MOORE FAMILY

1.    Abraham1 Moore, born say 1665, was one of the "Negroes" taxable in Robert Caufield's Lawnes Creek Parish, Surry County, Virginia household from 1683 to 1685. He was called "Abraham a free Negro" in 1686 when he was taxable in Thomas Patridge's household in Lawnes Creek Parish, Surry County, Virginia, with an unnamed "Negro" woman. She was probably "Joy a Negro Woman" who was taxable in Patridge's household in 1685 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.23, no.1, 38, 43, 50; no. 2, p.58]. Thomas Patridge was the agent for Robert Caufield and Major Allen who purchased goods and a slave on the Island of Barbados in February 1685/6 [Haun, Surry County Court Records, IV:623-5]. Abraham was called Abraham Moore in 1687 when he was a "Negro" tithable with Joy in Patridge's household, called "Abraham ye Negro at Mr. Allens quarter" in 1689, tithable at Major Allen's quarter in 1691: "Abraham Moor, Joy a Negroe - 2," and head of his own household with "Negro Joy" adjacent to Major Allen's tithables from 1693 to 1695. In 1694 Joy was identified as his wife [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol. 23, no. 2, p. 65; no. 3, 58, 66; no. 4, 65, 72; vol. 24, no.1, p.70]. On 5 July 1692 the Surry County court ruled that he owed a debt of seven barrels of corn to William Edwards, assignee of William Miles. On 3 January 1692/3 James Dykes sued him for slander, but the court ruled in Abraham's favor. And in November court 1694 he was listed among four residents of Surry County who were paid 200 pounds of tobacco for a wolf's head [Haun, Surry County Court Records, V:40, 44, 59, 119]. He may have been the Abraham Moore who sold 100 acres in Beaufort County, North Carolina, on the head of the west branch of Town Creek on 16 February 1716/7. This was part of 320 acres he had purchased from Samuel Oxdale [DB 1:241]. He may have been the father of

2        i. Keziah, born say 1710.

 

2.    Keziah Moore, born say 1710, was a "free Negro" taxable, head of a household of herself and two unnamed daughters in the 1755 Beaufort County tax list [SS 837]. In March 1756 she was sued for debt by Robert Peyton in Beaufort County court, but the jury found in her favor in March court 1757 [Minutes 1756-61, 1:2d (March 1756 Appearance Docket no.19); 1:24b (March 1757 Appearance Docket no.5)]. She purchased 30 acres in Beaufort County at a Cypress Landing near John Lesley's on 8 February 1757 [DB 3:299]. The June 1758 Session of the Beaufort County court ordered that:

a free Negroe Woman named Rachel Blango, another named Sarah Blango the younger, another named Dinah Blango and a Man named Gabe and another Negroe Woman named Bett Moore, another Mary Moore, and Keziah Moore be Summoned to appear at next court to produce a Master for their Children in order they may be bound out as the law directs [Minutes 1756-61, 1:46d].

She was a Beaufort County taxable in 1764, head of a household with John, James, and Penelopy Moore [SS 837]. She sold her Beaufort County land on 28 September 1768 [DB 4:239] and was a Craven County taxable in 1769, head of a household of 2 "Black" females. Administration on her estate was granted to Robert Mitchell on 200 pounds security on 13 June 1775 in Craven County court [Minutes 1772-84, 63]. Her children may have been

i. Abraham2, born say 1730, a "free negro" taxed by himself in 1755 in Beaufort County. He and (his brother?) Simon were called "free Negroes" when they purchased 300 acres on the south side of Terts Swamp and Durham's Creek in Beaufort County on 28 March 1758 [DB 3:383]. He was taxable in Craven County in 1769, head of a household of 1 "Black" male and 1 "Black" female and head of a Craven County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. He may have been the Abraham Moore who married Betsy Carter 21 November 1799 Craven County bond, John C. Stanly bondsman.

3        ii. Simon1, born say 1733, died 1819.

4        iii. James1, born say 1735.

5        iv. Mary, born say 1737.

v. William, born say 1738, nearly twenty-one years old in 1758. He was called "a free Negroe" in June 1758 Beaufort County court when he moved by his attorney, Malloy Chauncy, that he could prove that he was twenty-one years old and should be free from his indenture to Thomas Crimpen. The court denied his request after checking the record [Minutes 1758-61, 1:46c].

vi. Susan, born say 1739, a "free Negro" taxable with Mary Moore in Beaufort County in 1755. She was head of a Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134].

6        vii. Rachel, born say 1740.

7        viii. John1, born say 1742.

ix. Kuffie (free Negro), born say 1750, a "Black" taxable in his own household in 1769.

x. Penelopy1, born before 1753, taxable in 1764 in Keziah's Beaufort County household.

 

3.    Simon1/ Simeon Moore, born say 1733, was living in Beaufort County when he and (his brother?) Abram, called "free Negroes," purchased 300 acres on the south side of Terts Swamp and Durham's Creek on 28 March 1758 [DB 3:383]. He was called "Simon Moore, a free Neg.," in March 1759 court, when Michael Coutanche had a case against him and Will Peyton for which Coutanche failed to appear [Minutes 1756-61, 2:12c (March 1759 Reference Docket no.31)]. Simon was head of a Craven County household of 1 "Black" male and 2 "Black" females in 1769 and head of a Craven County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. His 10 October 1819 Craven County will, proved in December 1819, mentioned his wife (unnamed) and children [WB C:189]. His children mentioned in the will were

i. Simon2/ Simeon, born say 1762. On 13 September 1782 he and Benajah Bogey were charged in Craven County court with having joined the British. They were released when they consented to join the Continental Army [Minutes 1779-84, 47b]. He married Mary Davis ("widow"), 27 January 1790 Craven County bond, John Moore bondsman. Simon was head of a Jones County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:270].

ii. Hardy, born 1776-1794, head of a Lenoir County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:295] and 10 in Jones County in 1830 [NC:132].

iii. Selah, perhaps the Sealy Moore whose fourteen-year-old daughter, Susanna Moore, was bound apprentice to Alexander Reddit by the June 1814 Beaufort County court [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.].

iv. Abner.

v. Polly.

 

4.    James1 Moore, born say 1735, was called "James Moor free negroe" when he was sued by John Barker and Ed Satter in Beaufort County court in March 1756. He lost the case by default when he "made his escape." He was probably the James Moor who was sued by Coleman Roe in the same court. The September 1757 court ruled that a deposition be taken from him in a case against Thomas Blango, Jr., and Sarah Blango [Minutes 1756-61, 1:3a (Reference Docket no.28), 1:13b (Appearance docket no.22), docket no.47; 1:34c (Dockets no.8 & 9)]. He was taxable in 1764 in Keziah Moore's Beaufort County household, and was a taxable head of his own Craven County household of one "Black" male in 1769 [SS 837]. His 21 May 1793 Bladen County will named Abraham Freeman and Abigail Chavis as executors [Campbell, Abstracts of Wills, Bladen County, 54]. He named his daughters

i. Eardice.

ii. Lydia, born before 1776, head of Columbus County household of two "free colored" in 1820 [NC:50].

iii. Hannah.

 

5.    Mary Moore, born say 1737, was a "free Negro" taxable with Susan Moore in Beaufort County in 1755. The June 1758 Session of the Beaufort County court ordered that she be summoned to appear in the next court with a master for her children to be bound to. She may have been the Mary Moore who was a plaintiff in a Craven court case in August 1759 and January 1761 [Minutes 1756-61, 1:46c, 37b; 1761-2, 92b]. Her children may have been

i. Lemuel, born 1757, a fourteen-year-old "Free Negroe Boy" ordered bound apprentice to John Davis to be a house carpenter by the Craven County court on 14 December 1771 [Minutes 1767-75, 189b], perhaps the Lamuel Moore who was in Pitt County on 27 July 1791 when he gave John Moye, Esq., his power of attorney to receive his pay for twelve months service in the Continental Line under Captain Anthony Sharpe [NCGSJ XIII:237].

ii. Joseph, born about 1758, "a free born Negroe Boy Aged Sixteen Years," bound an apprentice house carpenter to Nathaniel Scarbrough by the 17 June 1774 Craven County court [Minutes 1772-84, 18d].

iii. James2, born say 1764, was probably twenty-one years old on 17 March 1785 when he and James York successfully petitioned the Craven County court to release them from their service to James Ellis. The following day General Caswell made an appeal on Ellis' behalf, but the court refused to grant it [Minutes 1784-86, 11c, 12c].

 

6.    Rachel Moore, born say 1740, was probably the Rachel who was taxed in Beaufort County in 1764: "John and Rachel F.N., 2 black tithes" [SS 837]. She apparently married a former slave named Punch (John Punch?) as this would explain the June 1786 Beaufort County court Docket no.41 which records the case of Richard Cogdell against "Old Punch and Rachel Moor." He may have been the Williams Punch (Williams' Punch, the former slave of the Williams family?) who was taxable on an assessment of 230 pounds in Beaufort County in 1779 [NCGSJ XV:143 (LP.30.1)]. This may have been an assessment on the 213 acres on Blounts Creek which was patented by Rachel Moore according to a Moore family Beaufort County deed of 7 January 1811 [DB 9:14]. Rachel Moore was head of a Beaufort County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:15]. Rachel and Punch may have been the parents of

8        i. Lucy, born say 1758.

9        ii. John Punch Moore, born say 1760.

iii. Giles1, born before 1776, head of a Beaufort County household of 6 "other free" as Giles Punch in 1800 [NC:15], 6 in 1810 (as Giles Moore) [NC:118], and head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "free colored" as Giles Moore in 1820 [NC:27].

 

7.   John1 Moore, born say 1742, was called "John Moor a free negroe boy" when he was bound apprentice to Robert Palmer, Esq., in Beaufort County court on December 1757 on the motion of Coleman Roe [Minutes 1756-61, 1:37b]. He was taxable in 1764 in Keziah Moore's Beaufort County household [SS 837]. He was called "John Moore free Negro" when he was acquitted of an unspecified charge in the January 1762 Craven County court [Minutes 1761-2, 64a]. And he was called "John Moore A free Negroe" when he purchased 100 acres in Craven County by deed proved in April 1763 [Minutes 1762-66, 13d]. He was called a cooper in this deed which was for 100 acres on Batchelor's Creek [DB 11:59]. He was a taxable head of a Craven County household of a "Black" male and a "Black" female in 1769 and head of a Craven County household of 12 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. On 22 November 1792 he petitioned the General Assembly for permission to liberate his children who were "illegitimate being born of a negro woman slave belonging to himself" because he had worked for fifty years to acquire a small amount of property and wished to pass it on to his children [Schweninger, Race, Slavery and Free Black Petitions, no. 11279207]. He named his children in his 1816 Craven County will and left his grandsons, children of his son John Moore, 150 acres with their father having a life right in their part [WB C:120]. His children named in the will were

10       i. John3, born say 1769.

ii. Edward.

iii. Sarah, born say 1775, wife of James Morgan, head of a Craven County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:59].

iv. June, born say 1778, wife of William Dove, head of a Craven County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:65].

v. Simon3.

 

8.    Lucy Moore, born say 1758, alias Lucy Punch, was head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" (as Lucy Punch) in 1800 [NC:15], 3 in 1810 (as Lucy Moore) [NC:113], and one "free colored" in 1820 (as Lucy Moore) [NC:28]. Her children were identified in the 23 August 1823 will of her son Willowby who named his mother "Lewsea" and siblings: William, John, Giles, and Peggy [Beaufort County Genealogical Society, Will Abstracts, 225]. Lucy's children were

i. William, born before 1776, head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:13], 5 in 1810 [NC:113], and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:27]. His land on the south side of Round Pole Branch was mentioned in the 17 May 1803 Beaufort County will of Catherine Healy/ Ealey.

ii. Sarah, head of a Beaufort County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 (called Sally Moore) [NC:118].

iii. John4, born 1776-94, head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:114] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:27]. He was probably the John Moore who was married to Elsey Carter on 4 November 1821 when they sold Craven County land she inherited from her father George Carter [DB 43:82].

iv. Giles2, born 1776-94, head of a Beaufort County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:27].

11      v. Willowby, born 1776-94.

12      vi. Margaret/Peggy, born 1776-94.

 

9.    John Punch Moore, born say 1760, was head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 (called John P. Moore) [NC:126] and 9 in 1800 (called John Moore) [NC:9]. He may have been the John Moore who gave Thomas Armstrong his power of attorney to collect his pay due for nine months service as a soldier in the Continental Line in Beaufort County on 5 June 1792 [NCGSJ XIII:236]. Property called "the John P. Moore Land and Plantation" was mentioned in Alexander Redditt's will proved in June Term 1814 Beaufort County court [Camin, Beaufort Orphans Book A, 81]. John's widow was most likely Mary Punch Moore who was granted administration on his Beaufort County estate in the September 1809 session of Beaufort County court on a bond of 150 pounds. She exhibited the account of sales in the March 1811 Session [Minutes 1809-14, first page of September 1809 Minutes; March 1811 Session, no page number]. She was called Mary Moore, head of a Beaufort County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NC:113]. One of their children may have been

i. Anthony, head of a Beaufort County household of 6 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [NC:114] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:27].

