MCCARTY FAMILY

1.    Margaret McCarty, born say 1712, was a servant woman with two years to serve on 5 April 1734 when she was listed with three-year-old "Mulatto" John McCarty in the inventory of the Stafford County estate of Edward Clement, deceased,  [WB Liber M, 1729-48, 134-5]. She was the mother of

i. John, born about 1731, about three years old on 5 April 1734 when he was listed as a "Mulatto" bound to serve until thirty-one in the inventory of Edward Clement's Stafford County estate.

ii. ?Sarah, "a Molatto" born 3 September and baptized 8 October 1732" in St. Paul's Parish, King George County (no parent named) [St. Paul's Church, King George County, Virginia, 46].

iii. Catherine, born 19 March and baptized 9 May 1736 in St. Paul's Parish, "Daughter of Margaret McCarty" (no race indicated) [St. Paul's Church, King George County, Virginia, 56].

 

McCOY/ McKEY FAMILY

1.    Samuel1 Mackie, born say 1720, and his wife Batsheba, "free Malattos," registered their children's births and baptisms in St. Paul's Parish, King George County. Their children were

i. John, born 23 November, baptized 24 November 1745.

ii. Elijah, born 25 August, baptized 19 September 1748.

iii. Jane, born 2 February, baptized 29 March 1752 [St. Paul's Parish Register, 102, 115, 123].

2        iv. James1, born say 1750.

3        v. Bennett, born about 1757.

4        vi. George McCoy, born say 1759.

vii. ?Mary Mackey, born say 1760, the servant of Stephen Donaldson, Gent., on 11 April 1781 when the Loudoun County court bound her "Mulatto" son Anthony (born 17 August 1778) to her master [Orders 1776-83, 350].

5        viii. ?Verlinda, born say 1763.

ix. ?Malinsa M'Guy, head of an Essex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:208]. She may have been the mother of Mary McGuy who registered in Essex County on 14 December 1810: born free by certificate of the clerk of Richmond County, dark Mulattoe, about 27 years of age, 5 feet 3-3/4 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.17, no.39].

x. ?Samuel2 Magee, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman over the age of 45 in 1810 [VA:101b].

xi. ?Thomas Magee, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 1 "other free," a slave and a white woman over the age of 45 in 1810 [VA:102a].

xii. ?George2 Makee, a "yellow" taxable in the lower district of Prince William County in 1809 and 1810 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 708, 736], head of a Prince William County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508]. He registered as a free Negro in Washington, D.C., on 25 August 1821: born free of a free woman in the neighborhood of Dumfries, Virginia. Perhaps his wife was Nancy Makee who registered on 25 March 1826 and was also born free in Dumfries. Her sixteen-year-old "mulato" daughter Betsy and seventeen-year-old daughter Maria registered in October 1827 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 7, 60, 74, 100]. George may have been identical to ____ McGee, a "yellow" complexioned soldier from King George County who enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 151].

 

2.    James1 McCoy, born say 1750, was taxable in the lower district of Westmoreland County from 1782 to 1815: taxable on 2 tithes in 1787 and 1788; 3 from 1789 to 1792; charged with John, George and Garard McKie's tithes from 1793 to 1796; called McGuy from 1782 to 1793, McKey from 1794 to 1815 and McKoy in the 1810 census [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1815, frames 247, 269, 318, 327, 347, 358, 381, 410, 434, 450, 461, 476, 492]. He was listed as a "free Molatto" farmer living on his own land in Westmoreland County with (his wife?) Polley McKey and child James McKey in 1801 ["A List of Free Mulattoes & Negroes in Westmoreland County" Virginia Genealogist, 31:40]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:778]. He received a pension for his service as a soldier in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 40]. His children were most likely

i. Catherine, born say 1770, called Catherine McGuy when she married Henry Thompson, 29 September 1789 Westmoreland County bond, Bennett McGuy security. She may have been the Kitty Thompson who was a "Molatto" living alone in Westmoreland County in 1801, a farmer on James Cox's land [Virginia Genealogist 31:46].

6        ii. Rodham, born say 1770.

iii. George3, born say 1772, married Nancy McCoy, 4 January 1808 Westmoreland County bond, William Brown security. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:780].

iv. Gerard/ Jerrard, born say 1774, married Winney Davis, 17 March 1801, with the consent of Winney Davis dated the same day. He and Winney were "Molattoes" farming Mrs. Cox's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40], and he was head of a Westmoreland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:780].

v. John1, born say 1778, a "Molatto" farmer living with (his wife?) Margaret McKey on Nathaniel Oldham's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40].

vi. James2, listed in James McKey's household in 1801.

 

3.    Bennett McCoy, born about 1757, was drafted into the service from Westmoreland County to serve in 1777. He was allowed a pension in 1818 [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 40]. He was taxable in Westmoreland County from 1789 to 1815: taxable on a slave in 1800 and 1801, in the "list of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813, called McGuy from 1789 to 1793, McKey from 1794 to 1815 and McKoy in the 1810 census [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1815, frames 347, 358, 399, 434, 476, 512, 542, 657, 771, 821]. In 1801 he was listed as a "free Molatto" farmer with Hannah McKey and child Nancy McKey, living on their own land [Virginia Genealogist 31:40]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:780]. His child was

i. Nancy, married George McCoy, 4 January 1808 Westmoreland County bond, William Brown security.

 

4.    George1 McCoy, born say 1759, married Elizabeth Nickens, twenty-four-year-old daughter of Nathaniel Nickings, 10 March 1788 Orange County, Virginia bond, 11 March marriage by Rev. George Eve. He was a "B.M." (blackman) taxable in Augusta County in 1796 and 1797 [PPTL 1796-1810, frames 32, 69] and a "free Negro" or "Melatto" taxable in Rockingham County in 1798, 1800, 1804, 1809 and a laborer taxable on 2 horses at Sam McWilliam's in 1810 [PPTL 1795-1813, frames 143, 199, 294, 460, 634]. On 23 June 1803 the Rockingham County court ordered him to show cause why his children should not be bound out because, "he is not able to raise and educate them in a proper manner" [Judgment & Orders 1802-4, 303]. He was head of a Rockingham County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:130b]. According to his Revolutionary pension file, he died in the poorhouse in Rockingham County in 1821 [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 40]. He was probably the father of

i. John2, born 26 January 1788 of free parents in Augusta County, Virginia, registered as a "free Negro" in Rockingham County on 17 October 1815 and recorded his "free papers" in Ross County, Ohio: a black man, aged 28 years the 26 January 1816, 6 ft 3/4 in., straight and well made, was born free [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 22; Rockingham County Register of Free Negroes, no.24, p.10].

ii. Hannah, born about 1790, registered as a free Negro in Rockingham County on 11 July 1811: about 5 feet 8 Inches high ... about 21 years of age ... a Dark Mulatto [Register, no.8, p.5].

iii. George4, born 1 June 1794, registered in Rockingham County on 20 June 1815: about 21 years the 1st of this Month ... bound an apprentice by order of the County Court of Rockingham to Joshua Peters also a free man of Colour to learn the trade of a Sadler, about 5 feet 7 inches high a dark Mulatto [Register, no.22, p.10].

 

5.    Verlinda McKee, born say 1763, was called a "mulatto woman" who had once been indentured to James Gwatkin on 5 August 1805 when her daughter registered as a free Negro in Prince William County [Orders 1804-6, 205]. She was the mother of

i. Polly Sanford Thornton, born about 1783, daughter of Verlinda McKee a free Mulatto, twenty-two years old when she registered as a free Negro in Prince William County on 2 September 1805 [Orders 1804-6, 239, 243].

ii. Sally, born about 1786, nineteen years old when she registered in Prince William County on 5 August 1805 [Orders 1804-6, 205].

 

6.    Rodham McCoy, born say 1772, married Mary Askins, 23 December 1793 Westmoreland County bond, John Kirk security. He and his wife Molly McKey and children were listed as "free Molattoes" farming William Ball's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:778]. He married, second, Elizabeth Brinn, 28 December 1816 Westmoreland County bond, William King security. His children listed with him in 1801 were

i. Bob.

ii. Fanny.

iii. Betsey, married Jarrat Thompson, 21 May 1822 Westmoreland County bond. Gerard Thompson was living in the household of (his parents?) John and Haney Thompson in the list of "free Molattoes" in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:45].

 

They may have been the ancestors of

7        i. William Megee, born say 1750.

ii. Robert Macky, head of a Hyde County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [NC:372].

iii. Easter Mackey, born 1776-1794, head of a Hyde County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:248].

iv. William McKey, head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:118].

 

7.    William Megee, born say 1750, was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:66] and 6 in 1810 [NC:38]. His widow was probably Winney McGee, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:156] and 5 in 1830. Their children were most likely

i. William J., head of a Halifax County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:36].

ii. Henry, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820.

iii. Tamzy, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820.

 

McCULLAM FAMILY

1.    Catherine McCollins, born say 1687, was a white woman servant of Elias Edmonds on 12 August 1705 when she confessed in Lancaster County court that she had a "mulattoe Child born of her body begotten by a Negroe." She may have been identical to Catherine McCollom who was cited on 12 March 1712/3 to appear in Lancaster County court to answer for having a "mulatoe" child [Orders 1702-13, 127, 300a]. She was apparently the mother of

i. ?Catherine Collins, born say 1705, a "free mulatto woman" of North Farnham Parish presented by the Richmond County, Virginia court in November 1725 for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1721-32, 248, 267].

ii. James McCollam, a "Molato" man listed in the inventory of the Lancaster County estate of Mrs. Frances Edwards on 14 April 1731. He was called a "Molatto named James McCullum" who had seven more years to serve when he was listed in the Lancaster County estate of William Edwards on 8 April 1737 [Deeds, Wills 1726-36, 190-1; Deeds, Etc. 1736-43, 50-1].

 

McDANIEL FAMILY

1.    James1 McDaniel, born say 1725, was a taxable with Kate, "a fr. mulattoe," in the 1751 Bertie County tax list [CCR 190]. Kate was Catherine Hammon, his common-law wife, as is apparent from the 1759 list of John Brickell and later lists:

James McDaniel, his son James & Catherine Hammon

In 1763 both he and Catherine were taxed as "free molattos" in John Nichols' list. James probably died about 1769 when Kate was taxable in the household of his son James in the list of Edward Rasor [CR 10.702.1]. She was still living in Bertie County in 1810, called Catherine McDaniel, head of a household of 3 "other free" and 1 white male [NC:187]. James' son was

2        i. James2, probably born circa 1745.

 

2.    James2 McDaniel, born about 1745, was probably the third (unnamed) person taxed in his father's household in the 1757 list of Henry Hunter. He was married by 1763 to Sarah, a taxable in his household in John Nichols' list, identified as his wife in the 1769 list of Edward Rasor [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. He was head of a Martin County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:68]. His children were most likely

i. Clary, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:358].

ii. Charles, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:38].

