PALMER FAMILY

1.    Ann Palmer, born say 1706, was the servant of Michael Gilbert of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, Virginia on 24 July 1724 when she acknowledged that she had a "Mulatto" child "begott of her body by a negro Man" [Orders 1721-31, 70a]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. John, head of a Loudoun County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:313].

ii. Betty, head of a Queen Ann's County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Samuel, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:165].

 

Another Palmer family:

Priscilla Palmer, born say 1702, was a single white woman of Christ Church Parish, Lancaster County, Virginia, who had a male child by Robert Carter's slave named "Mullatto Billy" on 26 March 1723 [Orders 1721-9, 98-100].

 

PARKER FAMILY

Members of the Parker family of Anne Arundell County were

i. Susan1, born say 1730, five and a half months left to serve when she was listed in Thomas Stockett's Anne Arundel County estate in 1751. She was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:109].

1        ii. Ann, born say 1731.

 

1.     Ann Parker, born say 1732, "a free Mulatto," bound her "Mulatto" son Robert Parker to Thomas Stockett in Anne Arundel County court on 11 June 1751 until the age of twenty-one [Judgment Record 1751-4, 3]. She was listed in the inventory of the Anne Arundel County estate of Thomas Stockett on 10 January 1763:

Mullatto Servants Bound 31 yrs:

Ann Parker about 22 months to serve - 5 pounds

Sue Do 5-1/2 ------ 7/10/0

Tobit Between ten & Eleven yrs old 12 pounds

Pegg between Eight & nine yrs old 8 pounds

Bacon between five & six yrs old 8 pounds

Isaac between three & four yrs old 6 pounds

William twenty months old 3 pounds

Charity about thirteen months old 2/10/0

[Prerogative Inventories 82:46-7].

She was the mother of

i. Robert, born say 1750, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:92].

ii. ?Tobit/ Toby, born about 1752, between ten and eleven years old on 10 January 1763 when he was listed in Stockett's inventory, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 1 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:117].

iii. ?Peg, born about 1754, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:116].

iv. ?Bacon, born about 1757, head of a Montgomery County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 5 "other free" in Allegany County in 1810 [MD:7].

v. ?Isaac, born about 1759.

vi. ?William, born about 1761, head of a Cecil County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:224] and an Anne Arundel County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:93].

vii. ?Charity, born about 1762, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:77].

viii. ?Priscilla, born about 1765, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 7 August 1807: aged forty two years ... complexion dark ... raised in Anne Arundel County [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 43, 44]. She was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:81].

Other members of the Parker family were

i. Sarah1, born about 1755, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 7 August 1807: aged fifty two years ... yellowish complexion ... raised in Anne Arundel County.

ii. Susanna2/ Suck, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:116].

iii. James, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:75].

iv. Andrew, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:75].

v. Jesse, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:81].

vi. Nancy, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:75].

vii. Lucy, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:77].

viii. Sarah2, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 8 April 1819: aged about forty years ... dark Complexion ... free born. She was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:75].

ix. Elizabeth, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County in 1807: aged about twenty five years ... yellowish complexion ... raised in Anne Arundel County.

x. William, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 21 August 1819: aged about thirty six years ... dark Complexion ... free born.

xi. Susanna3, born about 1784, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 4 March 1819: aged about thirty five years ... brown complexion ... free born.

xii. Charity, born about 1786, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 19 March 1823: aged about thirty seven ... brown Complexion ... free born.

xiii. Thomas, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 21 August 1819: a Mulatto man ... aged about twenty six years ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 43, 44, 128, 129, 140, 190].

 

PARKINSON FAMILY

1.   Moses Parkinson, born say 1750, married Sally Cornish ("Molattoes") on 7 January 1771 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 282]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred in 1774 [DSA, RG 2535]. He was called "Moses Parkinson of Indian River Hundred a free Mulatto" in 1791 when the State summoned him to court for "making shooting matches and selling Liquor in smaller measure than allowed by law" [DSA, RG 4805.021, 1755-1791, MS case files]. Moses and Sally were the parents of

i. Moses Cornish, born 29 August 1777, "son of Moses and Sarah Parkeson," whose birth was registered at St. George Protestant Episcopal Church of Indian River Hundred [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 103]. He was head of a Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:326].

ii. ?Major, head of an Accomack County, Virginia household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:47].

iii. ?John, married Sally Handzor, "Mulattoes," on 19 December 1810 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 322].

 

PARSONS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Parsons, born say 1702, was called "Elizabeth Dersons" on 28 August 1722 when she confessed to the Prince George's County court that she had an illegitimate "Malatto" child. The court sold her and her child to her master John Magruder. On 24 March 1723/4 she was called "Elizabeth Parsons, " the servant of John Magruder, when she was presented by the court for having another illegitimate child (no race indicated) on information of James Magruder, the constable of Western Branch Hundred. On 25 August 1724 she confessed to the offense, and the court ordered that she receive fifteen lashes. She was called "Elizabeth Persons" on 28 June 1726 when she confessed to having a "Malatto" child, and the court sold her and her child to John Magruder [Court Record 1720-2, 556, 620-1; 1723-6, 239, 338, 645-6]. She was probably the mother of

i. Page, born about 1721, a "Mollatto fellow named Page aged 29, 2 years to serve" who was listed in the inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Mr. John Magruder in October 1750 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 46:103-5].

 

Other members of a Parsons family in Maryland were

1        i. John, born say 1722.

ii. Catherine, born say 1724, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1745 that she had an illegitimate child by an Indian named William Asquash. The court ordered that she receive ten lashes [Judgment Record 1745-6, 246-7]. (A William Asquash was one of the Choptank Indians who sold land in Dorchester County in 1727 [Land Records 1720-32, Liber old 8, 153]).

2        iii. Thomas, born say 1726.

 

1.    John Parsons, born say 1722, married Sabria Okey, daughter of Robert Okey, before 3 September 1745 when they petitioned the Sussex County, Delaware Orphans Court to divide her father's land among his heirs [Orphans Court 1744-51, 17]. John was called a "mulatto" on 16 May 1747 when his daughter Ann was baptized on 16 May 1747 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 92]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County in 1774. He was the father of

i. Ann, born 16 May 1747.

 

2.    Thomas Parsons, born say 1726, a "mulatto," registered the 18 March 1749 birth of his son John at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 94]. He was the father of

i. John2, born 18 March 1749.

 

Their descendant in Delaware was

i. Jacob, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:255].

 

PATTERSON FAMILY

1.    Margery Patterson, born say 1734, was convicted in Kent County, Delaware, in April 1753 of having a female "Mulatto" child. The court ordered that she receive 39 lashes, be put in the pillory for two hours, be fined 10 pounds currency, and serve a total of 5 years. She was living in Duck Creek Hundred in August 1755 when she was indicted for having a child by a "Negro" [RG 3805.002, Quarter Sessions, 1734-79, frame 225 and August 1755 MS case file indictments]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. James, "N." head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:34].

ii. Peter, "N" head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:46].

iii. Hannah, born 1776-1794, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:32].

 

PECK FAMILY

1.    Ann Peck, born say 1703, confessed to the Prince George's County court on 26 March 1722/3 that she had a "Malatto" child who died before her court appearance. She named the father, "a negroe man nam'd Tom belonging to Esqr. Brooke." The court sold her to her master, Alexander Contee, for seven years. On 25 June 1723 Tom confessed to begetting the child, and the court ordered that he receive fifteen lashes. On 25 August 1724 she confessed to having another child by Tom, and the court ordered her sold for seven years and the child sold until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1720-2, 648; 1723-6, 9, 83, 306, 339-40, 390-1, 558]. She was the mother of

2        ii. Jane, born 15 February 1723.

 

2.    Jane Peck, born 15 February 1723, was called "Mulatto Jane belonging to Alexr. Contee" in Prince George's County court on 24 June 1740 when she was presented for having an illegitimate "Malatto" child. She and her daughter Sarah were sold to her master. On 27 November 1744 the court bound her son Joseph to William Beanes until the age of twenty-one years and ordered that he give the boy one year of schooling and his freedom dues at the completion of the indenture. She could not pay her fine, so she received ten lashes. The court ordered her daughter Priscilla bound to Robert and Edith Richards until the age of sixteen years and ordered that they teach her to read, spin, knit and sew. On 28 November 1749 the court bound her fifteen month old son John to Thomas Contee until the age of twenty-one, and on 22 March 1757 the court bound her seven month old son David to Thomas Contee until the age of thirty-one. On 25 November 1766 she confessed to having another illegitimate child for which the court ordered that she only pay a fine and court costs for which her son Joseph provided security [Court Record 1723-6, 340; 1738-40, 653; 1740-2, 18, 617; 1746-7, 620; 1748-9, 80, 85, 174; 1751-4, 174; 1754-8, 411; 1765-6, 27]. She was the mother of

3        i. Sarah, born 5 February 1740.

ii. Joseph1, born about January 1744, bound to William Beanes on 27 November 1744. John Booker purchased Joseph from Beanes and boarded him with Robert Richards. Booker died and Beanes claimed that Joseph still belonged to him because he had had no right to sell him [Court Record 1748-9, 235-6]. He may have been identical to the Joseph Peck who head of a Baltimore County household of 7 "other free" with Thomas Peck in 1810 [MD:477].

iii. Priscilla, born in October 1747.

iv. John, born about August 1748, a "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:281].

4        v. ?David1, born about September 1756.

 

3.    Sarah Peck, born 5 February 1740, was bound to Alexander Contee by the Prince George's County court on 24 June 1740. She was called "Mulatto Sarah" on 25 June 1765 when the court ordered that she be sold for seven years and sold her two year old son David to John Harrison until the age of thirty-one. She confessed to having another "Mulatto" child on 24 June 1766 and another on 22 March 1768 when the court ordered her sold for a third seven-year term and bound her seven-month-old child Beck to John Harrison until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1764-5, 1, 115; 1766-8, 452, 579]. She was the mother of

i. David2, born about June 1763, two years old on 25 June 1765 when the court sold him as an apprentice to John Harrison until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1765-6, 115]. He was head of a Frederick County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:841]. He registered in Frederick County on 14 June 1806: a yellow negro or Mulatto, about 5 feet 11 Inches high, stout made and of a good countenance, aged about forty three years...was born in Prince George's County in this State, and was brought to this County in the year 1781 by a certain John Harrison, Esq., now deceased, as his servant or slave until he should arrive to the age of thirty one years [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 1].

5        ii. ?Nathaniel, born say 1766.

6        ii. Rebecca1, born July 1767.

 

4.   David1 Peck, born about August 1757, was seven months old on 22 March 1757 when he was bound to Thomas Contee. He was a "free negro" head of a Prince George's County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:259] and 1 "free colored" in Frederick County in 1830. He was the father of

i. Henny, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 27 June 1815: a dark mulatto woman, about 19 years old ... daughter of David Peck Sr., a free man of color.

ii. Polly, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 27 June 1815: a bright mulatto woman, about 16 years old ... daughter of David Peck Sr., a free man of color.

iii. David4, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 10 July 1830: a free black man who was born free ... on Mr. Mackall's plantation and is the son of old David Peck who I daresay you very well know as he was a tenant for Mr. Mackall for many years. He and his wife were born free [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 18, 156].

 

5.    Nathaniel Peck, born say 1766, and his wife Lydia, "free negroes," registered the 1 September 1792 birth of their daughter Rebecca at St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore. He was head of a Baltimore Town household of 6 "other free" in 1790. Perhaps his widow was Mrs. Peck, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:314]. They were the parents of

i. Rebecca2, born 1 September 1792, baptized 3 February 1793 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:64].

ii. ?Mary, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:270].

 

6.    Rebecca Peck, born July 1767, was bound apprentice to John Harrison on 22 March 1768 until the age of thirty-one by the Prince George's County court [Court Record 1766-8, 579]. She was the mother of

i. Joseph2, born about 1780, registered as a free Negro in Prince George's County on 11 March 1813: a dark mulatto man, about 33 years old ... raised in the town of Upper Marlboro in Prince George's County and is a free man, being a descendant of a free woman named Rebecca Peck.

