carter [WB A:49]. His children may have been

i. Thomas1, born say 1752, patented 200 acres next to Abraham Jacobs' Duplin County land on 22 January 1773 [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:310] and was taxed on this land in Sampson County in 1784 [L.P. 64.1 by N.C. Genealogy XIV:2169]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:53], 10 in 1800 [NC:515], and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:278]. He may have been the father of Thomas2 Jacobs, Jr., head of a Sampson County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:278].

ii. Susanna Carter, executrix of Abraham's will, perhaps the wife of Moses2 Carter who also owned land near Rowan Swamp.

iii. Matthew2, head of a Sampson County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:278].

iv. Peter2, head of a Sampson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:278]. He sold 150 acres in New Hanover County on Poplar Branch adjoining Brian Buxton on 27 May 1817 [DB Q:175].

 

5.    An unnamed sister of Matthew1 Jacobs, born say 1736, was mentioned in Matthew's 13 September 1786 New Hanover County will. Her children were

6     i. Zachariah2, born on 4 October 1753.

ii. ?Peter1,born say 1758, enlisted in Hogg's Company of the 1st North Carolina Regiment for 3 years on 1 January 1777. T. Dixon received his final pay of 131 pounds for service in the Revolution [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1088; XVII:222]. Tilman Dixon was assigned Peter's right to military land warrant no. 1405 for his service in the Continental Line: 640 acres entered 16 November 1784 [N.C. Archives, S.S. 2051, , http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov]. He was not counted in the 1790 census, deceased by 21 May 1792 when John Jacobs proved to the New Hanover County court that Zachariah Jacobs was his heir [Minutes 1792-98, 8].

iii. ?William1, served in the Revolution and died before 1796 when his heirs Hezekiah and Josiah Jacobs received a warrant for 640 acres for his service as a private in the Continental Line of North Carolina. They assigned their rights Duncan Stewart [N.C. Archives, S.S. file 2369, Duncan Stewart warrant no. 4012; http://mars.archives.ncdcr.gov].

7     iii. Primus, born about 1760.

8     iv. ?Shadrack, born say 1762.

v. ?Ezekiah, enlisted as a private in Mill's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment on 18 December 1781 for 1 year [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1094]. He was head of a Brunswick County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:13], and 8 in 1810 [NC:236]. He recorded a certificate of his discharge from his service as a soldier in the North Carolina Line on 18 February 1788 in New Hanover County [NCGSJ XI:114]. He entered 100 acres in Brunswick County on Gum Swamp on 3 November 1800, 100 acres near Livingston's Creek including his settlement on 14 December 1804 (called Zedekiah Jacobs), 200 acres on the north side of Gum Swamp on 4 January 1811, 100 acres in the fork of Mill Branch on 16 June 1815, 200 acres on the north side of Gum Swamp where he formerly lived on 28 January 1820, and 75 acres in the fork of Mill Branch and Town Creek on 28 January 1820 [Pruitt, Land Entries, Brunswick County, 67, 91, 122, 138, 159].

vi. ?Josiah, received voucher nos. 4995 and 6003 on 2 October 1783 and 26 January 1785 each for 9 pounds allowed him for his services in the militia during the Revolution returned in the pay rolls [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-R9D1, Jacobs, Josiah]. He may have been the J. Jacobs, Sr., who was head of a Brunswick County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:234]. He entered 100 acres on the south side of Lewis Branch in Brunswick County on 12 November 1798 [Pruitt, Land Entries, Brunswick County, 52].

 

6.    Zachariah2 Jacobs was born on 4 October 1753 according to his Revolutionary War pension application in New Hanover County on 13 December 1832 [NARA, W.5304, M805-466, frame 0444]. He was a "Black" taxable in Brunswick County in 1772 [GA 11.1] and was head of a New Hanover County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194], 10 in 1800 [NC:313], and 5 in Richland District, South Carolina, in 1810 [SC:175a] and 7 "free colored" in Richland District in 1830. He enlisted in October 1781 with Captain James Mills in the 8th Regiment from Brunswick County, North Carolina, and left the service about a year later. He was in a skirmish near Dorchester, South Carolina, and was wounded in the leg at Guilford Courthouse. He married Sally Jacobs in New Hanover County in October 1791 according to her application for a pension as his surviving widow [NARA, W.5304, BlWt.17037-160-55, M805-466, frame 0444]. He assigned his right to his final pay for twelve months service in the Continental Line to Isaac Cole in New Hanover County on 6 December 1791 [NCGSJ XI:114]. He received 80 acres in New Hanover by the will of his uncle Matthew1 Jacobs [WB C:198]. He entered 200 acres in New Hanover County on the west side of Long Creek joining Matthew Jacobs on 7 April 1794 [Pruitt, Land Entries: New Hanover County, 59]. He may have been the Zachariah Jacobs who appeared in New Hanover County court on 21 May 1792 and was proved by John Jacobs to be the heir of Peter Jacobs [Minutes 1792-98, 8]. He was living in Brunswick County on 18 October 1815 when he sold 80 acres in New Hanover County on a branch of Long Creek which was willed to him by his uncle Matthew Jacobs (called his father in the deed) [DB P:595-6]. He died 10 April 1847 on Moore's Creek in New Hanover County according to his pension papers. His children were

i. William, born about 1791, sixty-six years old on 12 May 1857 when he testified on his mother's behalf in her application to obtain a widow's pension [M805-466, frame 0444]. He may have been the William Jacobs who was head of a New Hanover County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:308] and a Richland District household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:176].

ii. John4, born about 1805, fifty-two years old on 12 May 1857 [M805-466, frame 0444].