 

10.    John3 Moore, born say 1769, was head of Craven County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134]. His children mentioned in his father's 1816 Craven County will [WB C:120] were

i. Amos.

ii. Abraham3.

iii. Nathan.

 

11.    Willowby Moore, born 1776-94, purchased 183 acres on Nevil's Creek in Beaufort County from John Gray Blount of the town of Washington on 1 July 1801 and purchased 71 acres from Sarah and Giles Moore on 7 January 1811 (their 2/6 share of 213 acres) [DB 2-3:127; 9:14]. He was head of a Beaufort County household of 3 "other free" and 1 slave in 1810 [NC:114] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:27]. His 23 August 1823 Beaufort County will was proved in February 1824 by Lodowick Redditt, a witness to the will. Willowby mentioned his sister Peggy Moore; brothers John, William and Giles Moore; mother Lucy Moore; gave his wife Amy Moore 50 acres; and left the remainder of his land to his daughter Mary Ann Keis [Beaufort County Genealogical Society, Will Abstracts, 225]. His daughter was

i. Mary Ann Keis, head of a Beaufort County household of 4 "other free" in 1820 [NC:23].

 

12.    Margaret/Peggy Moore, born 1776-94, was head of a Beaufort County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NC:113] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:27]. Her children were

i. Patience, born about 1806, the eight-year-old daughter of Margaret Moore bound apprentice to Alexander Reddit by the June 1814 Beaufort County court [Minutes 1809-14, n.p.].

 

Wives and Children of Unnamed Members of the Moore Family

13.    Betty Sutton, born say 1720, was a "free negro" tithable in 1755 and head of her own Beaufort County household [SS 837]. She may have been the Bett Moore who was ordered by the June 1758 Beaufort County court to produce a master for her children [Minutes 1756-61, 1:46d]. She may have had a child by a member of the Moore family since a young woman called "Betty Moore Als Sutton" appeared in Craven County court on 10 April 1762 [Minutes 1761-62, 80b]. Her daughter was most likely

14       i. Betty Moore, born about 1738.

 

14.    Betty Moore, alias Sutton, born about 1738, was called "Betty a Negro Servant to Peter Conway" when she was ordered by the 10 October 1761 Craven County court to serve Conway another year because she had a child during her indenture. And she was called "Betty Moore Als Sutton" when her son Jack was bound out on 10 April 1762, and called "Betty Moore, a Negro Wench" on 9 April 1763 when she was ordered to serve an additional year of her indenture to Peter Conway because she had a child Molly during her indenture [Minutes 1761-62, 53a, 80b; 1762-66, 14d]. Betty's children were

i. John2/ Jack Moore, born about July 1761, nine-month-old "Base free Born Negro Son to Betty Moore Als Sutton," ordered bound to Peter Conway on 10 April 1762 by the Craven County court [Minutes 1761-62, 80b]. He was called John Moore in Craven County court on 14 September 1777, a thirteen-year-old (no race indicated) bound as an apprentice blacksmith to James Saunders [Minutes 1772-78, 24a]. He was head of a Craven County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134].

ii. Molly Moore, born about February 1763, two months old on 9 April 1763 [Minutes 1762-66, 14d]. She was head of a Beaufort County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:113].

iii. ?Peter Sutton, head of a Beaufort County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:127].

iv. ?Fab Sutton, head of a Carteret County household of 7 "other free" in 1800.

v. ?Peggy Sutton, head of a Beaufort County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:115].

 

15.    Sarah Blango Moore, born about 1740, was taxable as Sarah Blango Jr., "free Negro," in Rachel Blango's 1755 Beaufort County household [SS 837]. The 9 October 1778 issue of the North Carolina Gazette of New Bern carried an order to the sheriff to search for her stolen children:

she was last night robbed of her own children, by three men in disguise, one a boy about six years old named Ambrose, the other a girl named Rose, of the same age, they being twins... [Fouts, NC Gazette of New Bern, I:80-1].

Her children were

i. Ambrose Moore, born about 1772, married Hannah Howard, 24 December 1803 Carteret County bond with Jacob Moore bondsman and second, Polly Carter, 29 December 1804 Craven County bond with Jacob Moore bondsman. He was head of a Craven County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67]. On 4 November 1821 he and his wife Polly sold land in Craven County which she inherited from her father George Carter [DB 43:82].

ii. Rose, born about 1772, perhaps the Rose Carter, born 1776-94, who was head of a Carteret County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:123].

iii. ?Abel, born before 1776, head of Craven County household of Craven County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67]. On 4 November 1821 he and his wife Elizabeth Carter sold land in Craven County which she inherited from her father George Carter [DB 43:82].

 

16.    Catherine Ealey, born say 1755, was head of a Beaufort County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 (called Catherine Healy) [NC:125], 3 in 1800 (called Katy Ely) [NC:7], and 3 in 1810 (called Cate Ele) [NC:113]. She (or her husband) was probably a descendant of John Eley who was presented by the 21 November 1758 Surry County, Virginia court for not listing his tithable "Mulatto" wife [Orders 1757-64, 135]. Her 17 May 1803 Beaufort County will (called Cathron Ealey) left 100 acres on the south side of Round Pole Branch adjoining William Moore to her daughter Philpiny (Penelopy) Moore, 100 acres to her daughter Betsy Moore, and named her grandchild Hardy Moore. Penelopy and Betsy were named as her executors [Camin, Beaufort Orphans Book A, 67]. Her children named in the will were

i. Mary, "eldest daughter."

ii. Penelopy2.

iii. Betsy, "youngest daughter," born before 1776, head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:28].

 

Other members of a Moore family were

i. Roger, a "Negro Transported Servt (but no slave)" to Richard Hudnall who admitted in Northumberland County court on 15 August 1716 that he had stolen goods from the house of Thomas Evans. He was given 39 lashes [Orders 1713-9, 171-2].

ii. Jane, married Jacob Jeffries, 5 October 1796 Orange County bond, Joshua Wittid bondsman.

iii. James, born before 1776, head of a Hawkins County, Tennessee household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Benjamin, born before 1776, head of a Montgomery County, Tennessee household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

v. Francis, born before 1776, head of a Shelby County, Tennessee household of 5 "free colored" in 1820.

vi. Charles, married Elizabeth Going, 29 August 1795 Henry County, Virginia bond. He was head of Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:486].

 

Endnotes:

1.    The Craven County court called Robert Mitchell "Free Negro" when it ordered that he be exempt from working on roads since he was "upwards of sixty years of age" [Minutes 1772-84, 63, 33c].

2.    See Franklin's The Free Negro in North Carolina for details of the life of John C. Stanly.

3.    Columbus County was formed from Bladen and Brunswick Counties in 1808.

4.    James York was head of a Craven County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131].

5.    The court case against "Old Punch and Rachel Moore was decided for the plaintiff for one penny in September 1786 court [Minutes 1785-86, June Reference Docket no.41; September Reference Docket no.20]. The 1744-45, 1756-61 and 1785-86 records are among the few surviving eighteenth century court minutes and dockets for Beaufort County. The name Punch suggests some connection between the free Moore family of Beaufort and the James family of Bertie County. David James of Bertie County was a defendant in a December 1757 Beaufort County court case (called "David James, free negro") which was settled in March 1758 [Minutes 1756-61, 1:39b, 43b (docket no.26)]. Andrew and Ann James of Bertie County had a son named Punch born about 1758 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:157].

6.    Coleman Roe was a witness to the 8 February 1757 Beaufort County deed to Keziah Moore for 30 acres [DB 3:299].

7.    Other members of the family were Amey Keaes (head of a Beaufort County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:114]), Clary Keaes (head of a Beaufort County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:114]), Silvy Keais (head of a Beaufort County household of 4 "other free" [NC:127]), William Keese, head of a St. Mary's County, Maryland household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

8.    Harden Moore was head of a Lenoir County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:295].

 

MORDICK FAMILY

1.    Benjamin1 Mordick, born say 1705, was a "Mullatto Boy" freed by the 26 January 1726 Hyde County will of Sarah White. She gave him her livestock and her plantation on the Machepunga River "till the leas is out if he think fitt" [SS Wills]. He may have been married to a white woman since the June 1755 Hyde County court ruled that only his male dependents were tithable, but the September 1755 court reversed this ruling and required him to pay tax on his female dependents as well. He purchased two brass skimmers and a pewter dish at the sale of the estate of James Batchelor on 13 and 14 March 1761 [Haun, Hyde County Court Minutes, I:207, 213; II:218]. The Hyde County court recommended to the State Legislature that he and Michael Mordick (both Mullatos) be exempt from payment of tax on 25 October 1769 [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, VIII:109]. He named his children in his 14 August 1776 will [RW 1/481]. He left his land to be divided amongst his sons Benjamin and John, gave a church bible to his daughter Lydia, and named daughters: Mariam, Ruth, Rachel, Bridget, and Michael. His children were

i. Levy, born say 1729, recorded his livestock mark in the June 1754 session of the Hyde County court. He purchased 200 acres from John Harvey by deed proved in March 1757 court, purchased a cow and calf at the sale of John Harvey's estate, and purchased 300 acres from Richard Harvey by deed proved in September 1760 Hyde County court [Haun, Hyde County Court Minutes, I:186; II:2, 41, 206]. He was not mentioned in his father's will because he predeceased him. His 21 April 1771 Hyde County will (which he wrote himself) was proved December Term the same year. He left 200 acres called "Strides(?) nack" and 100 acres on North Harbor to his brother Benjamin, a long list of items to his sister Bridget, and mentioned sisters Michel and Letitia, and John Mordick. His land on "Torkil nake" was to be sold to pay his debts and pay for schooling for his sister Bridget's children. His father and brother Benjamin were executors [RW 1/25].

ii. Lydia, born say 1731, recorded her livestock mark in the September 1754 Hyde County court [Haun, Hyde County Court Minutes, I:187].

iii. Bridget, born say 1732, recorded her livestock mark in the September 1754 Hyde County court. She received a long list of items by the 1771 will of her brother Levi. He also provided schooling for her unnamed children.

iv. Shadrack, born say 1734, recorded his livestock mark in the March 1755 Hyde County court [Haun, Hyde County Court Minutes, I:203]. He was not mentioned in Benjamin's will, so he probably predeceased him.

v. Benjamin2, received three hundred acres by the 1771 will of his brother Levy. His Hyde County estate was administered in 1778 [SS 945].

vi. Michel, a daughter.

vii. Letitia.

viii. Mariam.

ix. Ruth.

x. Rachel, perhaps the Rachel Morrick who was head of a Craven County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:69]. There was also a Vensiter Morrick, born before 1776, head of a Craven County household of one "free colored" woman in 1820 [NC:76].

xi. John.

 

MORGAN FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Morgan, born say 1685, was a white servant of Henry Ashton, Gent., on 25 July 1705 when the Westmoreland County, Virginia court convicted her of having a "mulatto" child [Orders 1698-1705, 268]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Anthony, born say 1705, living in Richmond County, Virginia, in May 1736 when his white servant, James Talent, complained that he was being misused by his master and that his master was a "Mulatto." The court ruled that Talent be immediately discharged from his service [Orders 10:394].

ii. Thomas1, born about 1731, a soldier from Suffolk, Virginia, in the French and Indian War who deserted from the Virginia Regiment in September 1757 and was described as: age 26, 5'7", mulatto [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:96].

 

Several members of the Morgan family, all born about 1740, perhaps brothers and sisters or cousins of Anthony or Thomas Morgan, were living in North Carolina between 1760 and 1770. They were

2        i. Cerra (Sarah?), born say 1737, mother of a "Mulatto" bound in Edgecombe County in 1763.

3        ii. John1, born say 1740, purchased land in Northampton County in April 1762.

4        iii. William1, born say 1741, purchased land in Edgecombe County in September 1762.

5        iv. Lucy, born say 1743, a "Mulatto" bound apprentice in Edgecombe County in 1758.

6        v. George, born circa 1745, a Craven County taxable in 1769.

 

2.    "Cerra" (Sarah?) Morgan, born say 1737, was living in Edgecombe County on 25 January 1763 when her daughter Mary, "a Mulatto girl," was bound out [Minutes 1759-64, 51]. Cerra was the mother of

i. Mary, a "Mulatto girl" ordered bound to John Fort by the 25 January 1763 session of the Edgecombe County court. She may have been the same Mary Morgan, born about 1753, sixteen-year-old "Mulatto," who was ordered bound to Samuel Henderson, Jr., in Granville County on 16 July 1769 [Owen, Granville County Notes].

7        ii. ?Elizabeth, born say 1755.

iii. ?Patience, born before 1776, head of a Franklin County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:826], 11 "free colored" in Halifax County in 1820 [NC:156], and 3 "free colored" in Halifax in 1830.