 

Endnotes:

1.    James1 McDaniel may have been related to Alice McDaniel, born 18 March 1707, a twenty one year old "Mallatto Born of a white Woman" who was living in Charles County, Maryland on 13 August 1728 when the court ordered that she serve John Howard (the highest bidder) to the age of thirty one years. She was presented by the Charles County court on 11 March 1728/9 for having an illegitimate child on information of Constable George Thomas [Court Record 1727-31, 153, 229].

 

MCINTOSH FAMILY

1.    Anne1 Macentosh, born say 1686, was living in York County on 24 May 1706 she was summoned to court to answer the information of Charles Chiswell for having a "Mullato Bastard Boy." On 24 July the case was deferred for the publication of a new law which had not yet come to the county [DOW 12:406, 424, 433]. She was probably the ancestor of

2        i. Ann2, born say 1733.

 

2.    Ann2 McIntosh, born say 1733, was living in Richmond County, Virginia, in August 1752 when she was ordered to serve her master, Arjalon Price, an additional thirty-one days for running away and an additional two years for his curing her of "the foul disease" [Orders 1746-52, 416]. He brought her before the Orange County court on 28 October 1756 for having an illegitimate "Mulatto" child. After seeing the child, the court ordered that after the completion of her indenture she serve her master another year and pay the churchwardens of St. Thomas Parish 15 pounds currency or be sold for five years. She was called the servant of John Simpson on 27 April 1758 when the churchwardens of St. Thomas Parish complained that she had delivered a bastard child. She petitioned the court for her freedom from Simpson on 28 September 1758, and on 26 April 1759 she was ordered to serve him additional time for running away for thirteen days [Orders 1754-63, 283, 367, 368, 437, 455]. Her daughter was

3        i. Mary, born say 1756.

 

3.    Mary McIntosh, born say 1756, was indentured to Arjalon Price of Orange County, Virginia, when he called her his "Mallatto Woman" and left her to his wife by his 29 April 1773 will. She was a "Molatto Girl" valued at 20 pounds in Price's 28 October 1773 inventory [WB 2:470-3, 475]. She was taxable in Orange County on herself, two unnamed daughters and a son in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List]. She was the mother of

i. ?William, born say 1785, head of a Culpeper County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:55].

ii. ?Joseph, born say 1785, head of a Culpeper County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:55].

iii. Mary, born about 1787, obtained a certificate from David Jamison, a justice of the peace from Culpeper County, and produced it in the District of Columbia Court in Alexandria on 17 November 1803: daughter of Molley McIntosh who was born free ... about sixteen years old. I have known Mary als. Molly McIntosh from the time she was a girl, lived in the family of Arjalone Price of Orange County ... said Molly was the mulatto bastard child of Ann McIntosh a Scotch servant woman. Said Molly was bound till thirty one years old according to Law [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, no. 5, p.5].

 

MACLIN FAMILY

Members of the Maclin family were

1        i. Thomas1, born say 1704

2        ii. Godfrey1, born say 1720.

 

1.    Thomas1 Maclin, born say 1704, was taxable in Lunenburg County in 1749 and 1750, taxable on 2 tithes in 1751 and taxable in 1752 on his own tithe, Edward Peters and Benjamin Scott in the list of Peter Jefferson [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 110, 140, 169, 192]. He received a patent for 315 acres in Lunenburg County on the branches of Dockery's Creek and Flat Creek on 5 February 1753 [Patents 32:34]. On 10 May 1764 the Lunenburg County court declared him to be levy free [Orders 1764-5, 3]. On 1 July 1769 he sold (signing by mark) 60 acres in Mecklenburg County adjoining Lewis Parham to Lewis Parham for 10 pounds [DB 2:253]. By his 11 August 1761 Mecklenburg County will, recorded 8 March 1773, he left his entire estate to his wife Easter Maclin "to handle as she desires" [WB 1:157]. A few months later on 14 July 1773 she sold (signing by mark) 127 acres in Mecklenburg County adjoining Lewis Parham on the Wheat Stone Branch to Thomas Maclin, Jr., of York County for 20 pounds. On 2 April 1777 she was living in Lunenburg County when she sold 127-1/2 acres in Mecklenburg County on the branches of Dockery's Creek and Flat Creek to Thomas Maclin of Mecklenburg County [DB 4:268; 5:234]. Thomas and Esther may have been the parents of

3        i. Thomas2, born say 1746.

 

2.    Godfrey1 Maclin (Miklin), born say 1720, was presented by the York County court in November 1746 for not listing his wife as a tithable [OW 19:472, 486]. He was the "free mulatta" father of several children who were baptized in Bruton Parish, James City and York counties. His wife was probably named Mary since a "Godfrey and Mary his wife" (no last name or race indicated) had a child named Mildred whose 17 November 1744 birth was registered in Bruton Parish [Bruton Parish Register, 5, 8]. He died before 11 November 1765 when the Mecklenburg County, Virginia court bound his orphan son John to William Terrell Mills [Orders 1765-8, 154]. His children were

i. ?Lucretia, born about 1742, wife of David Bartley, called "free Mulattas" when they registered the 29 November 1764 birth of their son Godfrey Macklin in Bruton Parish, York County [Bruton Parish Register, 27]. She was called Lucretia Maclin in York County on 17 May 1773 when she sued William Roberts for trespass, assault and battery [Judgments & Orders 1772-4, 273]. Lucretia was in Halifax County, Virginia, on 19 November 1778 when she was charged with the murder of Mary Scandling. At her hearing, George Jones (who was also from York County) deposed that he had been riding on a horse with Mary Scandling when they met Lucretia who insulted him, tried to strike him with a stick about the size of his arm, and struck Mary Scandling instead. Lucretia was sent to Williamsburg for further trial. Oddly enough, on 20 April 1775 three years prior to her death, Mary had been discharged from her indenture to George Jones by the Halifax County because George was a "free Mulatto." Two years later on 20 February 1777 the court bound Mary's daughter Macklin Scandling to George Jones [Pleas 1774-79, 109, 193, 379]. Lucretia was listed in the 1782 census for Richmond City, a forty-year-old woman living in Hannah McLin's household, perhaps the mother of Milley McLin, an eighteen-year-old in the same household [VA:111].

ii. Mildred, born 17 November 1744, "Daughter of Godfrey and Mary his Wife" (last name and race not indicated). She was probably the Milly Roberts, wife of William Roberts, "free Mulattos" who registered the 22 March 1765 birth of their son Macklin in Bruton Parish, James City and York counties [Bruton Parish Register, 5, 29].

4        iii. Elizabeth1, born say 1747.

iv. John1, born say 1748, baptized in Bruton Parish on 7 May 1748, described as a "free mulatto" who lived near the lower Mecklenburg County store of Dinwiddie, Crawford, & Company and owed them 3 pounds on 1 September 1775 [Virginia Genealogist 15:291]. He may have been identical to John Macklin, "a poor soldier in the service of the United States," whose wife Frances was living in Mecklenburg County on 13 March 1780 when the court ordered Reuben Morgan to supply her with 2 barrels of corn for her support [Orders 1779-84, 19].

5        v. ?Hannah, born say 1749.

6        vi. Rebecca, born say 1760.

 

3.    Thomas2 Maclin, born say 1746, and his wife Thomason Maclin, "both free mulattoes," registered the birth of their son Godfrey in Bruton Parish, James City and York counties on 23 February 1766 [Bruton Parish Register, 27]. On 21 July 1766 he and Robert Evans were securities in York County for a 55 shilling debt William Roberts owed Lawson Burfoot [Orders 1765-68, 91]. He was called Thomas Maclin, Jr., of York County on 14 July 1773 when he purchased 127 acres in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, adjoining Lewis Parham from Esther Maclin. He was living in Mecklenburg County on 2 April 1777 when he purchased another 127-1/2 acres from Esther Maclin for 30 pounds. He purchased 65 acres adjoining his land from Reuben Morgan for 150 pounds on 9 January 1779 and sold 10 acres on the Church Road for 10 pounds on 12 August 1782 [DB 4:268; 5:234, 379; 6:191]. On 8 November 1779 the Mecklenburg County court ordered that he be added to the list of tithables, and on 9 April 1782 the court allowed his claim for 325 pounds of beef provided to the Continental Army [Orders 1779-84, 1, 125]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 11 persons in the list of Lewis Parham in 1782 [VA:34]. He was taxable on 16 head of cattle and 4 horses in 1782 and taxable on slaves Cate and Jerry in 1784 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 16, 48, 67, 97, 198]. He sued Benjamin Ferrell in Mecklenburg County court for trespass, assault and battery on 14 March 1785. The suit was discontinued on 9 October 1786 on agreement of the parties. He was sued for 8 pounds on 13 June 1785 and was security for Susanna Chavers in the suit of James King. On 9 July 1787 the court excused him from paying tax on his infirm son Godfrey [Orders 1784-7, 215, 269, 615]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable on 310 acres in the lower district of Mecklenburg County in 1787 [Land Tax List 1782-1811-A]. He sold land by deed proved in Mecklenburg County court on 8 December 1788 and 9 February 1789 [Orders 1787-92, 324, 329]. By 1790 he was in Wake County, North Carolina, where he was head of a household of 11 "other free" [NC:105]. He died before 25 June 1791 when his estate was administrated. Matthew, Elizabeth, John, and Thomason Maclin, William Stewart and Stephen Haithcock were buyers at the sale of his estate [Wynne, Wills, Inventories, Settlement of Estates, Wake County, 76]. In September 1791 the court appointed guardians for his children Godfrey, James, and Peggy. His children were

i. ?Matthew, born say 1764, listed in Mecklenburg County in Thomas Maclin's household in 1785 and listed in his own household on a slave named Liza in 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 138, 197]. He married Sally Jones, 9 November 1787 Warren County bond, Isaac Evans bondsman. Matthew was head of a Wake County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:105], 7 in 1800 [NC:781], and 7 in Stokes County in 1810 [NC:579]. He purchased half of lot 173 in Raleigh for 18 pounds on 20 March 1797 and sold it for 110 pounds on 24 September 1799. He purchased 100 acres on the north side of Crabtree Creek in Wake County on 3 September 1800 and sold it in 1803 [DB Q:405-6, 444; R:302].

ii. Godfrey2, born 23 February 1766 [Bruton Parish Register, 27], listed in Thomas Maclin's Mecklenburg County household in 1785 and 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 97, 198].

iii. Mary3, born 11 July 1768, baptized 14 August, "daughter of Thomas Macklin & Tomison His Wife Both free mulattoes" [Bruton Parish Register, 33].