 

7.    Primus Jacobs, born about 1760 according to his Revolutionary War pension application, received 80 acres by the 13 September 1786 New Hanover County will of his uncle Matthew1 Jacobs and was executor of the will [WB C:198]. He was head of a New Hanover County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194] and 7 "other free," one white woman, and one white boy 5-15 years old in 1800 [NC:314]. Perhaps the boy was James Futch. The 26 August 1794 New Hanover County court ordered Primus to show cause why James Futch should not be bound out by the court [Minutes 1792-98, 105]. He patented 100 acres in New Hanover County on the west side of Long Creek on 17 July 1801. On 25 November 1811 he sold 80 acres on the south side of a branch of Long Creek which was willed to him by his uncle Matthew Jacobs (called his father in the deed), and on 22 January 1817 sold 351 acres in New Hanover County on Poplar Branch adjoining Isaac Lamb [DB O:263; U:23]. He was about sixty years old on 11 November 1819 when he appeared in New Hanover County court and declared that he enlisted in the Revolution in New Hanover County in August 1782. He was about the same age on 15 August 1820 when he made a further declaration, stating that he was a cooper, but because of a broken shoulder he had difficulty supporting his family which consisted of his fifty-five-year old wife and four unnamed children aged twenty-four, twenty-two, twenty, and sixteen [NARA, S.41688, M804-1403, frame 0193]. By order of the September 1827 term of the New Hanover County court the sheriff sold 200 acres of his land on the west side of Cypress adjoining Isaac Lamb for a debt he and (his son?) Matthew Jacobs owed [DB T:96-7]. His wife Ann Jacobs appeared in Cumberland County court on 6 December 1834 and proved to the satisfaction of the court that he was a pensioner and that he died in New Hanover County on 23 July 1834 [Minutes 1831-35]. Perhaps their children were

i. Matthew3, a codefendant with Primus in a suit in New Hanover County court in September 1827.

ii. John3, head of a Cumberland County household of 9 "free colored" in District 9 in 1820 [NC:169].

iii. Levi, an insolvent Cumberland County taxpayer for the year 1825 listed in court on 9 September 1826 [Minutes 1823-27]. On 4 March 1835 the Cumberland County court ordered that he be sold or hired out if he did not pay a fine [Minutes 1831-35].

iv. Thomas3, a resident of New Hanover County on 10 September 1840 when he sold 175 acres on the west side of Cypress joining Isaac Lamb to (his brother?) Matthew Jacobs [DB Y:288].

 

8.    Shadrack Jacobs, born say 1762, bought 75 acres in Bladen County near the Brunswick County line on 6 February 1798 [DB 7:142]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 6 "other free" in 1800, 6 in 1810 [NC:203], and 7 "free colored" in Columbus County in 1820 [NC:50]. He called himself Shadrack Jacob of Columbus County in his 27 April 1818 Bladen County will, naming his wife Mary and children Arthur and Peggy. Benjamin Moore, head of a Bladen County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830, was a witness [WB 2:371]. He was the father of

i. Arthur, head of a Bladen County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Peggy.

 

Endnotes:

1.    Henry Bunch was head of a Newberry District household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [SC:66]. Neighbors of the Jacobs family who were counted as white in Camden District, Richland County in 1790 [SC:26] and "other free" in Richland District in 1810 were Moses Harris [SC:180], William, Nathaniel, Catherine, Benjamin, John, James, and Sam Rawlinson [SC:171, 175a, 177a, 178, 179], Berry Jeffers/ Jeffries [SC:176], and Arthur and Benjamin Neal [SC:174, 177]. William Neal was a "mulatto" taxable in New Hanover County in 1763 [SS 837] and taxable in Brunswick County in 1769 [NCGSJ V:242].

 

JAMES FAMILY

1.    Andrew1 James, born say 1650, was a "Negro Boy" named Andrew who was left by John Griggs, Sr., deceased, to his son John Griggs before 27 March 1655. Andrew was listed in the York County account of the estate of John Griggs (Sr.) on 8 September 1659 [DWO 1:264; 3:64]. John Griggs called him Andrew James "Negroe" on 23 December 1673 when they made an agreement that he was to be free when Griggs died. And on 22 October 1677 they signed an agreement whereby Andrew would work for himself as a carpenter for one year, in exchange for which, Andrew was to pay Griggs 500 pounds of tobacco at the start of the year, plant 3,000 corn husks, and pay 2,000 pounds of tobacco at the end of the year. Griggs was not to hinder him from working at his trade of carpenter during that year except for planting the corn. Griggs died before the completion of the year, and Andrew was a free man. On 26 August 1678 the court examined the accounts between him and Richard Savoy and ordered him to pay Savoy 640 pounds of tobacco. On 24 January 1678/9 the executor of Griggs estate, Thomas Nutton, sued Andrew for the 2,000 pounds of tobacco which he was supposed to have delivered to Griggs at the completion of their agreement, but Andrew answered that he had not been able to pay that amount because he had been assigned other work by Griggs. Andrew was reported to have left the county by 24 October 1682 when the sheriff attached his estate worth about 2,800 pounds of tobacco for debts he owed Thomas Nutton/ Nutting, Samuel Singnell, John Travellion, and William Wise [DOW 6:47, 59, 67, 94, 113, 117, 434, 463]. He was probably the Andrew James who received nine shillings by the 11 September 1696 North Carolina will of James Lankston. Lankston also left "Negro Betty" a sow. There was no location mentioned in the will, but it was probably in what is now Bertie County since the executor, William Duckinfield, was a resident of Bertie County [SS vol. 849]. James Langston may have been related to Christopher Langston, a resident of York County on 10 October 1679 [DWO 6:126]. Andrew was probably the grandfather of

2     i. Andrew2, born say 1710.

3     ii. David1, born say 1720.

4     iii. Solomon1, born say 1725.

 

2.    Andrew2 James, born say 1710, was taxable on two tithes in the 1757 Bertie summary list, was a delinquent taxpayer in the 1758 Bertie tax list of Edward Rasor, and was a "Mulatto" taxable on one tithe in the list of John Brickell in 1759 [CR 10.702.1]. He may have been out of the county in 1751 when his wife Ann James "fr: nego" was taxable in James Weston's household [CCR 190]. She may have been the Ann James, "free negro," who was a taxable head of her own household in Norfolk County, Virginia, near Tanners Bridge between 1752 and 1761. In 1754 Ann Page was in her household, and in 1757 Hannah Williams was in her household [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 30, 92, 120, 143, 166]. Andrew and his unnamed wife were "free Mulatto" taxables in the 1761 Bertie County list of John Hill, and he was head of a "free Mulatto" household in John Hill's 1763 list with Ann James and (their daughter?) Mary James. Andrew died about 1764, and Ann was called a widow in the 1764 Bertie summary list. He must have been a very poor man as the May 1764 session of the Bertie court assigned administration of his estate to John Pearson on security of only twenty pounds [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:668]. Ann was taxable in her own household in 1772 in the list of Humphrey Nichols [CR 10.702.1]. Their children were

i. Elizabeth1, born say 1735, called "daughter of Ann" in the 1772 list of Humphrey Nichols. There was also an Elizabeth James, "free negro" taxable in David1 James' household in 1751, who was called David's wife in the 1759 list of John Brickell. Since it is not possible to differentiate the two Elizabeths in the Bertie records, all information about the two has been listed under Elizabeth, wife of David.