 

Other members of the Peck family were

i.  Thomas, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:265].

ii. Betty, head of a Washington County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:554].

iii. Richard, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 13 January 1818: a Yellow Negroe Man aged about Twenty six years, five feet five inches high, square made ... is the son of Deborah, a free Woman of Colour and a free Born as appears by the affirmation of John Russell [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 81].

         

Eastern Shore of Maryland

1.    Mary Peck, born about 1712, was a spinster white servant of Solomon Horney in March 1758 when she acknowledged in Talbot County court that she had a child by a "Negro." The court ordered her to serve her master another twelve months for his damages and then be sold for seven years [Criminal Record 1755-61, 161]. She was about fifty years old and still had four years to serve on 10 November 1762 when she was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Solomon Horney [Prerogative Inventories 79:453]. She was the mother of

2        i. Frances, born say 1738.

3        ii. Simon, born say 1750.

iii. Patrick, born about 1757, a five-year-old "Mulatto" boy with twenty-six years to serve when he was listed in the 10 November 1762 Talbot County estate of Solomon Horney [Prerogative Inventories 79:453].

 

2.    Frances Peck, born say 1738, won her freedom in Talbot County in 1769 by proving that her mother was a white woman. She was probably identical to Frank Peck who was head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1790, Fanny Peck who was head of a Baltimore City household of 12 "other free" in 1800 [MD:332], and F. Peck, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:77]. She may have been the mother of

i. David3, head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:521].

 

3.    Simon Peck, born say 1750, was head of a Talbot County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:519]. He may have been the father of

i. Louranah, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 24 June 1815: a dark mulatto Woman .. about 33 yrs. of age ... born free and raised in the County.

ii. Henry, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 September 1815: a bright mulatto man about 28 years of age.

iii. Charles, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 23 September 1815: a bright Mulatto man ... about 25 years of age ... born free & raised in the County.

iv. George, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 July 1815: a Black man about five feet Seven Inches high about 21 years of age ... born and raised in the County afsd. and is free born [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 41, 49; 1815-28, 3].

 

PENNINGTON FAMILY

Members of the Pennington family were

i. Mahala, born say 1780, mother of Kitty Danby who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 8 September 1829: bright yellow ... born free in Dorchester County and is the daughter of Mahala Pennington who was also born free about 29 years of age [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 64]. Kitty Danby was probably related to Mary Dansby, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:530] and Andrew Danberry, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:510].

ii. James, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1790, 4 "other free" and 1 white woman 26-46 years old in 1800 [MD:522], 5 "other free" in New Castle County, Delaware, in 1810, and 8 "free colored" in Red Lion Hundred, New Castle County, in 1820 [DE:168].

iii. Philip, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:303].

 

PENNY FAMILY

1.    Ann1 Penny, born say 1680, was the mother of a "Mallatto" man named Sam Penny who was about twenty-six years old on 14 March 1726/7 when the Charles County court ruled that he was born in Charles County, the son of a white woman named Ann Penny, and should have been bound until the age of thirty-one. The court bound him to John Cox for five years [Court Record 1725-7, 411-2]. Ann was the mother of

2        i. Sam, born about 1701.

 

2.    Sam Penny, born about 1701, was living with Cleborn Lomax, Sr., on 14 June 1726 when the Charles County court ordered that he appear in court. On 14 March 1726/7 the court bound him to serve John Cox for five years [Court Record 1725-7, 236, 344, 411-2]. He may have been the father of

i. Ann2, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 6 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Sarah, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 10 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [MD:329]. She may have been the Sarah Penny who was presented by the Charles County court in March 1774 for having an illegitimate child [Court Record 1773-4, 77].

 

PERKINS FAMILY

The Perkins family originated in Accomack County, Virginia, where Esther Perkins had several mixed-race children in the 1730s. Her descendants were in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Louisiana before 1810. Her likely descendants in Maryland and Delaware were

i. Caleb, perhaps the Caleb Perkins who was sued by James Fisher in Sussex County court in May 1742 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 75], taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1785 to 1789 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1784-97], a delinquent taxable in Broadkill and Little Creek Hundreds, Sussex County, in 1790 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2], a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1798, and head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:18].

ii.Luke, taxable in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County in 1790 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2]..

iii. William, indicted in Sussex County court on an unspecified charge in February 1747/8 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 330], a taxable "Molatto" in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County on a cow and calf and 3 shoats in 1796. He was head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:343] and 6 in 1810 [DE:300]. Another William Perkins was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:363].

iv. James, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:101] and 8 in 1810 [DE:363].

v. Aaron, head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438].

vi. Peter, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:363].

vii. Adam, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:62].

1        viii. Frank, born say 1760.

ix. Sampson, a "Molatto" taxable in Pitts Creek, Worcester County in 1783 [MdHR, MSA S1161-11-9, p.4].

 

1.    Frank Perkins, born say 1760, was head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 6 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:514]. He was the father of

i. James, born about March 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 4 August 1810: aged about 21 years last March, a light mulatto, 5' 3 3/4 inches high ... son of a free white woman who is lawfully married to a free mulatto man, and was raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 92].

 

PERLE/ PEARL FAMILY

1.   Robert Perle, born about 1686, was freed by the 14 April 1713 Prince George's County will of Richard Marsham. Marsham called him "Robert (a molatto)...age 28 years" and stipulated that he should serve until the age of thirty-five at which time Robert, his wife and child were to be free. He also stipulated that Robert should build his grandson Leonard Brooke a twenty foot dwelling house and a fifty foot tobacco house, clear of carpenter's wages. Any other children born to Robert's wife while she was a slave were to continue as slaves [Prerogative Wills, Liber 13, folio 514-20]. Robert was listed in Marsham's 15 June 1713 Prince George's County inventory:

Negroes:

one Malato Man Robin 7 years to serve, age 27, 16 pounds

one Malato boy Jemmy 17 years to serve, age 18, 20 pounds

one Malato woman nanny, 7 years to serve, 14 pounds

one Malato boy Daniel, sickly, 2 yrs old, 5 pounds

 

In Negroe Robins house:

one Indifft good flock bed boulster & old blankett 0/10/0

3 worne Stript & Duffils matchcoats 0/9/6

old Iron carpenter's tooles a sett 0/10/0

one Chest 0/5/0

brown thread 0/20/0

2 Casters hatts 0/10/0

12 Ells brown ozn 0/9/6

1 felt hat 0/2/6

1 pl french falls 0/3/0

1 ream writing paper, ink powdr 0/8/0

an old Syth 0/1/6

44 hogs 3 yrs old or thereabts. 26/8/0

6 a yr. old do 1/16/0

3 Shoetes 0/9/0

Hair cloth for sailes 0/14/0

and old plow 0/9/0

a Creens bagg 0/0/6

a pl old Scales and weights 0/2/6

plate at 5-2 per ounce, 82 ounces  21/3/8

[Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Vol. 35A, 299-308].

 

He was called "Robert Pearl, carpenter of Prince George's Co., alias Mulatto Robin," when he purchased land in Prince George County near the Patuxent River and the Beaver Dam Branch from John Cranford for 20 pounds on 14 July 1722/3 and purchased a 100 acre part of Archer's Pasture from Jonathan Prather on 11 July 1724 [Land Records 1720-6, 443, 568 cited by http://members.aol.com/beccabol/maryland.htm]. He sued Charles Drury for assaulting him on 6 October 1727, but the court ruled unanimously on 26 March 1728 that the plaintiff was "a Malata born of a negroe slave and though manumitted by his late master's will" was not qualified to take the oath and prosecute any action at law in the court [Court Record 1728-9, 129]. He was called "Robert Perle of Prince George's County, free Mullatto," on 18 October 1727 when he petitioned the Assembly setting forth that he was rendered incapable by the justices of the county court from recovering his just debts [Archives of Maryland 36:20]. On 5 February 1728 he and Peregrine Makanesse, blacksmith, paid 5 shillings to Benjamin Loyd for a 52 acre part of the Taylortown in the freshes on the west side of the Patuxent River, a 12-1/2 acre part of Taylortown, and two Negroes, fifteen cattle, two horses, a mare, sixteen hogs, household goods, a dwelling house and 1,100 pounds of tobacco due Loyd from Charles Gervis for rent of land [Land Records M:460]. He was called "alias Malatto Robin" when he appeared in Prince George's County court between 1728 and 1735. He sued John Bursh in March 1728, but the case was agreed between them before trial, and he was sued for 972 pounds of tobacco in June 1728. On 25 March 1729 he and Peregrine Mackanesse petitioned the Prince George's County court saying that they had provided 200 pounds sterling security for Benjamin Lloyd's administration of the estate of his father Thomas Lloyd. They testified that Lloyd had mortgaged two parcels of land, two Negroes, one white lad, fifteen head of cattle, two horses, three mares, sixteen hogs, household goods, corn and tobacco on the plantation by a deed executed and acknowledged on 5 February 1728. However, Mackanesse and Perle were unable to get Lloyd to complete the administration of the estate, and they asked that the court either appoint them administrators or release them from their bond. The court rejected their petition. On 11 July 1729 Charles Drury had a case against "Robert Pearle alias Molatto Robin" which was heard by the Court of Appeals [Archives of Maryland 77:621]. On 27 November 1733 Richard Marsham Waring had a suit against him which was agreed to before coming to trial. In November 1735 he petitioned the Prince George's County court deposing that the main road ran through his plantation and people riding through were always leaving the gate open. The court appointed a jury to view the road and make a decision. On 22 June 1736 he and Thomas Swann provided 71 pounds security for John Orchard's administration of Darby Rine's estate, and he purchased the thirty-one-year indenture of Mary Wedge's "Malatto" child [Court Record 1728-9, 52, 209, 220, 410; 1732-4, 323-4, 452-4, 587, 655, 672-3; 1734-5, 642; 1736-8, 51, 60-1]. On 26 November 1736 he and his wife Ann sold 44 acres of Archer's Pasture near Cabbin Branch to Henry Holland Hawkins, Gentleman, of Charles County [Land Records T#1:423 cited by http://members.aol.com/beccabol/maryland.htm]. He leased 200 acres in Carrollton in March 1745 for seventeen and a half years [Prince George's County Land Records Liber BB, no. 1, fol. 264-5 cited by Hoffman, Princes of Ireland, Planters of Maryland, 221]. He was the overseer of the highway in the lower part of Monocacy Hundred on 23 August 1748 when the grand jury presented him for neglecting his duty. The court fined him 500 pounds of tobacco [Court Record 1746-8, 332; 1748-9, 45]. He and (his son) Thomas Pearl recorded their cattle marks in Frederick County court on 20 January 1748/9. By 7 October 1751 Frederick County deed he sold 124 acres of Archer's Pasture on the west side of the Patuxent River to the Rev. John Eversfield, rector of St. Paul's Parish in Prince George's County, for 6,000 pounds of tobacco. On 8 November 1756 he purchased 150 acres called Flint's Grove on the west side of Seneca Creek in the part of Frederick County which became Montgomery County in 1776 and sold this land on 2 December 176_. He left a 3 September 1765 Frederick County will, proved 4 October 1765, by which he gave slaves Peter, Rachel, Nan and Harry, a horse and furniture to his son Daniel; gave slaves Lucy, Peg, Jenney, Jo and Li_s to his son James; and named his children Thomas Pearl, Charles Pearl, Ann Marshall and Catherine Dean and gave four barrels of corn and a barrel of wheat to Elizabeth Jervis [Frederick County Land Records B:1; F:93-5; G:318; Prerogative Wills 33:351 cited by http://members.aol.com/beccabol/maryland.htm]. Elizabeth Jervis, widow, was convicted by the Frederick County court of stealing sixty-seven pieces of silver Spanish dollars and a gold French Guinea from his estate. Thomas Pearl, James Pearl, Basil Pearl, William Graves and Mary Marshall were witnesses against her. She received thirty lashes, a half hour in the pillory and was ordered to pay 3,992 pounds of tobacco to Robert's executors James and Basil Pearl [Judgment Record 1763-6, 800, 807, 808-10, 822]. Robert was the father of

2        i. Daniel1, born about 1711.

ii. Anne, born say 1722, a "Mulatto" woman who married a white planter named William Marshall. The Prince George's County court ordered that he be sold as a servant for seven years. On 23 August 1743 the court ordered him released from prison so the case could be tried at the Provincial Court [Court Record 1743-4, 17].

iii. James, left a Frederick County will naming his wife Elizabeth as executrix and designating Basil and Thomas Pearle as next of kin [Frederick County Wills, box 5, folder 77, MdAA cited by Hoffman, Princes of Ireland, Planters of Maryland, 222].

iv. Catherine, born say 1729, living at Monocacy Hundred on 25 August 1747 when the grand jury of Prince George's County presented her for bastardy. The presentment was quashed on 24 November 1747, perhaps because she was married [Court Record 1747-8, 90, 297]. She was married to a member of the Dean family when her father made his will.

v. Thomas, son of Robert Pearl, recorded his cattle mark in Frederick County court on 20 January 1748/9. He confessed in Frederick County court to assault against Elizabeth Jervis in June 1763 [Judgment Record 1763-6, 28, 42].

vi. Basil1, head of an Allegany County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 ("Basil Perril, Senr") [MD:1].

vii. Charles, master of John Grimes who was bound to him as an apprentice carpenter until the age of twenty-one by the Prince George's County court on 22 June 1762 [Court Record 1761-3, 188]. Charles was head of an Allegany County household of 5 "other free" and 5 slaves in 1800 [MD:5].

