JEFFERY FAMILY

Members of the Jeffery family were

i. Elizabeth, born say 1700, an Indian living in Northampton County, Virginia, on 12 January 1730/1 when she petitioned the court to order her former husband Thomas Fisherman, also an Indian, to return a mare and horse which were her property before their marriage [Orders 1729-32, 68; Mihalyka, Loose Papers I:237].

ii. Thomas, born say 1710, an Indian sued on 14 July 1736 in Northampton County, Virginia, by William Satchell for a debt of 500 pounds of tobacco [Orders 1732-42, 224]. He was tithable in Northampton County in 1744 adjoining Joseph Jeffery [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 357]. He was allowed 200 pounds of tobacco from the county levy on 2 November 1747 [Orders 1742-8].

1        iii. Mary, born say 1710.

 

1.    Mary Jeffery, born say 1710, died before 9 March 1773 when Daniel Eshon was granted administration on her Northampton County estate [Minutes 1771-7, 192]. Her inventory totaled 177 pounds, and included 45 pounds cash on hand, butter, hog fat, good pewter, knives and forks, 10 hoes, 3 plows, 30 cattle, 18 pigs, 22 hogs, 2 sheep, 22 barrels of corn, 3 horses, 6 ducks, 3 geese, 4 turkeys, and potato seed. Solomon Jeffery, Rachel Jeffery, Mary Jeffery, Thomas Fisherman, Mary Fisherman, Thomas Pool, and Abraham Lang were buyers at the sale of the estate. The account of the sales totaled 196 pounds and included a cart and wheels, beds, furniture and linen wheels. About 23 pounds was distributed to seven unnamed children [W&I 25:167-9, 262-6]. Mary was probably farming land on the Gingaskin reservation. She may have been the mother of

i. Stephen, born say 1729, an Indian sued by an Indian named John Daniel in a suit that was agreed in Northampton County on 11 March 1755 [Orders 1753-8, 199].

ii. Solomon1, born say 1731, sued by William Teague on 15 December 1752 for trespass, assault and battery. He was called an Indian when he was sued for trespass, assault and battery by another Indian named John Daniel on 8 March 1757. George Powell sued him for a 1 pound, 7 shilling debt on 15 February 1758. On 14 July 1762 his wife Mary Jeffery ("Indian") took the oath of the peace against him and he was ordered to post 20 pounds security for his good behavior towards her [Orders 1751-3, 210; 1753-8, 400, 406, 482; Minutes 1761-5, 35]. He bought twenty-three items at the 8 February 1774 sale of Mary Jeffery's estate, including pigs and three harrow hoes.

iii. Rachel, taxable on a horse in Northampton County from 1800 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1823, frames 310, 331].

iv. Joseph, tithable in Northampton County in 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 357]. He was sued by Peter Hogg for debt on 11 September 1750 [Orders 1748-51, 270]. The court bound out his son Jesse Jeffery to Adiah Milby to be a marriner on 11 August 1773 [Minutes 1771-7, 156].

v. Thomas2, bound to William Wood on 10 August 1773 [Minutes 1771-7, 151].

 

They were the ancestors of

i. Solomon2, born say 1767, married Tinsey Jacob, 16 January 1788 Northampton County bond, William Satchell, Jr., security. Tincy Jeffery was a "N"(egro) counted in Northampton County in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 539].

ii. William, married Polly Bingham, 26 January 1803 Northampton County bond, Samuel Beavans security.

iii. Littleton, married Nancy Collins, 18 September 1810 Northampton County bond, James Jacob security. He was an "Indian" taxable on a horse in the Indian Town (the former Gingaskin reservation land) from 1811 to 1813, living with a "free negro" woman in his household in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1823, frames 492, 513, 539].

iv. Sophia, married Thomas Carter, 7 December 1803 Northampton County bond, Peter Toyer security. Sophia Carter was a "Negro" living in Indian Town in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 531].

v. Polly, married Nathan Drighouse (Driggers), 24 July 1810 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security.

 

JEFFRIES FAMILY

1.    John1 Jeffries, born say 1670, was a "Negroe man" belonging to Captain Robert Randall on 5 July 1698 when Randall brought him before the Surry County court to declare him a free man [DW 5:157; Haun, Surry County Court Records, V:211]. He was probably the "John Negroe" for whom Captain Randall was taxable in 1698. He was taxable in his own household in Surry County from 1699 to 1703 near William Sweat [DW 5:193a, 233b, 156b, 209b, 289b; Magazine of Virginia Genealogy vol.24, no.2, 69, 75, 83; no.3, 69, 72]. He and William Sweat produced accounts against the public for fifty pounds of tobacco in Surry County court on 21 October 1713 [Orders 1713-18, 14]. On 18 February 1722 he received a patent for 100 acres in Surry County on the south side of Blackwater Swamp and north side of Seacock Swamp and another 70 acres adjoining this land and Richard Fitzpatrick on 30 August 1743 [Patents 11:188; 21:508]. He was called John Jeffries, Sr., in his 3 November 1746 Albemarle Parish, Surry County, will, recorded 16 June 1752, which named his daughter Martha Jeffries as executrix and gave her his land on Seacock Swamp. He also mentioned his daughter Mary Powell, left a gun to his grandson John Jeffreys and left his clothes to his grandson Benjamin Tan. If his daughter Martha died without heirs, the land was to pass to his grandson John Jeffrys [DW&c 1738-54, 798]. His children were

i. Martha.

2        ii. John2, Jr., born say 1690.

iii. Mary Powell (wife of Stephen Powell).

iv. a daughter, wife of Anthony Tann whose son Benjamin Tann was called an orphan on 20 February 1744 when the Surry County court ordered the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish to bind him out [Orders 1744-49, 11, 22].

 

2.    John2 Jeffries, Jr., born say 1690, was called John Jeffries "the Younger" on 14 December 1712 when he purchased 128 acres on the south side of Blackwater Swamp bounded by the College Line in Surry County [DW&c 6:127]. (His wife?) Elizabeth Jeffers died 16 August 1745, and he died on 14 January 1745/6 (informant John Jeffers) [Albemarle Parish, Surry and Sussex County, Parish Register 1739-1778, 161]. By his 24 December 1745 Surry County will, proved 19 March 1745/6, he left all his land on the north east side of Clift and Tar Kiln Branches and the College Plantation to his son Joseph and named his other children: Richard, John, Lucy, and Rebecca. Joseph was to care for his brother Richard until he reached twenty-one years of age. He allowed his unnamed father the use of the land he was living on until his death when it was to pass to his son John [DW&c 1738-54, 523]. His children were

3        i. Joseph, born say 1715.

ii. Lucy.

4        iii. John4, born say 1720.

iv. Rebecca, born 13 March 1728/9, daughter of John Jeffries, Jr., and Eliza. his wife.

v. Richard, born 26 August 1732, son of John Jeffries, Jr., and his wife Eliza.

vi. __ne (Anne), born 6 May 1738, daughter of John Jeffries, Jr., and Eliza his wife [Albemarle Parish, Surry and Sussex County Parish Register 1739-1778, part 1, 7, 38].

 

3.    Joseph Jeffries, born say 1715, received land on the northeast side of Clift and Tar Kiln Branches as well as the "College Plantation" by his father's 19 March 1745/6 Surry County will. He was also to care for his younger brother Richard who was not yet twenty-one years old [DW&c 1738-54, 798]. He sold 100 acres on the south side of Blackwater Swamp in Surry County, Virginia, on 10 September 1747 [DB 5:124]. He returned an account of his father's estate to November 1747 Surry County court, but in March 1747/8 Thomas Alsobrook and John Anderson, his securities, complained to the court of his "ill conduct" and the court ordered him to deliver up the estate to them or provide the security bond himself [Orders 1744-9, 233-4]. He may have been the Joseph Jeffries who was sued in Brunswick County, Virginia court by Peter Cumbo in June 1749. The suit was dismissed when both parties failed to appear [Orders 1743-49, 523]. In July 1749 the Surry County court awarded him four pounds damages in his suit for trespass against James Winkles [Orders 1749-51, 597]. He was called "Joseph Jeffries a mullatto" in Southampton County when the court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind out his children [Orders 1749-54, 388]. He was an insolvent taxable in Sussex County, Virginia, in 1754 [County Court Papers, 1754, frame 245, LVA microfilm no. 35]. He was a taxable head of household with (his brother?) John Jeffries in Granville County, North Carolina, in the summary list for 1755 [CR 44.701.23], and he and his wife Ruth were "mulatto" taxables in the Cross Road District of Granville County in James Paine's list in Robert Collier's household in 1761 and in Thomas Hawtorn's household in 1762 [CR 44.701]. He mortgaged his livestock and furniture in Bute County to Charles Johnson on 19 November 1764 [Wills & Inventories 3:12, by Kerr, Warren County Records, 2]. He and John Jeffreys were insolvent taxpayers in Bute County in 1769 [Miscellaneous Tax Records in N.C. Genealogy, 2431]. Joseph was taxable in Warren County on an assessment of 59 pounds in 1779 and taxable in Captain Colclough's district from 1781 to 1785: 610 pounds assessment in 1781, 83 pounds in 1782, taxable on 140 acres and poll tax in 1784, 2 polls in 1785, perhaps identical to Joseph Jefferson who was taxable on 196 acres and no polls in 1788 [1779 Assessments, p.2; Tax List 1781-1801, 17, 27, 63, 81, 97, 156; L.P. 64.1, p.19].

 

4.    John4 Jeffries, born say 1720, son of John2 Jeffries, received a gun by the 3 November 1746 Surry County will of his grandfather John1 Jeffries [D&W 1738-54, 798]. Sussex County was formed from the part of Surry County where the Jeffries lived. John sued William Bryan(t) in Sussex County court in April 1754, and he was sued by Howell Briggs and Arthur Richardson for a total of about 10 pounds currency in December 1754. He was not found by the sheriff so his estate (including nine cattle, a bed and furniture, a chest and gun and dishes) was attached and sold [Haun, Sussex County Records, 100, 114, 194]. On 12 February 1755 he sold 140 acres in Sussex County on the south side of Blackwater Swamp adjoining the College Line which was the land his grandfather John1 Jeffries patented, part of a "Survey made by John Jeffries Deceased" on 13 August 1743 [Sussex County DB A:84]. He was taxable in Granville County, North Carolina, in the household of his brother Joseph Jeffries in 1755, and he and his wife Mary were "mulatto" taxables in the Cross Road District of Granville County, North Carolina, in James Paine's list in 1761 and 1762 [CR 44.701]. This part of Granville County became Bute County in 1769, and he and Joseph Jeffreys were insolvent taxpayers in Bute County in 1769 [Miscellaneous Tax Records in N.C. Genealogy, 2431]. He was taxable on only his own poll in Bute County in 1771 [Tax List CR.015.70001, p.12 of pamphlet] and taxable in Warren County on an assessment of 20 pounds in Captain Shearing's District in 1782 [Tax List 1781-1801, 46]. Perhaps Joseph and John Jeffries were the ancestors of some of those members of the Jeffries family counted as "other free" and "free colored" in Orange and Caswell Counties, North Carolina:

5        i. Jacob, born say 1758.

ii. John6, born about 1759, listed as a volunteer Continental soldier from Bute County in 1779: born about 1759 in North Carolina, 5'6" tall, dark hair and dark eyes [NCGSJ XV:109].

iii. Elias, born 1776-1794, head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:406].

