ROBERTS FAMILY

Members of the Roberts family in Virginia were

1        i. Mary1, born say 1664.

ii. Thomas1, born say 1668, a "mollotta" servant bound by indenture to William Wise of York County, Virginia. He had twenty-seven months more to serve on 26 January 1690/1, but the York County court added another twenty-two months to his time for running away with Wise's Portuguese servant John Sherly between 18 August 1690 and 1 January 1690/1. Wise's account of the charges he had incurred while taking them up included expenses at New Castle and passage to and from Philadelphia. Thomas was the servant of Ralph Walker on 24 November 1693 when his suit against William Wise was dismissed by the court [DOW 8:527-8, 536; 9:269].

 

1.    Mary1 Roberts, born say 1664, was living in Elizabeth City County on 17 June 1724 when the court granted her petition to be levy free [Orders 1724-30, 34]. She may have been the ancestor of

2        i. Mary2, born say 1685.

3        ii. John1, born say 1710.

iii. Judith, born say 1718, a "Moletto" who Thomas Crips failed to list as one of his tithables in York County in December 1735 [OW 18:245].

4        iv. Margaret, born say 1725.

v. Daniel, born say 1725, a "Mulatto" son of "a Free Woman," who brought a case against Charles Hansford, Jr., in York County court in March 1746 for holding him in servitude, apparently after he had already completed his indenture. The court declared him a free man [WI 19:424].

5        vi. Joseph1, born say 1740.

vii. Esther, born say 1752, a free Negro woman, the wife of Stepney Blue who ran away from his owner, Nathan Yancy of York County, in 1774 [Virginia Gazette of 29 September and 2 November 1774].

6        viii. James3, born say 1753.

ix. Joseph2, a "free Negro" taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1783 to 1803: taxable on his own tithe, a horse and 2 cattle in 1783; taxable on 2 tithes from 1802 to 1804; called Joseph Rober(t)son in 1791, 1795, 1796 and 1798 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 36, 52, 93, 140, 153, 188, 235, 251, 340, 354, 399, 422, 437, 481, 500, 586, 606, 664].

x. Elizabeth born about 1761, registered in York County on 20 August 1827: a mulatto woman about 66 years of age 5 feet 3/4 inches high much pitted with the small pox, teeth project a good deal [Guardians' Accounts, 1823-46, end of book, Register of Free Negroes, No. 241].

xi. Hester, born about 1765, registered in York County on 17 September 1810: a dark woman abt. 45 years of age 5 feet 3-1/2 Inches high [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.56].

xii. Nancy, born about 1765, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a bright Mulatto woman aged about 57 or 58 years, five feet four Inches and one Quarter high, with woolly hair [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.176]. She was taxable on a horse in York County in 1795 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 212] and head of a York County household of 7 "other free" and two slaves in 1810 [VA:882].

xiii. Elizabeth, born about 1771, registered in York County on 17 May 1819: a Mulatto person nearly forty eight years of age five feet four & a half inch high, has long bushy hair inclined to curl...Born free [Guardians' Accounts, 1780-1823, following the index, No. 109].

xiv. Patsy2, born about 1772, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: about 50 years of age 5 feet 1-1/2 inch high [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no.177].

xv. Elizabeth/ Betsey, born about 1773, registered in York County on 18 August 1823: a Mulatto woman about 50 years of age 5 feet 2 inches high...has bushy hair and is turning grey. Born free [Guardians' Accounts, 1780-1823, following the index, No. 211].

 

2.    Mary2 Roberts, born say 1685, was a "Molatto" presented by the York County court on 15 November 1735 for not listing herself as a tithable [OW 18:237, 245]. Her 19 September 1749 York County will was proved on 20 November 1749. She left seven head of cattle, a bed and furniture to her son Matthew, left the same to her daughter Ann Robbards, and divided the remainder of her estate between her children Matthew Robbards, Ann Robbards, Anthony Robbards, Mary Clark, Elizabeth Cannady, Margaret Wilson and Sarah Banks. Her son Anthony Robbards was her executor [W&I 20:163-4]. Her children were

7        i. Ann, born say 1709.

ii. Mary3, born say 1711, presented by the York County court on 17 November 1729 for having an illegitimate child. On 17 May 1731 the court dismissed her petition against John Mundell that he was the father of her bastard children. On 20 December 1731 she was presented for having a bastard child on the information of the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish. On 21 August 1732 her mother Mary Roberts was her security for payment of the fine. She was called Mary Roberts, "a Molatto living at Chiscake," on 15 November 1735 when she was presented by the York County court for not listing herself as a tithable [OW 17:5, 13, 27, 161, 248, 273, 295, 308; W&I 18:237, 245]. She had married a member of the Clark family before 19 September 1749 when her mother made her will.

iii. Matthew, born say 1715, living in Yorkhampton Parish when he was presented by the York County court on 19 November 1770 for failing to list himself as a tithable and on 15 November 1773 for absenting himself from his parish church [Judgments & Orders 1770-2, 105, 337; 1772-4, 438, 443].

iv. Sarah Banks, born say 1717, perhaps the wife of John Banks who was presented by the York County court on 17 November 1735 for not listing his "Molatto" wife as a tithable [W&I 18:237, 245].

v. Elizabeth Cannady, probably the wife of Joseph Cannady who was presented by the York County court on 15 December 1735 for not listing his wife Betty as a tithable [OW 18:245].

vi. Margaret Wilson, born say 1720.

8        vii. Anthony, born say 1723.

 

3.    John1 Roberts, born say 1710, made his mark as witness to the 14 February ____ Northampton County, North Carolina deed of Philemon and Ann Maurice to Sebastian Squire which was proved in May 1745 [DB 1:189]. He was living in Southampton County on 14 May 1752 when he was sued by the executors of John Person and on 12 September the same year when he was sued by Thomas Tabor. Both suits were dismissed. On 13 June 1754 he was one of fourteen heads of household who were sued in Southampton County court by William Bynum (informer) for failing to pay the discriminatory tax on (his wife?) Martha Roberts. James Kindred testified against him. He was fined 500 pounds of tobacco [Orders 1749-54, 224, 266, 319, 496, 510-11; Judgment Papers 1752-5, frames 486-7; Orders 1754-9, 24]. He was in Northampton County in January 1762 when he voted in the election. Administration on his Northampton County estate was granted to William Arington in May 1764 on 100 pounds bond with John Dancy and Arthur Hart securities [NCGSJ XII:170, 171; XIV:157]. (Arthur Hart lived on land adjoining Cypress Swamp in the part of Northampton County which is near present-day Greensville County). John may have been the father of

9        i. James1, born say 1734.

ii. Thomas2, born say 1740, taxable in the Lunenburg County list of Edmund Taylor for St. James Parish in 1764 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 257]. This part of Lunenburg County became Mecklenburg County in 1765 and Thomas was counted there in 1782 as a "Mulatto" head of a household of 5 persons [VA:34].

 

4.    Margaret Roberts, born say 1725, left a 6 June 1789 Northampton County, North Carolina will which was proved in September 1794. She gave two shillings to each of her children Ishmael, James, and John Roberts, Mary Roberts, Faitha Scott, Christian Stewart, Phebe Roberts, Hannah Roberts, Milla Anderson, and Elizabeth Roberts and gave the remainder of her estate to her daughter Delpha Roberts. She named her daughter Delpha and (her son-in-law) Jeremiah Anderson executors [WB 2:54]. Her children were

10      i. Ishmael1, born say 1750.

ii. James5, born say 1756.

11      iii. John2, born say 1759.

iv. Mary5.

v. Faitha Scott.

vi. Christian Stewart.

vii. Phebe Roberts.

viii. Hannah Roberts.

ix. Milla Stewart.

x. Elizabeth Roberts.

xi. Delpha Roberts.

 

5.    Joseph1 Roberts, born say 1740, was mentioned in the 1772 Surry County, Virginia account of the estate of William Seward [WB 12:95]. He was head of a Surry County household of 8 free persons in 1782 [VA:43] and no "whites" in 1784 [VA:79]. His wife Hannah Banks was the heir of Matthew Banks from whom she received part of 75 acres. She and her husband and the other heirs sold this land in Surry County on 22 February 1796 [DB 1792-99, 344]. He was security for the 31 May 1786 Surry County bond, 1 June 1786 Isle of Wight County marriage, of Faithy Banks and James Wilson. He was taxable in Surry County from 1784 to 1813: taxable on Edwin Roberts' tithe from 1788 to 1791; taxable on Joseph Roberts, Jr.'s tithe in 1793; James Roberts' tithe in 1794, 1797, and 1798; John Roberts' tithe in 1799; listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 384, 393, 430, 505, 582; 1791-1816, 44, 143, 193, 221, 304, 344, 384, 573, 616, 656, 695, 753]. Joseph and Hannah were the parents of

i. ?Edwin, born say 1771, taxable in Surry County from 1788 to 1794: his tax charged to Joseph Roberts from 1788 to 1791 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 505, 582; 1791-1816, 44, 193]. He married Polly Jones, 7 January 1796 Isle of Wight County bond, Thomas Jones surety. He was a "F.N." Isle of Wight County taxable from 1795 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 368, 382, 411, 513, 565, 624, 641, 702, 741, 760]. He was head of a Norfolk County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:38].

ii. ?Joseph3, born in November 1772, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 17 August 1797: a mulatto man aged 25 years old next Novemr. pretty bright complection, about 5'5" high pretty stout and well made, short hair [Back of Guardian Accounts Book, 1783-1804, no.26]. He was taxable in Surry County in 1791, 1793 and 1798: his tax charged to Richard Scammell in 1791 and 1798, listed with Joseph Roberts in 1793 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 44, 143, 347]. He married Elizabeth Charity, 17 May 1802 Surry County bond, David Charity, father of Elizabeth, surety. He was head of a Campbell County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:880].

iii. James7, born about November 1777, registered in Surry County on 28 April 1801: bright complexion, 5'7-1/2" high, pretty straight & square made, aged about 23-1/2 years, he is son of Joseph & Hannah Roberts free persons of this county [Back of Guardian Accounts Book, 1783-1804, no.129]. He was taxable in his father's Surry County household in 1794, 1797 and 1798 [PPTL, 1791-1816, 193, 304, 344] and was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1803 to 1805 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 624, 641, 702]. He was probably the James Roberts who registered in Petersburg on 3 July 1822: 5 feet 7 inches high, 46 years of age, bright complexion...by Trade a Waterman. Born free per certificate of registry from the clerk of the city of Richmond. His wife was apparently Milly Roberts who registered the same day: 5 feet 2 inches high, 40 years of age, bright complexion...Emancipated by the will of Wm Wright(?) recorded in Petersburg. James died before 1 January 1825 when his wife Amelia Roberts' son registered: Joseph Jenkins, sixteen years old March next, rather above 5 feet 6 inches high, light complexion, grisley or reddish brown hair, born free & is a son of Amelia Roberts, a free woman under whose charge he now is [Register of Free Negroes, 1819-33, nos. 1187, 1188, 1362]. According to Joseph Jenkins Roberts' biography, he was born of free parents in Norfolk County on 15 March 1809. His father (or stepfather) James Roberts died in 1823, and he emigrated to Liberia with his widowed mother, two younger brothers, and two younger sisters in 1829. He established one of the most prosperous trading firms in Liberia. He was Liberia's first African American governor in 1841 and its first president in 1847 [Huberich, Political and Legislative History of Liberia, 1:770-71, by Wiley, Slaves No More].

iv. John4, born in October 1780, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 30 April 1802: (son of Joseph Roberts) a mulatto man, who is 5'5-1/2" high, aged about 21 years last October ... bright complexion, rather bushy hair, straight and well made and by trade a planter [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.137]. He was taxable in his father's Surry County household in 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frame 384] and was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1802 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 565, 624, 641, 702, 741, 760].

v. William3, born 5 April 1789, registered in Surry County on 23 February 1808: a son of Joseph and Hannah Roberts late of this county a Mulattoe Man who is of a lite complexion, aged about 19 years the 5 April next, 5'6-1/4" high, stout & well made has long hair [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 36].