 

2.    Daniel1 Pearl, born about 1711, a "Mullato," married a white woman named Elizabeth Graves before November 1742 when the Prince George's County court presented her for the offense on information of Thomas Wilson and Edward Mobberly. The case was dismissed by order of the Attorney General on 26 March 1744/5. Daniel was sued on 25 March 1745/6 by William Cumming for a debt of 1,600 pounds of tobacco [Court Record 1742-3, 191; 1744-6, 26, 504, 578]. He gave his age as fifty-seven and named his father Robert Pearl when he made a deposition in a Frederick County land dispute on 1 April 1768. He left a 5 September 1774 Frederick Town will, proved 15 November 1774, by which he directed that slaves Nann and Rachel be sold to pay his debts, gave a cow and calf to his son Basil, gave 5 shillings to his daughter Ann Burgis and divided the remainder of his estate among his children Joseph, Robert, Jeremiah and Sary Pearl who he ordered to take care of his son William Pearl; ordered his boy Kitt to be set free at age twenty-one; ordered his boy Jack who was given to him by the court to be delivered to his daughter Sary Pearl; and named his sons Joseph and Basil as executors [Land Record Liber L:518-20; Prerogative Court Wills 33:351 by http://members.aol.com/beccabol/maryland.htm]. He was the father of

i. Basil2, head of an Allegany County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 ("Bazel Perril, Junr" [MD:3].

ii. Joseph, sued John Johnson in Frederick County court in March 1764 for assault [Judgment Record 1763-6, 197].

iii. Robert2

iv. Jeremiah.

v. Sarah, posted bond of 10 pounds to appear in Frederick County court in August 1766 to testify against Margaret and Samuel Park [Judgment Record 1763-6, 1034], perhaps identical to S. Pearl, head of a Frederick County household of 3 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [MD:598].

vi. Ann Burgis, perhaps the wife of Edward or John Burgess, both called "Molatto" when they were listed as debtors to the Frederick County estate of  Lawrence Owen about 1762 [Prerogative Inventories 77:337-8].

ii. John, a "Molatto" who owed 8 shillings to the Frederick County estate of Lawrence Owen about 1762 [Prerogative Inventories 77:337-8].

vii. William.

 

Other Perle/ Pearl/ Perrill descendants were

i. Mary Perrill, head of an Allegany County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:7].

ii. Daniel2, head of a Prince George's County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:42].

iii. P., head of a Frederick County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:598].

 

PHILLIPS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Phillips, born say 1700, was the servant of Eliza Stevens of Saint Peter's Parish in March 1720 when the Talbot County court ordered that she serve her mistress an additional year for stealing petticoats and a bonnet from her mistress. In March 1724/5 she confessed to the court that she had an illegitimate child by "Negroe Will, the slave of Elizabeth Phillips." The court ordered that she be sold as a servant for seven years. She confessed to having another child by William in March 1725/6. She was the servant of William Stevens in November 1731 when she was convicted of fornication and given thirty lashes [Judgment Record 1720, 14; 1725-6, 64-5; 485-6; 1731-3, 463]. Elizabeth may have been the ancestor of

2        i. Jane, born say 1748.

3        ii. Richard, born say 1760.

iii. John, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

iv. Henry, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:165] and 6 in 1810 (H. Phillips) [MD:871].

v. Robert, head of a Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:845].

 

2.    Jane Phillips, born say 1748, was the servant of Moses Alford in August 1767 when she was convicted by the Kent County court of having a "Molatto" child. The court sold her son Anthony Phillips until the age of thirty one to her master for 5 shillings [Criminal Docket 1766-71, n.p.]. She was the mother of

i. Antony, head of a Harford County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:800].

 

3.    Richard Phillips, born say 1760, was head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" in 1790, 13 in 1800 [MD:471], and 8 in 1810 [MD:178]. He was probably the father of

i. Daniel, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 31 October 1809: yellow complexion, free born and raised in the said county [Certificates of Freedom, 33].

 

Anne Arundel County

1.    Mary Phillips, born say 1714, servant of William Lock, was convicted by the Anne Arundel County court in June 1734 of having an illegitimate child "begott by a Negro." The court bound her six-month-old daughter to her master until the age of thirty-one, and in March 1735/6 the executor of Lock's estate brought her into court to be sold for seven years [Judgment Record 1734-6, 4, 410]. She was listed in the inventory of the Anne Arundel County estate of William Lock, Esquire, in 1734:

Mary Phillips infirm 2 years & 4 months to serve - 5 pounds

Molato Dick 6 years to serve - 22 pounds

Negroes:

Sam a Molato 2 years old to be free at thirty one - 6 pounds

[Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1734, 191-4]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. John, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Betsey, born about 1770, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 7 August 1807: aged thirty seven years ... complexion yellowish ... raised in Anne Arundel County [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 43].

iii. Poll, head of an Anne Arundel household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:81].

 

PICKETT FAMILY

1.    Mary Pickett, born say 1703, was the servant of Edward Offutt on 27 August 1723 when she confessed in Prince George's County court that she had a "Malatto" child. The court sold her and her child to William Offutt [Court Record 1723-6, 77, 139]. She was probably the mother of

i. Sarah Pickart, born say 1725, mother of a "Molatto" son, Stafford, who was born in Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia on 22 October 1757 [Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Registry 1724-76, 192].

ii. William1, head of a Montgomery County, Pennsylvania household of 5 "other free" in 1790, perhaps the William Pickett who was head of a Philadelphia County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

 

PLOWMAN FAMILY

1.    Mary Plowman, born say 1685, was a "Spinster" presented by the Kent County, Delaware Court in May 1704 for having a bastard child by Frank, "A Negro Slave lately belonging to Cornelia Curtis."   The court ordered that she receive twenty-one lashes and that she serve her master, Daniel Rutty, additional time for paying her court fees. Frank received thirty-nine lashes, and his master, Hugh Luffe, was ordered to pay his costs. In August 1706 she came into court and bound her "Mollatoe" daughter, Rose, to Daniel Rutty and his wife Eleanor until the age of twenty-one [Court Records 1703-1717, 5b, 50b]. She was the mother of

i. Rose, born about 1704.

 

PLUMMER FAMILY

The Plummer family descended from a young white woman who was convicted by the Calvert County court of having a child by a "Negro" in January 1692. In August 1693 her father, Thomas Plummer of Anne Arundel County, appealed to the Council of Maryland to reduce her fine of 6,000 pounds of tobacco [Archives of Maryland 8:351-2]. Her daughter was probably the ancestor of

1        i.    Cupid, born say 1760.

ii.    Thomas, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:16].

 

1.    Cupid Plummer, born say 1760, was head of a Prince George's County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1800 [MD:281]. His wife was identifed as Milly Plummer when their children obtained certificates of freedom in Prince George's County. They were the parents of

i. Eliza, born about 1786, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County between 29 June and 28 July 1826: a dark mulatto woman, about 40 years old ... daughter of Milly Plummer.

ii. Becky, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 1 April 1820: Dr. William Beanes proved to the clerk's satisfaction that Becky Plummer, a black woman about 30 years old ... has a dark complexion ... daughter of a free man of color named Cupit Plummer and his wife Milly, his wife, who is also free. Becky was born and raised in Prince George's County.

iii. Milly, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 10 March 1828: about 30 years old ... daughter of Milly Plummer [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 34, 57, 73].

 

POULSON FAMILY

1.    Hannah Polson, born say 1725, was the servant of Edward Day on 6 November 1745 when she confessed in Baltimore County court that she had "a Negro basterd child latly born of her body." The court ordered that she serve her master an additional seven years and sold her daughter Nan to her master until the age of thirty-one [Proceedings 1743-6, 748-9]. Her descendants were

i. Joseph, born about 1769, a seven-year-old "Mulatto" bound to William Smith of Harford County in 1776 [Maryland Historical Society Bulletin, vol. 35, no.3]. He was head of an Allegeny County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:15].

ii. John, born before 1776, head of a Wilmington Borough, New Castle County, Delaware household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:186].

 

PRATT FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Pratt, born about 1694, an eighteen-year-old "mallatto Girle," was the daughter of Dido who was set free by the will of Major Thomas Truman on condition she serve another ten years. Elizabeth was detained as a servant by the widow of John Sotheron on 12 August 1712 when the Charles County court ruled that she be discharged from service [Judicial Records 1711-5, E-2:152]. Elizabeth was apparently the "Mallatto child" who was valued at 5 pounds in the 1 May 1712 Charles County inventory of John Southeron [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Vol. 33B, 140]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Daniel, head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:126], 4 in 1810 [DE:85], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:79].

ii. Polly, born about 1770, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 19 October 1816: a negro woman ... now about 43 years of age ... rather of a light Complexion ... born free and raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1815-28, 48].

iii. Samuel, born before 1776, head of a Kent County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

 

PRATTIS/ PROTEUS FAMILY

1.    Sarah Protice, born say 1715, was presented by the Queen Anne's County court in March 1770 for failing to list herself as a taxable. In May 1771 the court approved her petition to be levy free for the future [Judgments 1771-80, 6]. She may have been related to Isaac Bently who was described as a "mulatto fellow... alias Protus" on 14 August 1760 when Richard Tilghman Earle of Queen Anne's County advertised in the Maryland Gazette that he had run away with an English convict servant man named Benjamin Williams [Green, The Maryland Gazette, 1727-61, 251]. She may have been the ancestor of

2        i. Rebecca Proteus, born say 1735.

3        ii.Charles1 Pratis, born say 1750.

iii. William Prattice, "F.N." head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1810, listed twice [MD:33, 47], head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:13].

 

2.    Rebecca Proteus, born say 1735, was a spinster "Mulatto" woman living in Queen Anne's County in March 1754 when the was fined 30 shillings for having an illegitimate child named Margaret. Charles Conner was her security for her maintenance of the child [Criminal Record 1751-9, n.p.]. She was a spinster of Christ Church Parish who was convicted in Queen Anne's County court of stealing a hog worth 100 pounds of tobacco in June 1768 [Judgment Records 1766-7, part 1, CD image 100]. She was the mother of

i. Margaret, born about 1754.

 

3.     Charles1 Prattis, born say 1750, was head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" in 1790. He may have been the father of

i. Charles2, born 1 October 1769, registered in Caroline County on 20 July 1815: free born yellow complexion aged 46 in October next [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1863, p. 72].

ii. Isaac, born 28 October 1792, registered in Caroline County on 14 November 1814: negro man Isaac Prattis was free born yellow compexion raised in County of Caroline 22 years old 28 October last [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1863, p. 68].