iv. ?Jonathan, born say 1769, married Martha Nickins, 10 February 1790 Halifax County, Virginia bond. He purchased land from George Jones by deed proved in Halifax County in December 1793, and he and his wife Patsy sold 37 acres to John T. Colquit by deed proved on 28 July 1794 [Pleas 1792-5, 300, 487, 652]. He was taxable in the lower district of Halifax County in 1798 [PPTL 1782-99, frame 827].

v. ?William, born about 1769, about twenty-four years old on 23 March 1793 when the following article appeared in the North Carolina Gazette of New Bern: committed to the jail of this district a Mulatto fellow, about 24 years of age 5'7" high. He says his name is William Maclin and that he came from Mecklenburg county Va. has a pass which he says he got from Col. Richard Cannon [Fouts, NC Gazette of New Bern, II:15].

vi. ?John2, born say 1771, taxable in Thomas Maclin's Mecklenburg County household in 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 198]. He married Olivia Williams, 16 December 1791 Wake County bond, Matthew Maclin bondsman.

vii. ?James, born say 1772, married Mary Heathcock/ Haithcock, 5 October 1799 Wake County bond. He was taxable in Wake County on 398 acres in 1794 and taxable on 1 poll in 1802 [MFCR 099.701.1, frames 128, 270].

viii. ?Thomas3, born say 1773, married Delilah Evans, 23 December 1794 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, John Guy bondsman. He was called "Thomas Maclin (mulatto)" when he was taxable in Mecklenburg County on one "white" tithe and a horse in 1810 [Yantis, Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia, M-1]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 11 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:154] and was seventy-five years old when he was counted in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census [VA:55b].

ix. ?Fanny, born say 1780, married Earby Chavous, 9 March 1797 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Thomas McLin security.

x. Margaret3, born say 1782, married Barnabus Scott, 28 August 1803 Wake County bond. He married second, Peggy Corn, 1829 Wake County bond, Gilford Scott bondsman.

 

4.    Elizabeth1 Maclin, born say 1747, was baptized in Bruton Parish on 7 May 1748 [Bruton Parish Register, 8]. She was the "free Mulatto" mother of a bastard child Edy whose birth and baptism were recorded in Bruton Parish in 1765 [Bruton Parish Register, 26]. She may have been the Elizabeth Maclin who was head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1800. Her children were

i. Edy, born 2 August 1765, baptized 6 October.

ii. Mary2, born 27 September 1767 [Bruton Parish Register, 32].

 

5.    Hannah Maclin, born say 1749, was called a "free Mulatto" when the 8 March 1765 birth of her bastard child Edmund was recorded in Bruton Parish [Bruton Parish Register, 29]. She was called "Han McLin" in 1782, head of a family of 5 "free mulattoes" including Peggy, Milley, and Lucretia McLin and Edward Smith, with one tithable slave and two cattle, living on lots 498 and 479 in Wardship no. 3, Richmond, Virginia, in 1782 [VA:111]. Her children were

i. Edmund, born 8 March 1765, "a Bastard child son of Hannah Macklin a free Mulatto."

ii. Margaret2, born 9 May 1768, baptized 5 June [Bruton Parish Register, 32], a fourteen-year-old in her mother's Richmond City household in 1782 [VA:111].

 

6.    Rebecca Maclin, born say 1760, was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 8 June 1789 when the court bound out her illegitimate son Godfrey McLin. On 9 March 1801 the court bound him to John Bugg [Orders 1787-92, 406; 1798-1801, 512]. She was the mother of

i. Godfrey3, born about 1785, issued a certificate in Mecklenburg County by John Bugg on 3 January 1814: Godfrey Maclin was born and raised in the County of Mecklenburg, Virginia, is a free man, is Six feet two inches high, is a mahogany Colour & is about twenty nine years old. The said Godfrey Maclin lived in the family of my father & in my own family from about four years old, until he was twenty two years old, during the whole of which he Conducted himself in an honest & Orderly manner ... John Bugg [Free Person of Color, no.5, p.3].

ii. ?Betty, bound by the Mecklenburg County court to John and Sally Bugg on 14 December 1801 [Orders 1801-3, 127].

iii. ?An(?)visa, bound by the Mecklenburg County court to Henry and Martha Finch on 14 December 1801 [Orders 1801-3, 127].

 

Other members of the family in Virginia were

i. Mary1 Mackland, born say 1734, living in Bruton Parish on 15 July 1754 when the York County court fined her 500 pounds of tobacco for having a bastard child [Judgments & Orders 1752-4, 463].

ii. James Maclin, alias Roberts, born say 1745, added to the list of tithables in Elizabeth City County on 7 November 1764 [Court Records 1760-9, 262].

iii. Margaret1, born about 1754. She and Lizza (no last name indicated) ran away from Jonathan Patteson of New Kent County about 20 November 1766. He advertised for their return in the 29 January 1769 issue of the Virginia Gazette describing her and (her sister?) as: two Mulatto girls, named Margaret and Lizzy. The former is about 12 years old, of a dark complexion, and has a thin visage; the other is of a yellow complexion, and has a long woolly head. They are both bound to me as the law directs, viz. to serve until the age of 21 years [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements 1:49]. Margaret Maclin complained to the Lunenburg County court on 8 April 1773 that her master John Patteson, Sr., was holding her and Lizza Maclin in servitude. The court discharged her from Patteson's service as an apprentice on 9 September 1773 but dismissed Lizza's complaint [Orders 1769-77, 309, 350, 365].

iv. Elizabeth2/ Lizza, born say 1756, complained to the Lunenburg County court on 8 April 1773 that her master John Patteson, Sr., was holding her in servitude, but the court dismissed her complaint after hearing both parties on 15 October 1773 [Orders 1769-77, 309, 365].

v. Patty, married William Banks, 8 September 1787 York County marriage by Rev. John Davenport [VMHB XXV:300].

vi. Winnifred, married Reuben Gillett, 11 July 1790 York County bond.

vii. Jones, born about 1792, issued a certificate in Mecklenburg County on 20 October 1817: of a bright yellow complexion, Five feet eleven & a half inches high about twenty five years old [Free Person of Color, no.15, p.8].

viii. Patty, head of a York County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:878].

 

MADDEN FAMILY

1.    Mary Madden, born say 1740, was a white servant woman living in St. George Parish, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, on 17 April 1760 when her "mulatto" daughter Sarah was bound apprentice. Mary had at least one other child (unnamed) by 1770 when the vestry of St. George Parish paid Mary Turnley, wife of Francis Turnley, for helping her deliver it [Madden, We Were Always Free, 6, 5]. Mary was the mother of

i. Sarah, born 4 August 1758. See the two hundred-year-long history of Sarah Madden's descendants in T.O. Madden's book, We Were Always Free.

 

MAGEE/ McKEE FAMILY

1.    Samuel1 Mackie, born say 1720, and his wife Batsheba, "free Malattos," registered the birth and baptized their children in St. Paul's Parish, King George County. Their children were

i. John, born 23 November, baptized 24 November 1745.

ii. Elijah, born 25 August, baptized 19 September 1748.

iii. Jane, born 2 February, baptized 29 March 1752 [St. Paul's Parish Register, 102, 115, 123].

 

They may have been the ancestors of

2        i. William Megee, born say 1750.

ii. Mary Mackey, born say 1760, the servant of Stephen Donaldson, Gent., on 11 April 1781 when the Loudoun County court bound her "Mulatto" son Anthony (born 17 August 1778) to her master [Orders 1776-83, 350].

3        iii. Verlinda McKee, born say 1763.

iv. ____ McGee, a "yellow" complexioned soldier from King George County who enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 151].

v. Samuel2 Magee, head of a Spotsylvania County household of 3 "other free" and one white woman in 1810.

vi. George Makee, a "yellow" taxable in the lower district of Prince William County in 1809 and 1810 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 708, 736], head of a Prince William County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508]. He registered as a free Negro in Washington, D.C., on 25 August 1821: born free of a free woman in the neighborhood of Dumfries, Virginia. Perhaps his wife was Nancy Makee who registered on 25 March 1826 and was also born free in Dumfries. Her sixteen-year-old "mulato" daughter Betsy and seventeen-year-old daughter Maria registered in October 1827 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 7, 60, 74, 100].

vii. Malinsa M'Guy, head of an Essex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:208].

viii. Mary McGuy, born about 1783, registered in Essex County on 14 December 1810: born free by certificate of the clerk of Richmond County, dark Mulattoe, about 27 years of age, 5 feet 3-3/4 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.17, no.39].

ix. Andrew MKee, head of a Henrico County household of 2 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [VA:998].

x. Robert Macky, head of a Hyde County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" and 1 white woman in 1800 [NC:372].

xi. Easter Mackey, born 1776-1794, head of a Hyde County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:248].

xii. William McKey, head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:118].

 

2.    William Megee, born say 1750, was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:66] and 6 in 1810 [NC:38]. His widow was probably Winney McGee, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:156] and 5 in 1830. Their children were most likely

i. William J., head of a Halifax County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [NC:36].

ii. Henry, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820.

iii. Tamzy, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820.

 

3.    Verlinda McKee, born say 1763, was called a "mulatto woman" who had once been indentured to James Gwatkin on 5 August 1805 when her daughter registered as a free Negro in Prince William County [Orders 1804-6, 205]. She was the mother of

i. Polly Sanford Thornton, born about 1783, daughter of Verlinda McKee a free Mulatto, twenty-two years old when she registered as a free Negro in Prince William County on 2 September 1805 [Orders 1804-6, 239, 243].

ii. Sally, born about 1786, nineteen years old when she registered in Prince William County on 5 August 1805 [Orders 1804-6, 205].

 

MAHORNEY FAMILY

Members of the Mahorney family were

i.Thomas, born  about 1733, living with Sarah Weedon when he was taxable in Prince William County in 1800 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frame 443]. He was about 85 years old on 22 May 1818 when he made a declaration in Prince William County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he enlisted in January 1777 in Westmoreland County. He was called a "free man of colour," aged about ninety-one, on 3 October 1820 when he appeared in court again, declaring that his family residing with him was his wife Mima and son Jack, both slaves [M804-1615, frame 0568].

ii. Winny, born about 1759, registered in King George County on 5 August 1801: a dark mulatto woman about forty two years of age ... is a free woman, she having served in the estate of Richard Bernard, decd., the term of thirty one years [Register of Free Persons, no. 28]. She was called Winny McHorney in Westmoreland County, head of a household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:780].

iii. James, born about 1763, registered in King George County in February 1797: a black man, about thirty four years old ... having served his time with William Bernard, Gent., of this County, p. order or certificate of said County of King George [Register of Free Persons 1785-1799, no. 7].

iv. Sukey, born about 1775, registered in King George County on 5 August 1801: a black woman, aged about twenty six years ... is a free woman, she having served William Bernard, Esqr., the term of twenty one years [Register of Free Persons, no. 30]. She was called Susan McHorney in Westmoreland County, head of a household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:780].

v. Rachel, born about 1780, registered in King George County on 5 August 1801: a black woman, aged about twenty one years ... is a free woman, she having served in the estate of Richard Bernard, decd., the term of twenty one years [Register of Free Persons, no. 29].

vi. Caty, born about 1792, registered in King George County on 7 April 1814: a black woman aged about twenty two years, spare made about five feet four and a quarter Inches high ... was born free of a woman emancipated by Richd. Bernard late of King George County decd. [Register of Free Persons, no.46].