 

6.    James3 Roberts, born about 1753, and his wife Jane, "Mulattoes," were living in Charles Parish, York County, on 20 June 1773 when the birth of their son James was recorded [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 163]. He was taxable in York County from 1784 to 1814: taxable on a slave in 1795 and 1805, taxable on 3 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813, and taxable on 2 free male tithables over 21 in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 92, 394, 411] and head of a York County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:881] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:159]. He registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a dark Mulatto about sixty-nine years old, 5 feet 2-1/2 inches high [Register of Free Negroes 1798-31, no.151]. His son was

i. James6, born 20 June 1773, baptized 1 August in Charles Parish.

 

7.    Ann Roberts, born say 1709, confessed to the York County court on 18 May 1741 that she had an illegitimate child [W&I 19:12-3]. She may have been the mother of "poor orphans" named James and Mary Roberts who were ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Bruton Parish on 16 May 1748. And she may have been identical to _____ Roberts (damaged order book page), a "free Mulatto" who was living in Bruton Parish on 19 August 1751 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her daughter Patt to John Peale [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 83, 451]. She may have been the mother of

i. Pat1, born say 1743, ordered bound apprentice to John Peale in Bruton Parish on 19 August 1751.

ii. James2, born say 1745, a "poor orphan" living in York County on 16 May 1748 and 17 December 1750 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Bruton Parish to bind him out [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 83, 380]. He may have been identical to James Maclin, alias Roberts, born say 1745, who was added to the list of tithables in Elizabeth City County on 7 November 1764 [Court Records 1760-9, 262].

iii. Mary4, born say 1747, ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Bruton Parish on 16 May 1748.

 

8.    Anthony Roberts, born say 1723, was executor of the 19 September 1749 York County will of his mother Mary Roberts and was granted administration on the 18 November 1751 York County estate of Margaret Jasper, deceased [W&I 20:163-4; Judgments & Orders 1749-53, 483]. He was called "Anthony Roberds Mulatto" when his payment of 5 shillings was entered in the account of the York County estate of John Peters which was recorded in court on 15 September 1760 [W&I 21:20]. The York County court presented him on 20 May 1765 and 17 June 1771 for not attending Yorkhampton Parish Church and on 17 November 1766 for not listing his son as a tithable. He and Francis Peters were sued for debt on 18 April 1768, and he was sued for a debt of 30 shillings on 16 July 1770. He was presented on 19 November 1770, 15 November 1773, and 21 November 1774 for failing to list himself as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 374, 448; Orders 1765-8, 161, 206, 207, 499; 1770-2, 14, 105, 211, 337; 1772-4, 436, 442, 443; 1774-84, 66, 73]. He was taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1783, presented by the York County court in 1785 for failing to list his tithables, taxable on one tithe, a slave and a horse in 1788, tithable on a horse but exempt from personal tax in 1789, taxable on a free tithable and a horse in 1790, tithable on a slave in 1793, tithable on a horse in 1801 and 1802, and tithable on one free tithe and two horses in 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 72, 111, 144, 154, 164, 258, 267, 279, 289]. (His son?) William Roberts and he were sued for debt in York County on 19 July 1784. He was awarded 30 pounds in his suit for trespass, assault and battery against Daniel Lyons on 22 November 1796. James Roberts, David Poe and James Ashby were witnesses [Orders 1784-7, 20; 1795-1803, 136-7]. He left a 6 October 1803 York County will, proved 15 July 1805, by which he appointed his son John Robbards his executor, gave his grandson William Robbards all his estate, and by a 6 June 1805 codicil gave a heifer to his grandson Thomas Hunley and a calf to Margaret Robbards [W&I 23:677-8]. He was the father of

i. ?Hannah, born say 1747, presented by the York County court on 19 November 1770 for selling rum without a license and presented on 15 November 1779 for failing to list her tithables. She was sued by John Cary in 1780 [Judgments & Orders 1770-2, 105; 1774-84, 242, 256].

12      ii. William1, born say 1744.

iii. John3, born say 1763, taxable in York County from 1784 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 92, 144, 164, 195, 212, 231, 247, 267, 289, 308, 329, 356] and head of a York County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:881].

iv. ___, born say 1765, mother of Thomas Hunley (born about 1786) who registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a light complected Mulatto about 36 years old ... blue eyes has tolerable short hair ... Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 186]. He may have been related to David Hunley who was presented by the York County court on 15 May 1786 for failing to list himself as a tithable [Orders 1784-7, 322].

 

9.    James1 Roberts, born say 1734, was "a Mulatto" taxable in Lunenburg County in the St. James Parish list of Edmund Taylor in 1764 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 256]. He purchased 100 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, on the south side of Mockerson Branch adjoining George Jordan's land on 12 August 1765 and purchased 220 acres on Licking Branch adjoining George Jordan on 7 December 1785. He made his mark on a deed by which he sold 35 acres of his land adjoining Burwell Jordan to Burwell Jordan of Greensville County on 1 March 1790 [DB 3:408; 10:407; 8:227]. He was taxable in Northampton County on an assessment of 1,810 pounds in 1780 [GA 46.1] and head of a household of 4 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1790 [NC:73] and 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:472]. He left a 3 March 1803 Northampton County will (making his mark), proved in March 1809, by which he left a cow, calf, and bed to Willis Scott; left Jonathan Roberts, William Roberts and Mary Scott (no relationship stated) ten shillings; and left the remainder of his personal estate to Claxton Roberts. He divided his 325 acre plantation between his sons Lyas (Elias) and Claxton who were to provide for their mother Ann Roberts. Jonathan and Claxton were named as executors. Jonathan qualified in March court 1809 [WB 3:14]. Mary was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:256]. Their children were

13      i. James4, born say 1755.

14      ii. Jonathan1, born say 1759.

iii. William2, born say 1760, head of a Northampton County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:73], 7 in 1800 [NC:473], and 9 in 1810 [NC:743]. Administration on his estate was granted to Silas Long on bond of 500 pounds by the 2 December 1817 Northampton County court [Minutes 1817-21, 60].

iv. Mary4 Scott.

v. Elias1, head of a Northampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73], 11 in 1800 [NC:473], and 15 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [NC:743]. He and Stephen Walden were sureties for a 250 pound bond for Elisha Byrd to administer the estate of James Byrd in the 3 June 1816 Northampton County court [Minutes 1813-16, n.p.].

vi. Claxton, head of a Northampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:473] and 9 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:743]. He married Mason Reed, 29 January 1793 Southampton County, Virginia bond.

 

10.    Ishmael1 Roberts, born say 1755, was head of a Robeson County household of 10 "other free" in 1790 [NC:50], 15 in 1800 [NC:415], and 14 in Chatham County in 1810 [NC:195]. He received pay for Revolutionary War service from 3 June 1777 to 3 June 1778 as a private in Colonel Abraham Shepherd's Company. Colonel Shepherd gave him a certificate which stated that he was furloughed at Head Quarters Valley Forge to come home with me who was Inlisted in my Regement for the Term of three years - and Returned Home with me [NCGSJ XV:105]. He entered 100 acres in Robeson County on the north side of Saddle Tree Swamp on 5 September 1787, 100 acres on the north side of Five Mile Branch and 100 acres on the east side of Raft Swamp on 14 February 1788, and 100 acres on the west side of Five Mile Branch on 22 January 1793 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, I:7, 13, 70]. He sold land by deed proved in Robeson County on 5 January 1801 and purchased land by deed proved in Robeson County on 6 July 1803 [Minutes I:130, 256]. On 18 February 1804 he purchased two tracts of land in Chatham County, one of 250 acres on Bear and Bush Creeks for $450, a second of 100 acres on the waters of the Cape Fear River for $150, and he purchased a further 57 acres on Bush Creek for 75 pounds on 9 January 1805 [DB N:456, 437; M:641]. The sheriff sold 260 acres of this land on 12 February 1808 for a debt of about 16 pounds [DB P:118]. However, Ishmael repurchased this same 260 acre tract for about 17 pounds on 14 August 1811. And he purchased 102 acres on Little Lick Creek on 10 April 1818 [DB S:26; V:131]. On 8 and 12 February 1825 he sold (signing) most of his land to his sons: Richard, James, and Aaron [DB AB:166, 221; AA:275]. By his 12 July 1826 Chatham County will, he left his land on the west side of Bush Creek to his wife Silvey and then to his grandson Ishmael, oldest son of Zachariah. He also left one dollar to a list of persons, no relationship stated (who were identified as his children in his May 1829 Estate Papers), and he willed that his land where John Archie (Archer, his son-in-law) was living was to be sold and divided among his wife and a second list of persons (which included members of the first list), no relationship stated, and left $20 for the schooling of his grandson Thomas Roberts [CR 022.801.16]. When the will was offered for probate in the Tuesday, May 1827 session of the Chatham County court, the jury ruled that it was his will as regards his personal property but not as regards his real estate [Minutes 1822-27, n.p.]. A committee was appointed to settle the problem, and their report was recorded in the Monday, May 1828 session [Minutes 1828-33]. His estate papers listed seventeen persons and called them his children, but at least two of them, Ishmael and Elias, were probably his grandchildren [North Carolina Archives Estate Papers, Chatham County]. The fifteen other persons named in his will and estate papers were

15      i. Ethelred, born say 1780.

ii. Zachariah, born say 1782, father of Ishmael2 Roberts who was not yet twenty-one years old when his grandfather wrote his July 1816 will. Zachariah's wife Mary Roberts, and their son Ishmael were mentioned in the 20 December 1820 Robeson County will of her father Ethelred Newsom [WB 1:325].

iii. Kinchen2, born say 1784, head of a Chatham County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:195]. On 15 August 1821 he purchased 154 acres in Chatham County on the south side of Cape Fear River near the Ferry Road and Drake's land for $430 and sold this land seven years later on 25 December 1828 for $200. On 3 April 1829 he sold the 150 acres on Bush Creek which he received as one of the heirs of (his father?) Ishmael Roberts [DB X:320; AB:134, 186]. He was head of a Lost Creek Township, Vigo County, Indiana, household in 1850. He was a sixty-five-year-old, born in Virginia, with $3,000 estate, living with Nancy, fifty-eight years old, born in North Carolina [Household no. 202].

iv. Jonathan2, born say 1784, head of a Robeson County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:241]. He entered 100 acres in Robeson County on 1 January 1810 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, vol. II, no.162] and was living in Cumberland County when his father's estate papers were proved in May 1829 Chatham County court.