 

PRISS/ PRESS FAMILY

1.    Priscilla, born say 1688, was called "Priss alias Priscilla a Malatta or Mustee bigg with a bastard Child got in Somerset County in Maryland" in Accomack County court on 7 August 1706 when Edward Bagwell, "Indian," appeared in court and agreed to have her child bound to him [Orders 1703-9, 75]. Her child was

2        i. William, born in 1706.

 

2.    William Priss/ Press, born in 1706, was called "an Indian who was born in Accomack (County) of the body of a free Negro called Priscilla" in March 1730/1 when he was fined 1,000 pounds of tobacco for failing to list himself as a tithable in Northampton County, Virginia. Thomas Fisherman, who was also an Indian, was paid 1,000 pounds of tobacco for informing on him [Mihalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 239]. William was apparently the ancestor of the following members of the Press family:

i. Littleton, married Molly Fisherman 14 December 179? Northampton County bond, Reubin Reed security.

ii. Elsey, head of an Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:160].

iii. Tabby, married Thomas Francis, 26 December 1796 Northampton County bond, Edmund Press security.

iv. Molly, married Sam Beavans, 19 August 1797 Northampton County bond, Abraham Lang security.

v. Edmund, security for the 24 September 1796 Northampton County marriage of Solomon Beavans and Esther Casey.

vi. ?John, head of a Sussex County, Delaware family of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:375].

 

PRICE FAMILY

Delaware

1.    Eleanor Price, born say 1685, was living in Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in May 1703 when she was presented by the court for "Fornication with A Negro Man named Peter Belonging to Mr. John Walker" (their master). She pleaded guilty and received twenty-one lashes and was ordered to serve her master an additional eighteen months [Court Records 1699-1703, 80b]. In May 1708 the Kent County court bound her child, Jeremia, to John and Daniel Walker, sons of John Walker, until the age of twenty-one [Court Records 1703-17, 72b]. Her son was

2         i. Jeremiah1, born 15 March 1703.

 

2.    Jeremiah Price, born 15 March 1703, was bound to John and Daniel Walker of Kent County, Delaware, in May 1708 until the age of twenty-one [Court Records 1703-17, 72b]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Jacob, a "Molatter man" taxable in the North West Fork Hundred, Sussex County in an undated tax list, about 1780.

ii. William, head of a Montgomery County, Pennsylvania household of 7 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Peter, head of a Delaware County, Pennsylvania household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

iv. Josiah, head of a Franklin County, Pennsylvania household of 2 "other free" and 1 white woman in 1790.

v. Thomas, head of a Montgomery County, Pennsylvania household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

vi. Catherine, head of a Chester County, Pennsylvania household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

Maryland

1.    Jane Price, born say 1727, was the indentured servant of Hugh Eccleston of Great Choptank Parish, Dorchester County on 10 November 1745 when she confessed to having a "Molatto" child by a "Negroe" [Judgment Record 1744-5, 475]. She was a "Malatto Woman" who still had ten years to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the Dorchester County estate of Thomas Eccleston on 31 August 1747 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1747-1748, 264]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Rachel, born say 1757, a spinster servant who had a "Mulattoe" child during her service and was sold by the Caroline County court for seven years after the completion of her service. The court also sold her son Stephen, born 22 May 1777, until the age of thirty-one for 25 pounds [Criminal Record 1774-8, 369-70].

ii. Isaac, head of a Caroline County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Jere2, head of an Octararo, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

PRIDE FAMILY

1.  Southy Pride, born about 1738, was born in Sussex County, Delaware, and was twenty-one years old when he enlisted in Captain John Wright's Company in the French and Indian War on 11 May 1759 [Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 18, 25]. He married Eunice Hermon (Harmon), "Melattoes," on 13 May 1772 in Sussex County [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 284]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County in 1774. They may have been the parents of

i. Thomas, head of a Broadcreek, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391] and 5 "free colored" in Nanticoke Hundred in 1820 [DE:314].

ii. Peter, married Nancy Oakey, "free Mulattoes," on 12 February 1803 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 319]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:466] and 4 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:314].

iii. Ben, head of Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:27].

iv. Comfort, head of a Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:413].

v. Edward, head of a Appoquinimin Hundred, New Castle County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:147].

 

PRITCHETT FAMILY

1.    Ann Pritchard, born say 1748, was a spinster living in Queen Anne's County on 10 May 1767 when she had an illegitimate "Molatto" child by a "Negro man." The court ordered that she be sold for seven years after she completed her service to James Sudler [Judgment Records 1766-7, part 1, CD image 100]. She was probably the mother of the five-year-old "Mulatto" girl serving until the age of twenty-one when she was listed in the Queen Anne's County inventory of James Sudler on 8 April 1773 [Prerogative Inventories 113:199]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Silas Pritchett, manumitted by Solomon Barwell in Kent County, Delaware, on 20 October 1786 [Delaware Archives RG 3555.55], head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:63].

 

PROCTOR FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth1 Proctor, born say 1687, was the servant of Mrs. William Boreman (Boarman), Jr., on 12 June 1705 when the Grand Jury of Charles County, Maryland, presented her for having an illegitimate "Mollatto" child. She was ordered to serve her master another two years after the expiration of her indenture and her child was bound to Boarman on 14 August that year when she appeared in court and admitted her guilt. She was presented for the same offense on 9 March 1708/9. She admitted her guilt in court on 8 June 1709, and the court ordered her to serve an additional seven years and ordered her child bound to Boarman until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1704-10, 126, 146, 448, 469-70]. She was living on 60 acres of land in Charles County which belonged to William Boarman, Sr., when he made his 8 April 1720 will. And she was living on land adjoining William Boarman of Charles County on 26 February 1728/9 when he wrote his will [Baldwin, Maryland Calendar of Wills, V:10; VI:118]. Her own 3 February 1740 Charles County will was proved 15 March 1743. She left her entire estate to her son Charles Proctor [WB AC:166]. She was the mother of

2        i. Charles1, Sr., born say 1705.

3        ii. a child, born before 9 March 1708/9.

 

2.    Charles1 Proctor, Sr., born say 1705, received a Charles County deed of gift from his mother, Elizabeth Proctor, of four cows, a steer, two calves, a heifer, nineteen hogs, and household goods on 4 June 1727 [DB L-2:366]. He was a taxable in Trinity Parish Upper Hundred, Charles County, in 1758, head of a household which included (his sons?) Benjamin and Charles, Jr. He owned land in Charles County on 1 January 1762 when he leased a tract adjoining his, called "Chesam," from his neighbor Barton Wathin for ten years at one thousand pounds of tobacco per year. The lease required that he use no more than three taxables besides himself to work the land [Liber L-3, 140-1]. He was sued for debt in Charles County court by John and James Jameison in November 1771 [Court Records 1770-2, 126]. He was counted in the Constable's Census for Charles County in 1778 and taxable in the 3rd District of Charles County in 1783 [MSA 1161-4-10, p.10]. He may have been the father of

i. Benjamin, born say 1738, taxable in Charles County in 1758, sued for debt in Charles County court by Samuel Hanson in November 1767 [Court Records 1767-70, 39]. He was counted in the Constable's Census for Charles County in 1778 and was taxable in the 3rd District of Charles County in 1783 [MSA 1161-4-10, p.9].

ii. Charles2, Jr., born say 1740, taxable in Charles County in 1758, a taxable in the 3rd District of Charles County in 1783 [MSA 1161-4-10, p.10] and a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 7 "other free" in 1790. On 12 November 1760 the Charles County court presented him for begetting an illegitimate child by Jean Robinson, the servant of John Hanson, Sr. Thomas James Boarman was his security [Court Record 1760-2, 88, 90].

iii. Leonard, born say 1742, sued in Charles County court by Samuel Hanson in November 1767 for a debt of 1,350 pounds of tobacco owed since 23 February 1765 [Court Records 1766-7, 687]. He was listed among Charles County residents who took the oath of fidelity in 1778 and was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

3.    _____ Proctor, born before 9 March 1708/9, an illegitimate child born to Elizabeth Proctor in Charles County, may have been the parent of

i. Catherine, born say 1730, presented by the Charles County court in March 1748/9 for having an illegitimate child (no race indicated). The court ordered that she receive twelve lashes and serve her master Thomas Reading an additional year and a half [Court Record 1748-50, 350-1].

4        ii. William, born say 1730.

iii. Thomas1, born say 1734, taxable head of a Trinity Parish Upper Hundred, Charles County household in 1758, counted in the Constable's Census for Charles County in 1778, and taxable in the 3rd District of Charles County in 1783 [MSA 1161-4-10, p.10]. He and Samuel Collins were "Mulatto" heads of a Charles County household of 12 "other free" in 1790.

 

4.    William1 Proctor, born say 1730, was a taxable head of a Trinity Parish Upper Hundred, Charles County household in 1758. He was sued in Charles County court for debt by John and James Jameison in November 1771 [Court Records 1770-2, 126]. He took the oath of fidelity in Charles County in 1778. He was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 5 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:512]. He was the father of

i. Charles3, born say 1755, called "Charles Proctor (of William)" when he was counted in the 1778 Constable's Census for Charles County [Liber X-3:630-40]. He may have been the Charles Proctor who died while serving in the Revolutionary War [Archives of Maryland 18:150].

 

Other members of the family in Maryland were

i. Basil, born say 1755, counted in the Constable's Census for Charles County in 1778, head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:511] and 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:315].

ii. Francis, born say 1755, counted in the Constable's Census for Charles County in 1778 and taxable in the 3rd District of Charles County in 1783 [MSA S1161-4-10, p.10], a Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

5        iii. Henry, born say 1755.

6        iv. Joseph, born say 1760.

7        v. Thomas2, born say 1762.

vi. Eleanor, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1790, perhaps identical to Eleaius Proctor, head of a Charles County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:565].

vii. Daniel, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1790. He was the father of John Proctor, born about 1786, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 7 August 1809: a Mullatto man ... yellow complected ... about 23 years of age. Is the identical person named in a manumission from Daniel Procter his Father to him [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 76].

8        viii. Isaac, born say 1769.

ix. Alexander, head of a Charles County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

x. Robert, head of a Charles County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

xi. Cloe, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

xii. Michael, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

xiii. Elizabeth2, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790, married John Butler in St. Mary's (Roman Catholic) Mattawoman Parish, Charles County on 10 February 1793. The couple required a dispensation because they were related within the third degree of consanguinity which was equivalent to being second cousins [Colonial Dames of America, Records of St. Mary's Parish, 1793-1861, 161].

xiv Jacob, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 3 "other free" in Montgomery County in 1800 [MD:216].

xv. Tenney, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

xvi. Susanna, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

xvii. Milley, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

xviii. Jennett, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

xix. James1, "taxable in the 3rd District of Charles County in 1783 [MSA 1161-4-10, p.9], a Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 7 in 1800 [MD:517].

xx. Ann, "free Mulatto" head of a Prince George's County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:267].

xx1. Raph, head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:331].

 

5.    Henry Proctor, born say 1755, was counted in the Constable's Census for Charles County in 1778 and was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 11 in 1810 [MD:315]. He was one of the drafts and substitutes from Charles County who were discharged from service in the Revolutionary War on 3 December 1781 [Archives of Maryland 48:10]. He and his wife Ann were the parents of

i. Cornelius, baptized 29 March 1807 in St. Mary's Mattawoman Parish in Charles County. Elenora Proctor was the godmother.

ii. Catherine, baptized 21 September 1817 [Colonial Dames of America, Records of St. Mary's Parish, 1793-1861, 16, 20].