 

Other Members of the Jeffries family in Virginia were

i. Margaret, born say 1690, paid 3 shillings, 9 pence on 16 September 1719 by the Surry County estate of Charles Savidge for her attendance at his funeral. The December 1722 account of the Surry County estate of Samuel Thompson included a 17 shillings payment to her, a 9 shillings payment to William Sweat, and William Sweat's payment of his rent [Deeds, Wills 1715-30, 219, 456-7]. She and her daughter Margaret Jeffries, her husband William Sweat, and Francis Locus and his wife Hannah lost their right to 190 acres on the north side of the Meherrin River in Southampton County in a dispute with Arthur Taylor heard at the Council of Virginia on 8 November 1753. Taylor received a patent for this land bordering Turraroe Creek on 24 January 1756 [Hall, Executive Journals of the Council, V:448; Patents 32:667]. She was called Margaret Sweat in Southampton County on 12 June 1755 when the court ordered that she be exempt from paying levies [Orders 1754-9, 94].

6        ii. John3, born say 1718.

 

5.    Jacob Jeffries, born say 1760, was taxable in Orange County in 1790 [NC:95] and head of an Orange County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:514]. He recorded a certificate in Orange County on 24 July 1791 that he was the "Mulatto Jacob" who received a discharge for twelve months service as a soldier in the Revolution [NCGSJ XI:115]. He married, second, Jane Moore, 5 October 1796 Orange County bond, Joshua Wittid bondsman. His 14 July 1818 Orange County will left his wife Jane his household furniture, farm animals, the crop on the plantation, a bounty ticket worth $3,000 (apparently for Revolutionary War service) and named her executrix; left a cow to his son Rivers Jeffries; and left a dollar each to the his first wife's children Reuben Jeffries, Mourning Jeffries, John Jeffries, Katty Ammons (Hammons) and Betsy Guy [North Carolina original will, D:543]. Jinncy was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:344]. Jacob was the father of

i. Reuben, born say 1783, married Kissiah Hawly, 30 May 1808 Caswell County bond, Miles Scott bondsman. Reuben was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:354]. Miles Scott was head of an Orange County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:817].

ii. Mourning2.

iii. John, perhaps the John Jeffries who married Winfred Whitmore, 21 April 1800 Orange County bond, Charles Whitmore bondsman.

iv. Catey, married Mark Hammond, 10 May 1802 Orange County bond, Richard Hargreave and John Reeves bondsmen. Mark was head of an Orange County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:284].

v. Elizabeth, born say 1786, married Vines Guy, 8 January 1805 Orange County bond, Jesse Blalock bondsman.

vi. Rivers.

 

6.    John3 Jeffries, born say 1718, was called John Jefferson when he was granted 84 acres on Cattail Swamp in Brunswick County adjoining John Persons on 12 March 1739 [Patents 18:553-4]. He was called Jefferson in the early land records but called John Jeffres/ Jefferis when he voted in Brunswick County in June 1748 [DB 3:508, 510]. And he and his family were called Jeffries when they voted in Greensville County in 1792 and in the land records in the late 1790s and thereafter. On 26 May 1748 he purchased 228 acres in Brunswick County bounded by the north side of Cattail Creek from John Person of Isle of Wight County, heir to John Person of Surry County who was granted the land in 1726 [DB 3:447; Greensville DB 1:450]. He was among the freeholders of Brunswick County ordered to work on a road under Littleberry Robertson on 27 March 1759 [Orders 1757-9, 314]. His land on Cattail Creek was on the west side of Fountain Creek in the part of Brunswick County which became Greensville County in 1781. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, on 2 persons over the age of twenty-one and 1 person under the age of twenty-one in 1785 and free from personal tax in 1786 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-98, frames 135, 159]. He was called John Jeffries on 28 June 1787 when the Greensville County court discharged him from paying taxes (due to old age) starting from the year 1786 [Orders 1781-9, 332]. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1787 to 1796: taxable on (his son) Nathan Jeffries and 3 horses in 1789, taxable on a horse in 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 43, 65, 84, 109, 138, 189, 202]. John and his wife Judy Jefferson made a deed of gift of 55 acres to their son Simon in 1796 and made deeds of sale to (their sons?) Andrew, Simon, Nathan, and John in Greensville County between 1789 and 1798. They sold 50 acres of land adjoining their land in Greensville County to Andrew Jeffers on 4 February 1789, sold 45 acres on Person's Branch adjoining William Robinson to John Jeffers, Junior, for 3 pounds on 25 April 1792, and sold 40 acres to Nathan Jeffries for 20 pounds on 23 January 1798. By the terms of the deed Nathan was not to take possession of the land until the death of John Jeffries. On 27 December 1798 John and his wife Judy Jeffries also sold two parcels of land adjoining theirs to Andrew Jeffries, one of 40 acres for 9 pounds and another of 84 acres for 50 pounds [DB 2:487, 498, 505-6, 520, 524]. He may have been the Jefferson who was paid as a witness on 24 August 1799 for William Lanier in the Greensville County suit of William Stewart [Orders 1790-9, 635]. John Jeffries' wife Judy was identified as Judy Lane by their great grandson Parker Jeffries (son of Sally Jeffries) in a Greene County, Ohio court suit in 1841 [Parker Jeffries v. Ankeny]. Judy was probably the granddaughter of Elizabeth Lane who confessed in Surry County, Virginia court on 7 January 1690/1 that she had two "Molato" children by "Nicholas Sessums his Negro Man" [Surry Orders 1682-91, 771, 777]. John's children were

7        i. John5, born say 1745.

8        ii. Andrew/ Drury1, born say 1750.

iii. Shadrack, born say 1754, taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, from 1784 to 1787 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-98, frames 91, 136, 170, 204]. He voted in Greensville County on 26 April 1792 [DB 1:450]. He was surety for the 24 July 1794 Greensville County, Virginia marriage bond of (his niece) Grief Jeffries. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1788 to 1812: [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 64, 84, 109, 127, 138, 162, 179, 189, 202, 219, 232, 245, 260, 274, 288, 303, 322, 337, 354, 372, 387, 402, 416, 433]. His 12 May 1812 Greensville County will was proved 12 October the same year. He left all his lands to his wife Sarah and at her death to Mary Jefferson (Jeffries). And he left his property to his wife and at her death to his brother Nathan with one-twelfth to go to Sarah Wadkins (Watkins). His wife Sarah and brother Nathan were executors [WB 2:267-8].

9        iv. Simon, born say 1756.

v. ?Jacob, born say 1758, taxable on his own tithe, 2 horses and 3 cattle in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, in 1783 and 1784 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-98, frames 62, 91].

vi. Nathan, born say 1762, taxable on a horse and 3 cattle in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, in 1784 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-98, frame 91], married Clary Norton, 23 June 1791 Greensville County bond, Repts Steward surety. He was a taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1787 to 1827: listed in his father's household in 1787 and 1789, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813, listed with son Nathan from 1818 to 1820, listed with son Shade in 1822 and 1823, listed with (son?) John in 1825, with William Jeffers in 1827 [Personal Property Tax List 1799-1850, frames 43, 65, 84, 109, 127, 138, 162, 180, 189, 202, 219, 232, 245, 260, 274, 288, 303, 322, 337, 354, 372, 387, 416, 433, 447, 557, 581, 605, 653, 678, 705, 731, 804] and head of a Greensville County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:263].

 

7.    John5 Jeffries, born say 1745, was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, from 1782 to 1787: taxable on Isaac Jefferson's tithe in 1783, taxable on sons Isaac and Harris in 1784, called "John Jeffers, Junr." in 1785 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-98, frames 23, 62, 136, 159, 204]. On 23 July 1787 and 25 November 1788 the Brunswick County court exempted him from payment of taxes charged on two persons listed by mistake [Orders 1784-8, 525; 1788-92, 95]. He was called John Jeffers, Jr., on 25 April 1792 when he purchased 45 acres in Greensville County on Person's Branch adjoining William Robinson's line from (his father?) John Jeffers, Sr. [DB 2:520]. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1789 to 1810: taxable on a free male tithable aged 16-21 and 2 horses in 1788 and 1789, taxable on (his sons) Harris and Isaac Jeffries' tithes in 1790, taxable on Harris Jeffries and a free male tithable aged 16-21 in 1793 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 65, 84, 109, 127, 138, 162, 180, 218, 274, 387, 402]. His son Thomas appeared in Orange County, North Carolina court on 26 May 1837 to obtain a pension for his father's services in the Revolution. He stated that his father was born in Halifax County, Virginia, in 1733 (perhaps date in error and place meant to be Halifax County, North Carolina), was drafted in the fall of the years 1780 and 1781, that his father was very infirm and blind in December 1832 when he moved him to Orange County, and that his father died 4 December 1834 leaving no widow [M804-1409, frames 350-1]. John was the father of

i. Isaac, born say 1766, under the age of twenty-one in 1783 when he was listed in his father's Brunswick County household [Personal Property Tax List 1799-1815, frames 62, 91, 135, 170], taxable in his own Greensville County household in 1789, listed in his father's Greensville County household in 1792 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 84, 138].

ii. Harris, born say 1768, under the age of twenty-one in 1784 when he was listed in his father's Brunswick County household [Personal Property Tax List 1782-98, frame 91], charged with his own tax in Greensville County in 1788 and 1789, listed in his father's Greensville County household from 1790 to 1793 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 65, 84, 109, 127, 138, 162].

iii. Thomas, born say 1770, married Silvey Hathcock, 8 October 1789 Greensville County bond, by Rev. William Garner [Ministers Returns p.147]. He was taxable in Greensville County from 1791 to 1798 and from 1804 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 127, 137, 162, 180, 189, 219, 245, 322, 337, 354]. He was head of an Orange County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [NC:817] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:406].

iv. Lewis, taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1794 to 1814: listed in John Jefferson's household in 1794, listed in Joel Prince's household in 1798, listed in Benjamin Woodroofe's household in 1807, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 180, 189, 218, 234, 322, 337, 354, 387, 402, 416, 433, 447, 463] and bondsman for the 5 February 1821 Orange County marriage bond of Tempe Jeffers and Dixon Corn. He was head of an Orange County household of 6 "free colored in 1820 [NC:412].