v. Elizabeth, born say 1788, married John Archie. She may have been the Betsey Roberts who had an illegitimate child by Barna Stewart. The August 1805 session of the Chatham County court ordered Barna to pay for the child's support [Minutes 1805-10, 41].

vi. Benjamin, born say 1792, married Sally Archer, 30 June 1817 Orange County, North Carolina bond, Jesse Archer bondsman. He was one of the freeholders (or son of one) who was ordered to work on the road from Deep River to Little Lick Creek in Chatham County in May 1817 [Minutes 1811-18, 60]. Benjamin was head of a Chatham County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:192] and 6 in Orange County, Indiana, in 1840. He and his wife Sally obtained free papers in Chatham County on 6 November 1824 and recorded them in Orange County, Indiana on 11 February 1833 [Orange County Recorder Office Deeds D:433-4].

vii. Elias2, born say 1793, obtained free papers in Chatham County on 10 February 1823 which stated that he was married to Nancy Archie, the daughter of Thomas Archie, and that they had been living in Chatham County for twenty-three years. Elias recorded his free papers in Orange County, Indiana on 20 February 1833 [DB D:432].

viii. Aaron, born say 1795, married Jary Teary (Terry) 10 October 1816 Robeson County bond, William Carter bondsman. He purchased 100 acres in Chatham County from his father for $150 on 12 February 1825 [DB AA:275]. On 13 April 1830 he obtained Chatham County "free papers" in which the clerk stated that he was a "free man of color," the son of Ishmael Roberts, an old Revolutionary soldier who served under Colonel Shepherd. Aaron had a wife named Sarah, the daughter of Edward (Etheldred) Newsom, another "free man of color" who served in the Revolution, and a daughter named Candassa [Owen County DB 3:280]. Sarah was mentioned in her father's 20 December 1820 Robeson County, North Carolina will [WB 1:325]. Their daughter Candace married John Harper on 15 December 1842 in Owen County [DB B:179]. Aaron was head of a Washington Township, Owen County, Indiana household of 3 "free colored" in 1830 [IN:19] and 5 in 1840 [IN:33].

ix. Margaret Leucus (Locus), born say 1799. She married Isham Lucas, 26 August 1820 Robeson County bond, Ethelred Newsom bondsman, and was living in Robeson County when her father's estate was settled in May 1829 in Chatham County.

x. James10, born say 1800, married Polly Stewart, 12 February 1822 Chatham County bond, Thomas Cottrell bondsman. He purchased 62-1/2 acres in Chatham County on the south side of the Cape Fear River on Bush Creek from his father for $150 on 8 February 1825 [DB AB:166] and sold land by deed proved in Chatham County on Wednesday, May 1837 session [Minutes 1833-41].

xi. Richard3, born say 1802, purchased 100 acres in Chatham County on Bush Creek from his father for $400 on 8 February 1825 [DB AB:221]. The Thursday session of the August 1821 Chatham County court ordered him to support his child by Elleky Evans [Minutes 1805-10]. He married ___ Bird, 14 December 1827 Chatham County bond, John Archy bondsman. His wife was probably the daughter of Josiah Bird, head of a Chatham County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:211]. He sold land by deed proved in Chatham County on Wednesday, May term, 1837 [Minutes 1833-41]. Richard may have been the Richard Roberts who was head of a Ripley Township, Rush County, Indiana household of 5 "free colored" in 1840.

xii. Mary6.

xiii. Delphy, born say 1810. She was married to Henry Trevan before February 1830 when the deed for land they inherited from Ishmael Roberts was proved in Chatham County [Minutes 1828-33].

xiv. Rebecca.

xv. Lewis.

xvi. "Pardon Boin." He was one of the earliest settlers of the town of Spencer, Owen County, Indiana, where he purchased Lot numbers 251, 261, 119, 105, 228, 126, 5, 52, and 53 between August 1825 and June 1831, and he received a patent for 40 acres in Lafayette Township in 1836. He was called Bowen Roberts when he purchased land from the other heirs of Ishmael Roberts by deed proved in Chatham County court in the Monday, February 1830 session [Minutes 1828-33]. Before travelling back to Owen County, he obtained "free papers" in Chatham County on 1 March 1830 and recorded them in Owen County on 31 October 1831. They mentioned his wife Elizabeth and daughter Patsy and stated that he was the son of Ishmael Roberts, Sr., an "old revolutionary" who had been living in Chatham County upwards of twenty years. They also mentioned Ishmael's widow Silvia and her daughter Rebecca [DB 3:279]. Pardon was head of an Owen County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830 [IN:19].

 

11.    John2 Roberts, born say 1759, purchased 100 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, adjoining James Roberts and George Jordan on 10 September 1779 [DB 7:15]. He was a single man in 1780 when he was taxable on an assessment of 350 pounds in Northampton County [GA 46.1] and was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73]. He purchased 6 acres on the east side of Cypress Swamp in Northampton County on 9 September 1791 [DB 10:66]. On 20 January 1798 he purchased 400 acres in Chatham County on the south prong of Lick Creek for 140 pounds and sold 222-1/2 acres of this land on 17 January 1819 [DB J:285; X:230]. This was land which bordered the part of Orange County which became Durham County in 1881. He was head of a Chatham County household of 14 in 1800 and 10 in 1810 [NC:214]. Perhaps his widow was Molley Roberts, born before 1776, head of a Person County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498]. His children may have been

i. Polley, married Moses Archer, 23 April 1813 Orange County bond, Mathias Milton and Moses Bass bondsmen. Moses Archie was head of a Chatham County household of 4 "other free" in 1820 [NC:192].

ii. Joseph3, born 1776-94, head of a Person County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498].

 

12.    William1 Roberts, born say 1744, husband of Milly (Maclin?) Roberts, "free Mulattos," registered the 22 March 1765 birth of their son Macklin in Bruton Parish, James City County [Bruton Parish Register, 29]. The York County court presented him on 6 May 1765 for not listing his wife as a tithable. The case was dismissed after he paid her levy and the court costs. On 21 July 1766 he was sued by the executor of Lawson Burfoot for a 55 shilling debt. Robert Evans and Thomas Maclin were his securities [Judgments & Orders 1763-5, 370; Orders 1765-68, 91]. He was presented by the York County court on 19 November 1770 for failing to list himself as a tithable and for selling rum without a license, and presented on 15 July 1771 for not listing himself as a tithable. Lucretia Maclin sued him on 17 May 1773 for trespass, assault and battery [Judgments & Orders 1770-2, 105, 337; 1772-4, 273]. His widow Mildred was taxable in York County on one free tithable in 1782, one free tithable, a slave, 2 horses and 7 cattle in 1783, taxable on a slave named Lewis in 1784, and taxable on the tithe of (her son?) Richard Roberts and Lewis Wilson in 1785 [Personal Property Tax List, 1813-24, frames 69, 72, 92, 102]. William and Milly were the parents of

i. Macklin, born 22 March 1765 [Bruton Parish Register, 29], perhaps identical to Godfrey Roberts (named for his grandfather Godfrey Maclin?) who was presented on 15 May 1786 for failing to list himself as a tithable. On 19 May 1800 the York County court ordered him to stand trial in Williamsburg for stealing a horse belonging to George Morris [Orders 1784-7, 322; 1795-1803, 398]. He was taxable in York County from 1788 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 144, 164, 195, 212, 247, 267, 288, 318, 342, 367, 394, 411] and head of a York County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:881].

ii. ?Richard1, born about 1766, taxable in the York County household of Mildred Roberts in 1785, taxable on a horse from 1788 to 1814, taxable on a slave in 1798 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 102, 144, 164, 239, 258, 279, 299, 318, 342, 367, 394, 411], head of a York County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:881] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:159]. He registered in York County on 20 January 1823: light complexion about 56 years of age 5 feet 6-1/4 Inches high ... bony face, fine short hair [Register of Free Negroes 1798-31, no.202].

 

13.    James4 Roberts, born say 1755, was called the son of James Roberts in a promissory note made on 24 July 1778 by which Jonathan Bowing agreed to pay him 80 pounds currency for value received. The promissory note was in a small leather-bound notebook which the Roberts family took with them when they moved to Indiana [Roberts Settlement Papers, Library of Congress Manuscript Division]. He was taxable in 1780 in Northampton County on an assessment of 482 pounds, including 12 pounds, 8 shillings cash in hand [GA 46.1]. He purchased 100 acres adjoining James Saul in Northampton County on 20 May 1774 and another 250 acres on the east side of Cates Hole Mill Swamp adjoining George Jordan in 1779. He sold (signing) 215 acres on Cates Hole Swamp adjoining George Jordan to (his brother) Jonathan Roberts on 9 February 1796. He bought another 96-1/2 acres adjoining his own land in 1797 and sold (signing) 125 acres on Cates Hole Swamp on 24 November 1797 [DB 5:321; 6:331; 10:233, 327, 340]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73], 10 in 1800 [NC:473], 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:743], and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:256]. Perhaps his children were

i. Richard2, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:743] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:256].

ii. Kinchen1, born say 1780, head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:743]. He was among the freeholders of Northampton County who were required to furnish hands for the road from Frederick Stanton's to Nathaniel Stevenson's on 4 March 1816. He was deceased by 3 December 1816 when his wife Lucy was granted administration on his estate with Peter Stewart and Stephen Walden as sureties. On 3 March 1817 the court bound Kinchen's orphans James, Turner, and Harris to (their grandfather?) James Roberts.

iii. Katy, married Herbert Scott, 5 January 1816 Northampton County bond, William Sweat bondsman.

iv. Elijah, born 1776-1794, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "free colored" and a female slave under the age of 14 in 1820 [NC:256]. He was one of the freeholders ordered by the Northampton County court to work on a road Frederick Stantons to Nathaniel Stevenson's on 4 March 1816 [Minutes 1813-21].

v. Anthony3, born 1795-1806, ordered by the Northampton County court on 7 December 1814 to pay support for a child he had by Elizabeth Walden. He was one of the freeholders ordered by the Northampton County court to work on a road Frederick Stantons to Nathaniel Stevenson's on 4 March 1816 [Minutes 1813-21]. He married Betsey Davenport, 26 March 1816 Northampton County bond, Tom Hughes bondsman. He was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:256] and 9 "free colored" in Ripley Township, Rush County, Indiana in 1840.