 

6.    Joseph Proctor, born say 1759, was taxable in Luke Going's Loudoun County household in 1774 [Tithables 1758-99, 768] and a "F.N. taxable on a horse in Loudoun County in 1800 and 1803 [PPTL 1798-1812]. He may have been thee "Mulatto" Joseph Proctor who was head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790. He was head of a Abrams Plains, Granville County, North Carolina household of 2 "free colored" men in 1820 [NC:24]. He appeared in Granville county court on 7 May 1835 to make a declaration to obtain a pension for service in the Revolution. He stated that he was about seventy-three-years old and was drafted from St. Mary's County, Maryland, where he was born and resident. Two of his older brothers died in the service quite young, under the age of twenty. He, together with some others who had stayed behind, were sent for and carried to Annapolis. Someone paid him for taking his place. He was placed in Pendergass's Company but spent most of his time in the hospital on account of the ague and fever. He was sent to Frederickstown sometime in the Winter and guarded the Hessian troops and the magazines. His claim was rejected because there was a record of a Joseph and James Proctor listed next to each other on a list of arrears paid, but there was no way to tell which of the two had been paid [National Archives pension file R8497, http://www.fold3.com]. He and Elizabeth Proctor were the parents of

i. Elizabeth, baptized 2 March 1794 in St. Mary's Mattawoman Parish, Charles County [Colonial Dames of America, Records of St. Mary's Parish, 1793-1861, 7].

 

7.    Thomas2 Proctor, born say 1762, was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 3 in 1800 [MD:512]. He may have been the Tom Proctor whose burial was recorded in St. Mary's Mattawoman Parish between 1816 and 1819. He and his wife Anney(?) were the parents of

i. Cornelius, born 16 September, baptized in St. Mary's Mattawoman Parish in 1806 [Colonial Dames of America, Records of St. Mary's Parish, 1793-1861, 15, 23].

 

8.    Isaac Proctor, born say 1769, was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 5 in 1800 [MD:512]. He married Elizabeth Butler in St. Mary's (Roman Catholic) Mattawoman Parish on 29 September 1794. The couple required a dispensation because they were related within the second degree of consanguinity which was equivalent to being first cousins. They were the parents of

i. Ann, born 1 March, baptized in St. Mary's Mattawoman Parish on 1 April 1795 [Colonial Dames of America, Records of St. Mary's Parish, 1793-1861, 9].

 

 

Talbot County and Delaware:

1.    Mary Proctor, born say 1727, was a "Mulatto" spinster living in Saint Peter's Parish, Talbot County, in November 1747 when the court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro" person. The court sold her for seven years and her nine-month-old child Daniel to William Moodey for thirty-one years [Judgment Record 1747-50, n.p.]. She was the ancestor of

i. Daniel, born about 1747, convicted in Talbot County court in June 1767 of stealing 50 clapboards belonging to Samuel Bowman. He was ordered to receive 30 lashes, stand in the pillory and pay four times the value of the goods which amounted to 120 pounds [Criminal Record 1767-74, n.p.]. He was head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1790. He was the father of John Proctor, born about 1786, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 7 August 1809: a Mullatto man ... 5 ft. 8 in. high, yellow complected ... about 23 years of age. Is the identical person named in a manumission from Daniel Procter his Father to him [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 76].

ii. ?James2, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:325] and 6 "free colored" in Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County, in 1820 [DE:396]. He was called a "free Negro" in May 1793 when the Sussex County court charged him with having an illegitimate child by Nicey Dutton [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 521].

iii. ?Renney, born 1776-94, head of Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:396].

 

PROUT FAMILY

Members of the Prout family of Maryland were

i. Ann, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:101]

ii. Arthur, born about 1743, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 21 June 1807: aged sixty four years ... Complexion Black ... raised in Anne Arundel County [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 40].

iii. Isaiah, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:97].

iv. Jacob, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:97].

v. Catherine, born about 1761, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 15 May 1807: free born ... about the age of forty one years, her complexion is a mulatto and was raised at the head of south river in Anne Arundel County.

vi. Sarah, born abut 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 30 June 1807: thirty nine years of age ... her complexion is yellowish ... raised in Ann Arundel County [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 14, 42].

vii. James, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:101].

viii. William, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:101].

ix. Fanny, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:316].

x. Philip, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:316].

xi. Cate, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:330].

xii. Robert, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:101].

xiii. Nancy, head of a Washington, D.C. household of 1 "other free" in 1800.

xiv. Kitty, born about 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 15 June 1819: aged about thirty years ... brown Complexion ... free born.

xv. Frederick, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 2 September 1811: about twenty one years of age ... dark mulatto ... free born.

xvi. Philip, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 29 May 1816: about twenty three years ... brown complexion .. free born.

xvii. Harriet, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 13 November 1818: aged about twenty one years ... light Complexion ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 14, 82, 125, 138].

 

PUCKHAM FAMILY

1.    John1 Puckham, born say 1660, was an Indian who married Anthony Johnson's granddaughter, Joan Johnson, in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, Maryland, on 25 January 1682/3:

John Puckham an Indian baptised by John Huett minister on 25th day of January one thouseand six hundred eighty two And the said John Puckham & Jone Johnson negro were married by the said minister ye 25th February Anno Do./ Maryland.

Clayton Torrence surmised that John may have been from the Monie Indian Town which was not far from the home of Joan Johnson's likely father, John1 Johnson of Wicomico Creek [Torrence, Old Somerset]. And Thomas Davidson suggested that the name Puckham may have been derived from the Nanticoke Indian village of Puckamee which then existed in northern Somerset County [Davidson, Free Blacks, 32]. John Puckham may have been deceased on 13 June 1699 when Joan Puckham bound her sons John and Richard as apprentices in Somerset County court [Judicial Record 1698-1701, 162]. Their children were

2        i. ?Abraham, born say 1685.

ii. John2, born 1 December 1686, bound apprentice by his mother on 13 June 1699.

iii. ?Susannah, born say 1688, admitted in Somerset County court that she had an illegitimate child by John Candley in 1706 and by Anthony Smith in 1708 [Judicial Record 1705-6, 302; 1707-11, 100, 133]. She was probably identical to Sue Puccum whose illegitimate child by Thomas Britt was baptized in St. Anne's Parish, Anne Arundel County on 28 February 1719/20 [Wright, Anne Arundel County Church Records, 86]. He may have been identical to the Thomas Britt who was the servant of Captain Tunstall of Somerset County on 10 August 1708 when his age was adjudged at fifteen years [Judicial Record 1707-11, 133].

3        iv. Richard1, born 10 March 1690.

 

2.    Abraham Puckham, born say 1685, was taxable in the Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County household of Jacob Crouch in 1723 and 1724 [List of Taxables]. In March 1723/4 Elizabeth Crouch, administrator of Robert Crouch, sued Abraham in Somerset County court for two pounds, six shillings which he had owed since December 1718. He was taxable in the household of Giles Boushaw in Wicomico Hundred in 1725, in the Monie Hundred household of Philip Covington in 1727, and in his own household in Manokin Hundred in 1728. In November 1729 his wife, Honor Norgate, the servant of Philip Covington, and he, called "husband of aforesaid Honour," sued Covington for her freedom dues. And in 1730 they were sued by Covington [Judicial Record 1729-30, 205]. Abraham was not taxable in 1731, so he and his wife may have left the county that year. In the March 1742 session of the Dorchester County court he and his wife Margaret were accused of stealing a parcel of thread from Elizabeth Proctor, and in June 1743 he was sued by Carr apparently in a case for debt that was agreed to by both parties before coming to trial [Judicial Records 1740-3, 237-8]. He owed the Dorchester County estate of Colonel Joseph Ennalls 9 pounds, 2 shillings on 19 March 1760 [Prerogative Inventories 76:200].

 

3.    Richard1 Puckham, born 10 March 1690, was bound apprentice to Benjamin Colman in Somerset County court on 13 June 1699 by his mother, Joan Puckham [Judicial Records 1698-1701, 162]. He was taxable in the Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County household of Reverend Alexander Adams in 1723 and 1724. Reverend Adams was the minister of Stepney Parish. Richard was taxable in Wicomico in his own household from 1727 to 1734, in Manokin Hundred in 1736 and taxable in Monie Hundred in 1738 and 1739 with (his son?) John Puckham. He was head of a Manokin Hundred household with (his sons?) John, Richard, Matthew, Solomon, and David from 1744 until 1754. He probably died before 1756 when (his sons?) Saul/ Solomon and David were taxable in the Monie Hundred household of Mary Puckham. In 1759 (his children?) Priscilla, David, Matthew, and Solomon were taxables in the Manokin Hundred household of Mary Puckham. Mary may have been his widow or his daughter Mary. Richard was the father of

i. Mary, born say 1721, daughter of Richard Puckham "of Manokin," fined by the Somerset County court in 1742 for bearing a bastard child [Judicial Record 1742-4, 160]. She was head of a household with John Puckham in Nanticoke Hundred in 1740, in Manokin Hundred in 1743, and in 1746 she was head of a Manokin Hundred household with Richard Puckham - although not taxable herself. She rented a lot and house in Somerset County from George Wilson on 5 January 1746/7 [Land Records X:225].

ii. John3, born say 1723, first taxable in the Monie Hundred household of (his father?) Richard in 1739, taxable in John Bell's Manokin Hundred household in 1746, taxable in his father's Manokin household in 1748 and taxable in William Polk's household in 1753.

4        iii. Richard2, born say 1725.

iv. Matthew, born say 1734, first taxable in Manokin Hundred in 1750, received a patent for 30 acres on the east side of Princess Anne Town in 1762. He and Richard Puckham sold this land to Charles Redding on 2 April 1771 and Matthew sold 50 acres to Charles Redding for 5 shillings on 17 January 1764. He was a taxable "free Negro" in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1781 and 1782 and taxable with his brother Richard in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, in 1784 and 1790. He may have married Eleanor Durham, the Eleanor Puckham who witnessed the 9 April 1788 Kent County will of John Durham [WB M-1, fol. 171].

v. Solomon, born about 1735, taxable in the Manokin household of (his father?) Richard Puckham in 1751. In August 1762 he was called a planter when Ephraim Wilson brought a successful suit against him for a 4 pound debt for a bay mare Solomon purchased from Wilson in November 1760. On 21 March 1769 William Giddes sued Solomon and (his brother?) Matthew, carpenters, in Somerset County court for a twenty-six pound, fifteen shillings debt, and on 19 November 1771 Wilson Heath sued them for a four pound, five shillings debt [Judicial Records 1760-3, 166b-167; 1769-72, 11-2, 31-2, 261, 264].

vi. David, born say 1737, first taxable in 1754. He was called "David Pucham, planter" on 19 March 1771 when William Pollett sued him in Somerset County court for a one pound, nineteen shilling debt [Judicial Record 1769-72, 173-4].

vii. Priscilla, born say 1743, taxable in Mary Puckham's household in 1759. On 16 June 1767 and 15 August 1769 she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had illegitimate children (by a free person) and was fined three pounds by the court for each offense [Judicial Record 1766-7, 51, 145; 1769-72, 66].

 

5.    Richard2 Puckham, born say 1725, was taxable in the Manokin Hundred, Somerset County household of Henry Ballard in 1743 and 1744, in John Bell's household in 1748, and in his father's household in 1749 and head of his own household in 1759. In 1762 he received a patent for 192 acres in Somerset County. On 20 August 1767 he sold a mare and two cows to John Anderson to pay a debt he owed William Polk, and he sold a mare, a cow and a bull to George Miles on 8 January 1771. He and his wife Ann mortgaged 117 acres of their land to William Miles on 28 February 1769 and sold 75 acres to Levi Lankford on 21 June 1772. William Giddes sued him for a four pound, ten shillings debt on 20 June 1769 [Judicial Record 1769-72, 32, 209]. He was taxable in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1774 and taxable with his brother Matthew in Broadkill Hundred from 1784 to 1788, crossed off the list in 1789 [RG 2535, 1780-1796]. He was renting 135 acres in Broadkill Hundred on 5 September 1787 when the sheriff sold it to pay a judgment against the estate of the owner, Nicholas Little, deceased [Mason, Land Records of Sussex County, 78]. Nicholas Little sued him for debt in Sussex County court in February 1790 [DSA, RG 4815.006, frame 38]. He may have been the father of

i. Stephen, born say 1758, enlisted in Colonel David Hall's Company in the Delaware Regiment on 3 February 1776 and was listed in the muster in the barracks at Lewes Town on 11 April 1776 [Public Archives Commission, Delaware, 43-5].

ii. George, born say 1766, taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1788 and 1789 and head of a Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:480] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [MD:120].

iii. Levin, born say 1768, taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1788 and 1789 and taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1790. He was head of a Somerset County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman over forty-five in 1810 [MD:257] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [MD:120]. He was assessed on 40 acres in Wicomico and Nanticoke Hundreds, Somerset County, in 1813 and 1814 [Assessment Records 1813-16].

iv. Ephraim, born say 1769, taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1789.

v. John4, born say 1770, a delinquent taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1790, head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1810 [MD:257]. On 9 April 1804 he purchased 32 acres in Somerset County on the west side of Dividing Creek and the main road leading to Stephen's Ferry at the head of Wicomico River near Turkey Pen Ridge and sold this land on 16 January 1808.