 

8.    Andrew1 Jeffries, born say 1750 (before 1776), was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, from 1782 to 1787: taxable on a 4 horses and 4 cattle in 1782, taxable on John Jeffries' tithe in 1783 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-98, frames 23, 62, 91, 136, 159, 203]. He purchased 50 acres in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, adjoining Shadrack, Simon, and John Jeffers from John Jeffers on 4 February 1789, purchased 30 acres on the southside of Jordan's Road adjoining the land of John Jefferson (Jeffries) on 20 April 1790 and another 30 acres on the southside of Jordan's Road on 28 April 1796. And he purchased two parcels of land from John Jeffries and his wife Judy on 27 December 1798: one for 9 pounds and another of 84 acres for 50 pounds. He voted in Greensville County on 26 April 1792. He and his wife Mary sold 12-1/4 acres adjoining their land for $61 on 24 July 1815 [DB 1:292, 449; 2:359, 524; 4:520]. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1788 to 1812: listed with 2 tithables aged 16-21 in 1793 and 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 65, 84, 109, 127, 137, 162, 179, 189, 202, 219, 232, 260, 274, 288, 303, 322, 337, 354, 372, 387, 402, 416, 433]. He was called Andrew Jeffers when he was discharged from paying taxes in Greensville County in 1812 [Orders 1810-15, 253]. His 16 February 1821 Greensville County will was proved in October 1821. He left the part of his land adjoining David Robinson to his daughter Sally and the remainder on the southside to his daughters Linch and Morning. He named his surviving children: John, Drury, Littleton, Linch, Jancy, Grief, Morning, and Sally. Maclin Jeffries, Sally Jeffries and Grief Hathcock were buyers at the sale of his estate [WB 3:240, 299]. Andrew's wife was identified as Mary Dole in the Greene County, Ohio court suit of his grandson Parker Jeffries (son of Sally Jeffries) in 1841 [Parker Jeffries v. Ankeny]. Mary may have been the daughter of William Dale(s), head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76]. Andrew was the father of

i. John7, born about 1765, taxable in Andrew Jeffries' Brunswick County household in 1783 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-98], charged with his own tax in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1788 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 65, 84, 108, 127, 138, 218, 245, 260, 274, 288, 303, 322, 337, 372]. He was head of an Orange County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:342]. He married Dilly Ballard, 8 December 1824 Orange County bond, Andrew and Eaton Jeffers bondsmen. He was about sixty-seven years old and living in Orange County on 26 November 1832 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1780 and resided there until 1808 when he moved to Orange County. He made a second declaration in Orange County on 19 October 1837 that he had served in the place of his father Andrew Jeffreys. His widow Delilah was a resident of Alamance County on 19 November 1853 when she applied for a survivor's pension, testifying that they were married in 1822 and that her husband died on 15 April 1845. She was said to have been about eighty years old when she testified again in Alamance County on 11 April 1855 [M804-1409, frame 0363].

ii. Andrew/Drury2, born about 1768, married Silvia Scott, 28 January 1790 Greensville County bond, Andrew Jeffries surety. They were married by Rev. William Garner whose return was dated 10 Nov. 1789 [Minister's Returns, p.19]. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from to 1788 to 1812: taxable in his father's household in 1788 and 1789 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 65, 84, 109, 127, 137, 162, 180, 189, 202, 219, 245, 288, 303, 322, 337, 354, 372, 387, 402, 416, 433]. He was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 13 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:342]. He purchased 110 acres on Jordans Creek in Orange County from Robert Scott on 8 November 1832 [DB pp.254-5]. He made a deposition in Orange County on 10 November 1832 that he lived in Brunswick County when (his brother) John Jeffries left home to serve in the Revolution. He made a similar deposition in 1833 that he was born in Brunswick County about 1766, resided there until 1813 when he moved to North Carolina, and that he recollected that his brother returned home from service in 1781. He was deposed again on 19 October 1837 when he stated that he was about sixty-nine years old and the brother of John Jeffries. On 19 November 1853 he made a deposition for the survivor's pension application of John's widow Delilah Jeffries, stating that John and Delilah were married in 1822 [M804-1409, frames 375, 382, 425].

iii. Littleton, born before 1776, taxable in Greensville County in Andrew Jeffries' household from 1797 to 1802, listed in his own household in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 219, 232, 245, 260, 274, 288, 303]. He was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:835] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:342].

iv. Grief, born say 1772, daughter of Andrew Jeffries, married Colby Hathcock, 24 July 1794 Greensville County bond, Shadrach Jeffries surety [Minister's Returns p.30]. Colby was head of a Greensville County household of 8 whites in 1810 [VA:738]. Grief Haithcock was apparently a widow when she was head of a Greensville County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:262].

v. Jancy/Ginsy1, born before 1774, "over 21 years of age," married Robert Brooks Corn, 26 March 1795 Greensville County bond, Drury Going surety.

vi. Linchey Jeffers, born before 1776, head of a Greensville County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:263].

vii. Mourning, born 1776-94, charged Henry Avent, a white man, with being the father of her illegitimate child. The Greensville County court found him not guilty after a hearing on 11 May 1807 [Orders 1806-10, 100-101]. She was taxable in Greensville County on McLin Jeffries' tithe in 1822 and 1823 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 653, 679], head of a Greensville County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:263].

10      viii. Sally, born say 1780.

 

9.    Simon Jeffries, born say 1756, was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, from 1783 to 1786 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-98, frames 62, 91, 135, 159]. He received 55 acres in Greensville County, on which he was then living, from his father John Jeffers by deed of gift in 1796 [DB 1:487]. Simon was taxable in Greensville County from 1789 to 1807: taxable on 2 free male tithables and 3 horses in 1788, taxable on Surrell Jones Jeffries' tithe in 1789, taxable on a free male tithable aged 16-21 in 1790, 1792, 1794 and 1797, taxable on (his son?) Hudson Jeffries in 1798, taxable on a free male tithable 16-21 in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 65, 84, 127, 138, 162, 180, 189, 202, 219, 232, 245, 260, 274, 303, 322, 337, 354, 372]. On 8 December 1807 he and his wife Silvey sold their land in Greensville County (51 acres) to David Robinson [DB 4:73]. He was head of an Orange County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:410]. He may have been the father of

i. Hudson, born say 1777, taxable in Greensville County from 1797 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 219, 232, 245, 260, 274, 303, 321, 337], sued by Walton & Avent for a 5 pound, 18 shilling debt in Greensville County on 13 October 1800 [Orders 1799-1806, 76]. He was head of a Caswell County, North Carolina household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67].

 

10.    Sally Jeffries, born say 1780, was left land adjoining Robinson by her father's October 1821 Greensville County will. She had a child named Augustus by her Greensville County neighbor, Darius Robinson (a white man), according to her son's Greene County, Ohio petition to change his name to Robinson. Sally, Mourning, and Linchey Jeffers were listed together as "Mulatto" in the same Greensville County household in 1813. Sally was taxable on her son Wyatt Jeffries' tithe in 1823 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 447, 679]. Her children were

i. Parker.

ii. Wyatt, head of a Whitley County, Indiana household of 4 "free colored" in 1840.

iii. Augustus, petitioned the Greene County, Ohio court to change his name to Augustus Wyche Robinson. The petition was filed on 8 May 1843 and recorded 29 May 1843.

 

Other Jeffries descendants were

i. Middy, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:731].

ii. Eady, born before 1776, head of a Greensville County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:263].

iii. Jinncy2, born before 1776, head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:344].

iv. Martha, married Charles Evans, 17 August 1796 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Kinchen Chavous security.

v. Elizabeth, married Vines Guy, 8 January 1805 Orange County bond, Jesse Blalock bondsman. Vines was head of an Orange County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:795].

vi. Herbert, born 1776-94, taxable in Greensville County from 1809 to 1820: a "Mulatto" taxable in 1813 and 1814, a "F.N." in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 387, 402, 416, 433, 447, 463, 484, 557, 581, 605] and head of a Greensville County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:263].

vii. Nancy, born 1776-1794, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

viii. Joshua, born 1776-1794, taxable in Greensville County from 1802 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 288, 303, 337, 354], head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:344].

ix. John8, born 1776-1794, head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:340].

x. Willis, born 1776-1794, head of an Orange County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:340], perhaps the William Jeffries who married Penelope Evans, 21 February 1800 Orange County bond, Rept Stewart bondsman. Rape was head of an Orange County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:530].

 

Members of the Jeffers family who lived in Richland District, South Carolina, but were originally from North Carolina were

11      i. Berry, born 25 March 1750.

ii. Allen, born 29 December 1754, listed in the payroll of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment in March 1780 [M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, www.footnote.com/image/967938 viewed on 2 January 2008], recorded a plat for 200 acres on a branch of Rockey River in 96th District, South Carolina, on 21 January 1785 [South Carolina Archives, S213190, Vol. 86:1]. He was counted as white in Richland District in 1790 (as were all mixed-race families in that district), head of a household of 1 male over 16 and 2 females [SC:26] and 4 "free colored" in the town of Columbia in 1820 [SC:16]. He made a declaration in Richland County court on 20 Oct 1832, stating that his age was seventy-eight on the 29 December next, he was born in North Carolina and brought to South Carolina as a child to the fork of the Congaree and Wateree Rivers where he had lived ever since, and that he enlisted in the 3rd Regiment of Rangers in 1778. Gideon and Morgan Griffin appeared in Richland County court to attest to his service. He had moved to Rhea County, Tennessee, by 8 June 1835 to live with his son-in-law since he no longer had anyone in South Carolina he was related to. He died on 11 May 1839 [National Archives Pension file no. S1770, http://www.fold3.com].

iii. Osborne1, born say 1765, recorded a plat for 200 acres on a branch of Griffin's Creek in Camden District (later Richland District), South Carolina, on 26 January 1791 [S213190, Vol. 25:323], but said to have died during the Revolution in

iv. Betsy, head of a Richland District household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [SC:176].

v. John9, head of a Richland District household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [SC:176].

vi. Mary, a resident of Richland District in 1806 when she petitioned the South Carolina legislature to be exempted from the tax on free Negro women [S.C. Archives series S.165015, item 01885].

 

11.    Berry Jeffers, born 25 March 1750, was listed in the payroll of the 3rd South Carolina Regiment in March 1780 [M246, Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783, www.footnote.com/image/967938 viewed on 2 January 2008]. He was counted in the Richland County, South Carolina census as white (as were all mixed-race families in that district) in 1790: head of household of 2 males over 16, 1 under 16, and 3 females [SC:26] and head of household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [SC:176]. His forty-nine-year-old daughter Harriet Jeffers appeared in Fairfield District on 26 June 1850 to apply for a survivor's pension for his services in the Revolution. She stated that her father lived in Richland District, served for three years with fellow soldiers Morgan and Gideon Griffin and Allen and Osborne Jeffers, and that her father's brother Osborne died in battle in Charleston. Her father married Hannah/ Joanna Griffin on 23 August 1782. He died about 1814 and his widow died in Fairfield District in 1843 or 1844. Harriet had a family record (which is included in the pension file) that listed her parent's marriage and the birth dates of their children. Harriet Jeffers and Joanna Coon, their only surviving children, were allowed a pension on 30 September 1851. The record also included the birth of James Jeffers on 21 January 1801 (head of a Richland District household of 4 "free colored" in 1830 [SC:409]) and Jenney Jeffers on 5 August 1806, as well as the births of Issea Rowlison and Alford Rowlison (Rawlinson) on 9 February 1804; Disea Bunch daughter of Rebecca Bunch on 3 February 1800; Dorcas Kersey, daughter of Isaac and Sarah Kersey, on 22 October 1777; and Isaac Kersey, son of Isaac and Sarah, on 10 June 1779 [National Archives Pension file no. W10145, http://www.fold3.com]. Berry and Joannah were the parents of

i. Sally, born 27 March 1783, perhaps the Sarah Jeffers who was a resident of Richland District in 1806 when she petitioned the South Carolina legislature to be exempted from the tax on free Negro women [S.C. Archives series S.165015, item 01885].

ii. Griffin, born 4 January 1789.

iii. Gideon, born 18 December 1790.

iv. Rachel, born 26 February 1793.

v. Asa, born 9 March 1795.

vi. Osborne2, born 13 February 1797.

vii. Nancy, born 4 March 1799.

viii. Harriet, born 25 February 1801. She was the mother of Asa McKenzie Jeffers who was born on 29 October 1823.

ix. Johanna, born 26 March 1804.