 

14.    Jonathan1 Roberts, born say 1759, received 18 shillings, 8 pence pay for 7 days service in the Northampton County, North Carolina Militia under Colonel Allen Jones in 1775-1776 [Haun, Revolutionary Army Accounts, Journal "A", 20]. He was single in 1780 when he was taxable on a 286 pound assessment in Northampton County [GA 46.1]. He kept a leather-bound notebook which recorded the birth on 3 June 1782 of Willis Scott, son of Mary Scott, and recorded his payment of 2 pounds, 9 shillings for schooling for the year 1803 [Roberts Settlement Papers, Library of Congress Manuscript Division]. He may have married Mary Scott because he made a deed of gift to his son Willis Roberts which was proved in Northampton County court on 6 June 1814. However, Jonathan's father James Roberts still referred to Willis as Willis Scott when he left him furniture by his 3 March 1803 Northampton County will [WB 3:14]. Jonathan was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73], 10 in 1800 [NC:473], and 8 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:743]. He purchased 215 acres on the east side of Cypress Swamp from his brother James on 9 February 1796, sold (signing) 106 acres of this land on 26 December 1797. He transferred land to his son Willis Roberts by deed filed on 20 July 1814 and to his son Hansel by deed filed on 9 February 1819 [DB 10:233, 362; 17:45; 20:51]. By his 15 July 1820 Northampton County will, proved 4 December 1820, he left his plantation to his wife Mary and then to his son James, and left five shillings each to son Willis Roberts, daughter Delila Bass, daughter Delina Demcy, son Ransom Roberts, son Hansel Roberts, and daughter Viny Roberts. He left furniture to his granddaughter Beca Roberts and named son Willis executor [WB 3:241]. His children were

i. James9, born 1775-96, head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:256]. He married Martha Roberts, 21 November 1824 Northampton County bond, Ransom Roberts bondsman. He died before March court 1826 when Martha received 41 acres adjoining Willis Roberts' land as her widow's dower. (His brother) Ransom was executor of his estate [C.R. 071.508.178 (estates papers at North Carolina State Archives)].

ii. Willis, born 3 June 1782, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [NC:743] and 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:256]. His father transferred land to him by deed filed in Northampton County on 20 July 1814, and he transferred land to his brother Hansel by deed filed on 14 December 1833 [DB 17:45; 26:195]. He was head of a Ripley Township, Rush County, Indiana household of 8 "free colored" in 1840.

iii. Delila Bass, perhaps the Delila Bass, born about 1800, who married (second) Benjamin Bass on 7 January 1830 in Owen County, Indiana [DB A:34]. Benjamin was head of an Owen County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830 [IN:22] and 9 in 1840 [IN:42] and was living with Delilah in household no. 167 of Marion Township, Owen County, in 1850.

iv. Delina Dempsey.

v. Ransom, born 1775-94, head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:256].

vi. Hansel, married Priscilla Roberts, 25 December 1813 Northampton County bond, Willis Roberts bondsman. His father transferred land to him by deed filed in Northampton County on 9 February 1819, and his brother Willis transferred land to him by deed filed on 14 December 1833 [DB 20:51; 26:195]. He was head of household no. 261 in Jackson Township, Hamilton County, Indiana, in 1850.

vii. Viny.

 

15.    Ethelred Roberts, born say 1780, entered land in Robeson County on 5 March 1801 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Robeson County, vol. II, no.161] and purchased land by deed proved in Robeson County on 8 January 1805 [Minutes I:314]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:241], 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:321], and was living in Robeson County in May 1829 when his father's Chatham County estate was settled. He was probably named for Ethelred Newsom. He and his wife Dicey were mentioned in the free papers of their son Elias. They were the parents of

i. Elias3, born about 1815, a few months more than fifteen years of age in March 1830 according to free papers which were written for him in Robeson County on 8 June 1834 while he was a resident of Owen County, Indiana. He left Robeson County to go to Indiana with his uncles Aaron Roberts and Pardon Bowen Roberts, the latter of whom resided in Chatham County in 1830. The papers further stated that: the undersigned were well acquainted with the said Elias from his infancy and also with his father Etheldred Roberts ... and his wife Dicey ... persons of Colour are free born and that they have always sustained the reputation of Honest, industrious persons ... he was never indentured or otherwise to either of his uncles [Owen County DB 4:295].

 

Northampton County, Virginia

1.    Elizabeth Roberts, born say 1690, was "a negro" living in Northampton County, Virginia, on 20 December 1715 when she came into court to bind her children John and William Roberts to Thomas Preeson [Orders 1710-16, 235]. Her children were

i. John1, born say 1708.

ii. William2, born say 1710, a "negro" tithable in the Northampton County, Virginia household of Jonathan Stephens in 1731 and a tithable in John Kendall's household in 1738 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 224, 281]. On 8 October 1734 John Kendall paid a fine for an illegitimate child William had by Elizabeth Carter, "Negroe" [Orders 1732-42, 136]. Perhaps Elizabeth was identical to (his wife?) Elizabeth Roberts who was tithable in his household from 1739 to 1742 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 286, 308, 316, 331]. He won a suit for trespass, assault and battery against Howson Mapp for 5 shillings on 12 November 1740 [Orders 1732-42, 423].

2        iii. ?Mary, born about 1714.

3        iv. ?Sabra, born say 1718.

 

2.    Mary Roberts, born about 1714, a "free Negro," made choice of Jacob Waterfield as her guardian in Northampton County, Virginia court on 15 May 1728 [Orders 1722-9, 326]. She consented to the indenture of her son Hezekiah to Abel Upshur on 13 November 1739. She was tithable at Mol Upshur's plantation in 1740 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 308]. She was the mother of

i. Hezekiah, born in February 1734/5, bound apprentice to Abel Upshur on 13 November 1739 [Orders 1732-42, 373]. The Accomack County court presented him on 30 May 1775 for failing to list himself as a tithable in 1774. The case was dismissed at the next court [Orders 1774-7, 349, 365]. He was head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 (called Kiah) [Virginia Genealogist 2:160]. He was a soldier who served in the Revolution from Accomack County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 42].

ii. Rachel2, born 28 June 1733, a ten-year-old "Negroe" bound apprentice to John and Mary Luker in Northampton County on 12 April 1743 [Orders 1742-48, 78]. She may have been the Rachel Roberts who was presented on 13 May 1777 for bastard bearing [Minutes 1771-7, 370].

 

3.    Sabra Roberts, born say 1718, a "Negroe," was presented in Northampton County, Virginia, on 9 November 1736 for bastard bearing and was called "Sabra a Negroe Servant woman to William Smith" on 11 April 1738 when the court bound her daughter Dorothy to her master. On 12 August 1740 the court ordered her released from her indenture to William Smith but deliberated until 15 October before deciding that she was entitled to her freedom dues [Orders 1722-9, 246, 259; 1732-42, 309, 408, 415]. She was taxable in William Smith's household from 1737 to 1740 and taxable in her own household adjoining William and Betty Roberts in 1741 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 267, 285, 308, 317]. She was the mother of

4        i. Dorothy1, born 10 November 1735.

 

4.    Dorothy1 Roberts, born 10 November 1735, daughter of Sabra, was bound apprentice to William Smith in Northampton County on 11 April 1738 [Orders 1732-42, 309]. She may have been the mother of

5        i. Dorothy2/ Dolly, born say 1765.

 

5.    Dolly Roberts, born say 1765, was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:160] and 5 in 1810 [VA:53]. She was the mother of

i. Robin, born about 1778, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: Black, 9 feet 1/4 Inches [Register of Free Negroes, no. 36]. He was called son of Dol Roberts in the list of tithables for Accomack County in 1799 [Personal Property Tax List B, p.19]. He was married to Mary Roberts by 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

ii. ?Southy, born 14 September 1779, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: Black, 5 feet 3-5/8 Inches ... Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no. 11].

iii. ?Levin, born in November 1786, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: Black (rather light), 5 feet 4-1/2 Inches, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, no. 13].

 

Other descendants on the Eastern Shore of Virginia were

i. Rachel1, born about 1723, a twelve-year-old "Negroe" bound apprentice in Northampton County to Lydia Luke on 8 July 1735. On 8 April 1740 the court ordered Jonathan Smith to release her from servitude [Orders 1732-42, 167, 395].

ii. Esther, born about 1725, ten-year-old "Negroe" bound apprentice in Northampton County to Lydia Luke on 8 July 1735 [Orders 1732-42, 167]. On 8 April 1740 the court ordered Jonathan Smith to release her from servitude [Orders 1732-42, 395].

iii. Susanna, born say 1727, tithable in the Northampton County household of Joseph Delpeach in 1743 and 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 351, 367]. On 14 December 1743 James Delpeech paid her court costs when she was whipped for bastard bearing. Solomon Wilson sued her for debt, but the case was dismissed at his costs on 14 May 1746 [Orders 1742-8, 136, 327].

iv. Robert, born about 1765, seven years old in July 1772 when he was bound apprentice in Northampton County [Minutes 1771-77, 120]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:14].

v. Oney, head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:14].

vi. Isaac, head of an Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:161] and 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:52].

 

Augusta, Frederick and Spotsylvania counties

1.    Rebecca Roberts, born say 1730, a "Mulatto" servant, brought a successful suit for her freedom from her master John David Wilpart in Augusta County on 20 May 1761 [Orders 1761-3, 9]. She may have been the mother of

i. Anthony, born about 1753, registered in Petersburg on September 3, 1794: a brown Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, forty one or forty two years old, born free & raised in Spotsylvania County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 91].

ii. Edward, born 10 April 1755, a "Mulatto Bastard Child" bound to William Cockran by the Frederick County, Virginia court in August 1755. On 8 April 1767 the court ordered him bound instead to William Baldwin until the age of thirty-one [Orders 1753-5, 370; 1765-7, 349].

 

Endnotes:

1.    The other householders prosecuted in Southampton County for not listing their wives as tithables were John Porteus, Isaac Young, Thomas Wilkins, Francis Locust, James Brooks, Jr. and Sr., John Byrd, Jr. and Sr., Abraham Artis, Lewis Artis, William Brooks, John Demery, Ann Brooks, and William Tabor. The Brooks and Byrd families were also from York County.

 

ROBINS FAMILY

1.    John1 Robbins, born say 1700, was one of the Chowan County Indians who sold their land on Bennett's Creek in 1734 in the part of Chowan County which later became Gates County:

James Bennett, Thos Hoyter, Charles Beasley, Jeremiah Pushin, John Robins, John Reading & Nuce Will Cheif men of the Chowan Indians ... [Chowan DB W-1, 250].

On 12 April 1790 James Robins, Benjamin Robins, George Bennett and Joseph Bennett sold to Samuel Lewis and Samuel Harrell for $100 the last remaining 400 acres of the original tract of 11,360 acres near Bennetts Creek and Chowan Creek granted to the Chowan Indians in 1724. On 23 October 1790 Lewis and Harrell petitioned the General Assembly for authorization to purchase the land, stating that the Indian men had died,

leaving a parcel of Indian women, which has mixed with Negroes, and now there is several freemen and women of Mixed blood as aforesaid which has descended from the sd Indians...the said freemen...did in the late Contest with Great Brittain behave themselves as good and faithful soldiers.

Their petition was rejected at first but approved on 28 and 30 December 1791 on petition of James Robins, noting that the money had been paid and the deed signed by all except six Indian women, descendants of the tribe, who were living on land unaffected by the sale [General Assembly Session Records, Nov-Dec 1790, Box 2; Gates County DB 2:272-274]. John Robins' likely descendants were

2        i. Nan, born say 1743.

3        ii. Lucy, born say 1750.

 

2.    Nan/ Nancy/ Ann Robins, born say 1743, was among eight Indians who purchased for 5 pounds thirty acres near the old Indian patent on 1 August 1782 in Gates County: James, Benjamin, Patience, Sarah, Nancy, Elizabeth, Dorcas, and Christian Robbins. The following year she was identified as their mother in a deed for land adjoining theirs [DB A-2:33, 46]. On 20 August 1821 their land was divided among Sarah, Nancy, Elizabeth, Thaney, Lewis, Treasy, and Judith Robbins [DB 11:40]. Ann Robins was head of a Gates County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:276], 5 in 1810 (called Nancy) [NC:842], and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:155]. Possible children of Ann mentioned in the 1 August 1782 purchase of 30 acres were

4        i. James1, born say 1760.

ii. Benjamin, born about 1765, a fourteen-year-old Indian ordered bound by the Gates County court as an apprentice planter to James Garritt, Sr., in November 1779. He was about seventeen years old in May 1781 when he was bound to Jethro Miltear [Fouts, Gates County court Minutes 1779-86, 10, 32].