 

3.    John1 Morgan, born say 1740, purchased 200 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, on 6 April 1762. He and his wife Barbary sold 45 acres of this land near the county line (Greensville County, Virginia) to (their son?) John Morgan, Jr., in March 1785, proved by the oath of Mark Morgan. He and Barbary sold a further 66 acres adjoining this land on 3 August 1786. James Haithcock was witness to this deed [DB 3:245; 9:264; 10:297]. John Morgan, Sr., was head of a Northampton County household of one free male and 4 free females in Captain Williams' District for the state census of 1786, 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72], and 6 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [NC:736]. His 11 October 1820 Northampton County will, proved June 1821, left all his estate to his unnamed wife, to be divided equally between his children. William Fox was executor [WB 3:250]. His children mentioned in his will were

i. Joseph, born say 1760.

8        ii. John3, Jr., born say 1762.

iii. William2, born say 1764, cosigner of a Northampton County deed with John Morgan on 3 March 1792. He was head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72] and 6 in 1810 [NC:736].

iv. ?Mark, not mentioned in the will, head of a Halifax County household of 1 free male in district 2 in 1786 for the state census and 7 "other free" in Northampton County in 1790 [NC:72]. He received a deed of gift for 59 acres near the county line from John Morgan, Senior, on 3 March 1792. He may have been the Mark Morgan who married Elizabeth Good, 5 March 1793 Warren County bond, Daniel Mills bondsman. He and his wife Elizabeth sold their Northampton County land to William Fox, Junr., on 2 December 1796 [DB 9:263; 10:282].

v. Joshua.

9        vi. Matthew, born say 1770.

vii. Benjamin.

viii. Daniel.

ix. Archibles.

 

4.    William1 Morgan, born say 1741, purchased 100 acres on the south bank of White Oak Swamp at the mouth of Cabin Branch in Edgecombe County on 4 September 1762 and sold this land without a dower release on 19 April 1774. He purchased 107 acres adjoining this land on the south side of Fishing Creek on 3 May 1773, purchased another 240 acres on Long Branch on 23 November 1773, and purchased 140 acres in this same area from William Jackson on 12 October 1774. He and his wife Sarah sold 300 acres of their land to Jonas Shivers (Chavis?) on 22 November 1779 and 50 acres on 13 August 1783 [DB 1:602; 2, 72, 73, 87; 3:362, 501; 4:27]. His 10 November 1794 Edgecombe County will, proved February 1795, left all his land to his son William, and named his grandson David Morgan, and daughters Martha Price and Keddy Jenkins. William, David, and Isaac Morgan were buyers at the estate sale proved in August court 1796. His children were

i. William3, born say 1775, a "Mulatto" head of an Edgecombe County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:223] and 2 "free colored" males in 1820 [NC:126].

ii. Martha Price.

iii. Keddy (Kitty) Jenkins.

 

5.    Lucy Morgan, "a Mulatto girl" born say 1743, was ordered bound to William Lane by the 23 February 1758 session of the Edgecombe County court [Minutes 1757-59, 15]. Four years later the court ordered her and her son Jack bound to Robert Young [Minutes 1759-64, 27]. Her children were

i. John2/ Jack, born say 1760, ordered bound with his mother to Robert Young by the Edgecombe County court in September 1762. He may have been the John (Moore) Morgan who was head of an Orange County household of 4 "other free" and one white woman in 1800 [NC:589].

ii. ?Isaac, born about 1766, sixteen years old in 1782 when he was a "Mulatto" listed among the Drafts & Substitutes from Edgecombe County in the Revolutionary War [The North Carolinian VI:752]. He was a buyer at the sale of William1 Morgan's estate proved in August 1796 Edgecombe County court. He was counted as white in 1790, head of an Edgecombe County household of 3 males and 2 females [NC:57] and was a "Mulatto" head of an Edgecombe County household of 6 "other free" and one white woman in 1800 [NC:223].

 

6.    George1 Morgan, born circa 1745, was head of a Craven County household of 2 Black males and 2 Black females in 1769 [SS 837]. His children were probably those counted as "other free" in Craven County and the adjoining counties. They were

i. Elisha, head of a Jones County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:144]. Perhaps Rebecca Morgan was his widow. She was head of a Lenoir County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:17] and 5 "other free" in Jones County in 1810 [NC:270].

ii. James, head of a Craven County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:59]. His wife Sarah Moore was mentioned in the 1816 Craven County will of her father John Moore [WB C:120].

iii. Isham, head of a Lenoir County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:292].

iv. Jesse, head of a Lenoir County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:292] and 8 "free colored" in Craven County in 1820 [NC:62].

 

7.    Elizabeth Morgan, born say 1755, was living in Edgecombe County in 1774 when the October session of the County court ordered her "base born child" Selah bound out [Minutes 1772-84, first page of October 1774 Minutes]. She may have been the Betsy Morgan who was head of an Orange County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:A:400]. Her children were

i. Selah, born about 1771, bound to James Brown to learn carding and spinning (no race stated).

10      ii. ?Thomas2, born say 1773.

 

8.    John3 Morgan, Jr., born say 1762, was head of a Northampton County household of 1 male 21-60, 2 males less than 20 or 60 plus, and 1 female in Captain William's District for the 1786 state census. He was head of a Halifax County household of 16 "other free" in 1790 [NC:64] and 3 in 1800 [NC:328]. He was the father of

i. ?Fanny, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:157].

ii. ?Gardner, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:158].

iii. ?Randall, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:157].

iv. Lucy, born about 1813 in Halifax County, married (William) Riley Jones, 26 February 1838 Robeson County bond, and registered as a forty-year-old "free Negro," in Bartholomew County, Indiana, on 22 August 1853. According to her death certificate in Washtenaw County, Michigan, she was the daughter of John Morgan, born 16 March 1807, died 19 February 1907 [Vol.3, p.171, #429].

 

9.    Matthew1 Morgan, born say 1770, was head of a Halifax County household of 13 "other free" in 1810 [NC:36], 11 "free colored" in Robeson County in 1820 [NC:323], and 10 in Robeson County in 1840 [NC:201]. He sold 100 acres in Robeson County on the east side of First Swamp to (his son?) George Morgan on 28 November 1835 [DB W:290]. His children were most likely

i. Matthew2, born say 1805, married Nancy Bass, 12 February 1828 Robeson County bond, Henry Parker bondsman. He was head of a Robeson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830. He purchased 200 acres on both sides of the first branch of Wilkinson's Swamp from George Morgan on 29 October 1839 [DB BB:814].

ii. Lewis, born say 1808, head of a Cumberland County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:208]. He married (second?) Kitty Goins, 29 January 1829 Robeson County bond, Findl Ivy bondsman.

iii. George2, born about 1810, married Delila Bass, 6 June 1836 Robeson County bond, Lewis Morgan bondsman. They moved to Canada about 1853, to Haiti in 1861, and returned to the United States (Maryland) in 1868. In 1880 they were in Pilson Township, Charlevoix County, Michigan [Census 55/3/49].

 

10.    Thomas2 Morgan, born say 1773, was head of an Orange County household of 5 "other free" and one white woman in 1800 [NC:589]. Perhaps those counted as "other free" in Orange County were his children. They were

i. Thomas3, Jr., head of an Orange County household of 4 "other free" and one white woman in 1800 [NC:587] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:318].

ii. Paul, head of an Orange County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:587].

 

Endnotes:

1.    The original agreement between the Republic of Haiti and George Morgan's son-in-law is in the possession of Mrs. Maxine (Bass) Collins of Ann Arbor Michigan. William E. Calbert of Washington, D.C., provided the information on George Morgan and Lucy Morgan Jones.

 

MORRIS FAMILY

Norfolk County

1.    Ann Morris, born say 1673, the (white) servant of Isabella Spratt, was living in Norfolk County on 16 March 1690/1 when the court ordered that she serve her mistress an additional two years because she "was delivered of a Bastard Child begotten by a negro" [DB 5, pt. 2, 214]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Mary, born say 1750, taxable in the Norfolk County household of John Willoughby, Sr., on the north side of Tanners Creek in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 74].

 

Middlesex, Gloucester, Chesterfield, York and Charles City counties

1.    Elizabeth1 Morris, born say 1688, the servant of Francis Weekes, was presented by the grand jury of Middlesex County, Virginia, on 8 January 1705/6 for having a "mulatto bastard child." The court ordered the sheriff to give her twenty-five lashes and ordered the churchwardens of the parish to sell her after she completed her indenture to Weekes. She was presented for the same offense on 7 June 1708 [Orders 1705-10, 19, 28, 177, 182, 185, 188, 196, 203, 212]. She was a "Mulatto Woman" whose son James Morris was baptized in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, on 15 March 1705/6 [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church, 75, 195, 245]. She was the mother of

2        i. James1, born say December 1705.

3        ii. ?Winnifred, born 9 May 1707.

 

2.    James1 Morris, born say December 1705, was baptized 15 March 1705/6 in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church, 58]. He may have been the father of

4        i. Thomas1, born say 1743.

5        ii. William1, born say 1745.

 

3.    Winnifred Morris, born 9 May 1707, "a Molatto belonging to Francis Weekes, Junr," was baptized in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, on 25 January 1707/8. And she was called a "Mulatto" on 19 December 1740 when she registered the birth of her son George in the same parish. She died on 18 April 1745 [NSCDA, Parish Register of Christ Church, 75, 195, 245]. On 3 September 1745 the Middlesex County court ordered the churchwardens of Christ Church Parish to bind out her "two Mulatto children" George and James Morris [Orders 1745-52, 26]. She was the mother of

6        i. ?Biddy, born say 1722.

ii. ?Francis, born say 1731, a "malatto" taxable in Chesterfield County in 1756. He was probably identical to "Frank Malatto" who was taxable in his own household in 1752 [Tax List 1747-1821, frames 11, 26]. He brought a suit against Anthony Jasper which was dismissed by the Chesterfield County court in September 1760. He was called a "Mulatto" on 4 December 1767 when he was charged with being a vagrant in Chesterfield County. Edward Cox posted bond for his good behavior [Orders 1759-67, 85; 1767-71, 155]. He was a "yellow" complexioned man born in Henrico County who was living in Petersburg when he was listed in the size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Court House [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 151]. He may have been the Francis Morris who was taxable in Gloucester County from 1793 to 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99; 1800-20].

7        iii. George1, born 19 December 1740.

8       iv. James2, born say 1742.

 

4.    Thomas1 Morris, born say 1743, was head of a Petsworth, Gloucester County household of 7 free persons in 1784 [VA:69]. He was taxable in Gloucester County from 1782 to 1800: listed the same day as Seth, William, Jr., and James Morris in 1789, taxable on 2 tithes in 1796, taxable on a slave in 1798 and 1799, taxable on 3 tithes in 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1799; 1800-20], and head of a Gloucester County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:664]. Betsy Gladman was living with him "as a wife" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20]. He was the father of

i. Thomas2, born say 1783, "mulatto son of Thos," taxable in Gloucester County in 1804, called "Thomas, Jr., miller," in 1806 and 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

ii. William6, born say 1787, "mulo, son of Thos," taxable in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iii. Frances, "mulo, daughter of Thos," taxable in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iv. Cary, "mulo, son of Thos," taxable in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

 

5.    William1 Morris, born say 1745, was taxable in Gloucester County from 1782 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-99; 1800-20], taxable on 40 acres in Gloucester County in 1800 [1800 Land Tax List, p.13], taxable on 2 "mulatto" tithes in 1802 and 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20], and head of a household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:664]. He was called William Morriss, Sen., "mulo," in Gloucester County in 1813 when Sarah, a "negroe" was living with him as his wife [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20]. He was the father of

i. ?William4, born say 1768, called "William Jr." when he was taxable in Gloucester County from 1789 to 1813, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

ii. Polly, head of a Gloucester County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:664]. She was called the "mulo daughter of Wm Morris Senr when she was listed in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iii. ?Grymes, born say 1780, a "mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County from 1801 to 1820 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iv. ?George5, born say 1783, a "mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County from 1804 to 1817, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20], head of a Gloucester County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:664].

v. ?Philip, born say 1785, a "mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County from 1806 to 1820, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

vi. ?James4, born say 1792, called "James Morriss, Jr., mulo," when he was taxable in Gloucester County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

 

6.    Biddy Morris, born say 1722, may have been identical to Bidde (no family name), a "Mullatto" child living in Bristol Parish on 24 July 1727 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her to Godfrey Ragsdail [Chamberlayn, Register of Bristol Parish, 36]. Biddy Morris was living in Chesterfield County on 7 September 1750 when her son Jack (no race indicated) was bound apprentice [Orders 1749-54, 77]. She was the mother of

i. Abraham, born say 1745, taxable in Chesterfield County on one tithe and a horse from 1786 to 1796 and on two tithes from 1797 to 1804, taxable on one tithe and a horse in 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 16, 88, 162, 235, 339, 375, 450, 488, 526].

9        ii. Jack1, born say 1746.

iii. ?Matt, born about 1748, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a black Man, five feet five and a half inches high, about forty six years old, born free & raised in the county of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 43].

10      iv. ?Elizabeth2, born about 1754.