 

Endnotes:

1.    The trustees of Zenia Township denied Parker Jeffries the right to vote because he was a "person of color." He sued them in court and provided depositions from witnesses who had been neighbors of the Jeffries family in Greensville County in order to prove that he was white and Indian. Sally Robinson deposed that Sally Jeffries "claimed to be of White and Indian and I never heard anything to the contrary." Henry Wyche deposed that he believed Andrew Jeffries was "of Indian and White" (blood). Susan Wooten deposed that she grew up near the family where they lived in Greensville County. (She was probably married to or a member of the mixed-race Wooten family who lived just across the state line in Northampton County, North Carolina). Parker lost his case in the local court but won his appeal to the supreme court of Ohio which ruled that: There have been, even in this state, since its organization, many persons of the precise breed of this plaintiff, I mean the offspring of whites and half-breed Indians, who have exercised political privileges and filled offices, and worthily discharged the duties of officers. One such is now a clerk of this court, and two are now members of this bar. In 1831 in the case of Polly Gray v. State of Ohio, 4 Ohio, 354, and in 1833, in the case of Williamson v. School Directors, etc., Wright, 178, it was held that, in the constitution, and the laws on this subject, there were enumerated three descriptions of persons--whites, blacks and mulattoes--upon the two last of whom disabilities rested; that the mulatto was the middle term between the extremes, or the offspring of white and black; that all nearer white than black, or of the grade between the mulattoes and the whites, were entitled to enjoy every political and social privilege of the white citizen [Edwin M. Stanton, Reporter, Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Ohio (1873), XI:318-21].

 

JENKINS FAMILY

1.    Annakin Jenkins, born say 1720, was a "Moll. girl" born in Captain Henry Randolph's house in Bristol Parish, Virginia, and bound to him on 9 October 1724 [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 19]. She was living in Chesterfield County on 5 December 1755 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her daughter Patt Jenkins [Orders 1754-59, 150]. She was the mother of

2        i. ?Francis1, born say 1740.

3        ii. Pat, born say 1750.

4        iii. ?Doll, born say 1752.

iv. ?Ann, born say 1756, mother of a "mulato" bastard child bound by the Augusta County court on 21 May 1777 [Orders 1774-9, 198].

 

2.    Francis1 Jenkins, born say 1740, purchased 325 acres in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, on Compass Creek on 11 February 1762. He witnessed the 10 September 1765 Edgecombe County deed of John Jenkins, Sr., to Jesse Jenkins [DB 1:186; D:540]. On 12 October 1765 Elisha Battle called him a "mustee" when he reported to the Edgecombe County court that Francis had not listed his wife as a tithable [Minutes 1764-72, 42]. He was called Francis Jenkins alias Rogers on 4 August 1768 when he sold his land on Compass Creek [DB D:79]. He may have been the Rogers Jenkins who purchased 300 acres in Nash County on the south side of Beach Run from James Cain on 10 October 1778. He and his wife Fanny sold this land on 5 April 1779 [DB 1:50]. They may have been the parents of

i. Jesse, head of a Nash County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:106], perhaps the Jesse Jenkins who purchased 235 acres in Edgecombe County from John Jenkins, Sr., on 10 September 1765, and perhaps the husband of Keddy Jenkins who was mentioned in the 10 November 1794 Edgecombe County will of William Morgan.

ii. James, head of a Bertie County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:54], and 8 "other free" in Franklin County in 1810 [NC:826].

iii. Benjamin, head of a Cumberland County household of 3 "other free" in 1800.

iv. Thomas, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:730], and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:238].

 

3.    Pat Jenkins, born say 1750, was bound out in Chesterfield County on 5 December 1755. She may have been the mother of

i. Winney, born about 1771, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 August 1819: forty eight years old, brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 390].

ii. George, born in July 1779, registered in Petersburg on 21 January 1802: a brown Mulatto man, born free & raised at Bermuda Hundred in the County of Chesterfield, five feet five inches high, short bushy hair, twenty two July last [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 223].

iii. Anna, mother of Nancy Jenkins who married Archibald Batts, "free persons of color," 1 March 1815 Chesterfield County bond. Archibald was a "F.N." taxable on himself and a woman in Prince George County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

 

4.    Doll Jenkins, born say 1752, was living in Chesterfield County on 4 November 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out her daughter Martha [Orders 1774-84, 62]. She was the mother of

i. Martha, born say 1774, was ordered to be bound out on 4 November 1774, perhaps identical to Pat Jenkins who was ordered to be bound out in Chesterfield County on 7 August 1777 [Orders 1774-84, 180]. She registered in Petersburg on 9 July 1805: Patty Ginkins, a dark brown Negro woman, five feet one inches high, thirty years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 309]. She was called Patsey Jenkins in 1810, head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" [VA:118a].

ii. ?William, ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Manchester Parish in Chesterfield County on 1 March 1782, no race indicated [Orders 1774-84, 344].

 

Other members of the Jenkins family in Virginia were

i. Francis2, married Nancy Jackson, 23 February 1786 Campbell County bond. He was taxable in Campbell County from 1787 to 1790: his tax charged to James Robison in 1787 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 57, 85, 118, 152], taxable in Henry County from 1793 to 1795, listed with 2 tithables in 1795 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 392, 403, 417]. He and his wife Nancy sold property by deed proved in Henry County on 31 August 1795 [Orders 1792-7, 216].

ii. William, Sr., taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1787 to 1794 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 54, 86, 118, 191, 234, 304], levy free in Henry County in 1800, called "William Jinkins, Sr." in the list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 480, 579, 641].

iii. Joseph, Sr., taxable in the northern district of Campbell County in 1787 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 54].

iv. William, taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1789 to 1794, called "son of Ned." [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 118, 152, 303], perhaps the one who married Elizabeth Brown, 10 September 1789 Campbell County bond.

v. John, taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from to 1792 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 235].

vi. Oliver, born say 1774, taxable Campbell County in 1791 and 1792 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 191, 234]. He, a "Mulattoe," married Fanny Jenkins, a "Mulattoe," 27 April 1792 Campbell County bond. On 19 August 1793 the Campbell County court found him and Zachariah Goff not guilty of poisoning Micajah Moorman. Ned Jenkins was a witness [Orders 1791-7, 218-9]. He was taxable in Henry County from 1794 to 1815: in the list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 and 1814, listed with son William in 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 403, 417, 439, 480, 579, 605, 641, 656, 692].

vii. Joseph, Jr., married Mary Jenkins, 30 January 1786 Campbell County bond. He was taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1787 to 1793 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 54, 118, 152, 191, 234, 271], taxable in Henry County from 1794 to 1813, in the list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 403, 429, 453, 492, 505, 532, 554, 592, 641].

viii. Hannah, head of a Richmond County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:401].

ix. Isham, head of a Buckingham County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:811].

x. Polly, a "free mulatto" baptized in Saint Marks Parish, Culpeper County on 19 March 1795 [Virginia Genealogist, vol.3, no.3, p.100]. On 22 March 1814 Francis Slaughter certified to the Amherst County court that she was bound to him by the overseers of the poor in Culpeper County until the age of eighteen, had served her time, and was then a free woman aged twenty-three [Orders 1811-4].

 

JOHNS FAMILY

1.    William1 John, born say 1703, was leasing 76 acres in Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, near the border with Warwick County, from William Ferguson in September 1724 when Ferguson sold the land [Deeds & Bonds Book, Vol. III, 1713-39, 437; Richter, A Community and its Neighborhoods, 375]. He may have been related to John Johns who sued Major Lewis Burwell in York County court for his freedom dues on 24 June 1699 [DWO 11:150]. He was living in York County on 17 November 1740 when he was presented for failing to list his wife as a tithable, "she being a Mulatto." The court excused him from paying a fine but ordered that he pay her taxes that year and list her as a tithable in the future [W&I 18:652, 667]. They may have been the parents of

2        i. Thomas, born say 1730.

3        ii. William Combs, born say 1735.

4        iii. Mallory1, born say 1752.

 

2.    Thomas Johns, born say 1730, was living on a lot at Lowpoint, Surry County, Virginia, on 16 February 1773 when Archibald Dunlop sold this land [Hopkins, Surry County Virginia Deeds and Estate Accounts, 1756-87, 61]. He may have been the father of

5        i. Joshua1, born say 1753.

6        ii. John1, born about 1762.

 

3.    William Combs Johns, born say 1735, may have been related to the Combs family of York County. He was living in Goochland County on 11 May 1788 when he made his will which was proved 21 June 1789. He divided his estate, which included a slave named Patt, equally between his children Susannah Banks, John Johns, Naney Johns and Sarah Johns [DB 15:5]. He was the father of

i. Susannah Jones (Johns), born say 1758, married Jacob Banks, "Mulattoes both," on 29 August 1775 in Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347].

ii. John2, born about 1777, registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 5 May 1806: a free man of color about twenty eight or thirty years of age, five feet ten inches and three quarters high, dark yellow complexion...straight black hair and was free born [Register of Free Negroes, p.13, no.29]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Goochland County from 1804 to 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 690, 743, 784, 869; 1810-32, frames 10, 76, 101, 169, 197, 263].

iii. Nancy1, born say 1778, married Riley Scott, 18 October 1799 Goochland County bond, Joseph Scott surety, 19 October marriage.

 

4.   Mallory1 Johns, born say 1752, was a "mulato" taxable in Tillotson Parish, Buckingham County, in 1773 [Woodson, Virginia Tithables from Burned Counties, 62]. On 6 October 1785 the Campbell County court ordered that he be added to the hands who worked on a road. He won a suit against Jesse Ewton for 600 pounds of inspected tobacco on 4 August 1786 [Orders 1785-6, 158]. He was taxable in Campbell County from 1786 to 1791: charged with a 16-21 year-old tithable in 1789, charged with Mallory Johns, Jr.'s tithe in 1790 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 22, 100, 134, 173]. On 13 May 1791 he consented to the marriage of their daughter Sarah Johns to Richard Moss with Henry Moss as witness and Mallory Johns, Jr., as bondsman [Marriage Bonds and Consents, 1782-1853, M-P, frames 503-6]. He was granted 220 acres on the Main Ireland Creek, a branch of the Fluvanna River, in Buckingham County on 24 March 1790 [Grants 23:116]. He sued Robert Venable in Prince Edward County on 17 October 1791 and discontinued the suit on 17 June 1793 [Orders 1791-3, 60, 88; 1793-7, 48]. He was taxable in Amherst County from 1797 to 1799. He sued Caleb Watts for slander in Amherst County court on 22 July 1800. The suit was dismissed on 21 May 1802 because he failed to prosecute [Orders 1799-1801, 244, 281, 444; 1801-2, 145]. He was taxable on 2 tithes in the southern district of Bedford County in 1804 and 1 tithe in 1805 (called Mallory Johns, Senior) [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 596, 646]. He was in Bedford County on 28 May 1806 when he was declared an insolvent debtor in the suit of William Mitchell. His son Thomas was ordered to deliver up Mallory's tools and bed to the sheriff [Orders 1803-6, 337]. He was the father of

i. ?John, born say 1770, a "melatto" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County in 1788 and 1789 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 85, 118].

ii.Mallory2, born say 1772, listed in Mallory Johns, Sr.'s Campbell County household in 1790 then crossed off [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 134]. He was taxable in the southern district of Bedford County in 1804 and 1805 (called Mallory Johns, Jun.) and from 1811 to 1812 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 596, 646; 1806-16, frames 284, 328]. He may have been identical to "Jeffrey Johns or Patterson" who was taxable in Amherst County in 1806, called Mallory Johns or Patterson in 1807, 1809 and 1810, "Malory Johns or Patterson a man of color" in 1811, called "Jefrey Mallory Johns, M of C" in 1812, Malory Johns a "Mulatto" in 1813, Mallory Johns in a list of "Free Mulattoes & Negroes" in 1814, a "M.C." in 1815, working as a mechanic when he was in a list of "Free Negros and Mulattors" in 1816, a planter over the age of forty-five when he was in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1818 [PPTL 1782-1803, frames 395, 453; 1804-23, frames 148, 170, 192, 214, 235, 256, 284, 336, 403]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:286]. He may have been identical to Jeffery Johns who was a 55-100 year-old head of an Amherst County household of 7 "free colored" and a white female 40-50 years old in 1830.

iii. Sarah2, born say 1774, a "mulatto," "daughter of Mallory Johns, Sr.," who consents," married Richard Moss, a "Negro," 14 May 1791 Campbell County bond, Henry Moss witness, Mallory Johns, Jr., bondsman.