5        iii. Patience, born say 1763.

6        iv. Sarah, born say 1766.

v. Elizabeth.

7        vi. Thaney, born say 1770.

vii. Dorcas, head of a Gates County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:276] and 4 in 1810 [NC:842].

viii. Christian, living in Perquimans County on 23 February 1819 when he sold his rights to 5 acres in Gates County at Indian Town joining lands of Nancy, Elizabeth, and Sarah Robbins [DB 10:366].

 

3.    Lucy Robbins, born say 1750, was the mother of Samuel Robbins, a fifteen- year-old illegitimate boy, no race indicated, who was bound as an apprentice cooper to Jethro Miltear by the Gates County court in February 1787. She may also have been the mother of Elisha Robbins, an "Indian" boy who was bound to Jethro Miltear six years earlier in May 1781. Lucy was the mother of

8        i. ?Mary, born say 1768.

ii. ?Elisha, born about 1770, an eleven-year-old Indian boy ordered bound apprentice to Jethro Miltear in May 1781. He was an insolvent taxpayer in Gates County in 1794 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court, Gates County, 1779-86, 32; 1787-93, 3, 86; 1794-99, 80].

iii. ?Hardy, born say 1770, head of a Gates County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:23], an insolvent taxpayer in 1791 and 1794.

iv. Samuel, born about 1772, son of Lucy Robbins bound as an apprentice cooper in February 1787, an insolvent taxpayer in Gates County in 1794 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court, Gates County, 1787-93, 3; 1794-99, 40].

v. ?James2, born about 1780, an eleven-year-old "Indian Boy," no parent named, bound as an apprentice turner to William Gordon by the Gates County court in February 1791 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court, Gates County, 1787-93, 81].

 

4.    James1 Robins, born say 1760, was among eight members of the family named as buyers of 30 acres near the old Indian patent line in Gates County on 1 August 1782 [DB A-2:33]. In 1783 this land was called the "line of children of Nan Robbins," but by 1793 it was called James Robins' land [DB 3:167]. On 12 April 1790, he, (his brother?) Benjamin Robins, and George and Joseph Bennett were called "chief men and representatives of Chowan Indian Nation" when they sold for $100 the last 400 acres of the original 11,360 acres which the tribe held by patent of 24 April 1724 [DB 2:153]. He sued John Odom and William Watson in Gates County court for four pounds damages in May 1795 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court, Gates County, 1794-99, 35]. He was head of a Gates County household of 15 "other free" and a white woman in 1790 [NC:23], 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [NC:276], and 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:842]. Perhaps his children were

i. Jacob, born 1776-94, head of a Gates County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:842] and 8+ "free colored" in 1820 [NC:155]. He purchased land by deed proved in Gates County in May 1811 [Minutes 1806-11, 697] and February 1814 [Minutes 1812-17, 827] and was living in Perquimans County on 6 February 1816 when he sold 30 acres in Gates County [DB 10:125].

ii. Josiah, born 1776-94, head of an Orange County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:336]. He married Tabitha Shoecraft. They moved with the Shoecraft family from Hertford to Orange and then to Guilford County. Josiah's widow Tabitha Robbins, born 1794-1806, was head of a Guilford County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Lewis, head of a Gates County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:842].

iv. Kinston, one of the "sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free African Americans [NCGSJ XI:252].

v. Thomas, born 1776-94, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:186] and 5 in 1830 [NC:404].

vi. ?Nancy, born say 1788, married Jethro Martin, 8 October 1806 Gates County bond, (her brother?) Jacob Robbins bondsman.

 

5.    Patience Robbins, born say 1763, was among eight members of the family named as buyers of 30 acres near the old Indian patent line on 1 August 1782 [DB A-2:33]. She was the mother of

i. Judith, who was living in Chowan County on 15 May 1820 when she sold land in Gates County known by the name of Indian Town which was descended to her from her mother [DB 10:523].

 

6.    Sarah Robins, born say 1766, was head of a Gates County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:276], 4 in 1810 [NC:342], and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:155]. She was the mother of

i. ?John2, born 10 August 1782, bound an apprentice house carpenter and joiner to William Lewis in February 1794 by the Gates County court. He and James Robbins were called "Indian or Molatto Boys" when they were bound to Henry Lee in February 1796 after William Lewis' death [Fouts, Minutes of County Court, Gates County, vol. I:6, 53]. He may have been the John Robins who married Mrs. Mary Ann Weaver, "free persons of colour," 1816 Norfolk County bond, Robert Barrett surety. He was head of a Gates County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:155].

ii. James3, born in August 1784, ten-year-old son of Sarah Robbins bound as an apprentice house carpenter and joiner to William Lewis in Gates County in February 1794.

iii. ?Sealy, married James Reed, 25 October 1808 Gates County bond, James Lassiter bondsman.

 

7.    Thaney Robins, born say 1770, was living in Gates County in February 1794 when the court bound her son Charles as an apprentice cooper to William Hinton of Indian Neck [Fouts, Minutes of County Court, Gates County, I:6]. She received her part of the division of 30 acres in Gates County, formerly called Indian Town, on 20 August 1821 [DB 11:40]. Her children were

i. Charles, born about 1787.

 

8.    Mary Robins, born say 1768, was living in Gates County in May 1798 when the court bound her twelve-year-old son Jethro to Richard Rawls to learn house carpentry [Fouts, Minutes of County Court, Gates County, I:97]. Her son was

i. Jethro, born about 1786.

 

Endnotes:

1.    Mary Beasley was probably one of Charles Beasley's descendants. She paid 5 pounds for a 5 year lease on a small house and one acre of land in Gates County from David Watson on 2 November 1795 [DB 3:261]. Perhaps she was the Polly Beasley ("&d Major") who was head of a Washington County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:795]. See further the Bennett and Hiter histories.

2.    Several members of the Robins family of Virginia, descendants of Indian women brought to Virginia by traders between 1682 and 1748, brought suit in April 1772 against persons who held them in slavery [Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning American Slavery, I:91].

 

ROBINSON FAMILY

1.    Mary Robinson, born say 1730, was living in Truro Parish, Fairfax County, on 22 June 1749 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Truro Parish to bind her "Mullatto" child to Hugh West to serve until the age of thirty-one and bound her to her master for an additional year [Orders 1749-54, 20]. And on 22 May 1754 the churchwardens bound her four-year-old "Mulatto" son William Robinson to West. Her children were released from their indentures in Loudoun County about twenty-five years later by Hugh's son George West [Emancipation Papers, Loudoun County courthouse, by Townsend Lucas in JAAHGS, 11:122; Fairfax County WB 1752-67, 74]. Her children were

2        i. ?Jane, born about 1747.

ii. William, born about 1750, a "Mulatto boy" valued at 9 pounds in the 29 January 1755 Fairfax County estate of Hugh West [WB 1752-67, 80]. He was listed among the taxable slaves in George West's Loudoun County list for 1772, a "molatto" in 1773, a taxable in 1775, and from 1777 to 1780 [Tithables 1758-1799, 617, 663a, 799c, 817, 837, 917, 986]. He was thirty-one years old when he was discharged from his service to George West on 4 August 1781.

iii. ?James, listed among the taxable slaves in George West's Loudoun County list for 1772 [Tithables 1758-1799, 617].

 

2.    Jane Robinson, born about 1747, was a "Mulatto girl" valued at 10 pounds in the 29 January 1755 Fairfax County estate of Hugh West [WB 1752-67, 80]. She was a "molatto" taxable in George West's Loudoun County list for 1773, taxable in 1775 and 1777 [Tithables 1758-1799, 663a, 799c, 817]. She was thirty-one years old by 17 April 1778 when she completed her apprenticeship to George West in Loudoun County. Her children listed with her in the record of her emancipation were

i. John, born October 1769 at Cameron.

ii. Margaret, born about the middle of January 1771.

iii. James, born 14 February, died 1774.

iv. Mary, born 1 August 1774, discharged from her apprenticeship by Heathy Dade on 1 August 1792.

v. Amos, born 25 December 1777.

vi. William, born 29 May 1780.

vii. Henry, born 1 June 1782.

viii. Lewis, born in June, no year stated.

 

Others in Virginia were

i. Betty, born say 1730, called a "Christian White servant belonging to William Andrews" when she was charged by the churchwardens of Accomack Parish in Accomack County court on 2 June 1748 with having a bastard child by "Jemmy a Mulatto man Slave belonging to James Pettinger." The court ordered that her fine be paid by selling her for another five years when her servitude was completed [Orders 1744-53, 274].

ii. Sampson, "Mulatto" head of a Nansemond County household in Buxton's list for 1784 [VA:74] and a Frederick County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:597].

iii. George, a "Free Negro" taxable at G. Church in Nansemond County in 1815.

iv. Nancy, a "Free Negro" taxable on 2 cattle in Nansemond County in 1815 [Yantis, Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia, S-14].

v. Aaron, a "Free Negro" taxable in Nansemond County in 1815.

vi. Abby, head of a Norfolk County household of 4 "other free" and one slave in 1810 [VA:918].

vii. Charles(?), head of a Norfolk County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:918].

viii. Olley, head of a Frederick County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:590].

ix. James, head of a Frederick County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:596].

x. Thomas, head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:594].

xi. Susan, head of a Richmond City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:368].

xii. Peter, head of a Richmond City household of 2 "other free" and one slave in 1810 [VA:346], perhaps the Peter Robertson, "Free mulatto, who was living in ward 2 of Richmond City in the household of Isaac Armistead, a ship carpenter, in 1782 [VA:112].

xiii. Barnett B., head of a Richmond City household of one "other free" and 2 slaves [VA:328].

 

North Carolina

Members of a Robinson famly in North Carolina were

i. George Robison, born say 1710, and his wife Tiba were taxables in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1750 with their sons George (born say 1733) and Frank Robison (born say 1735) [CR 44.701.23].

1        ii. Mary, born say 1735.

 

1.    Mary Robinson, born say 1735, was a "free Molato" woman who petitioned the Onslow County, North Carolina court on 5 January 1756 to order Richard Whitehurst, Sr., to release her unnamed child to her. The court ordered the sheriff to find the child and deliver it to her [Minutes 1749-65, 31c, 37a]. Her children may have been

2        i. David, born say 1753.

3        ii. Zachariah1, born say 1760.

iii. Manuel, head of a Richland District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:173a].

iv. Thomas Robison, head of a "Molatto" New Hanover County household of 2 polls aged 21-60 years, 3 under 21 or over 60, and 5 females in 1786 in John Erwin's list for the North Carolina state census; called Thomas Roberson in 1800, head of a New Hanover County household of 7 "other free" [NC:311]. Perhaps the man in his household in 1786 was Joseph Roberson, head of a New Hanover County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:311], and one "free colored" man over forty-five years old in 1820 [NC:209].

v. Edward Robeson, head of a "Molatto" New Hanover County household of one poll aged 21-60 years, one under 21 or over 60, and one female in 1786 in John Erwin's list for the North Carolina state census. He may have been the Edward Robinson of Cumberland County who was ordered by the 21 May 1763 Cumberland County court to appear and show cause why "three Mulatto Children that live with him should not be Bound apprentice as the law directs." They were Rachel, Benjamin, and Juda Allen [Minutes 1759-65, 90, 102, 108].