5     ii. ?Hester, born about 1739.

6     iii. ?Mary1, born say 1741.

7     iv. Benjamin1, born about 1749.

v. Sophia, born about 1751, "daughter of Ann" bound to John Pearson on 28 April 1757.

8     vi. Rebecca/Beck, born about 1752.

vii. Sarah1, born about 1753, a taxable "free Mulatto" in John Moore's 1768 household and in her brother Benjamin's household from 1768 to 1773.

viii. Isaac, born about 1753, "child of Ann" bound to Edward Rasor to be a cordwainer on 29 July 1757 [CR 10.101]. He was taxable in Edward Rasor's household in an untitled 1765 Bertie list and in Rasor's household in Rasor's 1772 list. He received voucher no. 1963 for 11 pounds specie in Edenton District on 1 August 1783 for military service [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-P34F, James Isaac]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 1 "other free" in 1800.

9     ix. Elisha, born about 1755.

x. Punch, born about 1758, called "Bastard Mulatoe of Ann James aged about Seventeen" when she was ordered bound to Samuel Moore by the May 1775 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:157].

10   xi. Jeremiah2, born about 1758.

11   xii. Frederick1, born about 1751.

 

3.    David1 James, born say 1720, and his wife Elizabeth James were taxable "free negros" in the 1751 Bertie County Tax Summary List filed with the central government [CCR 190]. He may have been the same David James who was bound as an apprentice gunsmith to James Isedel on 5 July 1727 in Princess Anne County, Virginia [Orders 1717-28, 288a]. Elizabeth was listed alone in the 1756 tax list of Constable John Redditt. In December 1757 David was in Beaufort County court, called "free negro" when he was sued by the administrators of Thomas Ryan's estate [Beaufort County Court Minutes, Appearance Prosecution, and Trial Dockets, 1756-61, 1:43b]. He had returned to Bertie County by 1759 when he and Elizabeth were taxables in the list of John Brickell [CR 10.702.1, Box 1]. David probably died or left the county about 1762 since he was not listed in the tax records after 1761 and Elizabeth's children were bound out beginning 27 February 1763.

There were two Elizabeth Jameses in the early Bertie tax records; one was called the wife of David in the 1759 list of John Brickell, and the other was called the daughter of Andrew in the 1772 list of Humphrey Nichols. It is not possible to distinguish between the two, so they are counted as the same person in this history.

Elizabeth bought 250 acres near the "Downyeterry Swamp" in Bertie County on 7 June 1761 [DB K:72] and recorded her livestock mark in Bertie court on 14 July 1761 and in April 1762 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:544]. That year Elizabeth, David, and Jesse were taxable in their own household in the list of John Hill. Elizabeth seems to have sold or lost her land since she was not head of her own household in the tax lists for 1763 and thereafter, and five of her children were bound out in 1763. However, there was no deed of sale recorded for the land. Elizabeth was taxable in Arthur Williams' household in the tax lists from 1763 to 1772, and two of her children were taxed in his household when they reached twelve years of age: William in 1765 and Mary in 1767. In 1772 she was taxed in her own household, called "daughter of Andrew," in the list of Humphrey Nichols, perhaps living on the 75 acres which her son William purchased on 5 September 1772. She witnessed the 10 January 1777 Bertie will of John Harrell [WB B:92]. She married John Gardner, a white man, 9 February 1780 Bertie County bond, Martin Gardner bondsman. Her children were

12    i. Jesse1, born about 1749.

13    ii. William1, born about 1751.

iii. Nanny/ Nancy, born about 1753, "Nanny the Daughter of Betty James a Free Mulattoe about the age of Ten Years," ordered bound to Ephraim Weston by the May 1763 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:615]. She was called "Nancy," a taxable in his household in 1767 in the list of John Crickett.

iv. Mary2, born about 1754.

v. Pattey1, born about 1755, "Daughter of Betty James a Free Mulatoe," ordered bound to Richard Bell in May 1763 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:615].

vi. Ann, born about 1756, a seven-year-old child of Elizabeth ordered bound to Arthur Williams in May 1763 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:621].

vii. Thomas1, born about 1757, the six-year-old son of Betty James, "Free Mulatoe," ordered bound to John Moore in May 1763. Humphrey Hardy was granted administration on his estate on 6 August 1792 with 500 pounds security [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:957]. The administrator had a certificate from the Board of Army Accounts that wages due were settled at Halifax in the amount of 69 pounds [Bertie Estate Papers]. He enlisted in Blount's Company on 20 July 1778, the same day as Jeremiah and David James [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1092].

14   viii. Catherine, born about 1759.

15   ix. David2, born about 1761.

x. Sophia, born about 1762, a "Mulatoe orphan aged about III years," no last name stated, ordered bound to Solomon Cherry on 28 March 1765 [CR 10.101.7]. She was taxable as Saphira James in Solomon's household in the 1767 list of William Cherry. She was ordered bound to Solomon Cherry again at the age of fifteen years by the August 1777 Bertie court, "the Mulato Daughter of Elizabeth James."

xi. Andrew4, born about 1765, "the Bastard Child of Betty aged about five Years," ordered bound to Charles Sowell in June 1770 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:914]. The Northampton County estate of John Bridgers received money from him between 3 February 1797 and 3 September 1799 [Gammon, Records of Estates Northampton County, I:105]. He was in Halifax County by 26 March 1813 when Whitmell Cotton of Halifax County for 1 shilling gave him a lifetime lease on 600 acres [DB 23:31].

xii.Benjamin2, born about 1766, "the Bastard Child of Betty James aged about four years," ordered bound to Charles Sowell by the June 1770 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:914]. He may have been the Benjamin James who was head of a Martin County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68], 7 in 1800 [NC:398], and 7 "other free" in Halifax County in 1810 [NC:28]. He was a sixty-seven-year-old "free man of color," a blacksmith, who moved from Halifax County, North Carolina, to Hawkins County, Tennessee, before 1832 when several whites petitioned that he be allowed to remain in the state [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 193].

xiii. Elizabeth3, born about 1769, six-year-old "Mulato Bastard of Elizabeth James," ordered bound to Hardy Weston by the May 1775 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:147].