8        iv. ?William2, born about 1777.

v. ?James, born about 1780, taxable in the southern district of Bedford County in 1804 [PPTL 1782-1805, frame 596], called "James Johns or Patterson" when he was taxable in Amherst County from 1809 to 1818: a "man of color" in 1811 and 1812, a "Mulatto" in 1813, a "M.C." in 1815, counted in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1814 and 1818 [PPTL 1804-23, frames 169, 192, 214, 235, 256, 284, 303, 489]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:282]. He registered as a "Free Negro" in Amherst County on 20 November 1843: about 63 years of age, Bright mulatto, 5 feet 3 1/2 inches high...born free [Register 1822-64, no.118]. On the same day his children born by Betsy Terry registered [Register, nos. 121-126], and Betsy Terry registered: about 40 years of age, Bright mulatto, 5 feet 1 3/4 Inches high...born free [Register, no.119]. Betsy was probably the daughter of William Terry, head of an Amherst County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:287].

vi. ?Charles, born about 1781, "of Bedford County," married Louisa Clark, widow, by 1805 Amherst County bond. Charles was taxable in the southern district of Bedford County from 1800 to 1816: a "Blackman" in 1800, a "Negr." taxable on 2 tithes in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 458, 556, 596, 646; 1806-1816, frames 19, 52, 84, 147, 205, 260, 305, 394, 459, 696]. He registered in Bedford County on 24 October 1831: five feet five inches high, Bright Mulatto, aged 50 years, Born free. Louisa was called Lavisa Ann when she registered the same day: five feet three inches high, Bright Mulatto, aged 52 years, Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1820-60, p.16].

vii.?Patterson, born about 1784, taxable in Bedford County in 1809, 1811 and 1812 [PPTL 1806-1816, frames 147, 284, 328], taxable in Amherst County from to 1818: a "Mulatto" in 1813, a "M.C." in 1815, in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1814 and 1818 [PPTL 1804-23, frames 256, 284, 303, 489]. He registered on 16 November 1844: bright mulatto, 5 feet 8 inches high about 60 years of age cock eyed born free [Register, no.141]. He was married to Judy Johns when his children registered the same day [Register, nos. 142-3 by McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 68].

viii. ?Jesse, born about 1787, taxable in Bedford County from 1809 to 1811 [PPTL 1806-1816, frames 147, 205, 260], registered in Bedford County on 24 September 1832: yellow complexion, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches, Bald head, Free born [Register of Free Negroes 1820-60, p.19].

ix. Thomas, born about 1790, taxable in Bedford County in 1805 and 1809, taxable there on a slave and a horse in 1811 and 1812 [PPTL 1782-1805, frame 646; 1806-1816, frames 147, 284, 328], a "Mulatto" taxable in Amherst County in 1813 [PPTL 1804-23, frame 256]. He was counted as a seventy-year-old "Mulatto" farmer in the 1860 Amherst County census with "Mulatto" wife Catherine.

 

5.    Joshua Johns, born say 1753, was taxable in Prince George County on 6 horses in 1782, a horse and 2 cattle in 1783, 2 horses and 3 cattle in 1784, on 2 tithables in 1799, 4 tithables in 1796 and 1797, 2 in 1799, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1801 and 1802 and a "free Negro" taxable in 1804, taxable on 4 tithables in 1809, 3 "free" tithables in 1810 and 2 in 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 167, 184, 228, 287, 329, 428, 471, 704, 725, 746]. And he was taxable on 50 acres in 1799 [Land Tax List 1799, p.13]. He was head of a Prince George County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:533]. He may have been the father of

i. David, born say 1775, taxable in Prince George County from 1801 to 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 535, 558, 582, 600, 606, 630, 655, 704, 746]. He married Polly Scott, daughter of Nicholas Scott, 23 January 1802 Surry County bond. He was head of a Prince George County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:546].

ii. Willis, born before 1776, a "free Negro" taxable in Prince George County in 1805 and 1806 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 630, 655]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1810 to 1816: taxable on 2 slaves in 1810 but not subject to personal tax; taxable on his own tithe in 1811; listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813; taxable on a slave in 1816 [PPTL, 1791-1816, frames 671, 692, 710, 744, 821, 858]. He was head of a Surry County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Patsy, born say 1780, head of a Petersburg Town household of 8 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [VA:119a].

iv. Maze, born say 1785, head of a Prince George County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:546].

 

6.    John2 Johns, born about 1762, was taxable in Surry County in 1787, taxable on slaves Daniel, Once and Liza in 1793, taxable on his own tithe from 1795 to 1806, taxable on 4 slaves in 1807 [PPTL, 1782-90, frames 424; 1791-1816, 137, 216, 296, 335, 375, 490, 531, 595, 633]. He registered as a "Free Negro" in Surry County on 27 October 1796: a mulatto man, of a bright cast, stout made, about 5'4" high, about 34 years old, born free [Back of Guardian Accounts Book, 1783-1804, no.10]. He died before 1809 when the inventory of his estate was taken [Wills, Etc. 2:301]. He may have been the father of

i. Reuben, born say 1782, taxable in Surry County on a slave named Betty in 1803 and 1804, taxable on 2 slaves in 1806 [PPTL, 1791-1816, frames 533, 568, 614], a "free" taxable in Prince George County in 1809 and 1810 [PPTL, 1782-1811, frames 703, 725]. He married Rebecca Walden, 8 February 1818 Surry County bond, John Walden surety. She had married a member of the Elliott family by 9 September 1828 when she was mentioned in the Surry County will of her mother Priscilla Walden [WB 6:196].

 

7.    Sally1 Johns, born say 1759, married John Cockran, 30 April 1790 Goochland County bond, 2 May 1790 marriage by the Rev. Charles Hopkins. Jacob Banks testified that Sally was of lawful age [DB 15:386]. On 30 April 1790 Sarah Johns gave all her goods, including a cow and calf, a pewter dish, a bed and furniture, spinning wheel, and other items to her children Naney Johns, Susanna Johns and Linsey Johns with the agreement of her husband John Cockran on 20 May 1793 [DB 16:187-8]. Sally was the mother of

i. Naney/ Nancy2, a "Mulatto" doing house work on Thomas Miller's land in 1813 [PPTL 1810-32, frame 165].

ii. Susanna, born say 1785, married Edward Morris, 24 May 1806 Goochland County bond.

iii. Lindsay, born about 1786, registered as a Free Negro in Goochland County in April 1807: about twenty one years of age, five feet six and a quarter inches high...yellow complexion, Bushy hair [Register of Free Negroes, p.16, no.35]. He was head of a Campbell County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:849].

 

8.    William2 Johns, born about 1777, was taxable in Amherst County from 1799 to 1820: called "William Johns or Patterson" from 1800 to 1810, taxable on 3 tithes in 1810, called a "man of color" in 1811 and 1815, a "Mulatto" in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1803, frames 169, 192, 214, 453, 483, 519, 556, 590; 1804-23, frames 26, 68, 108, 256, 336, 539, 553]. He was head of an Amherst County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:271] and a seventy-three-year-old "Mulatto" farmer counted in the 1850 Amherst County census [VA:87]. He purchased 57 acres in Amherst County on Tobacco Row Mountain on 19 November 1807 and sold it on 15 October 1810 [DB L:348, 402]. He was called a "free man of color" when he purchased 400 acres on Bear Mountain in Amherst County on 13 December 1833 [DB U:317]. On 31 December 1856 he conveyed all his property on Bear Mountain to his children: 95 acres to Richard Johns, 109 acres to Thomas B. Johns, 96 acres and a house to Tarleton Johns, 75 acres to Edith (widow of Joshua Johns) and 75 acres to Edmund Branham [DB DD:334-341]. His 7 February 1861 Amherst County will, proved 20 April 1863, left his estate to his granddaughter Judith Branham and named Edward Branham as his executor [WB 16:307]. He was the father of

i. Polly, born say 1799, mother of Richard Johns who registered in Amherst County on 10 November 1845: Son of Polly Johns, very bright mulatto, 5 feet 10 inches 3/4 of an inch high, 32 years old in June 1846...Stout made Quick spoken free born [Register, no. 170]. Polly married Edmund Branham, 1825 Amherst County bond. Richard was a thirty-six-year-old "Mulatto" farmer counted in the 1850 Amherst County census with thirty-six-year-old Creasy Branham [VA:87].

ii. William B., born about 1803, registered in Amherst County on 25 July 1860: a free man of color, brown complexion, 57 years of age, 5 feet 9 1/2 inches high...born in Amherst County [Register, no. 352 by McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 102]. On 17 February 1840 he made a deed of trust for his interest in the lands of his father William Johns to secure debts owed by Tarleton Johns [DB X:236-7].

iii. Joshua2, born say 1807, married Edith Terry, daughter of Dicey Terry, 1828 Amherst County bond. Eady was a thirty-seven-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 Amherst County census [VA:87].

iv. Tarleton, born about 1812, a thirty-eight-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 Amherst County census [VA:88b]. He registered in Amherst County on 23 July 1860: a free man of colour, bright complexion, 50 years of age [Register, no.344 by McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 101].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Houck's Indian Island in Amherst County claims that William2 Johns was the son of Robert Johns, a white man, and an Indian woman named Mary. However, the William Johns who was a son of Robert Johns was born before 1755 since he purchased land in Amherst County on 28 July 1775 [DB D:300]. He died about 1777 when Thomas Johns was granted administration on his estate [WB 1:323, 324]. According to Robert Johns' 1 March 1779 Amherst County estate papers, Amherst County marriage bonds, and census records, all Robert Johns' children were white and married whites [WB 1:456-458, 481-482; Amherst County, Virginia, in the Revolution, Including Extracts from the "Lost Order Book" 1773-1782, 86].

 

JOHNSON FAMILY

1.    Anthony1 Johnson "Negro," probably born about 1600, was free before 10 January 1647 when he purchased a calf from James Berry by deed proved in Northampton County, Virginia [ODW 1651-54, 123]. He patented 250 acres in Northampton County at "great Naswattock Creek" for the transportation of five persons, including his son Richard Johnson, on 24 July 1651 [Patents 1643-51, 326]. His wife Mary and their two daughters were excused from paying taxes by the Northampton County, Virginia court on 28 February 1652:

... they have been Inhabitants in Virginia above thirty years ... ordered that from the day of the date hearof (during their natural lives) the sd Mary Johnson & two daughters of Anthony Johnson Negro be disengaged and freed from payment of Taxes ... [ODW 1651-54, fol.161].