 

7.    George1 Morris, born 19 December 1740, was called the son of Winefred Morris, a "free Mullatto," when his birth was registered in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County. He was taxable on 2 tithes in Gloucester County in 1770 and 1771 [Tax List 1770-1, 99], taxable in Petsworth Parish, Gloucester County, on 2 free tithes and 8 cattle in 1782 and 1784, taxable in Ware Parish in 1785 and 1786, taxable on 3 tithes in 1787, and taxable on himself and (his son?) James Morris in 1788 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99]. He may have been the father of

i.Seth, born say 1765, taxable on a horse in Gloucester County from 1789 to 1792 and taxable there from 1793 to 1799 [PPTL 1782-99], jointly taxed with James Morris (Mulos) on a 40 acre plot in Gloucester County from 1797 to 1820 [Land Tax List, 1782-1820], head of a Gloucester County household of 1 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:664], a "mulo" taxable in Gloucester County from 1801 to 1820 [PPTL, 1800-20], head of a Gloucester County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. James3, born say 1767, taxable in Gloucester County from 1789 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-99], jointly taxed with Seth Morris on a 40 acre plot in Gloucester County from 1797 to 1820 [Land Tax List, 1782-1820], head of a Gloucester County household of 1 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [VA:664], a "mulatto" taxable from 1804 to 1819, called "James Sr." after 1812, over forty five years of age in 1815 when he was taxable on a slave [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-20].

iii. Elizabeth3, head of a Gloucester County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:663]. She was called Elizabeth Morriss, Sen., "mulo," in 1813 when she was head of a Gloucester County household with (her daughter?) Dianna who was over the age of sixteen [Personal Property Tax List 1800-20].

 

8.    James2 Morris, born say 1742, was ordered bound apprentice by the churchwardens of Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, on 3 September 1745 [Orders 1745-52, 26]. He was called "James Morris a free born Negro" by the Richmond County court on 4 February 1754 when it ordered the churchwardens of Lunenburg Parish to bind him to Stuart Redman [Orders 1752-5, 117]. He may have been the James Morris who was head of a Charles City County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:957]. He was the father of

11      i. ?George2, born say 1762.

ii. ?Charles, born about 1766, a man of color from Charles City County listed in the size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Court House [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 151]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1798 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 358, 543, 620, 662, 717, 753, 799] and head of a Chesterfield County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 August 1814: about forty eight years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 224].

iii. Elvy, "daughter of James Morris," married Philip Wallace, 24 March 1815 Charles City County bond [Wm & Mary Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 8, No.3, p.195].

 

9.    Jack Morris, born say 1746, an orphan, no race indicated, was bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 7 September 1750 [Orders 1749-54, 77]. He was a soldier in the Continental Line on 7 February 1778 when the Chesterfield County court ordered that his wife Mary receive 6 pounds public money [Orders 1774-8, 158]. He may have been the John Morris who was head of a Chesterfield County household of 4 free persons in 1783 [VA:50]. and a John Morris was head of a Charles City County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:942]. His wife may have been the Mary Morris (born about 1746) who registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet one inches high, forty eight years old, born free & raised in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 57]. They may have been the parents of

i. Peter, a "free negro" taxable in Henrico County in 1790 [Personal Property Tax List B, p.2].

ii. Patsy, born about 1776, registered in Petersburg on 25 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet three and a half inches high, eighteen years old, born free & raised in Chesterfield County and registered again on 14 August 1800 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, nos. 85, 166].

iii. Arthur, born say 1777, a "Mulatto" laborer who was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1798 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 358, 470, 753, 799, 824].

iv. Obedience, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1800: a dark brown, spare made Mulatto woman, five feet six inches high, twenty two, short bushy hair, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 190].

 

10.    Elizabeth2 Morris, born about 1754, was "a poor child" who was bound out in Chesterfield County in March 1769 [Orders 1767-71, 266]. On 2 April 1779 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her daughter Nancy to Daniel McCallum, and on 6 June 1782 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her children William, John and Elizabeth Morris [Orders 1767-71, 266; 1774-84, 210, 358]. She was called a "free Mulatto woman" when she appeared before Mayor John Beckley of Richmond City and made oath that William Bowman was the only surviving brother and heir at law of James Bowman, deceased, a soldier in the Virginia Line. The affidavit was certified by the Henrico County court on 6 October 1783 [Orders 1781-4, 439]. She registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet five inches high, about forty years old, born free in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 25]. She was the mother of

i. William2, born say 1769, taxable in Chesterfield County from 1791 to 1811, a blacksmith living on Colonel Walthal's land in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 88, 162, 235, 302, 339, 375, 450, 488, 602, 689, 738].

ii. ?David, born say 1770, a "poor" child bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 4 February 1774 [Orders 1771-4, 398], a "Mulatto" carpenter taxable in Chesterfield County from 1791 to 1811, living on P.T. Edward's land in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 88, 163, 203, 235, 269, 302, 339, 375, 526, 602, 641, 738, 782, 824].

12      iii. Elizabeth, born about 1772.

iv. John born about 1773, registered in Petersburg on 29 June 1795: a brown Mulatto man with Bushy Black hair, five feet seven inches high, twenty two years old, born free in Chesterfield County & raised in the Town of Petersburg and registered again on 11 July 1797 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, nos. 102, 121].

v. Wilson, born say 1775, son of Elizabeth Morris bound out in Chesterfield County on 7 September 1781 [Orders 1774-84, 324]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1796 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 269, 340, 375].

 

11.    George2 Morris, born say 1762, was taxable in York County from 1784 to 1814: taxable on 3 horses and 9 cattle in 1784, taxable on a slave in 1788 and 1789, called George Morris, Sr., when he was taxable on 2 tithes in 1794 and 1799, listed as a "free Negro" in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 87, 142, 163, 203, 212, 288, 318, 341, 355, 409]. On 20 March 1790 he and Elizabeth Armfield were sued in York County court for a 10 pound debt, and on 19 December 1791 his suit against Elizabeth for debt was dismissed by the court. Elizabeth Lyons was a witness for Elizabeth Armfield, and Richard Roberts of James City County was a witness for George. He sold property by bill of sale proved in court on 15 September 1794. On 19 May 1800 the court ordered Godfrey Roberts to stand trial in Williamsburg for stealing his horse [Orders 1788-95, 233, 409, 525, 651; 1795-1803, 233, 398, 409, 525]. He may have been the father of

i. George4, born about 1782, registered in York County on 20 March 1809 and again on 14 March 1817: a light Mulatto about 35 years of age, 5 feet 3-1/2 Inches high, short stout fellow, large flat nose, thick lips, long bushy hair, & when in conversation has a simple smile which appears to be more natural than forced ... he has high cheek bones, born of free parents [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, nos. 36, 95]. He was called George Morris, Jr., when he was taxable in York County from 1803 to 1814: taxable on a slave in 1809 and 1810 and head of a household of one "free Negro & mulatto over 16" and 2 slaves in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 288, 318, 341, 355, 377, 392, 489]. He was head of a York County household of 4 "other free," a slave, and a white woman 26-45 years of age in 1810 [VA:878].

ii. Anthony, head of a York County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:878] and 3 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 392]. He registered in York County on 18 August 1812: (blank) years of age, 5 feet 5-1/2 Inches high ... dark complexion ... large round fierce Eyes & when conversing has a smile on his countenance. Born of free parents [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 66].

 

12.    Elizabeth Morris, born about 1772, registered in Petersburg on 1 March 1798: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet one and a half inches high, twenty seven years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 137]. She may have been the Betty Morris who was head of a Petersburg Town household of 6 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:120a]. She was the mother of

i. William5, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 24 April 1804: a dark brown Mulatto man (son of Betty Morris, a free mulatto woman) five feet six inches high, nineteen years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 269].

ii. ?Abraham, born about 1786, registered in Petersburg on 5 June 1809: a dark brown Negro man, five feet seven inches high, twenty two years old, a waterman, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 47?].

 

13.    Mary Morris, born about 1764, was the "Mulatto" mother of Moses Morris who was bound as an apprentice carpenter to James Blakely by the Hustings Court of Petersburg on 3 May 1790 [Orders 1784-91, 318]. She was forty-two years old on 8 September 1806 when she obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County: yellow complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 29, 145, 231, 310]. She was the mother of

i. Moses, bound apprentice in Petersburg on 3 May 1790.

ii. ?Archer, born about 1785, a twenty-one-year-old, free-born, dark brown complexioned man who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 12 March 1806 [Register of Free Negroes 1804-1853, nos. 23, 109, 234].

iii. ?Nancy, born about 1786, a twenty-year-old, free-born, yellow complexioned woman who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 September 1806 [Register of Free Negroes 1804-1853, nos. 31, 146, 311].

iv. ?Franky, born about 1794, a twenty-year-old, free-born, brown complexioned woman who registered in Chesterfield County on 10 October 1814 [Register of Free Negroes 1804-1853, nos. 233, 312].

 

Other members of the Morris family in York County were

i. George3, born say 1771, married Nancy Carter, 1 April 1792 York County bond, David Poe surety [WMQ 1:58]. He was taxable in York County in 1795 and 1798, called George Morris, Jr. [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 212, 239].

ii. Peggy, born about 1779, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: about 5 feet 3-3/4 inches & about 43 years of age, has thick pouting lips [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.178]. She was taxable in York County on one free male tithable in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 366].

 

Other members of the Morris family in the town of Petersburg or in Chesterfield County were

13      i. Mary, born about 1764.

ii. Nancy, born about 1767, registered in Petersburg on 24 March 1817: a free woman of colour, five feet eight inches high, fifty years old, light brown complection, short bushy hair, born free in Jas. City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 840].

iii. Rebecca, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 30 October 1809: Rebecca Brown formerly Morris, a dark brown free negro woman five feet and a half inches high, forty years old, born free & raised in the State of Maryland & migrated to this state prior to January 1794 as appears by the affidavit of Jas Minton of Maryland & Wm Burton of this town [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 498].

iv. Sally, born about 1770, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 September 1806: thirty-six years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 30, 147, 235, 314, 315]. She was counted in a list of "free Negroes and mulattoes" with her six children living on Elizabeth Walthall's land in Chesterfield County in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frame 824].

v. Sukey, a "poor" child bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 4 February 1774 [Orders 1771-4, 398].

vi. Peg, a "poor" child bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 4 February 1774 [Orders 1771-4, 398].

vii. Nancy, born about 1773, counted in a list of "free Negroes and mulattoes" with her three children living on Elizabeth Walthall's land in Chesterfield County in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frame 824]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 26 August 1816: forty-three years old, yellow complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 262].

viii. John, born say 1779, a "Mulatto" blacksmith who was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1791 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 88, 163, 203, 302, 340, 782, 824].

ix. William3, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 17 July 1806: a dark brown free Negro man, five feet six and a half inches high, twenty one years old April last, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 387].

x. Gabriel, born about 1780, registered in Petersburg on 10 July 1805: a dark brown stout made Negro man, five feet six inches high, large red eyes, twenty five years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 320]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 26 August 1816: thirty-eight years old, dark brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 230, 266].

xi. Elijah, born about 1781, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809: twenty-eight years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 88]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1805 to 1811, a blacksmith living on Edward Archer's land [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 602, 641, 689, 738, 782, 824].

xii. Lucy, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 July 1807: twenty-five years old, yellow complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 42].

xiii. Polly, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 July 1807: twenty-four years old, brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 120, 232]. She may have been identical to Polly Morris, born about 1783, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 25 March 1816: thirty three years old, dark brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 272]. She was counted in a list of "free Negroes and mulattoes" with her three children living on Jesse Cogbill's in Chesterfield County in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frame 824].

xiv. Jack, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 July 1812: twenty-four years old, bright yellow complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 169].

 

13.    Mary Morris, born about 1764, was forty-two years old on 8 September 1806 when she obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County: yellow complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, nos. 29, 145, 231, 310]. She may have been the mother of

i. Archer, born about 1785, a twenty-one-year-old, free-born, dark brown complexioned man who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 12 March 1806 [Register of Free Negroes 1804-1853, nos. 23, 109, 234].

ii. Nancy, born about 1786, a twenty-year-old, free-born, yellow complexioned woman who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 September 1806 [Register of Free Negroes 1804-1853, nos. 31, 146, 311].

iii. Franky, born about 1794, a twenty-year-old, free-born, brown complexioned woman who registered in Chesterfield County on 10 October 1814 [Register of Free Negroes 1804-1853, nos. 233, 312].

 

Other members of the Morris family in nearby Virginia counties were

i. Rosanna, a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County on 2 slaves and 4 horses from 1811 to 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 403, 424, 442, 462, 487], "F.B." head of a Powhatan County household of 5 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [VA:5].

ii. Edward, born say 1772, a "melatto" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County in 1792 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 237], a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1801 to 1806 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 227, 242, 260, 322]. On 18 January 1804 the Powhatan County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out his daughters Jane and Nancy Morris to Edward Moseley [Orders 1802-4, 404]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:705]. He married Susanna Johns, 24 May 1806 Goochland County bond.

iii. John, head of a New Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:762].