 

4.    Solomon1 James, born say 1725, and James Willsford (alias Howl) of unnamed county sold 340 acres on "Guys Hall" Swamp in Bertie County in 1759. This was half of a tract of 680 acres, the other half sold by Absolem /Abraham James of Pitt County on 23 June 1763 [DB I:402; K:470]. He may have been the Solomon James who was number 19 in the Payroll of the First Troop of Georgia Rangers from 18 August 1759 to 18 November 1759 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 985]. On 26 October 1767 he recorded a patent for 100 acres in Bladen County on the northeast side of Drowning Creek [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:461] and sold this land two years later on 10 March 1769 [DB 23:23]. He was a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County between 1768 and 1776, called Solomon James, Senr., in 1769, taxable with his son Solomon from 1772 to 1776 and head of a Bladen County household of one male under 21 or over 60 years old in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7, 16, 45, 81, 110; II:67, 82, 183]. He was the father of

i. Solomon2, Jr., born say 1755, a taxable "Mulato" in his father's Bladen County household in 1772, "Molato" head of his own household in 1776 and head of a household of two white males from 21 to 60, two under 21 or over 60, and five white females in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:81; II:67, 183]. Solomon James, Jr., was a "Molato" head of household in Bladen County in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:81; II:67, 183]. He served in the Revolution from Wilmington District [NCDAR, Roster of Soldiers from North Carolina in the American Revolution, 221]. He purchased 150 acres in Bladen County on the south side of Drowning Creek near the mouth of Raft Swamp in 1783 [DB 1:314]. He entered 150 acres on the west side of Drowning Creek on 29 September 1787 [Pruitt, Robeson County Land Entries, 1787-1795, 9]. He was called Saul James on 7 November 1784 when he received a patent for 150 acres in Bladen County on the east side of Drowning Creek below the mouth of Jacks Branch [DB 1:24]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 9 "other free" and one white woman in 1790 [NC:49].

 

5.    Hester James, born about 1739, was a taxable "free Mulatto" in Samuel Moore's Bertie County household in the 1757 list of Joseph Jordan [CR 10.702.1]. She was taxable in John Moore's household in the list of John Hill from 1761 until 1774. Her children were

i. John1, born about 1756, "7 year old orphan of Easter," bound to John Moore on 30 August 1763 [CR 10.101]. He purchased 157 acres on Conoho Creek in Martin County from Lot Harrell on 3 February 1776 [DB A:167], and he was taxable in Martin County in 1779 on 542 pounds valuation in District 7 [GA 30.1]. He received voucher nos. 4285 and 9483 in Halifax District for 1 pound, 16 shillings specie on 18 ___uary 1782 and no. 9483 for 5 pounds on 16 December 1783 for military service in the Revoltution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-P486, James, John]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:13], 11 in 1800 [NC:56], and 7 in 1810 [NC:149]. His Bertie County estate, administered by William Green on 13 August 1817, mentioned his widow Polly and buyers: Mary, John, Right, and Reuben James.

ii. ?William2, born about 1760, taxable with Hester in John Moore's household in 1772, 1773, and 1774. He was not indentured. He witnessed a 9 March 1779 Martin County deed [DB A:225].

 

6.    Mary1 James, born say 1741, was taxable in Andrew James' Bertie County household in the 1763 list of John Hill. In the undated (1772?) list of Humphrey Hardy she was a "Molatto" head of her own household, taxed on herself and "husband Jim" [CR 10.702.1, box 13]. Her children were

i. Andrew3, born about 1756, "son of Poll James (and Base Born)," ordered bound to John Pearson by the July 1761 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:538]. He was taxable in Ephraim Weston's household in the 1768 list of Humphrey Nichols as "Andrew J____ free." He married Janey Drury, 24 February 1784 Bertie County bond with his uncle Benjamin James bondsman. Andrew was head of a Bertie County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:13], 6 in 1800 [NC:56], and 6 in 1810 [NC:166].

ii. James1, born say 1759, "son of Poll," ordered bound to John Pearson by the July 1761 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:538].

16   iii. Dorcas, born about 1760.

iv. Elizabeth2/ Bett, born about 1762, "Mulattoe ... of Mary," ordered bound to John Pearson by the May 1764 Bertie court. She was fifteen years old when she was bound to Mrs. Pearson in August 1777 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:668; IV:241].

 

7.    Benjamin1 James, born about 1749, "son of Ann," was bound by the Bertie County court to John Pearson to learn husbandry on 28 April 1757 [CR 10.101]. He was taxable in Samuel Moore's household in the 1761 list of John Hill. He was head of his own household in 1768 and 1769 in the list of Josiah Ha rrell, taxable on himself, his sister Sarah James, and Abigail Jacobs, perhaps his common-law wife. He and Abigail were taxable in the 1774 list of Samuel Granberry. He was taxable in Bertie County on 3 horses and 4 cattle in 1778 [CR 10.702.1, box 3]. On 8 March 1779 he married Lucy Murray, Bertie County bond. He enlisted in Hall's Company of the 10th North Carolina Regiment in 1781 and left the service on 16 August 1782 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVI:1093].  He and his brother Jeremiah gave Seth Peebles of Northampton County power of attorney to obtain settlement of their Revolutionary War service pay [NCGSJ XI:114]. He was taxable on two polls in District 14 of Halifax County in 1784 and 1785, and one poll in 1787, 1788, and 1790. On 8 January 1792 he purchased 200 acres on the west side of Little Swamp in Halifax County near the Northampton County line and 109 acres on both sides of the new road on 25 January 1803 [DB 18:832; 19:288]. On 8 June 1796 Thomas Dempsey was bound an apprentice to him by the Northampton County court [Minutes 1792-96, 250]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68], 7 in 1800 [NC:322], 7 in 1810 [NC:29], and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:153]. He and (his son?) Hardy James sold 237 acres on Little Swamp on 23 March 1818 [DB 24:298]. His children were probably

i. Hardy, born about 1775, married Mary James, 18 February 1801 Bertie County bond with Frederick James bondsman. He was head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:320], and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:152].

ii. Willis, purchased 29 acres in Halifax County on 29 September 1804 [DB 19:493].