His "Negro servant," John Casor, attempted to gain his freedom by claiming he had been imported as an indentured servant. In 1653 Casor appealed to Captain Samuel Goldsmith who tried to intervene in his behalf, but Johnson insisted that

hee had ye Negro for his life [ODW 1651-54, 226].

Johnson's wife and children tried to persuade him to release Casor, and his neighbor, Robert Parker, apparently allowed Casor to stay on his property. However, Anthony Johnson bought suit in Northampton County court against Robert Parker in 1654 for detaining his "Negro servant, John Casor," and the court upheld Johnson's right to hold Casor as a slave [Orders 1655-58, 10].

In 1665 he and his wife Mary, his son John and his wife Susanna, and their slave John Casor moved to Somerset County, Maryland, with Randall Revell and Ann Toft, who claimed them and many whites as head rights for 2,350 acres of land [Patents 8:495-6]. Anthony and his wife sold 250 acres of their own land, left 50 acres to their son Richard, and took fourteen head of cattle, a mare, and eighteen sheep with them [Accomack DW 1664-71, fol.10; p.12-fol.12]. On 10 September 1666 he leased 300 acres in Somerset County on the south side of Wicomico Creek in Wicomico Hundred, called "Tonies Vinyard," for two hundred years [Land Records O-1:32-33].

Anthony apparently died before August 1670 when "a jury of white men" in Accomack County decided that his land should be escheated since "he was a Negroe and by consequence an alien" [Virginia Genealogist 2:20, 109-113]. His lease in Somerset County, Maryland, was renegotiated by his widow Mary for ninety-nine years with the provision that her sons John and Richard would assume the lease after her death [Land Records O-2, 20-21]. Her slave, John Casor, recorded his livestock brand in court with her consent on 3 September 1672, and she recorded her mark a few weeks later on 26 September 1672 [Archives of Maryland 54:760-1]. He was called "John Cazara Negro" when he was a witness (signing) to a power of attorney by which she assigned her son John authority over her property and authority to sue for some debts in Virginia, and he was also witness on 3 September 1672 to her deed of gift to her grandchildren. She called herself "Mary Johnson ... Negro (the relict of Anthony Johnson ... Negro deceased)" in the deed by which she gave cattle to her three grandchildren: Anthony, Richard, and Francis [Somerset County Judicial Record 1671-75, 159-62]. She was called "Mary Johnson of Wiccocomoco ... widow" in July 1676 when she purchased a mare and assigned it to John Corsala (her slave) [Somerset County Judicial Records 1675-7, 95]. She was called executor of Anthony Johnson deceased on 17 January 1690 when Edward Revell acted as her attorney in a suit she brought in Accomack County court [WDO 1678-82, 154]. She was living in Sussex County, Delaware, in March 1693/4 when Mary Okey appeared in court to support her complaint that her son John was not maintaining her as he had promised [Court Records 1680-99, 646, 655]. The children of Anthony and Mary Johnson were

2        i. John1, say 1631.

3        ii. Richard1, born about 1632.

iii. a daughter, excused from paying tax by the February 1652 Northampton County court, perhaps the Joan1 Johnson who in 1657 received 100 acres in Northampton County from "Deabendanba, Kinge of nusangs," being land next to her brother John [Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 671].

iv. a daughter, excused from paying tax by the February 1652 Northampton County court.

 

2.    John1 Johnson, born say 1631, received a grant for 550 acres in Northampton County on 10 May 1652 "at great Naswattock Cr. adjacent to 200 acres granted Anthony Johnson" for the importation of eleven persons including Mary Johnson [Patents 3:101]. He received this patent after suing a white resident of the county, also named John Johnson, who tried to illegally take possession of the land [DW 1657-66, 57-58, 103; DW 1651-54, fol.200]. In 1660 he was head of a household of two tithables in Northampton County, called John Johnson Negro. He and his wife Susanna sold their land in 1664 [Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 671]. In November 1654 he and Mary Gersheene, an African American servant of his father, were punished for fornication [ODW 1654-55, fol.35, ODW 1651-54 p.226-fol.226]. On 17 January 1664/5 his wife Susannah petitioned the Northampton County court to release him from jail where he was held for begetting a child by Hannah Leach who was probably white [Orders 1664-74, fol.92]. In 1665 he moved to Somerset County, Maryland, with his parents.

He was called "John Johnson Negro" on 11 March 1667/8 when he and two white men, Alexander King and John Richards, were charged in Somerset County court with stealing corn from an Indian named Katackcuweiticks. They confessed their guilt and were ordered to deliver two barrels of corn to the King of the Manoakin at Manoakin Town. John was sued by Randall Revell in Somerset County court for a minor debt on 13 January 1674/5 and appeared as a witness in a court case against Revell. The justices were at first doubtful about admitting the testimony of an African American against a white person. However, his testimony was allowed after he assured the court that he was a Christian and "did rightly understand the taking of an oath." He gave his age as thirty-seven in his deposition in 1670. He testified again in 1676 and was witness to several deeds. Edward Surman appointed him as guardian ("assistant") to his children by his will which was proved in Somerset County court on 10 January 1676/7 [Archives of Maryland, 54:675, 707, 712; Judicial Records 1670-1, 10, 15, 6, 205; 1671-5, 41, 260, 267-8, 429, 457-8; 1675-7, 47, 78]. He moved to Sussex County, Delaware, where he received a patent for 400 acres on Rehoboth Bay in September 1677. He purchased 200 acres in Sussex County and sold this land by deed which he acknowledged in court in April 1683. In August 1683 he was accused of murdering his wife Susan. The court took depositions from John Okey and Jeffry Summerford, and released him because they saw "no sign of murder." He appeared in Sussex County court as a witness on seven occasions between March 1680/81 and February 1688. He sued John Okey for debt in May 1685. And he was a defendant on sixteen occasions, mainly for debts. The court postponed action on one of these cases because he was in Virginia between December 1684 and May 1685. He was identified as a "Negro" on only three of these occasions, one a case in which he had the estate of Nathaniel Bradford in his custody. In August 1704 he was called "John Johnson, Free Nigroe, Aged Eighty Years and Poor and Past his Labour" when the Sussex County court agreed to maintain him for his lifetime on public funds. He was apparently still living in November 1707 when Walter Groombridge had a suit against him for a debt of three pounds [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 103, 110, 144, 166, 190, 193, 204, 214, 216, 229, 235, 251, 253, 299, 315, 342, 356, 365, 384, 447, 462, 516, 540, 635, 797, 857, 919, 1201, 1314]. John1's children were

4        i. John2, born say 1650.

ii. Anthony2, born say 1655, devised a cow and a calf by the will of his grandmother Mary Johnson. He was sued in Sussex County, Delaware court on 7 May 1706 and was a witness in a Sussex County case in November 1709 [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 1227, 1291].

iii. ?Joan2, a "Negro," married John Puckham, a baptized Monie tribesman, on 25 February 1682/3 in Somerset County, Maryland [Register of Liber IKL, Somerset Courthouse by Torrence, Old Somerset, 143]. See the Puckham history.

iv. an unnamed son, born say 1667. William Futcher claimed in February 1689 Sussex County court that Johnson's son had been bound to serve him for nine years. The suit was canceled because of Futcher's death [Court Records 1680-99, 294, 322, 342].

v. ?Elizabeth, born say 1670, living in Accomack County on 2 February 1702/3 when the court dismissed a case brought against her by William Yeo [Orders 1697-1703, 135a].

vi. ?Comfort, born say 1680, "free Nigrene," presented by the Sussex County, Delaware court for having a bastard child in 1699. James Walker of Rehoboth Bay agreed to pay her fine and give her a three-year-old heifer in exchange for her serving him an additional thirteen months, and she bound her two-year-old son to him until the age of twenty-one years [Court Records 1680-99, 768, 774, 775]. In February 1706 she confessed to having a bastard child by Justice William Bagwell's servant, Patrick Delany, and in May 1706 she admitted to having a child by Rice Morgan [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 1218, 1219, 1276, 1281].

 

3.    Richard1 Johnson, born about 1632, was one of the five persons his father claimed head rights for in 1651. On 8 February 1653 Governor Richard Bennett instructed Nathaniel Littleton to deliver a black cow to him. On 28 September 1652 he claimed two headrights, and on 21 November 1654 he received a patent for 100 acres in Northampton County adjoining his father and his brother John [ODW 1651-54, fol.103, p.133; Patents 1652-55, 296]. On 19 January 1663/4 he brought suit in Accomack County court against Richard Buckland:

The Difference depending betweene Richard Johnson negro plt. & Richard Buckland defdt. concerning a house to bee built by ye sd Johnson for ye sd Buckland ... [DW 1663-66, 54].

He remained in Accomack County on 50 acres left to him by his father when his father took the rest of the family to Maryland [Accomack DW 1664-71, p.12-fol.12]. He purchased 590 acres near Matomkin from Christopher Tompson in December 1675 and conveyed half this land to his son Francis in 1678 [WD 1676-90, 14; Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1088]. He was taxable in Accomack County on two tithes from 1676 to 168? (called Richard Johnson, Sen.) [Orders 1676-8, 34, 57; WDO 1678-82, 18, 100]. He was sued for debt by Christopher Thompson on 14 September 1677 in Accomack County court [Orders 1676-8, 66, 84]. On 17 November 1681 his suit in Accomack County court against (his son) Richard Johnson, Jr., was dismissed. On 18 October 1682 he admitted to the Accomack County court that he owed William Parker 682 pounds of tobacco. On 3 December 1684, he admitted that he owed Walter Harges 1,000 pounds of tobacco, and he was sued by John Cole for 5,978 pounds of tobacco. He died before 19 March 1689 when his wife Susan Johnson, called a widow, was sued by Hendrick Johnson for some cooper's work he had performed for her after her husband's death [WDO 1678-82, 55, 155, 268, 322]. She came into court to give account of the estate of William Silverthorne which included several yards of linen lent to "Richard Johnson Negro Since deceased" [W&Co 1682-97, 142, 155, 157]. She may have been white since their son Richard was called a "Mulatto." Their children were

i. Francis, born say 1655, received a calf by his grandmother's 3 September 1672 Somerset County deed of gift. He apprenticed himself to George Phebus in Somerset County for three years to be a cooper in November 1673 [Judicial Records 1671-75, 161-2, 336-7]. He moved to Sussex County, Delaware, with his uncle John1 Johnson by 8 September 1685 when he was summoned as a witness in a court case between William Futcher and John Crew [Court Records 1680-99, 99]. He sued Henry Stretcher in Sussex court in November 1686, and he was called "Francis Johnson, the Negro" in June 1687 when the court ordered William Orion to pay him 20 shillings for taking up his runaway servant, John Martin. He testified in court for Henry Stretcher in October 1687. He was in Accomack County about February 1689 (called "Francis Johnson Mollatto" and "Brother" of Richard Johnson) when he agreed to complete a fence which Richard contracted to build for Colonel John West. In 1689 he sold the land in Accomack County which his father had conveyed to him in 1678 in order to pay a debt of 6,000 pounds of tobacco [WD 1676-90, 507a, 508; W&Co 1682-97, 155a, 156, 187-187a]. He was living on land adjoining William Futcher in Rehoboth Bay, Sussex County, in December 1690 and testified in Sussex County in March 1693 in a case between John Barker and Aminadab Handsor [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 757; Court Records 1680-99, 600]. On 4 November 1707 Hill Drummond brought suit against him in Accomack County court for uttering scandalous words [Orders 1703-9, 103-103a]. On 8 April 1713 he paid Comfort Driggers' fine of 500 pounds of tobacco for the illegitimate child she had in Accomack County earlier that year. Perhaps Elizabeth Johnson, who gave evidence against Comfort, was a relation of his [Orders 1710-4, 56a, 58]. He was security in Accomack County court for Edward Winslow and his wife Anne who failed to appear to answer Thomas Dashiell and Ephraim Heather of Somerset County [Orders 1714-7, 19]. He may have been the Fran. Johnson who William Driggus appointed as one of the executors of his 7 June 1720 Somerset County will [WB 17:285].