 

MALBONE FAMILY

1.    Sarah, born say 1695, was a "free negro" formerly belonging to Mr. John Richardson, deceased, on 2 April 1718 when the Princess Anne County court ordered Rodolphus Malbone to pay her two barrels of corn yearly out of Richardson's estate according to his last will and testament [Minutes 1717-28, 13]. She may have have been the ancestor of

2        i. Daniel, born say 1755.

 

2.    Daniel, born say 1755, a "young Molloto lad...lawfully begotten," was set free by the 27 January 1766 Princess Anne County will of Reodolphus Malbone, Sr., "if in case the Law allow it" [Deed Book 9, part 2, 580-1]. He was apparently identical to Daniel Malbone who was taxable in the Lower Precinct of the Eastern Shore of Princess Anne County in 1782 and 1783 with (his wife?) a slave over the age of 16 named Phebe and infants under the age of 16 named Daniel and Love; and he was a "Free Negro" taxable in the Lower Western Shore Precinct (the same precinct as the Anderson family) in 1784, also taxable that year on slave John Francis who was under the age of 16. In 1787. In 1790 he was taxable on only horses and cattle; in 1792 on a slave over the age of 16 and 3 horses; in 1793 on only 2 horses, in 1807 he was a "F.B." taxable on a horse; in 1809 he was taxable on a slave over 16 and a slave aged 12 to 16. He paid $15 for a retailer's license in 1809 [PPTL, 1782-9, frames 551, 576, 605, 691, 693; 1790-1822, frames 19, 44, 67, 375, 399]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Sukey Malbern, born say 1796, married Charles Cuffee (free persons of Colour), 9 March 1814 Norfolk County bond, 20 March marriage by Thomas J. Jones, an ordained Methodist Episcopal minister [Marriage Bonds 1814, 14-14; Marriages Vol. 16, 1801-1819].

 

MALE/ MAIL FAMILY

1.    Wilmore1 Male, born say 1732, signed (making his mark) the Baltimore County, Maryland petition of 27 January 1768 to move the county seat from Joppa to Baltimore. Benjamin Banneker and Daniel Lett also signed (by writing their names) [Maryland State Archives, Archives of Maryland On-line, Vol. 61:528, 531, 544]. He was head of a Hampshire County, Virginia household of 11 "white" (free) persons in 1782 and 2 in 1784 (called "Sr.") [VA:26, 71]. He may have been one of two Wilmer Males taxable in Hampshire County in 1793 [PPTL 1782-99, frame 326]. Perhaps his widow or daughter was Sarah Male who was taxable on a horse in Hampshire County in 1798 [PPTL 1782-99, frame 519]. He was apparently the father of

2        i. Wilmore2, born about 1758.

3        ii. William1, born say 1764.

4        iii. Richard1, born say 1770.

iv. James, born before 1776, taxable in Randolph County, Virginia, in 1809 and 1810 [PPTL 1787-1829, frames 386, 402], head of a Monongalia County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:522], a "man of colour" taxable in Harrison County in 1813 [PPTL 1809-18, frame 194], a "cold" taxable in Randolph County from 1816 to 1818 [PPTL 1787-1829, frames 483, 494, 505, 519], head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 9 "free colored" in 1830.

v. George1, born about 1776, taxable in the lower district of Hampshire County in 1801 and 1803 [PPTL 1800-14, frames 59, 199], taxable in Randolph County from 1809 to 1811 and from 1819 to 1829: in the list of "Free negroes & Mulattoes" which began in 1822 [PPTL 1787-1829, frame 386, 401, 411, 584, 639, 655, 701, 720], and a "man of colour" taxable in Harrison County from 1812 to 1817 [PPTL 1809-18, frames 125, 196, 221, 294, 386]. He was counted as white in the 1810 Randolph County census along with Samuel Norris and William Cook, head of a household of 6 persons [VA:428], 6 "free colored" in 1820 (over 45) [VA:273b], 6 "free colored" in 1830 (36-55) [VA:130] and 7 in 1840 (36-55) [VA:272].

vi. ?Margaret, born about 1783, counted in the Barbour County household of George Male in 1850 [VA:96b].

 

2.    Wilmore2 Male, born about 1758, enlisted in the Revolution in 1776 or early 1777 from the part of Berkeley County, Virginia, that became Jefferson County, moved to Hampshire County in 1790 and applied for a pension from Hampshire County on 27 May 1818 at the age of sixty. On 20 June 1820 he was living in Randolph County with his wife Priscilla, aged fifty-nine, and son George, aged sixteen, when he refiled [National Archives pension file no. S. 38171, http://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Hampshire County household of 10 free persons and 2 other buildings in 1784 [VA:71]. He purchased 150 acres in Hampshire County in 1795 [Sage and Jones, Early Records, Hampshire County, 24] and was summoned by the Hampshire County court on 17 September 1796 to show cause why his children should not be bound out [Horton, Hampshire County Minute Book Abstracts, 1788-1802, 24]. He was taxable in Hampshire County from 1788 to 1812: one of two Wilmore Males taxable in 1793; called "a free black" in 1797, living at "Parsons Place" in 1798, taxable on 2 "F.M." in 1810 and 1811, a "F.M." taxable on his own tithe in the same district as Will Male Jr. in 1812 [PPTL 1782-99, frames 135, 254, 326, 343, 407, 541 571; 1800-14, frames 16, 490, 565, 589]. He was head of a Hampshire County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:826]. He and Willmer Male, Junr., were men "of color" taxables in the eastern district of Monongalia County in 1813 and "FN" taxables there in 1815, the same district as the Dalton, Cannady/ Kennedy, Goins and Hill families [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 635, 715]. He was a "Cold" taxable in Randolph County on his tithe and a horse in 1817 [PPTL frames 484] and head of a Randolph County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:273b], 2 "free colored" in Hampshire County in 1830 and 1840, listed as an 84 year-old "colored" veteran in the 1840 Revolutionary War pensioners for Hampshire County. He was the father of

i. ?Wilmore4, born say 1793, perhaps the second "F.M." tithable in Wilmore Male's household in the upper district of Hampshire County in 1810 and 1811, called "Will Male, Junr., F.M." in 1812 [PPTL 1800-14, frames 490, 565, 589] a "man of color" taxable in Monongalia County in 1813 and a "FN" taxable in 1815 [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 635, 715]. He was apparently the Wilmore Male who was married to a "negroe" slave named Nancy on 6 May 1826 when he made a Hampshire County deed of manumission to his wife freeing her from slavery on condition she remain his wife [DB 25:58, cited by Finley, Alexandra, Founding Chestnut Ridge, 25]. He was counted in the Evansville Post Office, Preston County, West Virginia census as a seventy-five-year-old "Indian" with forty-year-old "Indian" (wife?) Nancy Male and thirty-year-old (son?) Adam Male who were all said to have been born in Maryland. He had real estate valued at $1,200 [VA:292, family no. 2048]. George Male (born about 1821) was also counted in the same area as an "Indian" born in Maryland with $120 real estate [family no. 1996]. In the Reno Township, Preston County census for 1870 Wilmore was counted as a seventy-seven-year-old "Mulatto" with $1,000 real estate, sixty-one-year-old "Mulatto" (wife?) Susan, twenty-eight-year-old (daughter?) Nancy, and John J. and Sarah Dalton who were all born in Virginia. John Croston was in the next household [family nos. 215 & 216].

ii. George2, born about 1804, sixteen years old in 1820, called George Male, Jr., when he was head of a Randolph County household of 4 "free colored" in 1840 (age 24-36) [VA:273], perhaps the George Male who married Elizabeth Norris, 4 March 1822 Randolph County bond.

 

3.    William1 Male, born say 1764, was indicted by the Hampshire County court on 19 November 1798 for living in adultery with Nancy Jones [Horton, Hampshire County Minute Book Abstracts, 1788-1802, 100]. He was taxable in the lower district of Hampshire County on 2 tithes in 1792, 1 in 1795, 1796, 1798, 1801, and 1802: called a "free Mulatto" in the upper district in 1803 [PPTL 1782-99, frames 254, 407, 426, 519; 1800-14, 59, 111, 170], head of a Monongalia County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA:522], taxable in Randolph County, Virginia, from 1809 to 1829: taxable on 2 horses in 1809, 7 horses in 1828; a "Mulo" or "Cold" taxable starting in 1813; taxable on 2 tithes in 1811, 3 in 1815, called Richard Mail, Sr., in 1829 [PPTL 1787-1829, frames 386, 402, 413, 422, 448, 483, 494, 505, 519, 536, 556, 615, 639, 655, 720]. He was head of a Randolph County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:273b] and 2 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:272]. He left a 1847 Barbour County will in which he left his daughter Mary Dalton 75 acres of land and allowed her husband Nimrod the use of additional land [WB 1:23, cited by Finley, Alexandra, Founding Chestnut Ridge, 38]. He was the father of

i. Mary, born about 1803, married Nimrod Dalton. They were listed in the 1850 Barbour County census with real estate valued at $300 [VA:35b].

ii. ?William2, born about 1813, head of a Randolph County household of 8 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:272], a "Mulatto" listed in the 1850 Barbour County census with (wife?) Mary Ann Male and real estate valued at $1,000 [VA:36a]. On 2 October 1854 he was granted 175 acres in Barbour County on Laurel Creek and Booth's Run which he called "Guinea" [Land Office Grants 110:423].