 

Accomack and Northampton counties

1.    William1 Morris, born say 1689, was living in Accomack County on 6 December 1704 when John Willis accused him of assault. He was called "William Morris Mallatto" when several persons reported that he was threatening people with a gun [Orders 1703-9, 38, 42a]. And he was living in Accomack County on 16 December 1717 when he bound his children Sarah and Jacob Morris to Arthur Robins by Northampton County indenture [W&D 1711-18, 130]. He may have been a descendant of Martha Merris, an English widow, who made a deed of jointure to marry Philip Mongon in Northampton County in 1651 [DW 1651-54, 33, fol.33]. Perhaps William's wife was Sarah Morris, a "mulatto" taxable in the Northampton County household of Arthur Robins from 1724 to 1728 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 63, 113, 142]. She bound her sons Abraham and John to Arthur Robins of Northampton County on 1 September 1726. She was probably an elderly woman on 9 July 1745 when the court ordered that she be tax-free [Orders 1722-9, 252; 1742-8, 224]. William and Sarah's children were

2        i. Sarah, born about 1710.

3        ii. ?Tabitha, born say 1712.

4        iii. Jacob1, born about 1714.

iv. Abraham1, born in January 1718, eight-year-old son of Sarah Morris, bound apprentice to Arthur Robins in Northampton County on 1 September 1726 [Orders 1722-29, 252].

v. John/ Jack, born Christmas 1720, four-year-old "son of Sarah Morris," bound apprentice in Northampton County to Arthur Robins on 1 September 1726 [Orders 1722-29, 252]. He was a "negro" taxable in Jonas Jackson's household in 1743, and he was taxable in Jacob Henderson's household in 1744. He was a "Negro" sued for debt in Northampton County by Benjamin Dingly Gray on 10 September 1751 [Orders 1751-3, 12]. He was head of his own household with (his wife?) Esther Morris in 1765 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 347, 365]. Perhaps Esther was Esther Driggers, daughter of Thomas Drighouse and Jean Beckett, a taxable in Thomas Drighouse's household in 1744.

5        vi. ?Sabra, born say 1724.

6        vii. ?Rachel1, born say 1726.

 

2.    Sarah Morris, born about 1710, daughter of William Morris of Accomack County, was about seven years old on 16 December 1717 when her father bound her to Arthur Robins until the age of twenty-one by Northampton County indenture [W&D 1711-18, 130]. She was taxable in Joachim Michael's household from 1727 to 1729 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 122, 141, 188]. On 10 February 1731 she consented to serve Arthur Robins for three years after she attained the age of twenty-one in exchange for his paying her fine for a bastard child [Orders 1729-32, 68]. On 14 June 1732 Robins agreed to pay her fine and indemnify the parish from a child she had by William Allen [Orders 1732-42, 8, 28, 36, 42]. She was again taxable in Joachim Michael's household from 1737 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 262, 274, 289, 308, 326, 353, 362]. She may have been the mother of

i. Abraham2, born 1 March 1743, an eleven-year-old bound to Thomas Dolby on 14 January 1755 perhaps identical to the Abraham Morris who was about eight years old on 10 September 1754 when the court ordered him bound to William Galt [Orders 1753-8, 129, 180]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County from 1787 to 1794, levy free in 1793 and 1794 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 74, 155, 182].

ii. Rachel2, daughter of Sarah Morris, bound apprentice to Arthur Robins on 10 June 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 425].

iii. Adah, daughter of Sarah Morris, bound apprentice to Arthur Robins on 10 June 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 425].

 

3.    Tabitha Morris, born say 1712, was a "Mulattoe" whose base-born child was bound to John Foscew by the Accomack County court on 6 August 1728. She was presented by the court for having a another bastard child on 6 May 1729 [Orders 1724-31, 115a, 152]. She was living in Northampton County on 12 February 1733/4 when she consented to the indenture of her "poor Mulatto" children Isaac and Elishe to Thomas Marshall, Gentleman [Orders 1732-42, 91]. Her children were

7        i. Elishe, born in September 1730.

ii. Isaac1, born in July 1732, two-year-old "Mulatto" son of Tabitha Morris, bound apprentice on 12 February 1733/4 [Orders 1732-42, 91].

 

4.    Jacob1 Morris, born about 1714, the three-year-old son of William Morris of Accomack County, was bound by his father to Arthur Robins on 16 December 1717 by Northampton County indenture [W&D 1711-18, 130]. He was taxable in Jacob Andrew's Northampton County household in 1740 and in Abel Upshur's household with his wife Comfort Morris and (sister?) Rachel Morris in 1743. His wife was most likely Comfort Beckett, a tithable in the household of his neighbor, Thomas Drighouse, in 1739 and 1740. Jacob was head of his own household in 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 289, 313, 331, 353, 362]. He was sued by Samuel Grafton in a suit for trespass which was agreed on 10 May 1750 [Orders 1748-51, 218]. He was called Jacob Morris Negro, deced., on 11 June 1751 when "Comfort Morris Negro" recorded the inventory of his estate, valued at 35 pounds, in Northampton County court [Wills, Inventories, Deeds, 1750-54, 87-88; Orders 1751-3, 37, 57, 90]. Comfort sued Daniel Stephens for a 3 pounds, 1 shilling debt on 15 April 1752, and Daniel Stephens was paid 30 shillings for maintaining Jacob's orphans Isaac, Jacob and Esther Morris on 10 September 1754 and was paid 30 shillings for maintaining Jacob Morris on 13 August 1755 [Orders 1753-8, 129, 243]. Comfort probably married Daniel Stephens since a Comfort Stephens was taxable in his household in 1769 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 401]. Jacob's children were

i. Isaac2, born say 1740, called Aise Morris when he registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358].

ii. Jacob2, born say 1745, a tithable in the Northampton County household of Solathiel Harrison in 1769 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 398]. He was taxable in Northampton County in 1798, called "Jacob Morris Senr." [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 251], head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:158] and 6 in 1810 [VA:42].

iii. Esther, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 364].

 

5.    Sabra Morris, born say 1724, was the mother of

i. Lazarus, born in February 1743/4, three-year-old son of Sabra Morris, bound apprentice in Northampton County on 9 December 1746 [Orders 1742-48, 373]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County from 1787 to 1796 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 74, 125, 196].

 

6.    Rachel1 Morris, born say 1726, was taxable in the Northampton County household of Jacob Morris in 1743. The churchwardens sued her for debt on 14 December 1743, and they presented her on 8 July 1746 for having a bastard child [Orders 1742-48, 136, 344]. She was the mother of

i. Isaac3, born 23 September 1743, son of Rachel Morris, bound apprentice to George Fosque on 11 February 1745/6, eighteen-year-old son of Rachel Morris bound apprentice on 3 October 1761 [Orders 1742-8, 300; Minutes 1754-61, 275].

8        ii. ?Sarah, born say 1746.

 

7.    Elishe Morris, born in September 1730, the four-year-old "Mulatto" daughter of Tabitha Morris, was bound apprentice in Northampton County on 12 February 1733/4. She was presented for having an illegitimate child born on 9 November 1751 [Orders 1732-42, 91; 1751-3, 56, 70]. She was the mother of

i. Isaac4, born 3 October 1743, "Mulatto" son of Elishe Morris, bound to Elijah Mears on 10 November 1761, apparently because of his complaint to the court against Elishe Dowty on 13 October 1761 [Minutes 1754-61, 274-5].

ii. Abraham3, born in December 1750, ten-year-old son of Elishe Morris bound apprentice to Henry Gascoigne on 12 August 1760 [Minutes 1754-61, 19, 230], perhaps the Abraham Morris who was taxable in Northampton County from 1795 to 1813, called "Abraham Morris Senr." [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 196, 541].

9        iii. Rebecca, born say 1758.

 

8.    Sarah Morris, born say 1746, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. She was the mother of

i. Levin, born 29 September 1763, three-year-old "negro" son of Sarah Morris, bound apprentice to Caleb Scott on 14 April 1767 and bound to David Stott on 11 October 1768 [Minutes 1765-71, 107, 243]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County from 1787 to 1796 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 74, 81, 125, 182, 196]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:216A].

 

9.    Rebecca Morris, born say 1758, was the mother of

i. Jacob3, born about January 1779, son of Beck Morris, bound apprentice by the Northampton County court to Henry Abdeel on 14 June 1785 [Orders 1783-87, 293], married Phillis Only, 23 August 1802 Northampton County bond, York Stepney security.

 

Other members of the family on the Eastern Shore of Virginia were

i. George, born 28 April 1755, bound apprentice to John Upshur in Northampton County on 12 June 1770 [Minutes 1765-71, 372]. He married Mary Stevens, 19 October 1785 Northampton County bond, David Jones security. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1784 to 1787: called a "Mulatto" in 1787 and 1788 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 29, 74, 81].

ii. John, born about 1759, registered in Petersburg on 11 May 1804: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet seven and a half inches high, forty five years old with short napt hair, born free & raised in the County of Northampton [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 272].

iii. Isaac5, a "free Negro orphan" ordered bound by the churchwardens of St. George Parish in Accomack County to Archibald Garrison to learn shoemaking on 28 March 1775 [Orders 1774-7, 327].

iv. Sukey, born say 1774, married Jacob Thomson, 26 May 1795 Northampton County bond, Thomas Lewis security.

v. Revel, married Dilly Drighouse, 7 September 1801 Northampton County bond, James Smith security. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1795 to 1796 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 196].

vi. Mary, married Hezekiah Beavans, 31 July 1798 Northampton County bond, Revel Morris security.

vii. Nancy, married Daniel Weeks, 6 July 1803 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security.

viii. Dennard, married Rebecca Costin, 1808 Northampton County bond.

ix. Sophia, married Isaac Pool, 27 December 1811 Northampton County bond, John Upchurch security.

x. John, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:115].

xi. York, head of an Accomack County household of 3 "other free" and one slave in 1810 [VA:44].

xii. William, head of an Accomack County household of one "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [VA:182].

xiii. Daniel, born in 1786, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: Dark Mulatto, 5 feet 8 Inches...Born free [Free Negro Register, 1785-1863, no. 23].

 

MOSBY FAMILY

Members of Mosby family were

i. Joseph, head of a Campbell County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:853].

1        ii. Tim, born say 1765.

2        iii. Phillis, head of a Henrico County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:977].

 

1.    Tim Mosby, born say 1765, was a "f.B." taxable in Powhatan County from 1804 to 1809 [PPTL 1787-1825, frame 281, 345, 367]. He was the father of

i. Patty Hickman, born say 1790, "daughter of Tim Mosby who is surety," married Charles Coy, "free Negroes," 4 October 1809 Powhatan County marriage.

 

2.    Phillis Mosby, born say 1770, was the mother of several children who registered as free Negroes in Louisa County.

i. Pleasant, born about 1796, registered in Louisa County on 11 August 1821: son of Phillis Mosby who was born free, tolerable bright mulatto about 6'1-1/2" high, 25 years [Abercrombie, Free Blacks of Louisa County, 27-8].

ii. Samuel, born about 1802, registered in Louisa County on 20 January 1826: Samuel the son of Phillis Mosby a free man of color about 24 years old, 5'8-1/2" high, very light complexion [p.31, 41].

iii. Louisa, born about 1812, registered on 4 September 1833: daughther of Phillis Mosby who was born free, dark mulatto woman about 21 years old [p.45].

 

MOSELY FAMILY

1.    Thomas Moseley, born say 1725, was living in Henrico County on 6 November 1752 when he was indicted by the court for failing to list his "Mulatto" wife as a tithable. The case against him was dismissed at the next session of the court [Minutes 1752-5, 19, 27]. On 6 March 1769 the court ordered the churchwardens of Henrico Parish to bind out his children Leonard, Anne and Mary Moseley [Orders 1767-9, 397]. He was the ancestor of

i. Leonard, bound apprentice in 1769.

ii. Anne, bound apprentice in 1769.

iii. Mary, bound apprentice in 1769.

 

Other members of the Mosely family were

i. Beersheba, petitioned the Frederick County, Virginia court on 7 November 1770 for her freedom from Godwin Swift who was illegally detaining her as a slave. She was released on the testimony of witnesses that she was the daughter of a free Indian commonly called the "Indian Doctor" who lived in Queen Anne's County, Maryland. She paid Thomas Lewis for attending as a witness for her for two days [Orders 1770-2, 39, 126].

ii. Joseph, born say 1782, married Patty Teppance (Twopence), daughter of James Teppance, "Free negroes," 10 September 1804 Campbell County bond, John Going bondsman [Marriage Bonds & Consents, 1782-1853, M-P, frames 471-2].

iii. Caty, head of a Craven County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:134].

iv. David, head of a 96 District, Spartanburgh County, South Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1800 and 7 "other free" in 1810 [SC:181].

v. Nancy, born before 1776, head of a New Hanover County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:230].

vi. Jinny, head of a Petersburg Town household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:117a].