ii. Richard2, born say 1660, received a calf by his grandmother's 3 September 1672 Somerset County deed of gift [Judicial Records 1671-75, 161-162]. He and his wife Anne Johnson were servants of John Cole of Accomack County in 1680. She was required to serve her former master, William Whittington, an additional four years for having two illegitimate children while in his service [Northampton Orders 1678-83, 34; Accomack WDO 1678-82, 288-9]. On 3 September 1679 he was called Richard Johnson, Jr., when John Cole and his wife sued him in Accomack County court for kicking Mrs. Cole. On 5 August 1681 he deposed that about Christmas of 1680 he was the servant of John Cole of Motamkin [WDO 1678-82, 108, 288]. On 3 April 1688 Adam Michael sued him for 5,000 pounds of tobacco as a penalty for his nonperformance of a bond, and on 20 December 1688 Colonel John West sued him for failure to build a fence consisting of 400 wood panels for his cornfield (called "Richard Johnson Mollatto"). Richard completed only forty or fifty of the panels before turning the work over to "his Brother Francis Johnson" in exchange for a gun and several other items. On 16 June 1689 Captain William Custis won a suit for about one pound against Maximillian Gore who acted as his security. He was a tithable head of an Accomack County household in 1692. Esther Pharis identified him as the father of her illegitimate child who was born on 4 June 1695 [W&cO 1682-97, 129a, 132a, 150a, 155a, 156, 160, 258a; Orders 1690-9, 153, 173]. He was called "Richard Johnson, Mollattoe" in September 1699 when the Sussex County, Delaware court presented him for stealing a mare belonging to William Faucett of Somerset County. He was excused after explaining that he had already returned the mare, "taking of the Mare threw mistake, being so like his mare" [Court Records 1680-99, 780]. On 8 October 1707 he was called Richard Johnson "Mulatta" in Accomack County court when Hill Drummond brought a suit against him for debt [Orders 1703-9, 103-103a]. He may have been the Richard Johnson of Carteret County, North Carolina, who purchased 130 acres on Core Sound on the east side of North River from George Cogdell and sold this land on 2 October 1724 to (his nephew?) Jacob Johnson and (his niece's husband?) Theophilus Norwood. The deed was proved by John Simpson and Enoch Ward, who also proved the will of (his brother?) William1 Johnson [DB C:113-4].

iii. ?Morris, born say 1662, a "mulatto" who bound himself to work for John Cole of Accomack County for four years in return for 3,569 pounds of tobacco as well as food, clothes and lodging in September 1690. He registered his cattle mark in Accomack County on 23 March 1694 [WD 1676-90, 531: W&cO 1682-97, 268].

5        iv. ?William1, born say 1668.

v. ?Abel, born say 1680, tithable head of an Accomack County household in 1692 [W&cO 1682-97, 258a]. He registered his cattle mark in Accomack County on 23 February 1694 and was called "Abel Johnson Molatto" when Ester Rose (born about 1681) identified him as the father of her illegitimate child in Accomack County court on 6 August 1700 [WO 1682-97, 268; Orders 1690-07, 126b; 1697-1703, 97]. On 7 September 1732 the Carteret County, North Carolina court reported that he was (illegally) living together as man and wife with Ann Witnell, and he produced a certificate to prove they were lawfully married [Minutes 1723-47, fol.43b-c].

 

4.    John2 Johnson, born say 1650, was named as John Sr.'s son in 1670 when they recorded their livestock brand in Somerset County, Maryland [Archives of Maryland 54:757]. On 29 August 1677 he purchased a 44 acre lot on the east side of the Chesapeake Bay and south side of the Wicomico River called "Angola." This land probably adjoined "Tonys Vineyard" where his grandmother was then living [Maryland Provincial Patents, Liber 20:224-5; Davidson, Free Blacks, 29]. The land was escheated in 1706 with the notation, "no heirs as I understand" [Maryland Provincial Rent Roll, Vol. no. 1, 34]. He was in Sussex County, Delaware, in December 1680 when he was fined for singing "a scurlous disgracfull song" about Samuel Gray and his wife and would have been whipped if William Futcher had not posted security for him. He married Elizabeth Lowe (an English woman) in Sussex County, Delaware, on 13 March 1680/1 [Court Records 1680-99, 2, 23]. She was probably the Elizabeth Johnson who was twenty years old on 14 August 1683 when she appeared as a witness in court. He apparently left the county sometime before February 1683/4 when he was accused of killing a sow belonging to Andrew Depree and taking the meat to John Okey's house [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 228, 260]. On 5 March 1699/1700 the Kent County, Delaware court referred to him and his wife as "John Johnson, a free Negroe, and Elizabeth his wife (an English woman)" when they were accused of running away and leaving their seven-year-old daughter Susannah in the custody of Thomas Nicholls. The court bound her to Nicholls until the age of eighteen [Court Records 1699-1703, 14]. They were the parents of

i. ?John, born say 1682, a "Malattoe" servant boy ordered by the Sussex County, Delaware court in September 1698 to serve his master, Justice John Hill, another seven months for running away for a month [Court Records 1680-99, 744].

ii. Susannah, born about 1693.

 

5.    William1 Johnston, born say 1668 in Accomack County, Virginia, was probably a son of Richard1 Johnson since he also lived in Matomkin. He was a hired servant to John and Gertrude Cropper of Matomkin. He was a taxable head of a household in Major Bowman's Precinct in 1690. He was called a "Mullatto" on 8 November 1690 when he and two white men were accused of stealing goods from the cabin of a Matomkin Indian named Blincks. He won a suit against his employer, Gertrude Cropper, for 150 pounds of tobacco on 21 December 1692, and he won a suit against James Atkinson for a barrel of corn and a pair of "French Falls" shoes. In 1698 he was fined for fiddling and dancing on the Lord's day [Orders 1690-97, 2a-3, 86, 99a, 103, 191; 1697-1703, p.43a]. He purchased 150 acres near the Deep Creek and Hunting Creek in Matomkin from Christopher Tompson on 4 April 1699 [W&c 1692-1715, 368-9]. This was probably near the land (his father?) Richard1 Johnson purchased from Christopher Tompson in 1675. He and his wife Sarah sold this land in 1708 [Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 990, 993]. He may have moved to North Carolina soon afterwards since he was not mentioned again in the Accomack County records. His 5 November 1726 Carteret County, North Carolina will, proved March 1727/8, named his sons and daughter, and mentioned his son-in-law Theophilus Norwood, and grandson William Norwood. His wife Sarah was executor and was to keep all his land until her death [SS Wills 1722-35, 140]. The 5 March 1727/8 court mentioned a road on the east side of the North River from Wellses to the widow Johnston. At the June 1730 Carteret court she paid a debt of about 9 pounds to Joseph Richards, a New England merchant [Minutes 1723-46, fol.12a, fol.14a]. She probably died before 27 April 1739 when her sons Ezekiel and Stephen sold their land [DB D:216-9]. William1's children mentioned in his will were

i. Thomas, born say 1700, taxable in Craven County, North Carolina, in 1720:

Thomas Johnson & Jacob }

Johnson & Stephen Johnson } 3

Mulats ------------------ [SS 837].

ii. Jacob1, born say 1701, taxable in Craven County in 1720. He and his brother-in-law, Theophilus Norwood, purchased 130 acres in Carteret County on Core Sound and the east side of North River from (Jacob's uncle?) Richard2 Johnson on 2 October 1724, and Theophilus sold him his half of this land on 6 June 1727 [DB C:171, 113]. Joseph Wicker, Esqr., informed the 5 March 1727/8 Carteret County court that he was living together in adultery with Ann Johnston. The court warned them that they would be fined 50 pounds if they continued to live together. James Shackleford sued him for a 17 pound debt in the June 1730 Carteret County court. The sheriff, Daniel Rees, had a case against him in the 7 December 1736 court, but the jury found in favor of Jacob [Minutes 1723-47, fol.10a, fol.14a, fol.32d]. He sold 130 acres in Carteret on 16 April 1740 [DB D:236-7].

iii. Stephen1, born say 1703, taxable in Craven County in 1720. On 7 September 1732 the Carteret County court received information from Robert Wade that Stephen Johnson was living together as man and wife with Jane Jones, alias Jane Bruton, and also that (Stephen's uncle?) Abel Johnson was living together as man and wife with Ann Witnell. Both couples produced certificates to prove they were lawfully married [Minutes 1723-47, fol.43b-c]. He and his brother Ezekiel sold a 320 acre tract in Carteret County on the east side of North River for 225 pounds on 27 April 1739 [DB D:216-9]. This was land which they received by their father's will. Stephen moved to New Hanover County with Ezekiel/ Hezekiah, the Stephen Johnston who was listed there in the Muster Roll of Captain George Merrick's Wilmington Company on 27 November 1752 in the same list as Stephen Johnston, Jr., who was listed next to Joshua Pavey [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 683]. Stephen made oath on 7 July 1772 in New Hanover County court that he was unable to work on roads [Minutes, 1771-79, 52].

iv. Elizabeth, born say 1705, married Theophilus Norwood, the Deputy Marshall and ferry-keeper on North River who was mentioned in her father's will. See the Norwood Family History.

6        v. John4, born say 1710.

7        vi. Ezekiel/ Hezekiah, born say 1712.

8        vii. Solomon1, born say 1714.

 

6.    John4 Johnson, born say 1710, received a warrant for 200 acres in Beaufort County, North Carolina, on 19 November 1744 [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, IV:703]. He purchased 50 acres on the north side of Bay River in the fork of Chapel Creek beginning at Whitehouse Creek in Beaufort County on 31 May 1748 and made a deed of gift of this land to his son William4 on 5 December 1765 [DB 2:531; 4:99]. He was head of a Beaufort County household of 3 black tithables in 1755: "Johnson, Jno & son & wife" [SS 837]. He entered 100 acres in Bladen County on the southwest side of the Northwest Branch of Cape Fear River on 26 March 1753 and 100 acres adjoining this land on Pugh's Marsh Swamp on 27 August the same year when he was called John Johnson, Sr. [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, nos. 701, 804]. John4 Johnson's children were

i. John5, Jr., born say 1728, entered 100 acres in Bladen County on the north side of Pugh's marsh whereon John Oxendine was then living on 27 August 1753, the same day (his father?) John Johnson, Sr., entered land in this area [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, no.805]. He was taxable with his unnamed wife in Bladen County in 1763, taxable on 3 "Mulatto" tithes in Cumberland County in 1767, and taxable with his wife in Bladen County from 1769 to 1774 ("Molatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:20, 32, 66, 89, 123]. He and his wife were mentioned in the 19 September 1792 Cumberland County deed of Titus Overton who was a "black" Bladen County tithable in 1763 and a "Mulatto" taxable in 1767 [N.C. Genealogy XXI:3132, 3136]. According to the deed, John Johnson and his wife purchased 100 acres on the northeast side of the Northwest River near Beaverdam Pond on 27 April 1767, and they were buried there [DB 12:326].