 

8.    Rebecca/Beck James, born about 1752, "Daughter of Ann James," no age stated, was bound by the Bertie County court to John Pearson on 28 April 1757 [CR 10.101]. On 26 June 1765 the Bertie court again ordered her bound to John Pearson, stating her age as thirteen years, no parent named [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:710]. She was taxable in John Pearson's household in the 1767 list of Humphrey Nichols. Her child was

i. Peggy1, born about 1776, "a Bastard Child of Beck James aged three years," bound to William and Ann Virgin to be a weaver [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:303].

 

9.    Elisha James, born about 1755, "son of Ann," was bound by the Bertie County court to Samuel Moore to be a cordwainer on 29 July 1757 [CR 10.101]. He was taxable in Samuel Moore's household in 1767 in the list of John Crickett and was still in Moore's household in 1774 in the list of Samuel Granberry. He was listed among the militiamen from Northampton County who were paroled by Lord Cornwallis in Halifax in 1781, probably captured during the events surrounding the Battle of Guilford Court House on 15 March 1781 [NCGSJ IV:149]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 2 males and 3 females in Captain Winborne's District for the state census in 1786. In 1788, 1790, 1800, and 1802 he was a Halifax County taxable on one free poll in District 14 which bordered Northampton County. He was head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:65], 7 in 1800 [NC:320], 4 in 1810 [NC:29], 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:152], and 9 "free colored" in 1830. He made a declaration in Halifax County court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension on 16 November 1824 stating that he was sixty-five years old and that his children then living at home were Franky, Emma, and Sally. His children were

17    i. ?Benjamin3, born about 1790.

ii. Franky, born 1816.

iii. Emma, born 1822.

iv. Sally, born 1823.

 

10.    Jeremiah2 James, born about 1758, the "orphan of Nann James aged about Six years," was bound by the Bertie County court to John Norwood to be a weaver on 1 June 1764 [CR 10.101.7]. He was a "free Mulatto" taxable in John Norwood's household in the undated (1772?) list of Humphrey Nichols [CR 10.702.1, box 13]. He was counted in the 1787 state census for Bertie County in H. H. Hardy's list, head of a household of 4 males and 3 females. He leased land in Northampton County on the east side of Urahaw Swamp on 1 January 1798 [DB 10:372] and was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73] and 6 in 1800 [NC:453]. His estate, administered in Northampton County on 3 December 1805, mentioned Rebecca James. She was his wife who provided the following information when she applied for and was granted his Revolutionary War pension from Maury County, Tennessee:

He entered the service in Bertie County in Captain Blount's Company of the 10th Regiment for nine months on 20 July 1778 and again as a private in Captain Raiford's Company from 17 May 1781 to 15 April 1782. She was born in Virginia in May 1758 and married Jeremiah in Northampton County about February or March 1790. Jeremiah died on 1 October 1805. He owed Mike Walden $1.12 when he died. James Keemer, Micajah Walden, Batt Chavis, William Pettiford, Henry Dempsey, Noah Franklin, Jesse Bird and Rebecca James were buyers at the sale of his estate [Ancestry.com. North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 (database on-line)]. She married Isham Scott about a year later. After Scott died, she moved to Maury County, Tennessee. She named her children in her pension application and gave evidence of their birth and her marriage to Jeremiah in a book published in 1792, entitled, Baxter's Call to the Unconverted:

Jeremiah James Son of Ann James was born March 11, 1762

" " " "                                                   his book 1793

Axom James Son of Jeremiah & Rebecca James born Nov. 27, 1790

Uriah James            " " " " "                Aug. 25, 1794

Asa James              " " " " "                Feb. 22, 1805

Rebecca was living in the household of her son Exum in the 1850 census for District 19 of Maury County, Tennessee: a ninety-three-year-old woman born in Virginia [TN:220]. She named the following children in her application [NARA, M804, roll 1404, frame 605 of 781]:

i. Exum, born 27 November 1790 according to the family "bible." He married Nancy Hawkins, 18 January 1826 Halifax County bond. She was mentioned in the Halifax County will of her father Solomon Hawkins, proved August 1816 [WB 3:589]. Exum was head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:306]. He and Nancy were living in Williamson County, Tennessee, on 3 December 1832 when they gave power of attorney to Jeremiah James of the same to sell their rights to land of Solomon Hawkins in Halifax County [DB 29:6, 7]. They were counted with their children in District 19 of Maury County, Tennessee, in 1850 [TN:220].

ii. Delilah.

iii. Uriah, born 25 August 1794.

iv. Jeremiah4, born about 1800, counted in Maury County, Tennessee, in 1850.

v. Trusty.

vi. Kesiah, married James Keemer, 21 November 1817 Halifax County bond.

 

11.    Frederick1 James, born about 1764, was called the "natural son of Ann James" when he was bound by the Bertie County court to John Norwood on 26 September 1768 [CR 10.101.7 by NCGSJ XIV:33]. He was listed among the Militiamen from Bertie County who were paroled by Lord Cornwallis in 1781 in Halifax, probably captured during the events surrounding the Battle of Guilford Courthouse on 15 March 1781 [NCGSJ IV:150]. John Marshall received his final pay of 27 pounds for service in the North Carolina Continental Line in 1786 [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:223]. He purchased 63 acres near a place commonly called "Tound Pocosin" in Bertie County on 21 August 1795 and leased for ten years on 24 August 1797 land in Bertie which he was to take possession at the end of the lease [DB R:29, 468]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:13], 5 in 1800 [NC:54], and 3 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [NC:148]. He petitioned the legislature in 1816, stating that he had fought in the Revolution but that his constitution had become impaired and broken. He ran a refreshment house for those who attended public meetings in Bertie County but could not collect from customers who did not pay because he was "born of parents tho' free of African descent" [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 81]. He wrote his own Bertie County will in rather good handwriting on 25 February 1817, proved February 1818. He named his "Worthy friend" William Lee Gray his sole executor. In his inventory of the estate Gray wrote that there were "Sundry Book accts (the amt. unknown) all of which are Extremely doubtful - as the Testator was a colored man & there is no legal way to prove them." Frederick mentioned his wife Dicey and sons [WB G:45]. Dicey was head of a Bertie County household of 2 "free colored" women and a slave in 1820 [NC:82]. Their children were

i. Jonathan, born about 1785, head of a Bertie County household of 2 "other free" and one slave in 1810 [NC:149] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:84]. He was a 41-year-old wheelwright from Bertie County who emigrated with wife Amy (40), children and Diza James (47) to Liberia aboard the ship Indian Chief in 1826 [https://www.fold3.com/image/46670241].

ii. Allen, married Nancy Smith, 25 May 1808 Bertie County bond with Fred R. James bondsman. He was head of a Bertie County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:149].

iii. James2.

iv. Frederick2.

v. Jeremiah3, whose Bertie County estate was administered on 10 February 1817.