 

4.    Richard1 Male, born say 1770, was indicted by the Hampshire County court on 19 November 1798 for living in adultery with Rody Emmery [Horton, Hampshire County Minute Book Abstracts, 1788-1802, 100]. He was taxable in the lower district of Hampshire County in 1795, 1796, 1801, 1802, 1803 [PPTL 1782-99, frame 407, 426; 1800-14, frames 59, 111, 199], taxable in Randolph County, Virginia, from 1809 to 1829: taxable on 2 horses in 1809, 7 horses in 1828; a "Mulo" or "Cold" taxable starting in 1813; taxable on 2 tithes in 1811, 3 in 1815, called Richard Mail, Sr., in 1829 [PPTL 1787-1829, frames 386, 402, 413, 422, 448, 483, 494, 505, 519, 536, 556, 615, 639, 655, 720]. He was counted as white in the 1810 Randolph County census, head of household of 12 persons [VA:428], head of a Randolph County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:273b], 5 in 1830 [VA:130] and 4 in 1840 [VA:272]. He left a 24 May 1845 Randolph County will, proved in July that year, by which he left his land, livestock and household goods to his unnamed wife during her lifetime and a third part of the crop which was on land formerly owned by Wilmore Male, a dollar to his son Richard, Jr., $40 arising from the sale of his land to his son George, divided the remainder between Aaron, Elizabeth and Mary Male except for a colt which was to go to Sarah Ann Croston, and appointed his son Aaron Male his executor [WB 1:11, also cited by Finley, Founding Chestnut Ridge, 38]. Rhoda was a "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Barbour County, age 85, with Elizabeth Male, age 45 [VA:98a]. They were the parents of

i. Aaron, born about 1795, head of a Randolph County, Virginia household of 11 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:272], a "Mulatto" stonemason listed in the 1850 Barbour County census with (his wife?) Mary and children with real estate valued at $1,500 [VA:22a].

ii. Elizabeth, born about 1805, head of a Randolph County household of 6 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:272], a "Mulatto" living in the same household with Rhoda Male in Barbour County in 1850 [VA:98a].

iii. Richard2, born after 1805, head of a Randolph County household of 7 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:272].

iv. Mary.

v. George3, born about 1826, a "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Barbour County with (wife?) Martha and Margaret Male and real estate valued at $120 [VA:96b].

 

Other members of the family were

i. Wilmore3, born 1776-1794, counted as white in the 1820 Allegany County, Maryland census with 6 "free colored" in his household [VA:5].

ii. Jesse, born about 1806, a "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Barbour County with (wife?) Eleanor and real estate valued at $600 [VA:100a].

iii. Stephen, born about 1810, head of a Randolph County, Virginia household of 6 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:272], a "Mulatto" counted with (wife?) Nancy Male in the 1850 census for Barbour County [VA:22a].

iv. George, born about 1816, a "Mulatto" born in West Virginia, counted in the 1870 census for Wesley Township, Washington County, Ohio, with (wife?) Ebbie and $900 real estate [family no. 136].

v. Nathan, born about 1820, "Mulatto" head of a Barbour County household with (wife?) Nancy in 1850 [VA:98a].

v. Hezekiah, born about 1826, counted in the 1850 census for Barbour County with (wife?) Rebecca Male and real estate valued at $50 [VA:22b].

 

MANLY FAMILY

1.    Gabriel1 Manly was born before 28 September 1703 when his mother Elizabeth Manly, a servant of John Wilkins, was presented for bastard bearing by the grand jury of Northampton County, Virginia [Orders 1698-1710, 165]. He was called "a Malatto" child on 28 January 1703/4 when John Wilkins, Sr., recorded his indenture in court [OW&c 1698-1710, 183]. He was a taxable in John Wilkins' Northampton County household from 1720 to 1731, called Gabriel Manly in 1720, "Gabriel negro" in 1723, and Gabriel Manly "molato" in 1727 [L.P. 1720-1731]. He married Dinah Webb, born in 1704, the daughter of Jane Webb, and Left, a slave of Thomas Savage on whose plantation they lived. She was tithable in her mother's household, called Dinah Webb in 1728, Dinah Manly in 1729 and 1730, and she was head of her own household with her mother in 1731, living near Gabriel who was still serving his indenture to John Wilkins. Gabriel and Diana moved to Norfolk County, Virginia, where they were taxable in 1735 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1730-50, 158 & 167]. By 1742 they were in Bertie County, North Carolina, where he purchased 100 acres of land by deed witnessed by Francis Brown and Benjamin Wynn. He purchased 140 acres adjoining his land from Joseph Wynns on 23 February 1746/7, and as Gabriel Manley, cooper, he purchased another 100 acres of adjoining land near the Holley Swamp on 12 November 1750 [DB F:339; G:347, 236]. He, his wife Diana, and 3 children were "Fr mulatoes," taxable in Bertie County in 1751 [CCR 190].

He sold the 200 acres on which he was living on 7 September 1754, and in 1755 his son Abel signed with him when he swapped his remaining 140 acres of land adjacent to Culmer Sessums for 150 acres from James Davis near the "end of a capway running." Soon afterwards on 22 January 1756 he bought another 160 acres near his old property on the Holley Swamp [DB H:212, 319; I:103]. He was taxable in the 1757 list of Henry Hunter [CR 10.702.1], and on 26 July 1758 he signed a promissory note to Blake Baker for 3 pounds [CR 10.908.1]. He was living in the part of Bertie County which became Hertford County in 1759. The records for this period were destroyed by a courthouse fire, so there is no further information on him and his wife. His children were

2        i. Abel, born say 1730.

3        ii. Littleton1, born say 1732.

iii. Solomon, born say 1733, a taxable in his own household in 1751 [CCR 190], taxable in 1759 in the constable's list of William Witherington for Captain Benjamin Wynn's District, and taxable in Hertford County on two persons in 1768 and 1770 Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 55].

iv. Susannah, born before 1740, taxable in her father's Bertie County household in 1751.

v. Gabriel2, Jr., born before 1740, taxable in his father's Bertie County household in 1751. He was taxable in Hertford County on one person in 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 20] and head of a Hertford County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:25].

vi. Moses1, born before 1740, taxable in his father's Bertie County household in 1751. He was taxable in an untitled Bertie list with Francis Brown, 2 "black" taxables in 1758, and with Francis Brown in the list of John Brickell in 1759. He was taxable in Hertford County on two persons in 1768 and on 50 acres and one horse in District 4 of Hertford County in 1779 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 47; GA 30.1]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:26], 10 in 1800, 5 in 1810 [NC:92], and he was a "free colored" man over forty-five years of age living in Hertford County with a "free colored" woman in 1820 [NC:184].

vii. ?Southerland, born say 1747, taxable in Hertford County on one person in 1768, two in 1769 and 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 54], and head of a Northampton County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:461].

 

2.    Abel Manly, born say 1730, was a taxable head of a Bertie County household with Ann Archer, "free Milats.," in 1751 [CCR 190]. She was called his wife Ann in the 1757 tax list of William Wynns. He was taxable in Hertford County on five persons in 1768 and 1769 Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 8]. Possible children:

4        i. Moses2, born about 1761.

ii. Hardy, head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:331], 11 in 1810 [NC:37], and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:157].

iii. Lud, head of a Halifax County household of 15 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:156].

 

3.    Littleton1 Manly was probably born about 1732 since he was head of a household with Sarah in 1751 in the Bertie tax list. He was taxable in Hertford County on two persons in 1768, three in 1769, two in 1770, and taxable on two lots in Winton and a horse in District 3 of Hertford County in 1779 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 45; GA 30.1]. He was in the neighboring county of Northampton in 1790 where he was head of a household of 5 "other free" [NC:75]. He may have been the father of

i. William, called "William Munley Mulatto" in the state census for Northampton County in 1786, head of a Northampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:75], and a Halifax County household of 7 in 1800 [NC:330], 10 in 1810 [NC:38], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 (Billie Manly) [NC:157].

ii. Littleton2, taxable in Norfolk County from 1798 to 1806: a labourer in Western Branch District in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1801 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 254, 359, 384, 434, 467, 486A, 564, 579]. He was a "free colored" man over forty-five years of age who was living in Hertford County with a "free colored" woman thirty-six to forty-five years old in 1820.

iii. John, head of a Northampton County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [NC:461], perhaps the John Manley who was head of a Norfolk County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:814].

 

4.    Moses2 Manly, born about 1761, enlisted with Colonel Lytle in the Tenth North Carolina Regiment for nine months in August 1781. He made a declaration in Hertford County court for a pension on 17 August 1819 and a second declaration in Halifax County court on 26 October 1821. He named his wife Chloe and three of his daughters: Sally, Esther, and Candys [M805, reel 549, frame 703]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:14] and a Halifax County household of 5 in 1800 [NC:328], 7 in 1810 [NC:36], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:157]. On 18 August 1834 his widow Chloe Manley applied to the Halifax County court to receive her husband's Revolutionary War pension and proved to the court's satisfaction that: said Chloe is the widow of said Moses & that said Moses departed this life on 16 May 1834. Their children were

i. ?Arthur, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:157]. He was in the First Company detached from the Halifax County Regiment in the War of 1812 [N.C. Adjutant General, Muster Rolls of the War of 1812 from the Militia of North Carolina, 19]. He was living in Weldon in May 1844 when he made a declaration in Halifax County court to obtain the pension of Moses Manly, deceased [M805, reel 807, frame 712].

ii. Sally, born about 1800.

iii. Esther, born about 1804.

iv. Candys, born about 1806.

 

Fairfax County, Virginia

1.    Phillis Manley, born say 1728, was the servant of Moses Linton on 20 June 1749 when the Fairfax County court ordered the churchwardens to bind her "Mullatto" son Isaac to her master. She was the servant of Thomas Fields on 19 April 1754 when she won a suit against him for her freedom. On 18 March 1756 the court ordered the churchwardens of Cameron Parish to bind her daughter Jemima (no race indicated) to Paul Turley [Orders 1749-54, 16, 85; 1754-6, pt. 2, 496]. She was living in Loudoun County on 14 December 1757 when she acknowledged her indenture to serve Thomas Fields for seven years [Orders 1757-62, 57]. She may have been identical to Phillis, one of the "Negro" tithables in Thomas Field's Loudoun County household in 1762. She was called Phillis Manly in 1765 when she was tithable in Henry Potter's Loudoun County household [Tithables 1758-1799, 229]. She was the mother of

2        i. ?Sarah, born say 1747.

ii. Isaac, born say 1749.

3        iii. ?Ann, born say 1750.

iv. Jemima, born say 1755.

 

2.    Sarah Manley, born say 1747, was living in Fairfax County on 19 March 1771 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Truro Parish to bind out her two-year-old "Molatto" daughter Hannah to Paul Turley. Her suit against John Gibson for trespass abated on 22 August 1786 by her death [Orders 1770-2, 183; 1783-8, 259]. She was the mother of

i. Hannah, born about 1769.