 

Other members of the family were

i. Iby, born say 1745-50, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [MD:116].

ii. Lemuel H., born after 1775, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

 

QUANDER FAMILY

1.    Henry1 Quando, born say 1675, petitioned the Charles County court on 11 August 1702, "being a free Negroe," asking whether his wife should have to pay taxes. The court ruled that she was taxable [Court Record 1701-4, 80]. His wife was apparently Margaret Quander, a "free negroe woman" who petitioned the Prince George's County court on 25 June 1723 to allow her and her daughters to be levy free. Her petition was rejected, but she petitioned again on 26 November 1723 citing the law, and the court ordered that she and her three daughters be levy free in the future. Henry was called a planter on 22 June 1731 when he was sued in Prince George's County court by Richard Cross. The plaintiff failed to prosecute, so he was ordered to pay Henry his costs of 360 pounds of tobacco. On 28 August 1733 Margaret complained to the court that she was charged for tax on herself and daughters in 1732 and 1733, but the court rejected her petition. She claimed to have been upwards of seventy years old on 26 June 1739 when she successfully petitioned the court to be levy free because she was unable to labor and was dependent on her children for support [Court Record 1723-6, 83, 312; 1730-2, 142, 631; 1732-4, 66-7, 398; 1738-40, 349].(1) Henry and Margaret were probably the ancestors of

i. Maria, born say 1704, (no race indicated) confessed in Prince George's County court on 23 March 1724/5 that she had an illegitimate child. George Hardy, carpenter, undertook to pay her court fees [Court Record 1723-6, 420].

ii. Mary, born say 1706, (no race indicated) confessed in Prince George's County court on 22 June 1725 that she had an illegitimate child. Thomas Edelen undertook to pay her court fees and to keep the child from being a charge to the county [Court Record 1723-6, 420].

iii. Henry Adam, born say 1725, the servant of Joseph Green Simpson in March 1743/4 when he was charged with twenty-two days runaway time [Court Record 1743-4, 275].

iv. Henry2, "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:272].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Free Negro women and the mixed-race children of white women were taxables according to a law passed in 1725 [Archives of Maryland 35:427].

 

QUEEN FAMILY

The Queen family won its freedom from slavery on testimony that they descended from a native Indian of South America, and in 1810 members of the family sued for their freedom claiming descent from a white woman. Deponents testified for the trial in 1810 that they had heard talk that the ancestor of the family was Mary Queen who had been brought into the country by Captain Larkin and sold for seven years [Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning Slavery, IV:49-54; Circuit Court District of Columbia Minutes 1808-11, 285, 287, cited by Brown, Free Negroes in the District of Columbia, 69-70]. Members of the family in Maryland were

1        i. Mary1, born say 1755.

ii. Edward1, sued John Ashton for his freedom in Prince George's County on 15 October 1791 and won his case in the General Court of Maryland in May 1794. In April 1796 he sued Ashton for having kept him enslaved during the period his case was being decided, but the court found in Ashton's favor. Edward, a "free negro," died 23 February 1798 and was buried 24 February 1798 at St. Peter's Church in Baltimore [Piet, Catholic Church Records in Baltimore, 193].

iii. Simon, born about 1760, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 15 June 1810: a black man ... appears to be upwards of 50 years old. He was raised at the white marsh in Prince George's County and is free by judgment of the Prince George's County Court at its April Term 1796 on his petition against Reverend John Ashton.

iv. William1, born about 1767, head of a Prince George's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:298]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 3 September 1827: a black man about 60(?) years old ... obtained his freedom by judgment of the Prince George's County Court dated 15 April 1796 on his petition for freedom against John Ashton.

v. Nicholas, born about 1775, obtained a certificate of freedom Prince George's County on 25 April 1810: a Negro man with a dark complexion, about 35 years old ... raised in Prince George's County and was adjudged free by the Prince George County Court at its April Term 1796 on his petition against Reverend John Ashton   [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 6, 19, 68].

vi. Susannah, head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:348].

vii. Fanny, born say 1780, mother of Mary Angelique Queen, a two-month-old "Mulatto" baptized in St. Peter's Church, Baltimore on 20 November 1800 [Piet, Catholic Church Records in Baltimore, 99].

viii. Stephen, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 23 August 1819: a black man ... about 34 years old. He obtained his freedom by filing a petition in Prince George's County against John Ashton [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 29].

 

1.    Mary1 Queen, born say 1755, was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:97]. She was the mother of

i. ?Ann, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:93].

ii. ?Nancy, born about 1776, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 1 November 1816: aged about forty years ... dark complexion ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 92].

2        iii. ?Charity, born about 1777.

3        iv. ?Eleanor, born about 1779.

v. Isaac, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 18 August 1815: a negro man ... aged about twenty two years ... of a dark complexion ... born of Mary Queen.

vi. William3, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 18 August 1815: negro man ... aged about twenty one years ... dark complexion ... free born of Mary Queen.

 

2.    Charity Queen, born about 1777, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 8 September 1818: aged about forty one years ... dark Complexion ... free born. She was the mother of

i. Edward2/ Ned, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 24 July 1815: very dark complexion, is about 21 years old ... son of Charity Queen who recovered her freedom in Prince George County Court April term 1796 from the Rev. John Ashton.

 

3.    Eleanor Queen, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 8 September 1818: aged about thirty nine years ... dark Complexion ... free born. She was the mother of

i. William4, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 11 March 1817: Son of Nelly Queen, aged about twenty years ... dark complexion ... free born.

 

Other members of the Queen family in Anne Arundel County were

i. Robert, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 30 May 1817: aged about thirty eight years ... brown complexion ... free born.

ii. James, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 21 October 1815: aged about twenty four years ... brown complexion ... free born.

iii. John, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 9 February 1819: aged about twenty eight years ... black complexion was free born.

iv. Paul, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 7 April 1818: aged about twenty five years ... black complexion ... free born.

v. William2, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 7 August 1815: a negro man ... aged about twenty two years ... light complexion ... free born.

vi. Dennis, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 10 March 1818: aged about twenty four years ... dark complexion ... free born.

vii. David, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 14 August 1817: aged about twenty two years ... brown complexion ... free born.

viii. Gabriel, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 9 September 1815: a negro man ... dark complexion ... free born.

ix. John, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 17 September 1816: aged about nineteen years ... brown complexion ... free born.

x. Mary2, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 1 November 1816: aged about seventeen years ... bright complexion ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 60, 62, 63, 89, 92, 95, 98, 103, 110, 112, 121, 127].

 

RAY FAMILY

1.    Isabella Ray, born say 1694, was the indentured servant of Benoni Thomas in July 1713 when she admitted in Charles County court to having a "Mallato" child by a "negroe." The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and that her child be bound out until the age of thirty-one. She was the servant of Thomas Stone on 14 June 1715 when she confessed to the same offense, and on 9 June 1719 and March 1722 when she admitted in Charles County court that she had two more mixed-race children. On 10 March 1723/4 the court sold her to Stone for twenty-one years [Court Records 1711-5, 250, 255, 483, 499; 1720-2, 307; 1723-4, 217]. She was listed in the inventory of Thomas Stone, Sr.'s Charles County estate on 28 November 1728:

One white woman named Issabella to Serve abt 25 yeares for Mallatto Bastard- 10 pounds

One Mellatto born of a white woman named James abt 15 yrs old- 18 pounds

One Ditto named Bridgett abt 9 yrs old- 15 pounds

Ond Ditto named Charles abt 6 yrs old- 10 pounds [Prerogative Court Inventories 1728-9, 13:314-5].

She was probably the mother of

i. James, born about 1713.

ii. Sarah, born say 1715, presented for having an illegitimate child about 1735. On 9 June 1747 Anne Fowke petitioned the Charles County court saying that Sarah Ray, her "Mallatto Servant," had a child about twelve years previous, and she had neglected to have her adjudged for the expenses of having the child. The court ordered that Sarah serve an additional two years [Court Record 1746-7, 84].

iii. Bridget, born about 1719, a "Mulatto" presented by the Charles County court in March 1749 for having an illegitimate child. She was presented for the same offense in August 1743 with no race of the mother or child indicated [Court Record 1741-44, 627; 1748-50, 603].

2        iv. Charles1, born about 1722.

 

2.    Charles1 Ray, born say 1722, was a "Molatto" married to Bridget Rae in November 1757 when the Charles County court granted his petition to have her declared levy free [Court Record 1756-7, 297]. They may have been the parents of

i. Charles2, a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790, 4 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:531] and 12 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [MD:348].

ii. Thomas, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iii. James, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 7 in 1800 [MD:523].

iv. Daniel, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

v. Sadley, head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:119b].

vi. Adam Rea, head of a Northampton County, Pennsylvania household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

vii. Aaron, head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:331].

viii. Abednego, head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:334].

 

REARDON FAMILY

1.    Nelley Reardon, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 November 1812: a bright mulatto ... born free and being the illegitimate child of Jesse Reardon who was convicted at November Term 1768 and was sold at that term to Exekiel Keene until she arrived to the age of 31 years, now being 43 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 20].

 

REDDING/ REDDEN FAMILY

1.    Mary Redding, born say 1728, was taxable in the Pokomoke Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household of Purnell Newbold from 1747 to 1750: called Mary Redding in 1747 and 1748, called "molatto Moll" in 1751 and in 1753 when she was in Joyce Newbold's household, listed with "molatto Patience" [List of Tithables]. On 19 March 1750 the Somerset County court presented her for having an illegitimate child in March 1749. In June 1751 she was called the "Molatto" mother of "Molatto Patience" when Patience was bound to Purnall Newbold until the age of sixteen and she was given fifteen lashes as punishment for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Record 1749-51, 292-3, 295]. She was the mother of

i. Moses Redden, head of a Broadcreek Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391], 7 in 1810 [DE:318] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:398].

ii. Ibbe, born in 1770.

iii. ?Spencer, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

 

REED FAMILY

1. Elizabeth Reed, born say 1710, was the servant of Thomas Wilkinson of Saint Paul's Parish, Queen Ann's County, on 1 November 1729 when she had a "mullatto" child named Anne by a "negro." The court sold her daughter to her master until the age of thirty-one for 500 pounds of tobacco, ordered that she be sold for seven years and ordered her to serve 30 days for running away. In June 1732 the court convicted her for another illegitimate child. She was called a "Mullatto woman convict of fornication with a Negro" when the court sold her to Wilkinson for 12 pounds, 17 shillings [Judgment Record 1730-32, 56-7, 143-4, 526]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Sarah, born say 1736, a spinster "Mulatto" woman who was fined 30 shillings by the Queen Anne's County court in March 1754 for having an illegitimate child on 10 April 1753. Richard Small was her security for maintaining the child. In March 1755 she was convicted of having another child on 10 May 1754 [Criminal Record 1751-9, n.p.].

ii. Charles, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:695].

 

Other members of a Reed family in Maryland were

1        i. Sarah1, born say 1765.

ii. Henny, head of a St. Mary's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:431].

iii. Sarah, head of a St. Mary's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:412].

iv. Darky, head of a Baltimore City household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:328].

v. Nell, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:346].

2        vi. Catherine, born say 1780.

 

1.    Sarah1 Reed, born say 1765, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 3 in 1800 [MD:431]. She was the mother of

i. Jeremiah, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 5 April 1819: son of Sarah Reed ... complexion dark - about thirty one years of age ... born free.

ii. William, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 21 April 1820: Son of a free black woman by the name of Sarah Reed ... about thirty two years of age, and is of a dark complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 47, 54]. He was head of a St. Mary's County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:228].