 

12.    Jesse1 James, born about 1749, was taxable in David and Elizabeth James' Bertie County household in the 1761 list of John Hill. He was called Jesse Andrews, son of Elizabeth James, and was fourteen years old when he was apprenticed to John Perry on 23 February 1763 [CR 10.101.7]. He was taxed in Perry's household in the 1767 tax list of William Nichols. By 1780 he was a Northampton County taxable [LP 46.1]. He received voucher no. 4844 in Halifax District for 3 pounds specie per the Board of Auditors of 26 January 1782 for military service in the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-RMCK, James, Jesse]. He had 8 free persons in his Northampton County household in the 1786 state census and was head of a Northampton County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73]. On 3 December 1792 administration on his Northampton County estate was granted to Matthew Griffin on 500 pounds security, his unnamed widow having relinquished her right [Minutes 1792-96, 40]. Perhaps she was Sarah James, a buyer at the sale of the estate of David James, who made a deed of gift of two cows and a mare to her daughters: Patty, Rachel, and Peggy James, on 7 November 1796 [DB 11:68]. Their children may have been

i. Patty2.

ii. John2, "a free mulatto" murdered in Northampton County. His murderer escaped from the Halifax County jail according to the 20 March 1793 issue of the North Carolina Journal: Last night Harris Allen, who was committed for the murder of John James, a free mulatto, of Northampton County, made his escape from the gaol of this town. He is a remarkable tall man, and had on a short round jacket [Fouts, North Carolina Journal, I:205].

iii. Thomas2, ordered bound by the Northampton County court as an apprentice on 3 February 1794. He bought land in Northampton County by deed proved in court on 7 March 1814, and he and his wife sold this land two years later by deed proved in court on 4 March 1816 [Minutes 1792-96, 93; 1813-21, n.p.].

iv. Rachel.

v. Peggy2.

 

13.    William1 James, born about 1751, "12 year old son of Elizabeth James," was ordered bound to Arthur Williams by the 2 June 1763 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:621]. He was taxable in Arthur Williams' household with Elizabeth James in the 1766 list of John Crickett. On 5 September 1772 he purchased 75 acres near Georgey Dempsey on Sams Branch and sold this land on 8 December 1777 [DB L:349; N:243]. In an undated (1772?) list of Humphrey Hardy he was taxable in his own household with his "wife Ann." He received voucher no. 1778 for 12 pounds specie in Edenton District on 20 May 1783 for service in the Revolution [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-P9BQ, James, William]. He died before May 1788 when the Bertie court ordered his children bound as apprentices. Ann Gardner was granted administration on his Bertie County estate on 6 August 1792 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:697; VI:969]. His children were

i. Piety, born about 1780, daughter of William, ordered bound to Mary Weston by the May 1788 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:700].

ii. William3, born about 1784, "Mulatto son of William, decd," ordered bound to William Edwards to be a blacksmith.

 

14.    Catherine James, born about 1759, a four-year-old child of Elizabeth James, was ordered bound an apprentice to Arthur Williams by the May 1763 Bertie court. She was taxable in the household of Elizabeth James, "daughter of Andrew," in the 1772 list of Humphrey Nichols. Her child was

i. Frederick3, born July 1783, "son of Catey James," ordered bound to Andrew James to be a cooper by the 28 February 1789 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:621, VI:742].

 

15.    David2 James, born about 1761, the "2 year old son of Elizabeth James," was ordered bound as an apprentice to Arthur Williams by the Bertie County court on 2 June 1763. He was a taxable in Thomas Perry's household in the 1774 Bertie County list of William Cherry. Sampson Hays received 27 pounds as David's final pay for service in the North Carolina Continental Line [Clark, The State Records of North Carolina, XVII:222]. In August 1783 the Bertie court bound Thomas Dempsey to him to learn the trade of blacksmith [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes III:621; V:458]. On 1 January 1784 he leased 99 acres on Urahaw Swamp in Northampton County [DB 9:101]. He was in Captain Winborne's District of Northampton County for the 1786 State Census where he had 7 persons in his household, and he was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1790 [NC:73]. He purchased 185 acres on the south side of Urahaw Swamp on 28 February 1791 and 100 acres on the north side of the swamp on 3 March 1791. About a week later on 9 March 1791 he mortgaged both these tracts and his property, including 32 hogs, 7 cattle, and 3 horses [DB 11:350-1, 356]. His Northampton County estate was settled on 3 December 1792, the same day that Jesse James' estate was settled. David's widow Fanny James petitioned the court saying that he died intestate leaving 185 acres on Urahaw Swamp and two orphaned children, Milly and Jesse James. John Walden was security for her petition [Minutes 1792-96, 41]. His children were

i. Jesse2, who sold his father's land by a deed proved on 6 June 1814 [Minutes 1813-21, n.p.].

ii. Milly.

 

16.    Dorcas James, born about 1760, "3 year old orphan of Mary," was bound to Arthur Williams in 1763. The February 1777 Bertie court ordered her bound to Mrs. Pearson, she having had a child while in servitude [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:241]. Her daughter was

i. Sarah2/ Sall, born about 1777, bound to Sarah Clark on 21 August 1786 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:598].

 

17.    Benjamin3 James, born about 1790 in Halifax County, was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:29], 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:152] and 9 in 1830 [NC:344]. He purchased 141 acres in Halifax County on Little Quankey Creek on 16 May 1818 and sold this land on 20 May 1832 [DB 24:269; 28:366]. He was counted in the 1850 and 1860 Halifax census, a cooper born in 1790. One of his children may have been

i. Temperance, married Squire Walden, 28 March 1832 Halifax County bond.