 

3.    Ann Manley, born say 1750, was living in Fairfax County on 19 March 1771 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Truro Parish to bind out her one-year-old "Molatto" son George to Paul Turley. She petitioned the court for her freedom from Turley on 20 March 1771 and was discharged from his service a month later on 23 May [Orders 1770-2, 183, 185, 227]. She was living in Loudoun County on 10 August 1779 when she complained to the court that Thomas Jacobs was detaining her son Vincent Manly [Orders 1776-83, 183, 201,]. She was the mother of

i. ?Benjamin Fairfax, born about 1769, an eighteen-year-old (no race indicated) ordered bound by the overseers of the poor of Truro District, Fairfax County, to John Brumback on 19 June 1787 [Orders 1783-8, 420]. He was probably the Benjamin Manly who was bound to John Turley by the Loudoun County court on 14 August 1780 [Orders 1776-83, 256]. He was a "F.N." taxable in Loudoun County in 1800 and 1801 [PPTL 1798-1812]. The Prince William County court certified his registry (as a free Negro) on 5 August 1805 [Orders 1804-6, 205].

ii. George, born about 1770.

iii. Vincent, bound to Thomas Jacobs on 10 August 1779 when his mother Ann complained to the Loudoun County court. The court bound him to William McClelon on 14 December 1779 and ordered the churchwardens of Cameron Parish to bind him to William Beavers on 13 March 1780 [Orders 1776-83, 135, 229].

iv. ?Dorcas, bound by the churchwardens of Cameron Parish, Loudoun County, to John Turley on 14 August 1780 (no race indicated) [Orders 1776-83, 256]. She was a "F.N." taxable in Loudoun County on 1 to 4 cattle from 1802 to 1812 [PPTL 1798-1812], and she and her son Leck were listed as "F.N.s" in the 1813 tax list for Loudoun County [PPTL 1800-1815].

v. Frank, a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County in 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 865].

vi. ?Henry, bound by the churchwardens of Cameron Parish, Loudoun County, to Peter Harmon on 14 August 1780 [Orders 1776-83, 320].

vii. ?Susannah, a "F.N." taxable on a horse in Loudoun County in 1805 [PPTL 1798-1812].

viii. ?Craven, a "F.N." taxable in Loudoun County from to 1812 [PPTL 1798-1812].

ix. ?Rose, head of a Loudoun County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:246].

x. ?Charles, head of a Dinwiddie County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:154].

 

MANN FAMILY

1.    Sarah1 Mann, born say 1720, was the servant of John Sutton in August 1765 when she and her children brought suit against him for their freedom in Caroline County court. The court ordered that depositions be taken from several elderly witnesses regarding her freedom and ordered her master to deliver her and her son Glasgow to court in November 1766. She appeared in court on 15 July 1768 when she stated that she had withdrawn her suit because her master had severely beaten her and that others had warned her that her children "would be removed to the Indians where she would never hear from them." The court found in her favor [Orders 1765-7, 135, 434, 442; 1767-70, 48-9, 198-9]. She was the mother of

2        i. ?Frank, born say 1739.

ii. ?Hannah, born say 1740, discharged from John Sutton's service by the Caroline County court on 12 April 1771 [Orders 1770-1, 175].

iii. ?Remers, born about February 1742, released from servitude by consent of his master John Sutton on 11 February 1773 [Orders 1772-6, 171].

iv. Glasgow, born say 1744.

v. ?Caesar, born say 1745, petitioned the Caroline County court for his freedom from John Sutton on 12 April 1771. The court ordered that he serve until 1 November 1776. He was sued by William Bowler in November 1771 [Orders 1770-1, 175, 376].

3        vi. ?Milly, born say 1760.

4        vii. ?Rachel, born about 1761.

viii. ?Patty, brought suit in Caroline County court for her freedom from John Sutton on 11 June 1772. The case was dismissed, probably because she had not yet completed her indenture [Orders 1772-6, 18].

 

2.    Frank/ Frances Mann, born say 1739, was discharged from John Sutton's service by the Caroline County court on 12 April 1771. She was probably living in Louisa County on 11 November 1771 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Trinity Parish to bind out (her daughter?) Judy Mann, a "Melatto Bastard," to John Byarse. She was called Frances Mann "a Free Mulatto" on 10 May 1773 when the Louisa County court ordered the churchwardens of Trinity Parish to bind out her children Charity and Rose Mann to John Smith [Orders 1770-1, 175; 1766-74, 109; 1766-72, 511; 1773, 33]. She was the mother of

i. ?Judy, born say 1770, a "Melatto" child ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Trinity Parish on 11 November 1771.

5        ii. Charity, born say 1771.

iii. Rose, born say 1773.

iv. ?Charlotte, born about 1776, registered in Fauquier County on 24 April 1821: age 45, 5'5", a dark Mulatto [Register of Free Negroes, 1817-65, no. 41].

6        v. James, born say 1778.

 

3.    Milly Mann, born say 1760, complained to the Spotsylvania County court on 6 May 1788 that Abner Yates intended to move to Kentucky and take her sons Daniel and Billy who had been bound to him by the Caroline County court. The court bound her ten-year-old son Daniel and eight-year-old son Billy to Thomas Herndon [Minutes 1786-8, 171; Orders 1787-92, 73]. Milly was the mother of

i. Daniel2, born about 1778, ten years old on 6 May 1788.

ii. William, born about 1780, eight years old on 6 May 1788.

 

4.    Rachel1 Mann, born about 1761, was a "poor orphan" of Essex County on 16 July 1770 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Ann's Parish to bind her out [Orders 1767-70, 371]. She was taxable on a free male tithe aged 16-21 in Essex County in 1783 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frames 46]. She was head of an Essex County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:199] and 3 "free colored" in Spotsylvania County in 1830. She registered in Essex County on 19 August 1811: born free by infon of Thomas Pitts, colour Black, about 50 years of age, 5 feet 3-3/4 Incs. [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.20, no.49]. She may have been the mother of

7        i. Clary, born about 1779.

ii. Betsy, counted in a "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes in the Parish of St. Ann's" in Essex County in 1813, with a male and female above the age of sixteen in the same list as Rachel Mann [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frame 510].

iii. Rachel2, born about 1791, registered in Essex County on 22 April 1817: born free by statement of Thomas Pitts, Esq., light black, about 26 years of age, 5 feet 1 inch [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.27, no.70].

iv. Henry, born about 1794, registered in Essex County on 22 April 1817: born free by statement of Thomas Pitts, Esq., colour black, about 23 years of age, 5 feet 11-3/4 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.28, no.72]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Essex County in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frame 545]. He may have been the Henry Mann who was a "free Negro" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, from 1809 to 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 369, 415, 548].

v. John, a "free Negro" taxable in Essex County in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frame 545].

vi. Jane, born about 1802, registered in Essex County on 22 April 1817: born free by statement of Thomas Pitts, Esq., colour light black, about 15 years of age, 4 feet 10-1/2 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.28, no.71].

 

5.    Charity Mann, born say 1771, was living in Louisa County when her children registered as free Negroes. Her children were

i. Edmund, born about 1794, registered in Louisa County on 19 June 1816: (son of Charity Mann) a free person of colour, about 22 years of age, dark complexion ... formerly bound as an apprentice to William Terry and William Fortune.

ii. Stephen, born about 1796, registered in Louisa County on 13 May 1817: (son of Charity Mann) who was bound to Richard Harris of sd. county as an apprentice, 21 years old, black complexion.

iii. Nelson, born about 1797, registered in Louisa County on 8 September 1818: son of Charity Mann, a person of colour free born, 21-22 years of age, black complexion.

iv. Sarah2, born about 1798, registered in Louisa County on 8 November 1819: daughter of Charity Mann (the said Charity Mann was born free) and Sarah was formerly bound to John Gunnell of this county, 21 years, dark complexion, thick lips [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 23, 25, 26, 50]. She registered in Botetourt County on 18 March 1823: 25 years of age; Black; Born free as per Certificate from Clk. Louisa Cty. Court [Free Negroes &c Registered in the Clerk's Office of Botetourt County, no. 36].

v. William, born about 1798, registered in Louisa County on 12 October 1835: son of Charity Mann who was born free, dark complexion, age 37 years [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 50].

 

6.    James Mann, born say 1774, "Base Born child of Frances Mann," was living in Louisa County on 9 August 1779 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Trinity Parish to bind him out [Orders 1774-82, 259]. He was a "free Negro" aged 16-21 when he was taxable on a horse in Essex County in 1783. He was taxable in Essex County on a slave over the age of sixteen and a horse in 1806 and taxable on a free tithe and a horse in 1809 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frames 46, 398, 416, 431, 545]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Hanover County in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 29:105] and a "free Negro" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, in 1807, 1810 and 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, frames; 1800-1813, frames 326, 416, 461]. He was the father of

i. Sukey, born about 1802, registered in Essex County on 18 June 1821: emancipated by her father James Mann in Essex County Court by deed of record, colour Tawny, about 19 years of age, 5 feet 2 inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.36, no.91].

 

7.    Clary Mann, born about 1779, registered in Essex County on 22 April 1817: born free by statement of Thos. Pitts, Dark Mulattoe, about 38 years of age, 5 feet 2-1/4 Ins. [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.27, no.69]. She was the mother of

i. Stanton, born about 1796, registered in Essex County on 20 December 1819: born free appearing by the register of her mother Clary Mann, colour Tawny, about 23 years of age, 5 feet 2 Inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.32, no.83].

ii. Susan, born about 1803, registered in Essex County on 20 December 1819: born free appearing by the register of her mother Clary Mann, colour Black, about 16 years of age, 5 feet 1/4 Inches [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.33, no.84].

 

Other members of the Mann family were

i. George, born say 1764, bondsman for the 7 September 1785 Albemarle County marriage of Lucy Bowles and Charles Barnett. George was a "free Negro" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, in 1783, 1793, from 1800 to 1807, and taxable in Fredericksville Parish in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames 31, 368, 437; 1800-1813, frames 12, 144, 186, 277, 326, 573]. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:166b].

ii. Nancy, born about 1768, complained to the Henry County court that John Pace was detaining her in slavery. On 29 August 1796 the court liberated her from servitude, "it appearing to the court she has arrived to the full age of eighteen years" [Orders 1792-7, 265].

iii. Daniel1, born about 1769, obtained a certificate of freedom in Baltimore County, Maryland, on 4 September 1794 and recorded the certificate in Kershaw County, South Carolina, on 4 October 1797: Daniel Man a free negro... born in Prince George County, state of Maryland, he's about 38 years of age ... 5 ft. 5 1/2 inches high without shoes, a yellow negro man, with short curly hair [Journal of the Court of Common Pleas and Sessions 1791-1799, WPA transcript].

iv. William, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of 4 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [VA:366].

v. Nanny, born about 1779, registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 21 April 1806: Age 27, Color yellow ... born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 2].

vi. Molly Mans, born about 1779, registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 19 January 1807: Age 28 years, Color mulatto ... born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 3].

vii. John, a "free Negro" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, in 1805, 1807, and 1810: taxable on a slave over the age of sixteen in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 233, 326, 416].

viii. John, head of a Frederick County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:510].