 

2.    Catherine Reed, born say 1780, was the mother of

i. Attaway, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 4 May 1819: daughter of Catherine Reed ... about nineteen years of age, of a light complexion ... long and curly hair, was born free.

ii. Susanna, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 4 May 1819: daughter of the above (Catherine Reed) ... about seventeen years of age, a tolerable dark complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 50].

 

RHOADS FAMILY

1.    Mary Roades, born say 1675, was called a widow in June 1707 when Richard King petitioned the Anne Arundel County court to have her "Mullattoe" daughter Elizabeth Roades bound to him instead of to John Harwood to whom she was originally bound. The court refused to grant his petition unless he could better prove his case [Judgment Record 1707-8, 532]. She was the mother of

i. Elizabeth, born say 1700.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Maria Road, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:32].

ii. Pere Rhoads, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:885].

iii. Jacob Rhoads, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:885].

iv. Samuel Rodes, head of a Prince George's County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:44].

v. Clement Rhoads, "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:190].

vi. Sandy Rodes, "N." head of a Murderkiln Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:111] and 4 "free colored" in Wilmington Borough, New Castle County in 1820 [DE:195].

vii. Thomas Roads, "N." head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:93].

viii. Robert Roads/ Rhoads, head of a New Castle County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [DE:239] and 7 "free colored" in White Clay Creek, New Castle County, Delaware in 1820 [DE:107].

ix. Joseph Roads, head of a New Castle County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [DE:239].

x. Ceaser Rhoad, "N." head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:416] and 4 "free colored" in Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County in 1820 [DE:306].

 

RICHARDS FAMILY

1.    Ann Richards, born say 1727, was the servant of Peter Comerford of St. Peter's Parish in March 1747/8 when the Talbot County court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro." The court sold her son Stephen to her master until the age of thirty one for 15 pounds currency [Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.]. She was the mother of

i. Stephen, born about 1747.

 

RIDGEWAY FAMILY

1.   John1 Rigway, born say 1720, a "mulatto," had his daughters, Mary and Comfort, baptized on 22 May 1748 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 94]. He may have been identical to John Ridgway who called himself a French Man when he recorded his ear mark in Sussex County on 5 May 1746 [DB Q-16:301]. He was called John Regua when he purchased 148 acres in Indian River Hundred on the west side of a branch of Swan Creek from Cord Hazzard for 15 pounds on 1 May 1753 and another 147 acres adjoining this land from Hazzard for 18 pounds on 16 August 1754 [DB H-8; I-9:28]. In February 1754 when he charged Milby Johnson in Sussex County court with assault. He discontinued the suit when Johnson agreed to pay court costs. In March 1754 he petitioned the court saying he had lost thirty day's service worth 52 shillings from his servant Stephen Jackson. The court ordered Jackson to make up the cost in time of service. Robert Pack sued him in August 1757 and the court allowed a continuance so John could take the deposition of Thomas Baker. John sued Abraham Wiltbanck, Sr., for trespass in February 1758 and sued William Shankland and Robert Pack in November 1758, William Vaughan in August 1759. Cornelius Kollock sued him in April 1761 and the jury ruled that he pay Kollock 7 pounds in August 1762 when the case came to trial. The court required him to post 50 pounds for his good behavior in May 1762 and discharged him on payment of a fine in August 1762. He sued Thomas Worrington in August 1762 but discontinued the suit before it came to trial [Delaware Archives RG 4815.017, 1753-1760, frames 66, 86, 93, 370, 390, 409, 413, 489, 492, 508, 525, 544, 551, 564, 567, 584, 586, 600, 602, 629; 1761-1771, frames 23, 37, 54, 64, 76-7, 81, 87, 89, 99, 106]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1770 to 1791 [DSA, RG 2535, rolls 1 & 2]. On 20 April 1781 he charged Burton Prettyman with breaking and entering his property in Indian River Hundred and carrying away thirty fence panels containing eight logs each. He was charged with assaulting Prettyman and paid a 6 pence fine in November 1783. In November 1793 the court ordered the sheriff to secure his property which included a yoke of oxen, a steer and a cow which Joshua Ingram was detaining, and ordered the sheriff to recover a yoke of oxen, two cows, a desk, and other items from William Rigwah [RG 4815.017, 1761-1771, August Term Case Files, narrative 1-31; RG 4815.017, 1771-93, frames 284, 325; November 1793 MS case files, nos. 29 & 30]. On 11 April 1797 Zadock Barker entered a caveat against him and was given title to land they both claimed [Book of Caveats, 1796, p. 251]. He was the father of

i. Mary, born say 1746.

ii. Comfort, born say 1748.

2        iii. ?William1, born say 1753.

3        iv. ?Isaac, born say 1763.

v. ?Peter, head of a Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:400].

vi. ?Simon, born before 1776, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:208]. His "free Mulattoe" son Isaac2 Ridgway was baptized on 30 July 1803 at Indian River, Sussex County [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 403].

 

2.    William1 Riguway, born say 1753, was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1774 to 1791, and a "Negro" head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:407]. He and his wife, Jane, were the parents of an unnamed child, born 29 August 1784 and baptized 31 July 1785 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. Jane was probably the Jane Ridgeworth who witnessed the 26 October 1784 Sussex County will of William Handsor. William Rigware was indicted by the Sussex County court for forgery in November 1784 but was discharged on payment of court fees. John Rigwaw was his security [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1771-93, frame 375]. William was head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:407]. He was called William Rigware, Senr, of Indian River Hundred when he sold (signing) by 1 February 1813 to Philip W. Mariner the land he had purchased from John B. Frame as well as a piece of warranted land adjoining, amounting to about 60 acres in the fork of Swan Creek [DB 31:134]. He died before 7 November 1826 when his Sussex County estate was administered [RG 4545.009, roll 208, frames 178-9]. He may have been the father of

i. Francis(?) Rigwan, head of a Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:429].

ii. Ann Rigwan, head of an "other free" Sussex County household in 1810 [VA:400].

iii. Jacob, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:454].

iv. William2, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [DE:404] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:220].

v. John2, born about 1777, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:220], a seventy-three-year-old "Mulatto counted in the 1850 census for Lewes and Rehoboth Hundreds with fifty-six-year-old Nathaniel Clark and (his wife?) Unicey [family no. 852].

 

3.    Isaac1 Riguway, born say 1763, and his wife, Lydia, registered the 15 July 1785 birth of their daughter, Allender, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was taxable in Indian River and Angola in 1789. Isaac and Lydia were the parents of

i. Allender, born 15 July 1785, baptized 11 September 1785.

ii. ?Polly Rigware, married William Huggins on 29 April 1809 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 320]. William was head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:453] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372].

 

Other members of the family were

i. Ben Ridgeway, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 7 in 1800 [MD:531].

ii. Thomas, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Thomas Ridgway, head of a Nansemond County, Virginia household of 7 "whites" in 1783 [VA:57] and a "Mulatto" head of household in 1784 [VA:74].

 

RISNER FAMILY

1.    George Risner, born say 1765, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790. He may have been the father of

i. Sarah, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 16 March 1825: aged about thirty years, daughter of Susan Bullock ... of bright complexion ... born free and raised in Saint Mary's County [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 68].

 

ROACH FAMILY

1.   Rose Roach, born about February 1718, was apparently identical to "Rose Mullatto," a four-month-old child on 19 June 1718 when the Somerset County court ordered Mary Fountain to bring her to the next court. She was a "Mollatto Girl about 10 years old to serve till she is 31 years old" when she was listed in the inventory of the Somerset County estate of Mary Fountaine on 7 July 1723 [Judicial Record 1718, 112; Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1725-1727, 150-4]. She was called a "free born Mullato woman named Rose" in August 1738 when the Somerset County court convicted her of having an illegitimate child and sold her nine-month-old son Jack to Mrs. Mary Fountain until the age of thirty-one. Rose was probably the child of a white woman. In March 1740/1 she was called a "Mulatto" woman who had been bound as an apprentice to Mary Fountain until the age of thirty-one and still had eight more years to serve when the Somerset County court convicted her of having a child by Tom, the slave of Nicholas Fountain. She was called "Malatto Rose" in August 1749 when the court sold her to Ezekiel Hall for seven years, to commence 20 July 1749, and sold her son George for thirty-one years [Judicial Records 1738-40, 8; 1740-2, 58-9; 1749-51, 6]. She was apparently the ancestor of

i. Jack, born in December 1737.

ii. Charles, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

iii. James, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

iv. Moses, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

v. Sylvia, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Richard, head of a Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vii. George, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:375], 11 in 1810 [DE:312], and 3 free colored" in 1820 [DE:400].

viii. Gillis, born 1776-1794, head of a Northwest Fork, Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:248].

ix. David, a "Blackman," purchased 6 acres called Hog Quarter in Pitts Creek Hundred for $60 on 13 May 1807. He manumitted a "negro woman named Priscilla Roach" of the age of forty three years by Worcester County deed of 4 February 1826 [DB Z:53-4; AR:294-5]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

 

ROBERTS FAMILY

1.    Alice Roberts, born say 1712, was the spinster servant of Mr. George Thorpe in March 1732 when she admitted in Queen Anne's County court that she had a child by a "Negroe" and bore a "mullatto" child. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and sold her daughter Jane, born in November 1731, to George Thorpe for 700 pounds of tobacco. She was indicted for the same offense in the same court, but the attorney general decided not to prosecute [Judgment Record 1732-5, 14-16]. They may have been the ancestors of

i. William, born say 1734, charged in Talbot County court in March 1759 by constable Francis Duling (the tax collector) for failing to pay tax on his wife Rachel, but the court's attorney decided not to prosecute the case [Criminal Record 1755-61, 228-9].

ii. Tom, head of a Talbot County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:534], perhaps identical to Tom Roberts who was counted as head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:532].

iii. Adam, head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:522].

iv. Moses, a free African American who was indicted by the Dorchester County court in 1797 for marrying a white woman named Mary Webb. The justices agreed with Moses' contention that "there have been Marriages in the said County similar to his own, and that no prosecutions have taken place in consequence thereof" [Governor and Council, Pardon Papers, 1782-1830, Maryland Hall of Records, 7:66, 1797, cited by Daniels & Kennedy, Over the Threshold, 259-60].

v. Leven, head of a Talbot County household of 8 "free colored" in in 1830.

vi. Samuel, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

 

Somerset County

1.    Mary Roberts, born say 1705, was the servant of John Ricketts of All Hollows Parish on 18 June 1723 when the Somerset County court convicted her of having a child by her master's "Negro man Simon." She was called a mollatto" on 17 March 1723/4 when the court ordered that she receive ten lashes for having an illegitimate child on 1 September 1723 [Judicial Record 1723-5, 48, 145]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Esther, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:657].

ii. Robert, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:657], perhaps the husband of Leah Roberts, daughter of Samuel Collick and his wife Esther. Leah Roberts was one of their children who sold a tract called "Red Oak Ridge" and an adjoining 8-1/2 acres, called "Equantico Savannah," in Worcester County on 16 October 1801 [Land Records, U:405].

iii. Sarah, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:657].

 

ROBINSON FAMILY

1.    Isabella Robertson, born say 1727, was the servant of Elizabeth Bradford of Christ Church Parish in August 1747 when she confessed to the Queen Anne's County court that she had a child by a "Negro" and bore a "Mulatto" child on 10 July 1746. The court sold her for seven years to William Hopper for 750 pounds of tobacco on 22 September 1748 when her previous indenture was completed. In November 1750 she was called "Isabella Robinson spinster servant to William Hopper" when she confessed in court that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe." The court sold her daughter Henrietta to Hopper for 2 shillings, and in June 1752 the court bound her "Molatta" daughter Sarah Robinson to William Scott until the age of twenty-one, noting that Isabella had died during her delivery [Judgment Record 1747-8, 4, 197, 238; 1750, 115-6; 1751-2, 240]. She was the mother of

i. Henrietta, born in November 1750.

ii. Sarah, born 18 February 1752.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Thomas, a "Molatto" taxable on 100 acres in Acquango Hundred, Worcester County, in 1783 [MSA 1161-11-5, p.8], head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438], 7 in 1810 [DE:453] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:206].

ii. Rhoda, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:390].

iii. Moses, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:467].

iv. Jacob, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:445] and 4 "free colored" in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1820 [DE:212].