 

MOSES FAMILY

1.    Ezekiel1 Moses, born say 1710, was the "Negro fellow" (slave) of Elizabeth Harmonson in January 1739/40 when Elizabeth Webb, "a malatto," appeared in Northampton County, Virginia court and offered to serve Ezekiel's mistress for sixteen years on condition that she allow her to marry Ezekiel. She was called Betty Moses on 10 September 1745 when the court bound her sons Left and Luke to George Kendall [Orders 1732-42, 382; 1711-6, 255; 1742-8, 255]. Ezekiel and Elizabeth were the ancestors of

i. Left, born say 1741, bound to George Kendall on 10 September 1745.

ii. Luke, born say 1743, bound to George Kendall on 10 September 1745. He may have been the member of the Moses family, first name not indicated, who sued a member of the Jeffery family for 10 shillings in Northampton County in June 1762 and sued John Daniel (an Indian) in September 1762 [Minutes 1761-5, 30, 41, 42, 51, 56]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1800 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 290, 304, 433, 541].

iii. Ezekiel2, born say 1762, married Diana Beckett, "ward of Mark Becket," 22 August 1791 Northampton County bond, William Stith security. He was a "Mulatto" delinquent taxable in Northampton County in 1786 [Virginia Genealogist 20:269] and taxable in Northampton County from 1792 to 1796 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 140, 182]. He was a "yellow" complexioned seaman who enlisted as a substitute from Northampton County. He was later listed as a silversmith from Northumberland County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 151; Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 41]. He was taxable in York County from 1803 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 288, 297, 307, 341, 392, 409].

iv. Mark, born say 1764, married Mary Beckett, 13 December 1785 Northampton County bond, Isaac Beckett security. Mark was a "Mulatto" delinquent taxable in Northampton County in 1786 [Virginia Genealogist 20:269], a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County from 1787 to 1794 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 74, 125, 182], head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:160], and 6 in 1810 [VA:111].

v. Betty, probably born about 1766, a "Negro" orphan bound to Savage Cowdry by the Northampton County court on 9 April 1766. She was said to have been about ten years old on 8 July 1777 when the court bound her to Esther Davis [Minutes 1765-71, 35; 1777-83, 2].

vi. Daniel, born say 1780, married Rachel Teague, 25 September 1802 Northampton County bond, Levin Morris security.

 

MOSS FAMILY

Members of the Moss family were

1        i. Dorothy1, born say 1700.

2        ii. Thomas1, born about 1728.

3        iii. Richard1, born say 1730.

4        iv. William2, born say 1734.

 

1.    Dorothy1 Moss, born say 1700, left a 2 April 1764 Cumberland County, Virginia will, proved 25 June 1764, by which she divided her household goods and a mare among her children William Moss, Joseph Moss, Elizabeth Morris, John Moss, and granddaughter Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph Moss. Nathaniel Morris was a witness. She appointed her sons Joseph and John her executors [WB 1:294]. She was the mother of

5        i. Joseph1, born say 1725.

ii. William1, born say 1728, a "free Negro" taxable in Campbell County from 1785 to 1794: taxed on his unnamed nephew in 1785 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 6, 43, 136, 216, 305].

iii. Elizabeth1, probably wife of Nathaniel Morris.

iv. John1, born say 1735.

 

2.    Thomas1 Moss, born about 1728, was a carpenter indentured to Lawrence Egmond and employed by William Lightfoot of Charles City County. He ran away, and Lightfoot placed an advertisement in the Virginia Gazette on 11 July 1754 offering a reward for his return, describing him as: a Negroe Man...a slim made Fellow, about 5 Feet 8 Inches high and about 25 or 26 Years of Age, had on when he went away, a blue Cloth Coat, wide Trousers, and hath Oznabrigs and checked Shirts...subject to Drink and very talkative when drunk. The ad went on to say he was probably headed towards Newcastle where his wife lived [Virginia Gazette, p. 3, col. 2]. He appeared in Charles City County court on 2 July 1760 and again on 3 February 1762 and agreed to serve his master William Lightfoot, Esq., an additional year after the completion of his service [Orders 1758-62, 197, 352]. Perhaps he and his wife were the parents of

6        i. Judith, born say 1751.

7        ii. Sarah, born say 1753.

8        iii. Temp, born say 1754.

 

3.    Richard1 Moss, born say 1730, may have identical to Richard, a "Muletto" (no last name) who was bound out by the Henrico County court in April 1741 [Orders 1737-1746, 138]. Richard Moss died before 4 April 1778 when the Chesterfield County court ordered the churchwardens of Manchester Parish to bind his orphan William Moss to William Gibson [Orders 1774-84, 162]. He was the father of

9        i. ?Richard2, born about 1752.

ii. ?Henry1, born about 1754, ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Raleigh Parish in Amelia County on 24 March 1757 [Orders 1754-8, n.p.]. He was head of a Powhatan County household of 3 persons in 1783 [VA:58]. On 18 May 1785 the Powhatan County court found in his favor in a suit brought against him by William Prosser. The court bound three children to him to learn the trade of bricklayer: Thomas Pool, orphan of Aggy Pool on 21 July 1791; Benjamin Cousins, son of Jane Cousins, on 19 July 1792; and John Martin son of Judith Martin on 20 December 1792 [Orders 1784-6, 197, 342; 1791-4, 7, 132, 199]. He was taxable in Powhatan County from 1789 to 1791 and from 1803 to 1817: called a "Mullo" in 1790, charged with William Pollock's tithe in 1791, called a "F.B." from 1813 to 1815 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 36, 48, 63, 262, 280, 321, 366, 443, 463, 488, 538]. He was about forty-two years old on 1 July 1796 when he was described by the 1 July 1796 issue of a Virginia newspaper as: born a free Negro in one of the lower Counties of this state...his father was a black and his mother a mulatto, but he has turned white; he was in the Virginia Line in the last war [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers].

10      iii. ?John2, born say 1760.

iv. Benjamin, born say 1762, made choice of his guardian Jesse Cogbill in Chesterfield County court on 4 December 1778 [Orders 1774-84, 201]. He was head of a Powhatan County household of 2 persons in 1783 [VA:58] and a "Mullo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1787 (called Benjamin Moss, Jr.) to 1797 [PPTL 1787-1825, frames 8, 22, 36, 48, 63, 65, 81, 95, 119, 134, 148], perhaps the Benjamin Moss who was a "Mulatto" taxable in Buckingham County from 1800 to 1807 [PPTL, 1782-1809], a "Mulatto" taxable in Goochland County in 1811 [PPTL, 1810-32, frame 56].

v. ?Dorothy2/ Dolly married Shadrack Battles in Louisa County on 25 July 1780 [Jones, The Douglas Register].

vi. William3, born say 1764, bound apprentice to William Gibson In Chesterfield County on 4 April 1778. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County on a tithe and a horse from 1788 to 1794 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 107, 144, 185, 218]. He married Nancy Auter (Otter), "daughter of Sarah Auter," 5 January 1793 Henrico County bond, Nathaniel Cousins surety. He may have been the William Moss, Jr., who was a "free Negroe" taxable in Henrico County from 1799 to 1814, listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 376, 449, 491, 537, 726, 758, 824]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:985].

vii. ?Nancy, born say 1765, married David Howell, 24 April 1786 Powhatan County bond.

viii. ?Elisha, a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County in 1792, 1793, 1798, and 1801 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 80, 95, 166, 227].

 

3.    William2 Moss, born say 1734, may have been identical to William, a "Mulleto" (no last name), who was bound out by the Henrico County court in April 1741 [Orders 1737-1746, 138]. William Moss was taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1799 to 1807: taxable on a horse and 3 cattle in 1785; called William Moss, Sr., a "free Negro," from 1799 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 376, 408, 449, 491, 537]. And he was taxable in the upper district of Henrico County on 6 acres from 1799 to 1816, called a "fn" in 1804, 1812, 1815 and 1816 [Land Tax List 1799-1816]. He may have been the father of

i. Archer, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 March 1814: thirty two years old, dark brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 218]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in 1814 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 824].

 

5.    Joseph1 Moss, born say 1725, was named in his mother's 2 April 1764 Cumberland County will. He was living in Cumberland County on 22 May 1775 when the court bound Elizabeth Moss's "mulattoe" son Joseph to him [Orders 1774-8, 331]. He was the father of

11      i. Elizabeth2, born say 1750.

12      ii. ?Anna, born say 1753.

 

6.    Judith Moss, born say 1751, was living in Prince Edward County on 19 October 1772 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Patrick's Parish to bind out her son Burwell (no race indicated). She was the mother of

i. Burwell, born say 1770, son of Judith Moss, bound apprentice on 19 October 1772 [Orders 1771-81, part 1, 177]. He was a "free Negro" head of a Charlotte County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:68].

ii. Jesse, born say 1772, orphan of Judith Moss, bound apprentice in Prince Edward County on 15 August 1774 [Orders 1771-81, part 2, 458]. He may have been the Jesse Moss who was a "free Negro" taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1799 to 1814: listed with his unnamed wife in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 147, 376, 449, 491, 537, 759]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:985].

iii. Siller, born say 1775, daughter of Judith Moss, bound to Charles Smith in Prince Edward County on 18 March 1781 [Orders 1771-81, part 2, 94].

 

7.    Sarah Moss, born say 1753, had a "free Negro" son Julius Moss whose 25 March 1782 birth was registered in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County, Virginia [NSCDA, St. Peter's Parish Register, 169]. She was the mother of

i. Julius, born 25 March 1782, a "FN" taxable in New Kent County from 1811 to 1815 [PPTL, 1791-1828, frames 466, 491, 515], head of a New Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:762].

ii. Richard, indebted to the estate of Andrew Scott before 1831 when his administrator obtained a judgment against Richard who claimed that Scott was indebted to his brother Julius Moss [LVA chancery case 1831-030].

iii. ?George, a "FN" taxable in New Kent County from 1801 to 1815 [PPTL, 1791-1828, frames 359, 408, 420, 444, 455, 477, 491, 515], head of a New Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:761].

 

8.    Temp Moss, born say 1754, was living in Prince Edward County on 20 January 1777 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Patrick's Parish to bind her son Robert Moss (no race indicated) to Charles Smith to learn the trade of cooper [Orders 1771-81, part 2, 507]. She was the mother of a "Mulattoe" child named Joe Moss who was bound to Baker Ewing in Bedford County on 25 January 1779 [Orders 1774-82, 220]. She was the mother of

i. ?Richard3, born say 1770, a "Negro," married Sarah Johns, "mulatto" daughter of Mallory Johns, who consented, 14 May 1791 Campbell County bond, Henry Moss witness, Mallory Johns, Jr., bondsman [Marriage Bonds and Consents, 1782-1853, M-P, frames 503-6]. He was taxable in Campbell County from 1787 to 1790 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 43, 73, 102, 136] and taxable in the northern part of Bedford County from 1800 to 1816, not listed in 1813: a "Negro" from 1814 to 1816, listed with 3 tithables and 3 horses next to "Negro" Peter Moss in 1814 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 477, 510, 543, 577, 619, 684; 1806-16, frames 54, 126, 178, 238, 286, 330, 463, 574, 692]. His wife was probably Sall Morse, Senr., who registered in Bedford County on 24 October 1831: 5 feet 3/4 inch high, bright mulatto, straight hair, 56 or 57 years old, Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1820-60, p.15].

ii. ?Henry2, born say 1771, taxable in Campbell County from 1787 to 1790, taxable in the northern part of Bedford County from 1800 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 477, 510, 543] and a "F.N." taxable in Campbell County from 1809 to 1811 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 43, 73, 102, 136, 734, 9771, 807]. He married Winney Valentine, "free negroes," 15 June 1806 Campbell County bond, Benjamin Armstrong and Harry Moss bondsmen [Marriage Bonds & Consents, 1782-1853, M-P, frames 493-4].

iii. ?Edward2, born say 1772, married Rachel Hill, 20 July 1793 Bedford County bond, Robert Hill bondsman. He was a "free Black" head of a Bedford County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:473] and a "free No" taxable in the southern district of Bedford County from 1800 to 1814 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 460, 493, 529, 557, 598, 653; 1806-16, frames 24, 93, 210, 307, 365, 430]. Bob Hill was a "F.Negro" taxable in the southern district of Bedford County in 1807 [PPTL 1806-16, frame 84].

iv. Joseph4, bound to Baker Ewing in Bedford County on 25 January 1779, taxable in the northern district of Bedford County from 1800 to 1807 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 477, 510, 543, 619, 685; 1806-16, frames 54, 126].

v. Robert, bound apprentice to Charles Smith in Prince Edward County on 20 January 1777, called Bob Moss when he was bound to Robert Ewing, Jr., in Bedford County on 25 September 1780 [Orders 1774-82, 297].