 

MANNING FAMILY

1.    George Manning, born say 1740, was a "Mullatto" taxable in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, in 1769 [N.C. State Archives SS 837]. He may have been the father of

i. Keziah, born say 1760, married George Perkins, 5 April 1780 Bladen County marriage bond, John Cade bondsman.

ii. Ann, born say 1761, a "Mulatto" taxable in Bertie County, North Carolina, in Abraham Taylor's household in 1775 [C.R. 10.702.1].

iii. John, born say 1775, head of a Sumter District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:218a].

 

Mecklenburg County, Virginia

Mixed-race members of the Manning family living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, before 1800 were probably related to Samuel Manning. On 18 September 1766 the churchwardens of St. James Parish, Mecklenburg County, bound Nancy Chavis, daughter of Findwell Chavis, to him. And on 13 September 1768 Samuel's wife testified on behalf of Susannah Chavis when the churchwardens sued her for debt [Orders 1765-8, 212; 1768-71, 38, 54]. Members of the family in Mecklenburg County were

i. Polley, married John Ginnet Stewart, 9 December 1794 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Earbe Chavous (Chavis) security, with a note from Polly's mother Susanna Chavous.

ii. Benjamin, married Fanny Guy, 5 May 1796 Mecklenburg County bond.

 

MANUEL/ EMANUEL FAMILY

1.    Nicholas1 Manuel, born say 1680, and his wife Bungey were freed by the 28 October 1718 will of Edward Myhill of Elizabeth City County, Virginia. Other members of his family did not fare as well:

For serving well and faithfully for many years past, two negro slaves Nicholas Manuell and Bungey his wife are to be freed immediately. ... slaves Hanah Manuell, David, William, George, Nicholas the younger, and Elizabeth Manuell are devised to Elizabeth Myhill for life & then divided among children [Deeds, Wills 1715-21, 194-5].

They were probably the parents of

2        i. Ephraim, born about 1725.

 

2.    Ephraim Emanuel, born about 1725, was listed in the muster roll of Captain Elisha Williams' Edgecombe County Militia in the 1750's [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 675]. He may have been the husband of Hannah Mannuel who was paid by the estate of James Harris of Halifax County, North Carolina, between 10 August 1774 and December 1776 [Gammon, Record of Estates II:26]. He was taxable on 500 acres and one poll in Sampson County in 1784 [L.P. 64.1 by N.C. Genealogy XIV:2174]. The Sampson County court recommended that he be exempt from paying tax on 20 September 1785 [Minutes 1784-1800]. He made a deed of gift to his son Jesse of 300 acres on the west side of Coharie Swamp in Sampson County on 15 September 1789 and sold land to Levy Manuel in the same area of Sampson County on 1 April 1795 [DB 8:414; 9:485]. Ephraim was head of a Sampson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:51]. His children were

4        i. ?Christopher, born about 1752.

ii. ?John1, born say 1755, purchased 100 acres on the upper side of Edge's Branch on the great swamp in Sampson County on 15 September 1773 [DB 6:199]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:51]. He purchased 230 acres on the west side of the Coharie Swamp on 20 November 1794 and sold this land a few years later on 6 March 1797 [DB 10:52, 375]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:517] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:310]. In 1810 he was counted as white: over forty-five years old, head of a family of 12 persons [NC:472].

5        iii. ?Nicholas2, born say 1757.

iv. Jesse1, born about 1760, received his final settlement certificate as a twelve months soldier in the Revolution on 25 December 1787 [NCGSJ XIII:93]. His father gave him 300 acres on the west side of Coharie Swamp in Sampson County by deed of gift on 15 September 1789. He sold this land on 1 May 1792 [DB 8:404; 9:126]. He provided bail for John Walden's appearance in Sampson County court on 15 August 1786 [Minutes 1784-1800, 42]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:51], and he was over forty-five years of age with 6 persons counted as white in 1810 [NC:474]. He was about sixty years old on 6 October 1820 when he made a declaration in Sampson County court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension. He enlisted in Bladen County in April 1782 and served in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment. In 1820 his family consisted of his sixty-two-year-old wife and his nine-year-old granddaughter. He was in Wake County on November 1821 when he made and amendment to his declaration, stating that he had been a resident of Wake for seven years and that he had resided in the city of Raleigh for about three years out of the seven. Henry and Moses Carter testified for him. Henry stated that he had been acquainted with him since they were boys, that they were near-neighbors in Duplin County, that they met while both were in the service, and that he could not be mistaken about Jesse because he was such a remarkably tall man [M804-1627].

v. ?Levy, born say 1762, taxable on 125 acres in Sampson County in 1784 [L.P. 64.1 by N.C. Genealogy XIV:2171]. He purchased 100 acres on the west side of Coharie Swamp from (his father?) Ephraim Manuel on 1 April 1795, purchased a further 205 acres in the same area of Coharie Swamp on 22 February 1796, and purchased 150 acres on the east side of the swamp on 15 October 1798 [DB 9:485; 10:110; 11:38]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:53], counted as white in 1810 [NC:486].

 

3.    Jesse2 Manuel, born say 1775, was head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:575]. He may have been the husband of Elizabeth Manual who was discharged by the 6 June 1838 Cumberland County court as an insolvent. He was probably the father of

i. Isaac, born say 1800, "a free man of colour," ordered by the 9 December 1841 Cumberland County court to show cause why his children should not be bound out.

ii. John2, born say 1795, head of a Cumberland County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:167].

iii. Jacob, head of a Cumberland County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:178].

 

4.    Christopher Manuel, born about 1752, was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 6 males 21-60 years old, 1 male less than 20 or more than 60, and 3 females in the 1786 state census, head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:75], 11 in Sampson County in 1800 [NC:517] and 6 "free colored" in Sampson County in 1820 [NC:308]. He was about eighty years old on 19 November 1832 when he made a declaration in Sampson County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was born in Halifax County, North Carolina, and moved to the part of Duplin County which became Sampson County before the war [M804-1627]. He may have been the father of

i. Lemuel, born before 1776, head of a Sampson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:290].

ii. Michael, born 1776-1794, head of a Sampson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:292].

 

5.    Nicholas2 Manuel, born say 1757, was taxable on 150 acres and one poll in Sampson County in 1784 [L.P. 64.1 by N.C. Genealogy XIV:2174] and purchased 20 acres on the east side of the Coharie Swamp on 5 March 1792 [DB 9:126]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:51], 9 in 1800, was counted as white in 1810 [NC:472], and was a "sleymaker," head of a Sampson County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820. His widow Milly Manuel was about eighty-eight years old on 11 November 1845 when she made a declaration in Sampson County court to obtain a widow's pension for her husband's services in the Revolution. She stated that they were married by Fleet Cooper, Esq., in Duplin County and that her son Shadrack Manuel was born the day (Corn)Wallis was captured. Her husband died on 27 March 1835. Milly died before 30 March 1855 when Shadrack, heir at law of Nicholas Manuel, appointed attorneys to receive his survivor's pension [M804-1627]. Their son was

i. Shadrack, born say 1780, head of a Sampson County household of 8 "white" persons in 1810 [NC:476] and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:298].

 

A member of the Emanuel family in Virginia was

i. Ritter, a "poor Mulatto Girl" living in Surry County on 22 February 1774 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southwarke Parish to bind her out [Orders 1764-74, 421].

 

MARSHALL FAMILY

1.    Thomas Marshall, born say 1723, was fined by the Charles City County court on 6 September 1758 for failing to list his wife as a tithable. He may have been identical to Thomas Marshall, a white planter, who married Anne Perle, a "Mulatto" woman, in Prince George's County, Maryland, before 23 August 1743 when the court ordered that he be sold for seven years. He was ordered to be released from prison so the case could be tried at the Provincial Court [Court Record 1743-4, 17]. He was living in Halifax County, North Carolina, on 1 December 1762 when his deed of bargain and sale was proved in Charles City County [Orders 1758-62, 57, 496]. He purchased 17-1/2 acres in Halifax County on 11 June 1760, 100 acres on 25 September 1760, was granted 640 acres there on 10 December 1760, and purchased 100 acres on Cain Quarter Creek on 18 January 1764. On 10 February 1769 he gave his daughter Martha King 640 acres which had been a Granville grant to him and gave her 100 acres on Cain Quarter Creek, reserving 10 acres for his lifetime. He was married to Winnifred Marshall on 7 May 1774 when he and his wife sold tracts of 17-1/2 acres, 100 acres joining John Marshall, and an 8 acre tract [DB 7:163, 164, 219; 8:369; 10:524; 13:1]. Administration on his Halifax County estate was granted to Willifred Marshall in November 1784. The same November 1784 court called him a "very improper person" when it bound his apprentice Abner Booth, base born child of Sarah Boothe, to someone else [Gammon, Record of Estates, Halifax County, 45 (no.571), 50 (no.652)]. His will was recorded in Will Book 2, page 31, but that page is missing from the microfilm copy of the deed book. His daughter was

i. Martha, married William King. William left a Halifax County will by which he left 100 acres to his son Thomas Marshall King and left 440 acres to his father-in-law Thomas Marshall. They may have been the ancestors of William King who was born before 1776 and head of a Halifax County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

 

MARTIN FAMILY

1.    Hanna Martyn, born say 1703, was the servant of Martha Rust on 20 August 1721 when she confessed to the Westmoreland County, Virginia court that her child was "begott by a Negro" [Orders 1721-31, 7]. She may have been the ancestor of

2        i. Robert1, born say 1721.

3        ii. Ann1, born say 1734.

iii. Mary, born say 1740, married Francis Cousins, "Mulattoes both of Maniken Town" (Goochland County) on 15 December 1759 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347].

4        iv. Absalom1, born about 1745.

5        v. Edmund, born say 1760.

vi. Ann2, a "poor" child bound out by the Chesterfield County court on in November 1766 [Orders 1759-67, 791].

6        vii. Jane, born about 1779.

 

2.    Robert1 Martin, born say 1721, was living in Chesterfield County on 1 December 1758 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out his "poor" children John, Beck and Judah. On 4 May 1759 the grand jury presented him for failing to list his tithables [Orders 1754-9, 477, 520]. He was the father of

7        i. Rebecca, born say 1738.

8        ii. John1, born say 1740.

9        iii. Judith, born say 1750.

 

3.    Ann Martin, born say 1734, "a free Molota Woman," complained to the Onslow County, North Carolina court on 13 September 1763 that John Humphrey was illegally keeping her two children. The court ordered the children returned to her because the indentures were obtained by deceit. In March 1764 she bound her son Robert to William Williams, Jr., and her son Daniel to Elizabeth Brack [Minutes 1749-65, 63a, 66a]. Her children were

10      i. Robert2, born about 1753.

ii. Daniel, born about 1755, nine years old when he was ordered bound apprentice to Elizabeth Brack by the Onslow County court. He was head of a Wilmington, New Hanover County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:206].