 

2.    David Robinson, born say 1753, was head of a Jones County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:143]. He may have been the father of

i. Benjamin, head of a Lenoir County household of 4 "other free," one white woman, and one white boy in 1800 [NC:15].

ii. Charles Robinson, born 1794-76, head of a Lenoir County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:291].

iii. John Roberson, head of a Lenoir County household of one "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:287].

iv. Lewis Roberson, head of a Lenoir County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:287] and 2 whites in 1820 [NC:291].

 

3.   Zachariah1 Robinson, born say 1760, was head of an Anson County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [NC:56] and 15 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:12]. He may have been the father of

i. Sarah, born say 1783, married John Demery in Anson County in 1801 according to his recollection [History of Randolph County, Indiana, 137].

4        ii. Zachariah2, born say 1785.

iii. Moses, head of a Cumberland County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:189].

iv. Thomas, born 1776-94, head of an Anson County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:12].

v. Martin, head of an Anson County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:12].

 

4.    Zachariah2 Robinson/ Roberson, born after 1775, was head of an Anson County household of 15 "free colored" in 1830. He was a "free man of color" who purchased land in Gibson, County, Tennessee just before the legislature required free people of color to leave the state. He and several whites petitioned the legislature in 1832 and 1833 to allow his daughters Nancy and Sally and sons William and Elbert who had remained in North Carolina with their families to join him in Tennessee [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 193, 196]. He was the father of

i. Nancy.

ii. William.

iii. Sally.

iv. Elbert.

 

ROGERS FAMILY

Sarah Rogers, William Rogers, and Thomas Swet (Sweat) were the "Negro Children" slaves of Alexander Young who made a 25 December 1726 Isle of Wight County will which was proved 27 January 1728/9. He gave them to his friend John Exum to serve until the age of twenty-one and then to be free on the condition they pay him thirty pounds of tobacco yearly. He also gave Exum a "Negro woman" slave named Fortune who was to serve until her son Thomas Swet reached the age of twenty-one and then she was also to be free. The inventory of Young's estate, taken on 25 March 1729, included "1 Negro woman, 1 Negro girle, 2 Negro Boys" [Inventories & Accounts, 1726-34, 143-4, 181-2]. John Exum owned land in the part of Isle of Wight County which later became Southampton County and adjoined the Nottoway Indian reservation [DB 7:244, 246]. Other members of the Rogers family were

i. Francis Jenkins alias Rogers, born say 1740. See the Jenkins family history.

ii. Mary, born say 1748, a "free molatto" taxable in the Bertie County summary list for 1764.

iii. John, born say 1750, one of the Tuscarora Indians who sold land by 10 February 1777 Bertie County deed [DB M:314-5].

iv. Jeffry, born about 1761, a "free Mulato" boy aged four years on 5 October 1765 when the Craven County, North Carolina court ordered him bound to Elizabeth Mason to be a shoemaker. His master Thomas Mason died before 11 September 1770 when the court bound him to Thomas Nelson [Minutes 1758-66, 34c; 1767-75, 154b].

v. Abraham, born 1776-1794, head of a Beaufort County, North Carolina household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:33].

vi. Celia, born say 1760, one of the Nansemond Indians who sold 238 acres of the Nottoway reservation in Southampton County on 12 July 1792 [DB 7:714]. She died in September 1805.

vii. Alexander, born about 1797, an eleven-year-old orphan Indian boy listed in the special census of the Nottoway Indians which was taken in Southampton County in 1808. He was the half-brother of Fanny and Solomon Bartlett (on their mother's side). The three children lived with their relative Celia Rogers until her death in September 1805 when they were taken in by white neighbors [Virginia Archives, Box 154a, Executive Papers June 21 - July 22, 1808, 4-7].

 

Cumberland County, Virginia

1.    Prudence Rogers, born say 1735, was the mother of Sarah, Ann and Jane Rodgers who were bound by the churchwardens of Southam Parish, Cumberland County, to Job Thomas on 27 April 1761. On 23 September 1765 she complained to the court about his treatment of her children. On 27 March 1775 the court ordered the churchwardens of Littleton Parish to bind out her "mulattoe" children Nathaniel, Ansel, and Elizabeth Rodgers to Jesse Thomas [Orders 1758-62, 185, 315; Orders 1774-8, 321]. She purchased for 20 pounds 50 acres on Jumping Run of Button Creek in Campbell County bounded by lands of the Jenkins family on 26 October 1789 with the provision that it pass to her son Ansel at her death. And she sold this land on 20 November 1793 [DB 2:490; 3:207]. She was the mother of

2        i. Sarah, born say 1757.

3        ii. Ann, born say 1759.

iii. Jane, born say 1761, probably identical to James(?) Rogers, the mother of a "mulatto" son John Rodgers who was bound to Edward Clements in Cumberland County on 25 October 1779 [Orders 1779-84, 76].

iv. Nathaniel, born say 1763

v. Ansel, born say 1765, taxable in Henry County from 1797 to 1814, in the list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in 1813 and 1814, listed in 1813 next to Fanny Rogers, no relationship stated [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1830, frames 442, 469, 495, 641, 656].

vi. Elizabeth, born say 1767.

 

2.    Sarah Rogers, born say 1757, was bound to Job Thomas in Southam Parish on 27 April 1775. She was the mother of

i. Molly, born say 1775, bound to John Johnson by the churchwardens of Southam Parish in Cumberland County on 25 March 1776, called Mary Rodgers, a poor orphan, on 26 October 1776 when she was ordered bound by the churchwardens of Littleton Parish to John Montague. She complained to the court on 26 March 1781 and the court cancelled the indenture [Orders 1774-8, 364; 1779-84, 154, 158].

ii. ?David, born say 1782, a "mulattoe" orphan ordered bound to Jesse Thomas on 25 November 1782, no parent named [Orders 1779-84, 293.

 

3.    Ann Rogers, born say 1759, was bound by the churchwardens of Southam Parish to Job Thomas on 27 April 1761. She was the mother of

i. Absalom, son of Ann Rogers bound to Joel Meggs in Cumberland County on 25 February 1782 [Orders 1779-84, 173].

ii. Isham, son of Naney Rogers, ordered bound to Martin Richardson in Cumberland County on 23 February 1784 [Orders 1779-84, 500].

iii. ?Stephen, orphan of Nancy Rogers, bound to William Sanderson in Littleton Parish on 24 January 1785 [Orders 1784-6, 195].

 

ROLLINS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Floid, alias Rollins, born say 1738, servant of John Brown, confessed in Prince George's County, Maryland court on 22 November 1757 that she had a "Mulatto" child. The court ordered her sold for seven years and bound her seven-month-old daughter Jane to her master until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1754-8, 540]. She was the mother of

2        i. Jane, born April 1757.

 

2.    Jane Rollins, born April 1757 in Prince George County, Maryland, registered in Petersburg, Virginia, on 8 June 1810: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet one and a half inches high, fifty two years old, born free in Fredericksburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 578]. She may have been the mother of

i. Lucy, born about 1774, registered in Petersburg on 9 June 1810: a dark brown free Mulatto woman, five feet one inches high, thirty six years old, born free p. cert. of Registry of Fredericksburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 577]. She (called Lucy Rawlings) was head of a Petersburg household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:119b]. She may have been identical to Lucy Rawlings who was head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:110b].

3        ii. Benjamin, born say 1777.

iii. Charlotte, born about 1779, registered in Petersburg on 6 June 1816: a free woman of colour, five feet one half inches high, dark brown, near black, supposed thirty seven years old, born free in Essex County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 809]. She (called Charlotte Rollings) was head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:120b].

iv. Betsy Jarratt, born about 1782, registered in Petersburg on 8 June 1810: Betsy Jarratt, a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet four and a half inches high, twenty eight years old, born free p. cert. of Registry from the Clerk of Fredericksburg, her name Betsy Rollins [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 569]. She may have been the wife of Richard Jarratt who registered in Petersburg on 11 December 1809: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet seven 3/4 inches high, thirty years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 500]. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:119a].

 

3.    Benjamin Rollins, born say 1777, was taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Essex County, in 1800 and was listed there as a "free Negro" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1819, frames 510]. He was head of an Essex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:198]. He was probably the husband of Jane Rollins who registered as a free Negro in Essex County on 8 December 1810: daughter of Mary Soleleather by statement of Thomas Brockenbrough always passed as a free born person, 25 years of age, five feet 2-1/4 inches, bright Mulattoe [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.14, no. 30]. She was the mother of

i. Polly, born about 1809, registered in Essex County on 8 December 1810: by statement of Thos. Brockenbrough daughter of Jenny Rollins who always passed as a free born person, 1-3/4 years of age [Register of Free Negroes 1810-43, p.14, no.31].

 

ROSARIO FAMILY

1.    Philip1 Rosario, born say 1700, was an Indian living in Northampton County, Virginia, had an account with John Abdell, ordinary keeper, in 1722. In July 1724 the court ordered him to pay 4 barrels of corn which he had lost in a card game to David Stott. In November 1730 the court ordered the sheriff to arrest him until he provided security to appear in court to answer the suit of Andrew Walls, merchant, for a debt of 4 pounds. Philip sued William Vawter for 1 pound, 12 shillings in February 1730/1 [Orders 1729-32, 70; Mihalyka, Loose Papers, 1628-1731, 59, 90, 232]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1722 to 1729 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 31, 44, 110, 124, 166, 189]. He died before 16 July 1752 possessed of an estate so small in value that the court ordered its sale by the sheriff [Orders 1751-3, 143]. He was probably the ancestor of

2        i. Philip2, born say 1740.

ii. Elizabeth Rozario, listed in the town of Williamsburg with 3 "Black" persons in her household in 1782 [VA:45], probably the mother of Caroline and Suckey Rosara who were counted in a list of "Free Negroes and mulattoes" in Williamsburg in 1813. They were in the same list as Kizza Sunket who was probably from Northampton County [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List]. See also the De Rosario family.

 

2.    Philip2 Rosario, born say 1740, was an Indian bound by the Northampton County court to Thomas Barlow on 12 January 1762 [Minutes 1761-5, 4]. He may have had children by a slave since a number of manumitted slaves in Accomack County used the name Rosario. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Cyrus Rosarrous, registered in Accomack County: Born about the year 1762, a light Black inclining to yellow, Emancipated by a deed of manumission from Mary Griffin recorded in Accomack County Court [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 192].

ii. Sarah Roseairy, registered in Accomack County: born in June 1776, a very dark yellow approaching to a light black, 5-4-3/4", Emancipated by Robertson Rodgers by a deed of Manumission of Record in Accomack County Court [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 90].