 

9.    Richard2 Moss, born about 1752, was head of a Powhatan County household of 8 persons in 1783 [VA:58] and a "Mullo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1787 to 1791 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 8, 21, 36, 48, 63]. He married Dorothy Moss, 30 December 1786 Powhatan County marriage bond. On 17 March 1791 the Powhatan County court presented him for receiving six bushels of wheat which had been stolen by the slave of Anthony Martin [Orders 1786-91, 636; 1791-4, 46]. He was taxable in Goochland County from 1797 to 1813: taxable on a free male tithable aged 16-21 in 1799; 2 tithes aged 16-21 in 1800; 2 in 1801 when he was called a "free negroe planter," called a "Mulatto" from 1802 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 453, 499, 512, 568, 583, 639, 654; 1810-32, frames 144]. He may have been the Richard Moss who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 May 1812: sixty years old, dark brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 163] and was head of a Chesterfield County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062]. He was the father of

i. ?William3, born say 1772, married Nancy Jackson, daughter of Jacob Jackson, 21 November 1792 Powhatan County bond. William was a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1792 to 1805 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 81, 95, 107, 121, 148, 165, 188, 209, 227, 242, 261, 281, 299]. Jacob Jackson was a "Mo" taxable there from 1798 to 1801 [PPTL 1787-1825, frame 164, 186, 208, 226]. William married, second, forty-two-year-old Polly Childress, "people of Colour," 28 December 1814 Campbell County bond. She gave her own consent with Littleberry Moss as bondsman and Jonathan and Lucy Moss as witnesses [Marriage Bonds & Consents, 1782-1853, M-P, frames 514-7].

ii. Celia, born say 1773, "daughter of Richard Moss," married Aaron Goen (Gowen), 29 December 1792 Powhatan County bond.

iii. ?John3, born say 1769, a "Mulatto" taxable in Goochland County from 1803 to 1814: a ditcher at George Payne's" in 1809, a waterman at Colonel Payne's in 1810, a ditcher on Robert Pleasants' land in 1811 who was taxable on a slave over the age of 16 from 1811 to 1814, also taxable on a slave aged 12-16 in 1814. John was over the age of forty-five in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 654, 764, 808, 871; 1810-32, frame 12, 79, 104, 169, 200, 265].

iv. ?Daniel, a "Mulatto" taxable in Goochland County from 1809 to 1811 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 849; 1810-32, frame 56].

 

10.    John2 Moss, born say 1760, was head of a Powhatan County household of 4 persons in 1783 [VA:58] and a "Mullo" taxable in Buckingham County in 1788 [PPTL A, p.10]. He was a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1794 to 1804 [PPTL, 1787-1825, frames 108, 120, 147, 166, 188, 209, 241, 261, 280], a "FN" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1807 to 1810 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 699, 734, 771] and head of a Campbell County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:848]. He may have been the father of

i. Lucy, registered as a "Free Negro" in Campbell County on 15 October 1836: Age: 56; 5 feet 6-1/2 Inches; Born free in said County [Register of Free Negroes, 1801-50, p.14].

ii. Elizabeth2, born about 1791, registered in Campbell County on 15 October 1836: Age: 45; 5 feet 4-1/2 Inches; Born free in said County of Campbell [Register of Free Negroes, 1801-50, p.14].

iii. Littleberry, born about 1794, a "Mulatto" taxable in Albemarle County from 1809 to 1813 [PPTL, 1800-13, frames 369, 506], 548]. He married Elizabeth Farrow, "people of Colour," October 1814 Campbell County bond with Daniel Farrow as bondsman. Elizabeth gave her own consent with Drury Farrow as witness [Marriage Bonds & Consents, frames 496-99]. He was a "FN" taxable in Campbell County in 1814 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 931]. He registered in Campbell County on 3 October 1834: Age: 40; 6 feet; Bright Malattoe; left Eye smaller than the right, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1801-50, p.14].

iv. Keziah, born about 1802, registered in Campbell County in September 1837: Age 33; 5 ft 2 in. Bright complexion [Register of Free Negroes, 1801-50, p.15].

 

11.    Elizabeth2 Moss, born say 1750, was living in Cumberland County, Virginia, on 23 April 1770 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind out her "mulattoe" son Joseph Moss to Thomas Epperson [Orders 1767-70, 503]. She married Zachariah Goff in June 1796 in Campbell County according to her application for a pension for his services in the Revolution [M805-362, frames 285-96]. She was the mother of

i. Joseph3, ordered bound by the Cumberland County court to Thomas Epperson on 23 April 1770 and bound to (his grandfather?) Joseph Moss on 22 May 1775 [Orders 1774-8, 331]. On 16 May 1782 the Powhatan County court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind him, "the orphan of Elizabeth Moss," to Francis Smith [Orders 1777-84, 222]. He married Phebe Martin, 25 December 1786 Powhatan County bond, surety Dick Moss. He was a "Melatto" or "F.N." taxable in the southern district of Campbell County from 1787 to 1794 [PPTL, 185-1814, frames 43, 73, 136, 256, 293].

 

12.    Anna Moss, born say 1753, was a "Mullo" taxable in Buckingham County on a horse in 1788, taxable on her 3 unnamed sons and 5 horses in 1798, taxable on James, Drury and Thomas Moss in 1799, taxable on Thomas Moss in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1809], a "Mulatto" taxable on her unnamed son in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, in 1811, taxable on a horse in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-13, frame 461, 548]. She was the mother of

i. Thomas2, born say 1774, a "Mulatto" taxable on 3 free males and 3 horses in Buckingham County in 1795, taxable on John Moss's tithe in 1796, John and James Moss's tithe in 1797, listed with Ann Moss in 1799 and 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1809], a "free Negro" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, in 1802 and 1803 [PPTL, 1800-13, frames 100, 144]. He was a "FN" taxable in Campbell County from 1809 to 1814: listed with a woman over the age of sixteen in 1813 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 734, 771, 806, 892, 931].

ii. John4, born say 1778, taxable in the Buckingham County household of Thomas Moss in 1796 and 1797, taxable on a horse in 1799 (called Jonathan Moss) [PPTL, 1782-1809], a "Mulatto" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, from 1800 to 1812: taxable on an unnamed apprentice in 1802, taxable on a slave in 1803, taxable on apprentices P. Cuzins and Alexander Moss in 1804, taxable on his unnamed brother in 1805, taxable on a slave in 1806, taxable on his brother Richard in 1811, called Jonathan Moss in 1809, 1812 and 1813 [PPTL, 1800-13, frames 12, 145, 186, 232, 232, 277, 548], head of a Prince Edward County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:577].

iii. James, born say 1780, listed as a taxable with Ann Moss in Buckingham County in 1799.

iv. Drury, born say 1782, listed with Ann Moss in Buckingham County in 1799 [PPTL, 1782-1809], a "Mulatto" taxable in Albemarle County from 1804 to 1809 and in 1812 [PPTL, 1800-13, frames 186, 233, 277, 326, 369, 505], head of a Nelson County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:712].

v. Alexander, a "Mulatto" taxable in Albemarle County from 1806 to 1813 [PPTL, 1800-13, frames 278, 327, 506, 553], head of a Nelson County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:712], a "FN" taxable in Campbell County in 1814 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 931]. He married Nicey Hill, daughter of Zacker Hill, "people of Colour," 16 November 1814 Campbell County bond with Drury Moss as bondsman [Marriage Bonds & Consents, 1782-1853, M-P, frame 485].

vi. ?Lucy, listed as a "free Negro" in Albemarle County in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-13, frame 553].

vii. Richard5, born say 1795, taxable in Albemarle County in 1811.

 

Other members of the family were

i. Patty, head of a Chesterfield County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

ii. Richard4, born about 1772, a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County on a tithe and a horse from 1792 to 1810 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 144, 184, 470, 543, 799] and head of a Chesterfield County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 10 May 1813: forty one years old, dark brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 188].

iii. Elizabeth, counted with 3 females over the age of sixteen in a list of "free Negroes" in Chesterfield County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

iv. ?Edward3/ Ned, born about 1778, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 June 1813: thirty five years old, black complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 187].

v. ?Sally, married Jeremiah Mayo, "free man of color," 12 October 1807 Chesterfield County bond, Richard Moss security and witness.

vi. Peter, born say 1784, married Fanny Armstrong, daughter of Benjamin Armstrong, 27 December 1809 Campbell County bond, Peter Moss and Benjamin Armstrong bondsmen [Marriage Bonds and Consents, 1782-1853, M-P, frame 502]. He was a "FN" taxable in Campbell County in 1810 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frame 771], head of a Campbell County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:853], and a "Negro" taxable in the northern district of Bedford County in 1814 [PPTL 1806-16, frame 463].

vii. Aggy, head of a Henrico County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:985].

viii. Matilda, head of a Richmond City household of 5 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:326].

ix. Polly, head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:374].

x. Ridley, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 May 1812: ___ years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 162].

 

MOZINGO FAMILY

1.    Edward1 Mozingo, born say 1641, was a "Negro man" whose apprenticeship to Colonel John Walker was completed on 5 October 1672 [McIlwaine, Minutes of the Council, 316]. He was a tenant on Andrew Boyer's land in Old Rappahannock County in March 1680/1. In 1683 the Old Rappahannock County court granted him judgment against Rees Evans for three barrels of Indian corn and ordered him and his wife Margaret to post security for their good behavior towards Colonel John Stone [D&W 6:134-5; Orders 1683-6, 30, 166-7]. Edward's 30 July 1711 Richmond County will was proved 7 May 1712. He left two guns to his son Edward and divided his land and property among his wife Margaret and sons Edward and John who he also named as executors. Edward Barrow was a witness to the will and returned an inventory of the estate [Wills & Inventories 1709-17, 75-6, 87]. He was the father of

2        i. Edward2, born say 1664.

ii. John1, born say 1668, petitioned the Richmond County court on 28 October 1709 for his "nearest Friend" Edward Mazingoe. On 2 April 1712 the Richmond County court reported that he had refused to procession his land in North Farnham Parish where he was living because he did not know the bounds between the land he held under Colonel Pierce's patent and the land of Samuel Bayley [Orders 1711-6, 13]. On 31 May 1733 John Minor brought a suit against him in Westmoreland County court which was agreed to by both parties [Orders 1731-9, 86a].

 

2.    Edward2 Mozingo, born say 1664, brought suit against Edward Barrow in Richmond County, Virginia court on 5 April 1705 [Orders 1702-4, 327]. His mother-in-law Elizabeth Booth mentioned him and his children Sarah and John in her 27 October 1708 Cople Parish, Westmoreland County will, proved 26 January 1708/9. She left Edward 500 pounds of tobacco and five head of cattle, and left his daughter Sarah furniture and pewter dishes. Elizabeth also named her daughter Ann Grimstead, grandchildren William and Thomas Grimstead, and named son-in-law Thomas Grimstead executor [WB 4:169-70]. On 28 October 1709 Edward appeared in Westmoreland County, Virginia court as the "nearest Friend" of Sara Mazingoe in her suit against Thomas Grinstead, executor of the estate of Elizabeth Booth. Grinstead was ordered to deliver to Sarah a bed, furniture, and pewter dishes which were willed to her by Elizabeth Booth. And in the same court Edward and his wife Elizabeth brought a successful suit against Grinstead to deliver to Edward five head of cattle and 500 pounds of tobacco which was his legacy from Elizabeth Booth [Orders 1705-21, 133a]. The Grinstead/ Grimstead family descended from Elizabeth Key, a mixed-race slave who sued for her freedom in Northumberland County in 1656 and later married her white attorney William Grimstead [Northumberland County Record Book 1652-58, 66, 67, 85a, 85b; 1658-66, 27, 43, 44]. Edward Mozingo appeared in Richmond County court numerous times between 1721 and 1752 [Orders 9:61, 97, 284, 343, 358, 370; 10:403; 11:29, 294, 379, 395, 403, 442, 457, 542; 12:48, 69, 79, 340]. On 27 March 1734 he and Ephraim McCarty were acquitted in a trial held in Westmoreland County court in which they were charged with breaking open a tobacco house and stealing tobacco which belonged to Nicholas Minor [Orders 1731-9]. His 10 November 1753 Richmond County will was proved by his son Edward on 1 April 1754. He left his land, tobacco house, and property to his sons Edward, George and John, and pewter dishes to his daughter Margaret. He allowed (his son-in-law) George Henson and (daughter) Margaret Henson to lease the land they were then living on for seven years. He also named his daughter-in-law Hannah and his daughter Sarah Chandler [Wills 1753-67]. Edward2 and Elizabeth were the parents of

i. Edward3, born say 1720, sued in Lancaster County court with John and Gerrard Mozingo by Marmaduke Beckwith on 8 February 1739/40 for 900 pounds of tobacco. On 12 September 1740 Gerrard agreed to serve his master William Ball, Jr., after the expiry of his term of service at the rate of 800 pounds of tobacco per year until the debt was paid in case John or Edward did not pay the judgment [Orders 1729-43, 289]. He was taxable in Richmond County in the district between Tutusky and Rappahannock Bridge from 1782 to 1788: taxable on Edward Mozingo, Jr.'s tithe in 1784, exempt from personal tax in 1785 [PPTL 1782-8, frames 621, 665, 679, 707, 716, 740, 748].

ii. George.

iii. John2, taxable in Richmond County from 1782 to 1788 [PPTL 1782-8, frames 621, 679, 717, 748].

iv. Margaret, presented but not prosecuted by the Richmond County court on 6 January 1730/1 for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1721-32, 546, 562], married Francis Chandler in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County on 18 July 1731 [King, Registers of North Farnham Parish, 135]. She was called the wife of Francis Chandler on 26 May 1741 when the Westmoreland County court presented George Hinson of Washington Parish for living in adultery with her and presented Francis Chandler and Rebecca Payn for cohabiting together. The case against George Hinson was dismissed on 27 February 1741/2 when it was suggested to the court that he had run away [Orders 1739-43, 100, 115a, 134].

v. Sarah, married John Chanler in North Farnham Parish on 25 August 1729 [King, Registers of North Farnham Parish, 135]. He was called John Chandler, a "Mulatto," when he was sued in Westmoreland County, Virginia court for a two pound debt on 30 September 1755 [Orders 1755-8, 7a].