11 iii. ?Jesse, born about 1756.

 

4.    Absalom1 Martin, born about 1745, enlisted in the town of Beaufort, North Carolina, for twelve months in Captain William Dennis' Company in the 1st North Carolina Regiment in April 1781. He made a declaration in Carteret County court to obtain a pension on 22 August 1820, declaring that he was married to Rachel, also born about 1745, and had three grandchildren living with him: William, born 1807; Jacob, born 1808; and David, born 1811. He owned 140 acres of "barren pine land." He died eight years later on 20 September 1828 [M805, reel 0555, frame 20]. He was head of a Carteret County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:128], 12 in 1800, 16 in 1810 [NC:443], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:121]. His children were most likely:

i. Tamer, head of a Carteret County household of 4 "other free" in 1800.

ii. Samuel2, born before 1776, married Keziah Black, Carteret County bond 4 June 1819, head of a Carteret County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:121], mentioned in the 16 September 1821 Carteret County will of his father-in-law, Martin Black [D:57].

iii. Absalom2, born 1776-1794, head of a Carteret County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:115].

 

5.    Edmund Martin, born say 1760, was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1804 to 1815: a "Mulatto" farmer living near William George's in 1804, living on William Richardson's land in 1809 and 1810 when he was charged with Samuel Martin's tithe, charged with Samuel and Jacob Martin's tithes and 2 horses in 1811 and 1812; listed with his wife Polly, Jacob and Bartlet Martin in 1813, over the age of forty-five in 1815 when he was charged with Jacob and Bartlet Martin's tithes [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 692, 746, 786, 829, 872; 1810-32, frames 12, 79, 169, 201, 266]. He may have been the father of

i. Samuel3, born about 1786, registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 16 February 1807: about five feet five inches and one quarter high, about twenty one years of age, yellow complexion...with straight Black hair [Register of Free Negroes, p.14, no.32]. He married Nancy Isaacs, 7 March 1808 Goochland County bond, Francis Cousins surety, 10 March marriage by Rev. Chaudoin [Minister's Returns, 100], and was head of a Goochland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810. He was a "Mulatto" planter on Maria Woodson's land from 1809 to 1814, listed with wife Nancy in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frame 871; 1810-32, frames 12, 77, 103, 168, 200].

ii. Jacob2, born say 1794, his tax charged to Edmund Martin in 1811.

iii. Bartlet, born say 1796, his tax charged to Edmund Martin in 1813.

 

6.    Jane Martin, born about 1779, was counted in "A List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes in the District of John Holloway, Commissioner, in Botetourt County for the Year 1802" with daughter Betsy and son Jefferson and listed with them again in 1803 [Orders 1800-04, Loose Papers, no. 38, 45-7]. She registered as a free Negro in Botetourt County on 30 September 1829: 50 years of age; Dark Mulatto...Born free as per Certificate of Clerk of Halifax. Jenny was the mother of

i. Betsy, listed with her mother in 1802 and 1803.

ii. Jefferson, listed with his mother in 1802 and 1803.

iii. Judy, born about 1808, registered in Botetourt County in January 1829: daughter of Jane; 21 years of age; Mulatto; Born free.

iv. Meshack, born about 1805, registered in Botetourt County in January 1829: son of Jane; 24 years of age; Mulatto; Born free.

v. Harriet, born about 1810, registered in Botetourt County in January 1829: daughter of Jane; 19 years of age; Mulatto; Born free.

vi. ?Mary Jane, born about 1811, registered in Botetourt County in September 1828: 17 years of age; Mulatto...Born free [Free Negroes &c Registered in the Clerk's Office of Botetourt County, nos. 48, 55-8, 96].

 

7.    Rebecca Martin, born say 1738, was the apprentice of Edmund Logwood on 7 August 1761 when the Chesterfield County court ruled that she was free and due her freedom dues [Orders 1759-67, 173]. She died before 18 February 1779 when her daughter Rachel Martin brought suit in Powhatan County court against Paul Michaux of Cumberland County and Peter Stover of Henrico County claiming they were illegally holding her in servitude. The case was dismissed on 15 July 1779 [Order 1777-8, 78, 88, 100]. Rebecca was the mother of

i. Rachel, born say 1758,

ii. ?William1, born about 1765, no race indicated on 7 August 1772 when the Chesterfield County court ordered the churchwardens of Manchester Parish to bind him out [Orders 1771-4, 131]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 September 1805: forty years old, dark Mulatto, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 12]. He was a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1788 to 1796 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 23, 35, 94, 108, 120, 134], a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1799 to 1810 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 393, 470, 543, 717, 753, 799] and head of a Chesterfield County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062]. He may have been the William Martin, a "yellow" complexioned man, who was born in Cumberland County and was living in Pittsylvania County when he was listed as a soldier who enlisted in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 151].

iii. ?Samuel1, born before 1766, a "Mulatto" taxable in Goochland County in 1776 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frame 360], a "Mulatto" taxable on a tithe, a horse, and 3 cattle in 1787 and 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 154, 180], perhaps the Samuel Martin who was a "Free Negro" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, from 1803 to 1812 [PPTL, 1800-13, frames 145, 186, 255, 326, 369, 505].

iv. ?Jacob1, born say 1768, a "Mulatto" taxable in the upper district of Goochland County in 1798, a carpenter living on William George's land from 1805 to 1807, living on George Holman's land from 1809 to 1812, living with wife Fanny on William Gammon's land in 1813, over the age of forty-five in 1815 when he was charged with William and John Martin's tithes [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 484, 746, 786, 832, 871; 1810-32, frames 13, 77, 104, 202, 265], head of a Goochland County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:705].

 

8.    John1 Martin, born say 1740, was the apprentice of George Hancock on 7 August 1761 when the Chesterfield County court ruled that he was free and should be paid his freedom dues [Orders 1759-67, 173]. He was head of a New Hanover County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194] and 11 in 1800 [NC:310]. He gave power of attorney to Thomas Nuse to receive his final settlement for service in the Continental Line on 9 September 1791. John Williams, a justice of the peace for New Hanover County, attested that he served in 1782 [NCGSJ XIII:94]. He may have been the John Martin who married Mary Dove, 28 December 1802 Craven County bond. Perhaps his child was

i. Hetty, head of a New Hanover County household of 5 "other free" in 1820 [NC:224].

 

9.    Judith Martin, born say 1750, was living in Cumberland County, Virginia, on 22 August 1774 when her "mulattoe" daughter Rhoda Martin was bound to James Cannifax [Orders 1774-8, 276]. She married Zachariah Goff in St. James Northam Parish on 14 October 1775 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 22]. She or another Judith Martin had married a member of the Fox family by 22 September 1794 when her daughter Rhoda married in Goochland County. (Zachariah Goff was married to Elizabeth Goff in June 1811). Judith was the mother of

i. Rhoda, born say 1773, "orphan" of Judith Martin ordered bound to James Canifax by the Cumberland County court on 22 August 1774, a "mulattoe" orphan (no parent named) bound to James Cannifax on 26 March 1777 [Orders 1774-8, 276, 402]. She was called the "of age daughter of Judith Fox" when she married Edward Fuzmore, 22 September 1794 Goochland County bond, Thomas T. Bates surety.

ii. John2, born say 1780, son of Judith Martin, bound by the Powhatan County court on 20 January 1791 to John Melony to be a blacksmith on condition he not be removed from the state. The court bound him to Henry Moss to be a bricklayer on 20 December 1792, but Moss refused to take him and he was bound instead to Noah Prince on 17 January 1793 [Orders 1786-91, 629; 1791-4, 199, 211]. He was taxable in Powhatan County household of Noah Prince in 1798 [PPTL 1787-1825, frame 169] and was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1801 to 1810 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 470, 753, 799] and head of a Chesterfield County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

iii. ?Nancy, born say 1788, married William Banks, 16 February 1808 Goochland County bond, John Martin surety.

iv. ?William2, born say 1789, taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1806 to 1814: listed with Edward Fuzmore in 1806 and 1807, a "Mulatto Waterman" listed with wife Judith on Thomas Miller's land in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 780, 823; 1810-32, frames 79, 103, 167, 202]. He was called a "Man of color" when he married Judith Jenkins, 1 January 1811 Goochland County bond, James Shelton surety, 2 January marriage.

 

10.    Robert2 Martin, born about 1753, was eleven years old when the Onslow County court bound him as an apprentice to William Williams, Jr. He was head of a New Hanover County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:194], 6 "other free" and 2 slaves in Bladen County in 1800, and he may have been the R. Martin who was head of a Brunswick County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:228]. His children were probably those who were counted as "other free" in Bladen County in 1810:

i. Sarah, born before 1776, head of a Bladen County household of 4 "other free" in 1800, 3 in 1810 [NC:218], and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:152].

ii. Henry, head of a Bladen County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:218] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:152].

iii. Ally, head of a Bladen County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:205].

 

11.    Jesse Martin, born about 1756, enlisted for nine months in 1780 in Captain Arthur Gatling's regiment of the North Carolina Line commanded by Colonel Armstrong. He was discharged in Stono, South Carolina, in 1781. He was an infirm farmer with no family except his wife Sarah, born about 1765, when he made a declaration to obtain a pension in Gates County court on 15 August 1825 [M805, reel 883, frame 836]. He was head of a Gates County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:23], 9 in 1800 [NC:273], 7 in 1810 [NC:842], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:162]. His son may have been

i. James, head of a Gates County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:842] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:162].

 

Other members of the Martin family were

i. Susannah, born about 1764, registered in Petersburg on 23 August 1794: a light Mulatto woman, five feet two and a half inches high, 30 years old, born free & raised in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 82].

ii. Molly, a free-born, brown complexioned woman who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 May 1812, no age mentioned [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 165].

iii. Isham, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 September 1806: twenty three years old, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 32], perhaps identical to Isham Martin who was a "Mulatto" taxable in Pittsylvania County from 1799 to 1815: taxable on 3 male and 2 female "Mulattoes" over the age of sixteen in 1813 [PPTL 1797-1812, frames 121, 230, 264, 381, 406, 477, 503, 600, 665, 809; 1813-23, frames 14, 90, 119].

iv. Zachariah, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 September 1806: twenty one years old, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 33]. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:332].

v. Lucky, head of a Petersburg Town household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:126b].

vi. Lucy, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 23 December 1808: a very light colourd Mulatto woman, five feet seven inches high, twenty one years old, born free in the County of Dinwiddie. Jas. Day made oath to her being reputed free [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 431]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:123b].

vii. Peggy, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:122a].

 

Another member of the Martin family was:

i. John, "free person of color" who married Sally Gowens on 3 October 1819 in St. Philips Parish, South Carolina.

 

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