 

Other members of a James family in Virginia were

i. Thomas, born about 1755, a soldier in the Revolution, residing in Albemarle County in 1780 when he entered the service, deserted in Goochland County on the way to Chesterfield County court house: age 25, 5'4" high, born in Chesterfield County, yellow complexion [Register & description of Noncommissioned officers & Privates, LVA accession no. 24296, by http://revwarapps.org/b69.pdf (p.63)].

ii. James, Jr., born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in Buckingham County on 16 August 1804: James James jurior a free man by birth...aged twenty five years, six feet one or two inches high, yellowish complection, and recorded it in Gallia County, Ohio, on 12 January 1808 [James Jr, James (M, 25): Free Negro Certificate, 1804, African American Narrative Digital Collection, LVA].

iii. Silviah, head of a Surry County household of 7 "other free" in 1810.

iv. William, head of a Henrico County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1001].

v. Billey, head of a Henrico County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1012].

vi. Polly, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:334b].

 

Endnotes:

1.     A Thomas Herrill, born about 1693, was a "Mulatto" living in Northampton County, Virginia, in April 1723 [Northampton County L.P. 5, Thomas Herrill's Petition].

2.    Solomon Cherry, William H. Green, and James Bognell proved Frederick James' will in the February 1818 session of the Bertie County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions declaring "that they were acquainted with the hand writing of Frederick James."

 

JAMESON FAMILY

1.    James Jameson, born say 1758, was taxable in James City County from 1782 to 1814: taxable on a free tithe and 2 cattle in 1782, a horse and 3 cattle in 1785, called a "mulatto" in 1805, taxable on 2 free tithes in 1809 and 1810, called a "mulatto" from 1811 to 1813 and "cold." in 1814 [PPTL, 1782-99; 1800-15]. He and his wife Jane, "Free mulattoes," baptized their daughter Nancy in Bruton Parish, James City County, on 26 February 1785 [Bruton Parish Register, 36]. He may have been the James Jameson who received payment for services in the Revolution [Eckenrode, Virginia Soldiers of the American Revolution, I:238, citing Auditors' Account XXII:70 (Accounts from 24 May 1784 to 14 December 1784)]. He and Jane were the parents of

i. ?Thomas, born about 1782, taxable in James City County from 1800 to 1814: a "mulatto" head of a household of 2 "Free Persons of Colour above 16 years" in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-15]. He registered in York County on 15 June 1807: a bright mulatto about 25 yrs of age, 5 feet 5-1/2 Inches high with short wooly hair, his left eye which appears to have been affected by some stroke or Disease is smaller than his right...born free in Bruton parish, York County [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no. 33]. He married Dicey Meade of Bruton Parish, 17 March 1800 York County bond, James Jameson security.

ii. Nancy, baptized 26 February 1785.

iii. ?William, born say 1788, a "mulatto" taxable in James City County from 1811 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-15].

 

JARVIS FAMILY

1.    Susan Jarvis, born say 1727, was a "Poor Mulatto" woman living in York County on 17 December 1759 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish to bind out her children because she was unable to provide for them [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 103]. She was head of a York County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:876]. She was called Susanna Parrott alias Susanna Jarvis when she was sued by Thomas Fauntleroy in a case heard in York County court between May 1801 and May 1802. James Trice, Thomas Trice (of King and Queen County) and John Bowden (of James City County), and Thomas Drewry were witnesses. The case was discontinued with each party paying their own costs [Orders 1795-1803, 457, 482, 483, 498, 516-8, 522]. She may have been the mother of

2     i. Thomas, born say 1748.

 

2.    Thomas Jarvis, born say 1748, was living in the household of James Burwell on 19 November 1770 when the York County court presented Burwell for not listing him as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1770-2, 104]. He left a 2 February 1781 York County will, proved 17 September 1782, by which he gave his estate to his "Mulatto Boy" Billy Jarvis who he expected to be freed by the next session of the Assembly. He asked that Billy be bound to James Horrey of Williamsburg to learn a trade and that his executors purchase Billy's brother and sister Franky and Johnny, two "Mulatto children," who were the property of Nathaniel Burwell of King's Creek [W&I 22:537]. He was the father of

i. William, born about 1769, registered in York County on 17 December 1810: a bright Mulatto about 41 years of age ... Emancipated by the will of Thomas Jarvis decd. recorded in York Ct. on the __ day of 177_ [Free Negro Register, 1798-1831, no. 59]. He was called an orphan and apprentice of Stephen Mitchell, cabinet maker, on 18 January 1790 when he was discharged from his apprenticeship on his complaint that his master was not providing him sufficient clothing and was neglecting to instruct him in his trade [Orders 1788-95, 199]. He was taxable in York County on one tithe in 1791, taxable on 3 slaves from 1793 to 1812, and head of a household of 4 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" and 4 slaves in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 172, 193, 211, 230, 307, 340, 365, 391]. He was head of a York County household of 9 "other free" and 7 slaves in 1810 [VA:876].

 

Other members of the Jarvis family were

i. Charles, born about 1793, registered in York County on 18 April 1814: abt. 21 years of age ... light complexion, rather yellowish ... Born free [Free Negro Register, 1798-1831, no. 81].

ii. Thomas, born about 1801, registered in York County on 18 November 1822: a bright Mulatto about 21 years of age ... has long bushy hair ... born free [Free Negro Register, 1798-1831, no. 81].

 

JASPER/ JESPER FAMILY

1.    Margaret Jesper, born say 1690, was a "Molatto" presented by the York County court on 17 November 1735 and 15 May 1738 for failing to list herself as a tithable. On 21 August 1738 she was exempted from paying tax on her son because he was a cripple. Administration of her York County estate was granted to Anthony Roberts on 18 November 1751. The inventory was returned on 20 July 1752 and included furniture, household items and a breeding mare and two cows [Judgments & Orders 1749-53, 483; W&I 18:237, 245, 414, 440; 20:266]. She may have been the mother of

i. John, born say 1709, granted leave by the York County court to prosecute a suit against Anna Maria Timson on 15 February 1730/1. He was presented by the York County court on 15 November 1735 for failing to list his "Molatto" wife Anne as a tithable. On 13 May 1736 he was charged by the court with stealing a cow [OW 17:154; W&I 18:237, 244, 322].

2     ii. Elizabeth born say 1710.

3     iii. Mary, born say 1720.