 

ROSS FAMILY

1.    Jane1 Ros, born say 1717, was living in Caroline County, Virginia, on 9 May 1735 when she was presented by the grand jury for having a "mulatto" child at William Oliver's house. The presentment was dismissed on 13 February 1735/6 [Orders 1732-40, 291, 326]. She was probably the grandmother of

i. Reuben, born say 1755, a soldier from Culpeper County who served in the Revolutionary War [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 42]. He married Sally Terrel, 25 October 1791 Culpeper County bond. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1782 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 23, 83, 195, 336, 417, 496, 609, 693, 823, 867] and a "F. Mo." head of a Culpeper County household of 9 "other free" and one white woman in 1810 [VA:68]. He purchased property in Culpeper County on 29 March 1796 and 19 March 1810 [DB T:210; EE:15] and he was taxable on a half acre in Stevensburg from 1797 to 1813 and another two lots of 5 acres each in 1813 [Land Tax List 1782-1813]. They were probably the parents of George Ross who registered as a free Negro in the Corporation of Staunton: A bright mulatto man said to be 20 years of age the 10th day of May last. About 6 feet high, free born of a white woman in the county of Culpeper [Free Negro Register, no.28, http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/vshadow2].

ii. Jonathan, a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse in Culpeper County from 1782 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 23, 83, 195, 336, 417, 496, 609, 693, 823, 867].

iii. David, born say 1760, a soldier from Culpeper County who served in the Revolutionary War.

iv. Jane2, head of a New Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:766].

 

ROUSE FAMILY

Members of the Rouse family were

1        i. Peter1, born say 1738.

ii. John1, purchased 100 acres on Panther Branch in Bladen County, North Carolina, on 31 May 1762 with Peter Rouse as witness (signing) [DB 23:87]. He was a "Molato" taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, with (his brother?) Neil Rouse in 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:61]. He died before 8 June 1790 when Neal Rouse was granted administration on his Marlboro County, South Carolina estate [Minutes 1785-1808, n.p.].

2        iii. Cornelius, born say 1740.

3        iv. Jane, born say 1755.

4        v. Peter2, born 22 December 1760,

 

1.    Peter1 Rouse, born say 1738, was listed in the muster of Captain Paul Demere's Company of Independent Foot on duty in South Carolina and Georgia, "stationed on the spot," from 25 August 1756 to 24 October 1756 [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 989]. He was head of a South Orangeburgh, South Carolina household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [SC:99]. Perhaps his widow was Charity Rouse, head of a Barnwell District household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:65]. Charity was taxable on 150 acres in Winton, South Carolina, in 1800. He may have been the father of

i. Tristram, a "free Negro" taxable in Winton, South Carolina, in 1800 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 301, 313].

 

2.    Cornelius Rouse, born say 1740, was a "Molato" taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, with (his brother?) John Rouse in 1771 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:61]. He was a "Negroe" head of a Cheraw District, South Carolina household of 2 "other free" males above the age of 16, 2 "other free" males under 16, and 7 "other free" females in 1790 [SC:358], 15 "other free" in Barnwell District in 1800 [SC:62], and 9 in Abbeville District in 1810 [SC:84]. He was called Neale Rous when he received pay for thirty days duty in the militia in 1782 [S.C. Archives Accounts Audited For Revolutionary War Services, AA6636, frame 466, roll #128]. He was granted administration on the Marlboro County, South Carolina estate of John Rous on 8 June 1790 [Minutes 1785-1808, n.p.]. He may have been the Cornelius Ross (born before 1776) who was head of an Abbeville District household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [SC:5a]. He may have been the father of

i. Edmond Rouce, head of an Abbeville District household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [SC:82] and 12 "free colored" in Rutherford County, Tennessee in 1820.

ii. John2, head of an Abbeville District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [SC:82].

iii. Charles, born before 1776, head of an Abbeville District household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [SC:5a].

 

3.    Jane Rouse, born say 1755, was the mother of six-year-old Ann Rouse who was bound to Mrs. Norris by the Petersburg Hustings Court on 2 March 1785. She was the mother of

i. ?Nancy, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 13 February 1798: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet high, twenty three years old, born free in the County of Dinwiddie & raised in the Town of Petersburg. Feb. 27, 1817: Reentered by name of Nancy Johnson alledged to have been married [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 135].

ii. Ann, born about 1779, bound to Mrs. Norris on 2 March 1785.

iii. ?Samuel, a "free" taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1792, 1796, 1797 and 1798 [PPTL, 1791-9 (1792 B, p.11), (1796 A, p.12), (1797 A, p.13), (1798 B, p.13)].

 

4.    Peter2 Rouse, born 22 December 1760, enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Regiment under Captain William Campbell in Dinwiddie County according to his application for a pension in Greene County, Pennsylvania, on 10 September 1832 [M805-706, frame 0545]. He was taxable in Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 241] and married Sarah Lawrence, daughter of Robert Lawrence, deceased, 19 October 1786 Brunswick County bond, Woody Lawrence bondsman. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:473]. He was probably the ancestor of

i. Isaac, a "free boy of Colour," who was bound to William Moore to be a farmer by the 2 September 1822 Northampton County court [Minutes 1821-25, 123].

 

ROWE FAMILY

1.    Patty Rowe, born say 1736, was living in Nottoway Parish, Amelia County, on 28 April 1755 when the court ordered her daughter Lucy bound to Robert Mumford. She had two children who were ordered bound to Jonas Vasser: Moll on 22 January 1756 and Tabitha on 24 March 1757. On 14 November 1763 the Amelia County court presented Nathaniel Robertson for not listing her as his "Mulatto" tithable in Nottoway Parish [Orders 1763, fol. 232]. She was probably identical to "Patt a Free Mulatto" of Nottoway Parish who was presented on 22 May 1766 for not listing herself as a tithable. On 23 March 1769 the court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind out her children Randall White Roe and Dinny Roe to William Wilson. She was probably the mother of Tabb and Jack Roe, "Free Mulattoes," who were ordered bound by the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to Colonel Richard Jones on 24 October 1771. They were probably identical to Jack and Tabb (no last names), "Free Mulattoes," who were ordered bound by the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to William and Mary Vasser on 25 September 1767 [Orders 1754-8, n.p.; 1763, fol. 232; 1765-7, 90, 95; 1767-8, 83; 1768-9, 88; 1769-72, n.p.]. Patty was living in Bute County, North Carolina, on 15 February 1775 when the court bound her children Charles Randolph and Dinney Randolph to William Toulson to read and write and learn "the planters business" [Minutes 1767-76, 322]. Her children were

i. Lucy, born before 28 April 1755.

ii. Moll, born before 22 January 1756.

iii. Charles Randolph, born about 1759 in Virginia, one of the Continental soldiers who volunteered in Bute County in 1779 (abstracted as Charles Kons[?] in NCGSJ): 5'8" tall, dark hair and dark eyes [NCGSJ XV:109 & The North Carolinian VI:727]. He was called "Charles Roe a poor boy" on 24 November 1763 when the Amelia County court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind him out [Orders 1763, 237]. He was called Randolph Rowe when he married Susannah Stewart, 17 December 1793 Warren County bond with Richard Evans bondsman, and he was called Charles Rowe when he married, second, Elizabeth Taborn, 11 December 1797 Granville County bond, Solomon Harris bondsman. He was sued for a 2 pound debt in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 13 October 1794 [Orders 1792-5, 351]. He was head of a Wake County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:793], 5 in Chatham County in 1810 (called Randolf Roe) [NC:201], and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:209]. He received a pension in 1832 when he was seventy-eight years old [M804-2072].

iv. John1, born about 1762, head of a Fluvanna County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:478], registered in Nottoway County on 5 November 1818 and again in Botetourt County on 13 March 1820: 58 years, Black Colour, 5 feet 8 inches [Free Negroes Registered in the Clerks Office of Botetourt County, no.29].

v. Tabitha, born say 1764.

vi. Dinney Randolph, born say 1765.

 

Other members of the family were

i. Frederick, "F.N.", head of a 96 District, Laurens County, South Carolina household of one "other free" in 1790 [SC:71].

ii. James1, born say 1760, granted land for service in the Revolution [Franklin County, North Carolina DB 6:780].

iii. James2, born about 1770, bound to Edmund Denny in Wilkes County, North Carolina, on 7 September 1779 [Absher, Wilkes County Court Minutes 1778-1788, I:11].

iv. Sarah Baltrip, alias Roe, born about 1778, bound in Wilkes County to Charles Gordon on 28 October 1790 [Absher, Wilkes County Court Minutes 1789-1797, III:19] and to Edmund Denny on 3 August 1792 [Absher, Wilkes County, N.C. Will Books One & Two 1778-1811, 33].

v. John2, born 12 September 1780, a "Molatto boy" bound to P. R. Walker in Person County on 19 March 1793 [Minutes 1792-96], head of a Person County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:632], 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498], and a "Negro" head of a Guilford County household of 3 in 1830. He married Tamer Bass, 2 December 1801 Granville County bond, George Pettiford bondsman, and second, Sally Pendergrass, 2 March 1802 Person County bond.

vi. Polly, born about 1799, registered as a free Negro in the Corporation of Staunton, Virginia, on 14 June 1832: (alias Polly Harris) a free woman of colour aged about 33 years, of a dark yellow complexion, 5 feet 7-1/4 inches high ... as appears from the certificate of M.W. Norvell Clerk of Lynchburg Hustings Court dated 14th June 1825 [Register of Free Negroes, no.119].

vii. Samuel, Polly, and William, "children of colour" bound apprentice in Warren County on 31 August 1804 [WB 12:242 by Kerr, Abstract of Warren County Will Books].

 

ROWLAND FAMILY

1.    Ann Rowland, born say 1700, was living in Surry County, Virginia, on 20 May 1719 when the court presented her for having a "molatto" bastard [DW 7:188]. She was probably the mother of

i. Simon, born about 1719, a servant bound to Peter Bagly until the age of thirty-one. By Bagly's 15 November 1735 Surry County will he ordered his executors to give Simon his freedom at the age of twenty-eight. Simon was probably the "Molleto boy" with eleven years to serve who was listed in the 17 March 1735/6 inventory of Peter Bagly's estate [DW 8:547, 576].

ii. Mary, born say 1721, presented by the court in Surry County on 21 May 1740 for having a "Negro Bastard" [DW 9:172].

 

RUFF FAMILY

1.    Margaret Ruffs, born say 1725, was living in Southwarke Parish, Surry County, Virginia, on 21 November 1752 when her daughter Lucy was brought to court and adjudged to be the "Mulatto" child of a "white woman" [Orders, 1751-53, 503]. She was apparently the mother of

2        i. Deley, born say 1743.

3        ii. Judith, born say 1745.

iii. Lucy, born say 1752, a "poor orphan" daughter of Margaret Ruff bound out by the Surry County court on 20 April 1756 [Orders 1753-7, 378].

 

2.    Deley/ Dilce Ruffs, born say 1743, was a "Mullatto" girl (no parent named) who was bound out by the Henrico County court in July 1743. She was the mother of Jeffrey, John and Joseph Ruff who were ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 3 February 1783. She died before 1 December 1788 when the court ordered the churchwardens of the lower district of Henrico County to bind her son Joseph Rough to Arthur Giles, carpenter [Orders 1737-46, 225; 1781-4, 183; 1787-9, 493]. She was the mother of

i. Jeffry.

ii. John, taxable in Botetourt County on a horse in 1796 [PPTL 1783-1810, frame 271], a "Molatto" taxable in Pittsylvania County from 1802 to 1805 [PPTL 1797-1812, frames 353, 376, 432, 455, 530], head of a Fluvanna County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:492].

iii.Joseph, born say 1778, bound to Arthur Giles in Henrico County on 1 December 1788, taxable in Bedford County, Virginia, from 1800 to 1816 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 462, 530, 559, 600, 657, 1806-16, frames 29, 98, 180, 288, 332, 469, 582, 700], a "free Black" head of a Bedford County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:480]. He was living in Bedford County on 9 December 1833 when he petitioned the Virginia Legislature to allow him to own a gun, claiming that his father had fought in the Revolution and a gun was required for hunting wild fowl and protecting the crop on the small farm he owned in the mountains [Johnston, Race Relations, 59; Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks: Series 1, 282].

iv. ?Sally, married Abram Goff, 25 July 1798 Bedford County bond, John Mann and Richard Moss bondsmen.

v. ?Asy, born about 1781, registered in Bedford County on 26 July 1803: Black, 5'4-1/3", born free [Register of Free Negroes 1803-20, p.3].