9        ii. ?Abram1, born say 1730.

iii. ?Isaac, born say 1732, taxable on two black tithes in Beaufort County on himself and his wife in 1755 [SS 837]. He purchased 150 acres on the north side of Bay River at the mouth of a small creek in Craven County on 17 March 1770 and sold this land two years later on 20 August 1772 [DB 4:368]. He was a taxable "Molato" in Bladen County in 1768 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7] and head of a Robeson County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:48].

iv. ?Jesse, born say 1735, taxable on two black tithes in Beaufort County on himself and his wife in 1755 and 1764 [SS 837].

10       v. William4, born say 1737.

 

7.    Ezekiel/Hezekiah Johnson, born say 1712, received land by the February 1728/9 Carteret County will of his father William1 Johnson [SS Wills 1722-35, 140]. He was in Onslow County on 1 February 1734/5 when the Onslow County court ordered John Arther's wife Elizabeth taken from him and returned to her husband on Core Sound [Minutes 1734-78, vol. I, fol.2c]. He received an Onslow County patent for 400 acres on the west side of Turkey Point Creek adjoining (his brother) Jacob Johnson on 16 November 1738 and received a further 400 acres on the same date [Hoffman, Land Patents, I:122]. He and his brother Stephen sold their 320 acre tract in Carteret County on the east side of North River for 225 pounds on 27 April 1739 [DB D:216-9]. This was land they received by their father's will. Ezekiah purchased four hundred acres in Craven County on the north side of Neuse River at the mouth of Peter Ecles' upper gut in August 1743 and another 25 acres in this same area on 31 May 1750 [DB 1:401, 566]. On 10 September 1747 he sold his Onslow County land "known as Ezekiel Johnston Plantation" [DB C:1]. He was called Hezekiah Johnson when he recorded his mark in Hyde County court in September 1744 [Haun, Hyde County Court Minutes, I:47] and was in Craven County in June 1751 when he was fined by the County court

Hezekiah Johnston a Mollatto ... for Concealing his Taxable_ for the year 1750 [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, IV:46].

He sold 100 acres of his land in Craven County on the north side of Neuse River on 8 October 1752 [DB 9-10:259] and was taxable on 345 acres in Craven in 1756 [Wills, Deeds, Bonds, Inventories, Accounts of Sales, 316]. As Ezekiel Johnson he was a taxable head of a New Hanover County household of two "Negro Males" in 1755 [T&C, box 1]. On 7 December 1759 he was allowed two pounds and eleven shillings by the General Assembly for the use of a horse impressed from him on an express from Wilmington to Virginia [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, VI:101]. He was awarded 30 shillings by the Craven County court in his issue on assault against Benjamin Price on 6 July 1763, and he was called Kiah Johnson on 9 April 1767 when he was ordered to pay Clifford Howe 15 pounds [Minutes 1762-4, 24c; 1767-75, n.p., Thursday court]. He purchased 100 acres in Craven County on the north side of the Neuse River joining Thomas Little, "running a mile back," on 9 March 1771 and sold this same land on 25 December 1774 [DB 19:180; 22:162]. His will (which has not survived) was proved in Craven County court by Gideon Tingle on 8 March 1784 [Minutes 1779-84, 66c]. The account of sales of his estate, returned in June court 1784, included buyers Thomas and Levy Muckelroy. There was a letter remaining in the New Bern Post Office for Hezekiah Johnson in 1788 [Fouts, NC Gazette of New Bern, I:5]. His wife may have been Ann Johnston, head of a Craven County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. His children were

i. Jacob2, born 17 November 1735, if he was the "Mulatto boy named Jacob" (no surname mentioned) who was bound to John Todd of Onslow County in July 1742 [Minutes 1734-49, fol.19a]. He purchased seven acres in Craven County adjoining his house and the land of David Roach on 9 March 1768 [DB 15:14] and was called the son of Hezekiah Johnston by the Craven County court on 11 June 1771 when the court recommended that he be exempt from taxes since he was an infirm person with no estate whatsoever [Minutes 1767-75, 178].

11      ii. ?Jeremiah, born say 1755.

iii. ?Stephen, head of an Onslow County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:334].

iv. ?Elizabeth, head of a New Hanover County household of 3 "Molatto" females and one "Molatto" male under 21 or over 60 in 1786 for the state census.

v. ?Keziah, born say 1765, married George Curtis, 20 May 1783 Craven County bond with George Ransom bondsman.

vi. Solomon3, born 1 August 1771, ordered bound to James Carr as a house carpenter by the 14 September 1774 Craven County court [Minutes 1779-84, 77a]. He was called "Son of Hesekiah Johnson Dcd" when he was bound to John Allen to be a millwright by the 18 March 1785 Craven County court [Minutes 1784-86, 13c]. And on 15 June 1786 he was fifteen years old when he was ordered bound to Thomas Wilson as an apprentice blacksmith [Minutes 1786-87, 3b].

 

8.    Solomon1 Johnson, born say 1714, was taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, with his wife and Jacob Braveboy in 1769 and taxable with his wife in 1770 and 1771 ("Molatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:17, 45, 61]. He was granted land in Bladen County on Green Swamp east of Drowning Creek adjoining William Driggers on 22 December 1768 and sold this land on 22 July 1769. He purchased 200 acres on the south side of Raft Swamp from Solomon Johnston, Jr., on 1 January 1770 and was living in St. Matthew Parish, Georgia, on 3 October 1771 when he sold this land [DB 23:91, 135]. He may have been the father of

i. Solomon2, born say 1740, called "Solomon Johnston, Junr.," a taxable in Bladen County with his wife from 1768 to 1770 ("Molatoes") [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:8, 14, 45]. He purchased 200 acres in Bladen County on the south side of Raft Swamp from James Oberry and sold this land to Solomon Johnston, Sr., on 1 January 1770 [DB 23:135, 503].

 

9.    Abram1 Johnson, born say 1730, was taxable in Beaufort County in 1755:

Johnson, Abram & wife free N. 2 black tithes [SS 837].

and he and his wife were tithable in Beaufort in 1764 [SS 837]. In 1774 he was living on the north side of Bay River on the head of Chapel Creek which was land that John Johnson purchased in 1748 [Hoffman, Land Patents, I:667]. He purchased 30 acres on the north side of Bay River and west side of Chapel Creek on 28 November 1786 and was called Abraham Johnson, Senr., when he was granted a further 100 acres adjoining this land on the north side of Whitehouse Creek on 9 March 1799 [DB 7:200; 1:154]. He sold 25 acres on the north side of Whitehouse Creek to David Johnson on 22 November 1800 [DB 2-3:338]. He was head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:125] and 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:11]. He devised land to his children by his 4 October 1800 Beaufort County will (no probate date) [WB p.429]. His children were

i. John6, who received 40 acres on the south side of Whitehouse Creek by his father's will.

12      ii. Abram2, born say 1775.

iii. Rebecca, married ___ Linsey, perhaps the wife of Joshua Lindsey, Sr., head of a Craven County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134].

iv. Patty Johnston.

 

10.    William4 Johnson, born about 1737, was a "black" taxable with his wife in Beaufort County in 1764 [SS 837]. As mentioned above he received 50 acres from his father John3 Johnson on 5 December 1765. Perhaps he was the William Johnston who was head of a Beaufort County household of one "other free" in 1800 [NC:11]. His children may have been

i. Joshua, taxed on an assessment of 101 pounds and four polls in Beaufort County in 1779 [NCGSJ XV:143], head of a Beaufort County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:126].

ii. Cuff Levi, head of a Beaufort County household of 2 "other free" and one white woman in 1800 [NC:11].

 

11.    Jeremiah1 Johnston, born say 1755, was granted 200 acres in Hyde County on the west side of the Pungo River and the fork of the Indian Run on 28 October 1782. He sold 100 acres of this land on 21 January 1784 and the remainder on 12 February 1798 [DB B:921; D&E:208; K:410]. He received a second grant for 100 acres in Hyde on the west side of the Pungo River and the Indian Run Bridge on 9 August 1786 and sold this land on 12 February 1798. And he received a third grant for 100 acres on the west side of the Pungo River on 17 December 1794 [DB D&E:460; K:409; I:400]. He was head of a Hyde County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1810 [NC:118]. His children were

i. Jeremiah2, Jr., sold his household goods to his father for 20 pounds on 27 August 1798 [DB K:498].

ii. ?Brutus, born say 1760, described by Charles Wood as a man of colour who died at Valley Forge while serving as a soldier in the North Carolina Line of the Continental Army [N.C. Genealogy XVI:2580]. His estate descended to his brother David Johnson [NCGSJ IV:173].

iii. ?David, married Charity Driggers, 20 December 1796 Craven County bond with Joshua Lindsey bondsman. He purchased 25 acres on the north side of Whitehouse Creek from Abram Johnson on 22 November 1800 [DB 2-3:338] and was head of a Hyde County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NC:117].

 

12.    Abraham2 Johnston, born say 1765, was head of a household of 4 "other free" in New Hanover County in 1790 [NC:194]. By the 4 October 1800 Beaufort County will of his father Abraham1 Johnson, he received his father's plantation and "all the land that's belonging to all the rest of my removable estate." He bought land in Duplin County on 17 January 1809 and sold it soon after on 18 May 1810 [DB 4A:191]. He was head of a Craven County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67]. His 11 October 1843 Craven County will, proved November 1844, left 150 acres to his children Jeremiah Johnston and Martha Dove, and mentioned his grandchild Betsy Dove [WB D, folio 106]. Two of his children were

i. Jeremiah3, married Mary George, 8 January 1828 Craven County bond, William Martin bondsman.

ii. Martha Dove, wife of Arnett Dove and mother of Betsy Dove. She received 100 acres by her father's will. Arnett Dove, born about 1806, was about twelve years old on 10 March 1818 when he was listed as one of "Sundry Free Born Colored persons ... as needy of proper persons" (to be bound to) [CR 028.101.1]. He married Patsy Johnston, 4 March 1824 Craven County bond, John A. Smith bondsman.

 

Endnotes:

1.    Patrick Delaney's age was adjudged as thirteen years by the Accomack County, Virginia court on 7 February 1700 [Orders 1697-1703, 84].

2.    Francis Johnson was identified by race in only one of the seven times he was named in Sussex County Court [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 356, 425, 468, 481, 720, 757, 863]. A "Mulatto" Francis Johnson was in North Carolina between 1691 and 1701 [Price, The Colonial Records of North Carolina (1691-1701, 10, 12, 66, 73, 116].

3.    Edward Winslow provided security for William Driggers in Somerset County court when he was convicted of having an illegitimate child by Mary Winslow [Somerset County Judicial Records 1707-11, 95-6].

4.    There was also an Abel Johnson in colonial New Hanover County, presented by the 11 March 1740 court for "working Constantly on the Lord's Day [Minutes 1738-69, 115].

5.    He was called Ezekiel in Onslow and New Hanover Counties and Ezekiah/ Hezekiah in Craven County.

 

Another Johnson family

1.    Jane Johnson, born say 1735, was the servant of John Ford of Fairfax County on 17 August 1756 when the court ordered that she serve him an additional year for having a "base born child a Mulatto." She was apparently the mother of

i. Joseph, born in June 1755, a seven-year-old "Mulatto" child bound by the Fairfax County court to John Ford on 19 October 1762 [Orders 1756-63, 790, 14 (at end of microfilm reel)].

 

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