 

Members of the Robinson family in Dorchester County were

i. David Robertson, born say 1760, a "yellow/ freckled" soldier born in Dorset (Dorchester) County, Maryland, who enlisted in the Revolution in Northampton County, Virginia, and lived in Middlesex County [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 153].

2        ii. Levi, born say 1768.

iii. Isaac(?), head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:338].

iv. Enoc, head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:690].

v. Margaret, born say 1775, died before 18 July 1818 when her son Robinson Hill (born about 1796) obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County: of a bright yellow complection ... born free and raised in Dorchester County and is the son of Margaret Robinson, now deceased ... about 22 years old [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 38].

vi. Anthony Robertson, born before 1776, head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

 

2.    Levi Robinson, born say 1768, was head of a Dorchester County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:689]. He and his wife Nelly were the parents of

i. Richard, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 January 1815: of a chestnut colour, was born free, the son of Nelly who was the wife of Levi Robinson who formerly belonged to Henry Hooper ... aged about 21 years.

ii. Levin, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County in 1822: of a dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the son of Nelly Robinson the wife of Levi, aged about 22 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 20, 47].

 

ROGERS FAMILY

1.    Grace Rogers, born say 1710, was the mother of a "Mulatto" child named Ishmael who was being cared for by Jacob Bull in Baltimore County in August 1728 [Liber HS#6, 30, cited by Barnes, Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759, 555]. She was the ancestor of

i. Ishmael, born before August 1728.

ii. ?James, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

iii. ?Samuel, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iv. ?William, head of a St. Mary's County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:412].

v. ?Edward, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:352].

vi. ?Sucky, head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:531].

 

ROLLINS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Floid, alias Rollins, born say 1738, servant of John Brown, confessed in Prince George's County court on 22 November 1757 that she had a "Mulatto" child. The court ordered her sold for seven years and bound her seven month old daughter Jane to her master until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1754-8, 540]. She was the mother of

i. Jane, born April 1757.

ii. ?Benjamin, head of an Essex County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:198].

iii. ?Charlotte, head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:334b].

 

ROSS FAMILY

1.    Margaret Ross, born say 1736, the servant of Ann Lewis, was presented by the Anne Arundel County court in August 1756 for having a "Molatto Bastard" [Judgment Record 1754-6, 705, 706, 714]. She was the mother of

i. Patience, born say 1756, bound by the Anne Arundel County court to Ann Lewis until the age of twenty-one.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Robert, "Negro" head of a Harford County household of 7 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Joseph, head of a Washington County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:654].

iii. Tamer, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:352].

2        iv. Hammond, born say 1770.

v. James, head of a Frederick County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:853].

vi. Henry, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:152].

vii. John, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:158].

viii. Charles, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:97].

ix. Sarah, head of an Annapolis household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:117].

 

2.    Hammond Ross, born say 1770, was married to Mary, "free Mulattoes," when the birth and baptism of their daughter Mary was recorded in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore. Ham was head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:328]. Hammond and Mary were the parents of

i. Mary, born 6 October, baptized 29 December 1793 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:74].

 

ROUNDS FAMILY

1.    Benjamin Rounds, born say 1750, was free according to the certificates of freedom granted to his grandchildren, Matilda and Mary Ann Rounds, in Washington, D.C., on 16 October 1835. He was the father of

i. ?Treasy, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington, D.C., on 25 January 1813: a mulatto woman about forty-five years old ... born free and raised in St. Mary's County. Her daughters Betsy and Mary Swann obtained a certificate of freedom on 11 June 1821.

ii. ?Nancy, born about 1769, about forty-four years old on 28 January 1813 when she obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington, D.C.: Nancy Scott alias Nancy Rounds, a mulatto woman ... raised in St. Mary's County.

iii. ?Off, born about 1772, obtained a certificate of freedom on 25 January 1813: a mulatto man aged about forty-one, was born free and raised in St. Mary's County. He served for a considerable time as an apprentice to Michael Cusick. He was probably identical to Theophilus Rounds, husband of Milly Turner, whose stepson Lewis Turner obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington, D.C., on 19 July 1830. Richard Briscoe, a justice of the peace, testified that Lewis' parents moved from Maryland to Washington about 1800.

2        iv. Hezekiah, born about 1774.

v. ?Stephen Round, head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:784].

 

2.    Hezekiah Rounds, born about 1774, was about thirty-nine years old on 28 January 1813 when he obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington, D.C.: a Mulatto man ... born free and raised in St. Mary's County. He served as an apprentice "for a long time" with Michael Cusick of St. Mary's County. He was married to Kitty Rounds on 4 September 1821 when their children obtained certificates of freedom. Kitty was the daughter of a white woman named Nancy Collier [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 7, 8, 68, 280-1, 181]. Hezekiah and Kitty were the parents of

i. Eliza, born about 1798, twenty-three years old when she obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington, D.C., on 4 September 1821.

ii. Leathy, born about 1802, about nineteen years old when she obtained a certificate of freedom on 1 September 1821.

iii. Hudson, born about 1803, eighteen years old when he obtained a certificate of freedom on 4 September 1821.

iv. Sarah, born about 1805, about sixteen years old when she obtained a certificate of freedom on 5 June 1821.

v. Matilda, born about 1811, about ten years old when she obtained a certificate of freedom on 4 September 1821.

vi. Alfred, born about 1813, about eight years old when he obtained a certificate of freedom on 4 September 1821.

vii. Kitty, born about 1814, about seven years old when she obtained a certificate of freedom on 4 September 1821.

viii. Mary Ann, born about 1816, about five years old when she obtained a certificate of freedom on 4 September 1821.

 

RUSSELL FAMILY

1.    James1 Russell, born about 1690, a "Mallatto belonging to Mr. Notley Rozier," petitioned the Charles County court for his freedom on 13 March 1721, setting forth that he was the son of a white woman and had reached the age of thirty-one [Court Records K-2:236]. The Prince George's County court called him a "Malatto Man" on 26 August 1729 when it ordered that he take his three children who were with John Pritchett into his own care [Court Record 1729-30, 136]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Richard, head of a Baltimore City household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:328] and 11 in 1810 [MD:194].

ii. _____, born say 1750, an unnamed "mulatto" free man who married Mary, the daughter of Mary Spanow (a white woman of Montgomery County) and a "Negro" man. Their daughter Rachel was a widow in Bladensburg, Maryland, on 28 February 1822 when her daughter Elizabeth Thomas registered as a free Negro in Washington, D.C. [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 18].

iii. Jane, born say 1750, called a "yellow woman now deceased" by Richard Ponsonby on 21 September 1802 when he made an affidavit in Bladensburg and recorded it with the Prince George's County court stating that she was free born, had lived with his family many years previous and that her twenty-three-year-old son William was born while she was in his service [Land Records JRM #11, 166].

iv. James2, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:323].

v. Sarah, head of a Washington County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:534].

 

RUSTIN FAMILY

1.    Margaret Ruston, born say 1670, the servant of Colonel Edward Pye, admitted to the Charles County court on 12 January 1691/2 that she had an illegitimate child. The court ordered that she receive twelve lashes. A year later on 1 January 1692/3 Pye brought her into court to have her adjudged for the damages he sustained by her giving birth to a child during her indenture, and the court noted that her child was a "Molattoe and ye father of ye sd. Child a Negroe slave belonging to ye sd. Edwd. Pye." She may have been the first white woman in the county to give birth to a mixed-race child under the law of 1692 because the justices were undecided about how to rule on the matter and referred it to the next court so that "ye old Lawes Concerning Negroes & Slaves may be Enquired into" [Court and Land Record 1690-2, 334; 1692(3)-4, 9]. She was the mother of

2        i. Thomas1, born about 1691.

 

2.    Thomas1 Rustin, born about 1691, was living in Charles County on 12 June 1750 when the court ordered that his wife Lucy should be levy free due to an infirmity. On 10 August 1756 the court ordered his goods attached to pay his debt of 1,003 pounds of tobacco to William Gammell. On 12 June 1759 the court ordered that he be levy free for the future. He may have had children by a slave. A slave named Thomas Rustin was called "Thomas Rustain, Junior" and "Molatto Thomas Rustain" in Charles County court in November 1756 [Court Record 1748-50, 724; 1756-7, 2, 3, 117-8, 144, 201; 1759-60, 177]. Perhaps he was the father of

i. Robert, born say 1720, the slave of William Neale on 13 November 1750 when he, Ned Boy (also a slave of William Neale), and "Negroe James" (the slave of Ledstone Smallwood) were presented by the Charles County court for stealing goods from the storehouse of Hugh Mitchell [Court Record 1750, 140].

ii. Thomas2, born say 1725, the slave of William Neale on 8 June 1756 when the Charles County court convicted him of stealing a hat which belonged to Thomas McPherson and ordered that he receive thirty-nine lashes and be put in the pillory for one hour. On 10 August 1756 he was called "Thomas Rustain Junior (Slave to William Neale)" when the Charles County court presented him for stealing a saddle which belonged to James Carroll. He was called "Molatto Thomas Rustain" in November 1756 when he was acquitted of the charge. On 8 November 1757 the Charles County court presented him for striking Richard King. On 9 November 1758 the court presented his master, William Neale, for allowing him to keep a horse or horses as his own property [Court Record 1756-7, 2, 3, 117-8, 201; 1757-8, 1, 566].

iii. George, born say 1728, the slave of William Neale on 9 November 1758 when his master was presented by the Charles County court for allowing him to keep a horse or horses as his own property [Court Record 1757-8, 566].

 

Other members of the Rustin family were living in adjoining Prince George's County about the same time.

1.    Abigail Tent, born say 1670, claimed to be about sixty-seven years old on 28 August 1733 when the Prince George's County court granted her petition that she be supported on public funds. The county continued to provide 600 to 750 pounds of tobacco for her support between 22 November 1748 and 27 November 1753 due to her old age and blindness. Her daughter, Elizabeth Rustin, testified in Prince George's County court on 24 August 1736 that her mother was a "Molatto born of a white woman" and her father a white man. Abigail was probably related to John Tent who paid Elizabeth Rustin's fine in Prince George's County court on 23 August 1715 [Court Record 1710-5, 766, 790; 1732-4, 405-6; 1736-8, 155-6; 1748-9, 3; 1751-4, 316, 503]. She was the mother of

2        i. Elizabeth Riston, born say 1692.

 

2.    Elizabeth Riston, born say 1692, confessed in Prince George's County court on 23 August 1715 that she had an illegitimate child but refused to identify the father. John Tent paid her fine. She confessed to having another illegitimate child on 27 March 1721/2, and the court ordered that she receive nineteen lashes. She petitioned the Prince George's County court on 28 August 1733 saying that she was that year counted as a taxable and conceived that she should not have been because her mother was a "Molatto born of a white woman" and her father a white man. Her petition was rejected. She petitioned the court again on 24 August 1736 saying she was the daughter of a white man who had a child by Abigail Tent, a "free Molatto" woman and the court granted her petition. Samuel Magruder, Sr., sued her in Prince George's County court on 27 March 1738/9, but the matter was agreed before it came to trial [Court Record 1732-4, 405-6; Court Record 1720-2, 488-9; 1736-8, 155-6; 1738-40, 320]. She was the mother of

i. Ann, born say 1715, petitioned the Prince George's County court together with her sister Alice on 24 August 1736 saying that they were the children of Elizabeth Riston by a white man and asked that the constable where they lived be ordered to remove them from the list of taxables. The court granted their request [Court Record 1736-8, 151].

ii. Alice, born say 1718.

 

They were probably the ancestors of

i. James, a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

ii. John, "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:298].

iii. Charlotte, the ancestor of William Rushten who obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 13 September 1822: a bright mulatto man, about 24 years old ... is free, being the descendant of Charlotte Rushten, a free woman of color [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 43].

 

 Go to Next Family Group: Salmons-Turner

Return to Maryland and Delaware