 

2.    Elizabeth Jasper, born say 1710, was living in Charles City County in February 1743/4 when the churchwardens of Westover Parish were ordered to bind out her children: Anthony, Robert, and Lucy (no race indicated) to Joseph Day [Orders 1737-51, 287]. She was the mother of

i. ?Hannah1, born say 1727, presented by the York County court on 20 November 1749 for failing to list herself as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 256, 277, 284]. On 20 December 1773 she was awarded 40 shillings in her suit against George Jones for debt. She was granted administration on the York County estate of Lucy Jasper on 19 June 1780 [Orders 1772-4, 455; 1774-84, 267].

ii. Anthony1, born say 1728, father of Johnny Peters who was baptized in Bruton Parish, James City County, on 4 June 1748 [Bruton Parish Register, 8]. He was probably related to Anthony and Jasper Peters of York County. Francis Morris brought a suit against him which was dismissed by the Chesterfield County court in September 1760 [Orders 1759-67, 85]. He may have been the Anthony Jasper who served as a soldier in the infantry in the Revolution. William Gordon received his final pay of 28 pounds on 15 December 1784 [NARA, M881, Roll 1093, frame 146 of 2068; https://www.fold3.com/image/23285601].

iii. Robert, born say 1730, taxable in Chesterfield County in 1788 [Personal Property Tax List 1786-1811, frame 41]. He may have been identical to "Jasper a Mulattoe" who was presented by the Henrico County court on 3 May 1785 for failing to list his tithables [Orders 1784-7, 170].

iv. Lucy, born say 1732, died before 19 June 1780 when Hannah Jasper was granted administration on her York County estate. It was returned to court on 14 July 1780 and included a mare, two cows, a bed, furniture, and a spinning wheel [Orders 1774-84, 267; W&I 22:494].

 

3.    Mary Jasper, born say 1720, "a Mulatto," was living in Charles City County in May 1746 when her children Sarah and Henry were ordered bound out by the churchwardens [Orders 1737-51, 410]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born say 1737, agreed with her master Joseph Hix to give up her freedom dues in exchange for early release from her indenture in Charles City County on 1 December 1756 [Orders 1751-7, 441].

4     ii. Henry1, born say 1740.

iii. ?Martha, a "poor orphan" living in Bruton Parish on 17 August 1752 when the York County court ordered the churchwardens to bind her out [Judgments & Orders 1752-4, 105].

 

4.    Henry1 Jasper, born say 1740, was bound apprentice in Charles City County in May 1746 and was a "mulatto" bound out in Chesterfield County on 3 September 1756, no parent named [Orders 1754-59, 222]. He was a "Mullato" taxable in Chesterfield County in 1776 [Tax List 1747-1821, frame 105], head of a Chesterfield County household of 7 persons in 1783 [VA:49] and was taxable in Chesterfield County on one tithe and a horse in 1786 [Personal Property Tax List 1786-1811, frame 13]. He may have been the father of

i. Hannah2, born about 1764, registered in Petersburg on August 19, 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet five inches high, thirty years old, born free and raised in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 62].

ii. Elizabeth1, born about 1769, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809 (and 18 July 1822): forty years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 96, 457].

iii. Francis, charged by the Hustings Court of Petersburg on 3 October 1791 with stealing goods out of the storehouse of James Byrne & Company. Francis Durusel deposed that Francis had lived in his kitchen for three to four weeks but did not come the morning after the theft to wait on him as usual. Another deponent testified that a message was brought to him that a piece of linen was offered for sale by a "Negro" and upon going to the person's house found Francis who told him he bought it from Norfolk some weeks ago, that he was a free man and had a right to sell it [Orders 1791-7, 3-4].

iv. Henry2, born about 1772-4, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 October 1826 (and 10 November 1828): fifty two years old, Mulatto complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 551, 612]. He was taxable on two tithes in Chesterfield County from 1786 to 1795 and taxable on one tithe until 1811 when he was living with his wife and six children on William Bracket's land [Personal Property Tax List 1786-1811, 202, 234, 268, 450, 525, 738, 782, 824]. He was head of a Chesterfield County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

v. Wiley, born about 1774, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 February 1809: thirty five years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 107]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1794 to 1811, a "Mulatto" living in the Hundred in 1809 and a laborer living on Maria Stratton's land in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1786-1811, frames 202, 301, 601, 689, 738, 782, 824]. He was head of a Chesterfield County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

vi. Archer, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809: thirty years old, bright yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 79]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1796 to 1811, a "Mulatto" living in the Hundred in 1809 and a laborer living with his wife on Maria Stratton's land in 1811 [frames 268, 374, 450, 689, 738, 824]. He was head of a Chesterfield County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

vii. Moses, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 10 May 1813: twenty six years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 184]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1801 to 1811 when he was living with his wife, mother (or wife['s] mother?) and four children on William Bracket's land [Personal Property Tax List 1786-1811, 450, 488, 525, 782, 824].

 

Their descendants were

5     i. Nancy Kemp, born about 1765.

ii. Henry3, born about 1781-2, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809 (and 11 September 1815): twenty seven years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 80, 247].

iii. Elizabeth2/ Betsy, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 October 1826: forty three years old, Mulatto complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 552].

iv. Anthony2, head of a York County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:890]. Perhaps his widow was Peggy Jasper, head of a York County household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 390].

v. Peter, "FB" head of a Princess Anne County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:459].

 

5.    Nancy Kemp Jasper, born about 1765, registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a small, light col'd Mulatto woman, about five feet & half inches high, about twenty nine years old, Born free in Charles City & raised in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 17]. She was the mother of

i. William Kemp Cary, born about 1786, registered in Petersburg on 13 September 1805: a light brown Mulatto lad, son of Nancy Kemp Jasper, a free woman, five feet one inches high, nineteen years old, strait black hair [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 364].

 

Members of the Jasper family in North Carolina were

i. Sally, born 1776-1794, head of a Cumberland County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:264].

ii. Henry, an insolvent taxpayer in the Upper Little River District of Cumberland County, North Carolina, on 6 September 1834. He may have been the father of Julia Jasper, a four-year-old "free girl of colour" bound to Archibald Graham by the Cumberland County court on the previous day. She was ten years old on 3 June 1840 when the court bound her to her grandfather Abram Scott [Minutes 1831-5, 1838-40].

 

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