 

Most of their descendants were considered white by 1790. However, three descendants were counted in "A List of Free Mulattoes & Negroes in Westmoreland County" in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:42]:

i. Thomas, taxable in Richmond County in 1784 [PPTL 1782-8, frame 678], taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1787 to 1810 when his name was crossed off the list [PPTL, 1782-1815, frames 310, 333, 443, 521, 587, 707], married Mary Cannady, 24 September 1793 Westmoreland County bond.

ii. Richard, taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1789 to 1801 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1815, frames 341, 426, 484, 501, 532], married Nancy Yardly, 10 May 1796 Westmoreland County bond.

iii. William, taxable in Richmond County in 1788 [PPTL 1782-8, frame 748], taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1790 to 1809 [PPTL 1782-1815, frames 353, 388, 426, 532, 686].

 

MUCKELROY FAMILY

1.    James1 Muckelroy, born say 1720, was a witness to the 10 October 1739 Beaufort County deed from William Carruthers to William Phipps. He purchased 330 acres from Moses Prescott on the north side of Bay River on 2 December 1751. This was land on Chapel Creek adjoining Abraham Johnston [Hoffman, Land Patents, II:667]. He was a "black" taxable with his unnamed wife and William Tyre in Beaufort County in 1755 and with his son in 1764 [SS 837]. The December 1757 Session of the Beaufort County court recorded that he married Eliza Humes, daughter of James Humes, decd., and was appointed guardian to her sister Abigail Humes. He complained to the court that: there is a negro man, Hercules, that falls among the sd. two daughters and another daughter of the sd. decd... [Minutes 1757-61, I:37c]. He purchased 200 acres in the fork of Trent Creek on the south side of Bay River near the Cedar Landing adjoining his own land on 13 June 1770, John Curtis and John Mackelroy witnesses [DB 18:125]. His 23 April 1773 Beaufort County will was proved 20 October the same year. He appointed his wife Elizabeth as executrix and gave land to his children:

i. David, "my plantation."

ii. Adam2, land on the south prong of Trents Creek.

iii. James2, land in the fork of Trent Creek.

iv. Sarah, land on Neale's Creek.

v. Elizabeth, land on Neale's Creek.

vi. Mary Cirtis, land on Raccoon Creek. Perhaps she was the wife of Richard Curtis, a "free negro" taxable with his wife in Beaufort County in 1755 [SS 837].

 

2.    Adam1 Muckelroy, born say 1715, was witness to the 10 October 1739 Beaufort County deed of William Carruthers to William Phipps. He was probably the Adam McCoy who purchased 100 acres on the northwest prong of Bay River on 5 May 1745 with James Mackelroy as witness. He and his wife were taxables with their son Thomas and his wife, and (son?) William in Beaufort County in 1755, and he was taxable on only himself in 1764 [SS 837]. He was taxable on an assessment of 3,384 pounds in 1779 [GA 30.1 by NCGSJ XV:145]. His children were

i. Thomas, born say 1735, taxable with his wife in 1755 in his father's household and in his own household in Beaufort County in 1764 on two "black" tithes. He was head of a Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131].

ii. ?William, born say 1740, taxable in 1755.

 

MUMFORD/ MUNFORD FAMILY

The Mumford family was probably related to Munford Blanks, head of a New Hanover County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:221]. Members of the Munford/ Mumford family in North Carolina and South Carolina were

i. Lydia, head of a Chesterfield County, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:105], perhaps identical to the Lydia Mumford who was head of an Anson County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:233] and 4 in 1810 [NC:28].

ii. Elvia, head of a Chesterfield County, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:105].

iii. Sally Munford, supposedly over 100 years old when she was head of an Anson County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Samuel, head of a Marion District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1810 [SC:79a].

v. Henry Munford, born after 1775, head of a Marion District, South Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [SC:79a] and 3 "free colored" in Anson County in 1830.

vi. Mimy, head of a Darlington District, South Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

 

MUNDAY FAMILY

1.    Cretia Munday, born about 1747, registered in Southampton County on 30 July 1810: age 63, Dark Mulatto, 5 feet 1/2 inch, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 742]. She was probably the mother of

i. Pherebe, born about 1776, registered in Southampton County on 30 July 1810: age 34, Dark Mulatto, 5 feet 2 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 743].

ii. Etheldred, born about 1783, registered in Southampton County in December 1804: age 21, Blk., 5 feet 6 inches, free born. He registered again on 30 July 1810: age 27, Dark Mulatto Man, 5 feet 9 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 316, 740]. He was listed in Southampton County as a "fn" with his wife Abby in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 321, 421].

iii. Jacob, born about 1787, registered in Southampton County on 30 July 1810: age 23, Dark Mulatto Man, 5 feet 8-1/2 inches, free born. He registered again on 12 June 1816 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 741, 1013].

iv. Isaac, listed in Southampton County as a "fn" with his wife Kesiah in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 321, 421].

v. Isham, listed in Southampton County as a "fn" with his wife Judah in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 321, 421].

vi. Thomas, born about 1792, registered in Southampton County on 26 August 1816: age 24, Mulatto, 5 feet 6-1/4 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1024].

 

MUNS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Munds, born say 1748, was a "Molatto" woman living in Sussex County, Virginia, on 19 June 1777 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her children Stephen and Anne Munds [Orders 1777-82, 17]. Elizabeth was taxable in Sussex County from 1789 to 1812: taxable on a horse in 1789; taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1803; taxable on 2 horses from 1810 to 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 96, 106, 204, 233, 265, 553, 600, 614, 651, 706, 787, 820, 841]. She was the mother of

i. Nancy, born 9 December 1770, called Nancy Brown when she registered in Petersburg on 26 January 1798: Nancy Brown, a light brown Mulatto woman, short bushy hair, five feet high, twenty seven years old the 9 Dec. 1797, daughter of Elizabeth Muns of this town a free woman & now wife of Jack Brown a free man [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 128].

ii. Anne, born say 1772, a spinner in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" for Sussex County living on the land of Tom Moore in 1807 [List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1801-1812, frame 33, LVA micrfofilm no. 221].

iii. Stephen, born in January 1774, registered in Petersburg on 9 July 1798: a light brown, straight well made Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, short bushy hair, twenty five Jan. next, born free & raised in the County of Sussex [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 140].

 

MURPHY FAMILY

1.    John Murphy, born say 1754, was a "mulatto" given by Francis Burgess to his son Dawson Burgess by his 5 November 1767 Fauqier County will, proved 26 March 1770, "so long as he shall have by law to serve." He was listed in the inventory of the estate of Francis Burgess with fifteen years left to serve and valued at 25 pounds [WB 1:157-8, 162-3]. He was listed in same district of Faquier County as Dawson Burgess in the 1790 tax list, taxable on 3 horses. He was probably related to William Murphy whose tax was charged to Tunis Johnson in 1790 [PPTL 1790B, pp.13, 16]. He may have been the father of

i. Larkin, a "FN & mulatto above 16" in Prince William County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

ii. Mary, a "FN & mulatto above 16" in Prince William County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

iii. Jesse, a "FN & mulatto above 16" in Prince William County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

 

MURRAY FAMILY

1.    Mary Murray, born say 1700, was the servant of Nicholas Minor on 25 March 1719 when the Westmoreland County court presented her for having an illegitimate "Mulatto" child. The court ordered that she be sold by the churchwardens after she completed her indenture to Minor [Orders 1705-21, 367]. She was probably the mother of

2        i. Ann, born about 1719.

 

2.    Ann Murray, born about 1719, was a "Mulatto woman" living in Yorktown, York County, on 18 June 1753 when she bound her son Gabriel as an apprentice to John Richardson, carpenter and joiner [Deeds & Bonds 5:550]. She was indicted in York County for selling liquor without a license on 19 November 1759 and fined 10 pounds currency. On 21 November 1763 the court presented her for not listing herself as a tithable, and on 16 July 1764 Mary Brown paid her as a witness in the York County suit of James Reade. On 17 November 1766 the court again presented her for not listing herself as a tithable [Judgment & Orders 1759-63, 90, 126; 1763-5, 90, 126, 248; Orders 1765-8, 161, 206]. Her children were

3        i. ?Lucy1, born say 1738.

ii. Gabriel, born about 1746, seven years old when he was bound apprentice to John Richardson of Yorktown on 18 June 1753 [Deeds & Bonds 5:550]. He may have been the Gabriel Murray who sued Robert Goode for trespass, assault and battery in Henrico County on 6 September 1768. The court awarded him 5 pounds currency [Orders 1767-9, 352, 449].

iii. ?Margaret, born say 1748, living in Henrico County on 4 April 1768 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Henrico Parish to bind out her "Mulatto" daughter Milley [Orders 1767-69, 211]. Perhaps one of Milly's children was Charlotte Murray who registered in Chesterfield County on 14 June 1830: thirty two years old, dark brown complexioned, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 721].

 

3.    Lucy1 Murray, Sr., born say 1738, may have been identical to the Lucy Murray, no race indicated, who was living in Chesterfield County on 5 October 1759 when the court dismissed the suit of the churchwardens against her for debt (for having a bastard child?) [Orders 1759-63, 28]. She left a 15 November 1815 Halifax County, North Carolina will, proved in August 1816. She devised 100 acres near Zachariah Archer to her son Mark Murray and 50 acres to David Winborn, no relationship stated; a dollar to each of her daughters Polly Brown and Patty Jones; a heifer to Patty Jones's son William Jones; and a dollar to the heirs of her daughter Fanny Curtis [WB 3:587]. Her children were

4        i. Mark, born about 1760.

ii. ?Lucy2, born say 1761, not named in the will. She married Benjamin James, 8 March 1779 Bertie County bond.

iii. Fanny Curtis, deceased when her mother's will was written. She was called Frances Murray in 1790 when she was head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" [NC:64].

iv. Polly Brown.

v. Patty Jones, mother of William Jones.

 

4.    Mark Murray, born in Virginia about 1760, was head of a household of 1 male and 7 females in District 12 of Halifax County, North Carolina, in the 1786 state census. He was head of a Halifax County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:64], and he was also counted with 9 in his household in Martin County in 1790 [NC:69]. He sold his land in Halifax County to Thomas Winborn, Senior [WB 4:52]. On 23 October 1832 he testified in Halifax County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. He stated that he was about seventy-two years old, born and raised in Caroline County, Virginia, moved from there to Hanover County and from there to Halifax County, North Carolina, about 1792. He gave his age as eighty-nine years on 5 May 1845 when he applied for a pension while living in Wilson County, Tennessee. He stated that he enlisted in 1780, but had no record of his service because he left his discharge papers with his father who died shortly after the Revolution. On 18 September 1851 he gave his age as ninety-six years when he again appeared in Wilson County court and testified that:

his Great Grandmother came from Ireland, had to be sold for her passage, and his parents always told him that a gentleman by the name of Col. Walk brought her. She was free and fair skinned and after serving out her passage Murrey had children by a Negro which accounts for his being mixed blooded.

 

Elizabeth Pope (a white woman) deposed in Smith County Tennessee on 15 October 1851 that:

Mark and his wife use to come across (Deep Creek) to go to meetings on Fishing Creek. They were verry Respectable for coulored people. The old Sady, Marks Mother, was a great midwife was sent for a great deal among the most Respectable people.

 

Thomas Hale deposed in Smith County that:

(Mark) was a man of first rate character although a Mixed Couloured Man ... a light Mulatto, was highly respected ... Mark's Mother was called a Portague.

 

Jesse Grimes testified that as a boy in Halifax County he had often seen Mark joking at log-rollings and house-raisings with other former (white) soldiers about their service in the Revolution [M840-1796, frames 1-57]. In 1850 he was ninety-four years old, living in Wilson County, Tennessee, with (wife?) Lucy, sixty-one years old [TN:221]. Their probable children were

i. John, born about 1784 in North Carolina, a "male Mulatto" living near Mark Murray in the 1850 census for Wilson County, Tennessee [TN:223].

ii. Polly, born about 1805 in North Carolina, living near Mark Murray in 1850 [TN:224].

iii. Martha Richardson, born about 1805, living nearby Mark Murray's household in 1850 [TN:222].

 

MURROW FAMILY

1.    Margaret Murrow, born say 1668, was the servant of Charles Lee on 17 April 1689 when the Northumberland County court ordered that she serve her master additional time for having a child by a "negro" [Orders 1678-98, 460]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. John, a white tithable in the Bertie County, North Carolina list of David Standley from 1769 to 1772 and a "Mulatto" tithable in 1774 [C.R. 10.702.1, box 13].

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