 

3.    Judith Ruff, born say 1745, was living in Bedford County when the court ordered her "poor children" (no race indicated) Dinah and Britain bound out by the churchwardens [Orders 1763-71, 283]. She was the mother of

i. Dinah.

ii. Britton, a "melatto" taxable in the northern district of Campbell County from 1788 to 1810 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 88, 113, 157, 197, 241, 277, 307, 702, 664, 773], head of a Campbell County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:881].

 

Other descendants were

i. Winifred, born 20 August 1765, a "Free Negroe Girl" bound to Thomas Silgreaves until the age of eighteen years in Craven County, North Carolina, on 8 October 1766 [Minutes 1764-66, 50d].

ii. Step, a "f. negroe" or "melatto" taxable in Campbell County in 1790 and 1791 [PPTL, 1785-1814, frames 155, 196].

iii. Rebecca, born about 1792, registered in Southampton County on 4 December 1817: age 25, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches, Mulatto woman free born (in) Prince George County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1129].

iv. James, born say 1800, married Betsy Blizzard, 23 May 1823 Surry County bond. He was head of a Surry County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

   

RUFFIN FAMILY

Members of the Ruffin family were

i. Dilcy, head of a Richmond City household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:345].

ii. Thomas, head of a Southampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:79].

iii. Polly, head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:361].

iv. Joe, head of a Richmond City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:369].

v. James, married Betsy Bird, 20 January 1810 Surry County bond, Wright Walden surety.

 

RUSSELL FAMILY

1.    Eleanor Russell, born before 1723, was over eighteen years of age on 27 April 1741 when she appeared as a witness against Jack, "a mulatto Slave" convicted by the Craven County, North Carolina court of killing his master, Robert Pitts. She helped to convict him by testifying that he tried to convince her to do it for him. The court ruled that he be

hangd by the neck till he is Dead & then his head to be Severed from his body & stuck upon a pole [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, II:275-6].

The Craven County records do not mention Eleanor's fate, but apparently she was also convicted since she petitioned the General Assembly on 5 May 1742 for reprieve from her death sentence. Eleanor's "Mixtd Blood" daughter Hannah Russell was indentured later that year on 21 September [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, III:339, 617, 653]. Her children were

2        i. ?John, a "Mulatto" born about 1736.

ii. Hannah, daughter of Eleanor Russell, ordered bound out to Nicholas Rutledge by the Craven court on 25 September 1742 [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, III: 339], perhaps identical to Ann Russell, head of a Craven County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131].

 

2.    John1 Russell, born about 1736, a "Mulatto," no parent named, was six years old on 21 September 1742 when the Craven County court bound him to David Lewis. Lewis promised to teach him, "to Read & Write a Ledgable hand & to teach him or cause to be taught the Shoemakers trade." However, Lewis gave him to his brother, John Lewis of Chowan County, and he sold him to Captain Hews of Suffolk County, Virginia [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, III:328, 653]. He may have been the John Russell who was a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County in 1769 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:16]. He may have been the father of

i. Thomas, a taxable "Mulato" in Bladen County in 1768 and 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7; II:68, 92], head of a Georgetown District, Prince Fredericks Parish, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Polly, head of a Barnwell District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:65].

 

Loudoun County, Virginia

1.    Anne Russell, born say 1737, was the mother of a "Mulatto" daughter who the churchwardens of Cameron Parish, Loudoun County, were ordered to bind out on 13 September 1757 [Orders 1757-62, 17]. She was the mother of

i. Jane, born say 1757.

 

Other members of the Russell family were

i. Thomas, a "Mulata" boy valued at 5 pounds in the inventory of the King William County estate of William Clayborne on 17 January 1706/7 [RB 1702-6, 53].

ii. John2, "a Negro poor person" who was assigned counsel by the Goochland County court in January 1759 to sue the executors of Thomas Drumwright who were detaining him as a slave [Orders 8:175].

2        iii. Amy, born say 1747.

3        iv. George, born say 1756.

 

2.    Amy Russell, born say 1747, was a "free Negro" living in Norfolk County on 16 January 1767 when the churchwardens of Elizabeth River were ordered to bind her children James and Frank as apprentice bakers to Paul Heriter. She complained to the court against John Halstead, Jr., in February 1774 [Orders 1766-68, 69; 1773-5, 27]. Her children were

i. James1, born say 1764, bound to Paul Heriter on 16 January 1767 and a "free negro" bound to John Runsberg on 17 December 1773 [Orders 1773-5, 8].

ii. Frank, born say 1766.

iii. ?Lewis, head of a Richmond City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:316].

iv. ?Molly, head of a Norfolk County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:917].

 

3.    George Russell, born say 1756, enlisted in the Revolution while resident in Brunswick County, Virginia [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 42]. He was head of a Wake County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:103] and 4 in 1800 [NC:791]. He sold 75 acres, and James Russell sold an adjoining tract of 60 acres in Wake County about 1800 [DB Q:415]. He applied for a pension while resident in Smith County, Tennessee. Perhaps George's children were

i. James2, head of a Wake County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:103], 9 in 1800, and 7 "free colored" in Richmond County in 1820 [NC:200].

ii. Matthew, head of a Montgomery County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:166].

 

SAMPLE FAMILY

1.    Dorothy1 Sample, born say 1690, was living in Accomack County, Virginia, on 15 November 1792 when her mother Mary Sample, a widow, bound her to John and Dorothy Washbourne until the age of eighteen [Orders 1690-7, 78a]. She was in adjoining Northampton County in May 1710 when the court bound her eighteen-month-old son Jacob as an apprentice. On 15 June 1714 she successfully sued Rebecca Maddux, administratrix of the estate of Thomas Maddux, for 405 pounds of tobacco [O&W 1698-1710, 536; Orders 1710-16, 165]. She was called a "white Christian Single Woman" when she was presented by the churchwardens of Accomack County on 6 April 1715 and 2 May 1721 for having illegitimate children by "one Negro Slave named Black Daniel" [Orders 1714-7, 7-7a; 1719-24, 30]. On 4 November 1718 she bound her three-year-old daughter Tabitha to Benjamin Wattson [Orders 1717-9, 23a]. Her children were

2        i. Jacob, born about December 1708.

ii. Tabitha, born 12 January 1715.

 

2.    Jacob Sample, born about December 1708, eighteen-month-old son of Dorothy Sample, was bound apprentice in Northampton County, Virginia, in May 1710 [O&W 1693-1710, 536]. He was taxable in Richard Smith's Northampton County household in the list of Thomas Marshall in 1725 and in the Tobacco List of Daniel Luke and Jonathan Bell in 1728 [L.P. 1725, 1728]. He probably left the county that year since he was not taxable in 1729 or the following years. Jacob may have been the father of

i. Eliza Simbler, born 6 January 1733, a "Mulatto girl" bound to William Waddill in St. Peter's Parish, New Kent County [NSCDA, Parish Register of St. Peter's, 117].

3        ii. Daniel1, born say 1740.

 

3.    Daniel1 Sample, born say 1740, was tithable with (his wife?) Mary Sample in Thomas John Marshall's list for Northampton County in 1765 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 371]. He sued a member of the Stephens family for a debt of 1 pound, 9 shillings on 16 September 1773 [Minutes 1771-7, 177, 189]. The Accomack County court presented him on 30 May 1775 for failing to list himself as a tithable in 1774. The case was dismissed at the next court [Orders 1774-7, 349, 365]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Accomack County from 1787 to 1789: taxable on 2 tithes in 1789 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 239, 304], head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:162] and 4 in 1810 [VA:60]. He was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:216]. He may have been the father of

i. Thomas, born say 1765, "free Negro" taxable in Accomack County in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 239] and head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 1 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:161].

ii. Daniel3, a "fn" taxable in Accomack County in 1798 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frame 365], registered in Accomack County: born about 1767, a Black, 5 feet 3-1/4 inches, Born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 481].

iii. Solomon, a "fn" taxable in Accomack County from 1798 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frames 365, 404, 441].

 

Members of the family in Accomack and Northampton County, Virginia, were

i. Comfort, registered in Accomack County: born about 1766, a Black, 5'1", born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 681].

ii. Francis, born say 1768, taxable in Northampton County from 1789 to 1796 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 103, 147, 198]. He was sued in Northampton County court for 5 pounds on 14 September 1790, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 83, 107, 364], head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:14].

iii. Sinah, born say 1770, married Charles Webb, "Free Negroes," 7 June 1791 Northampton County bond, William Satchell security.

iv. Tince, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:163], perhaps the same person as Finney Sample, head of an Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:61].

v. William, taxable in Northampton County in 1795 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 199].

vi. Betty, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:60], married in 1813 to Isaac, a slave freed by Ames [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 833].

vii. Lisha, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:163], perhaps the same person as Eliha Sample, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:59] and 5 "free colored" in 1830.

viii. Deborah, head of a Accomack County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

ix. Sarah, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:161] and 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:59].

x. Littleton, a "free Negro" bound by the churchwardens of St. George's Parish to Thomas Jacob to be a farmer on 27 August 1776 [Orders 1774-7, 460].

xi. Saul, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:163].

xii. Sabra, registered in Accomack County about 1832: born about 1780, Black, born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 592].

xiii. Peggy, registered in Accomack County about 1832: born about 1782, Black, 5'3", born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 597].

xiv. Ader, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:60].

xv. Scarburgh, head of an Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:61].

xvi. John, married Kesiah Beavans, 13 February 1810 Accomack County bond, Isaiah Carter security.

xvii. Emmerson, born in April 1785, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: Dark Mulatto, 5 feet 6-1/8 Inches, a little pitted by the smallpox on his face, Born free [Register, no. 1].

xviii. Fanny, born about 1785, registered in Accomack County: born about 1785, a light Black, 5'1" high, born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 502].

xix. Molly, married Nathaniel Collins, 16 August 1810 Northampton County bond, Isaiah Carter security.

xx. Billy, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 364], married Christina Weeks 26 November 1817 Northampton County bond, Frank Sample security.

xxi.Edy, born before 1776, bound by the Accomack County court to Elijah Handcock on 25 September 1793 [Orders 1793-6, 1], head of a Accomack County household of 7 "free colored" in in 1830.

xxii. Dingledy, bound by the Accomack County court to Elijah Handcock on 25 September 1793 [Orders 1793-6, 1].

 

Members of the family on the Southside of Virginia were

4        i. Dorothy2, born say 1750.

ii. Ezekiel, born 10 December 1754, a seven-year-old "Mullatto" bound to Benjamin Dingly Gray by the Princess Anne County court on 18 March 1761 to learn to read and write [Minutes 1753-62, 420]. He was in a "free Negro" taxable in St. Bride's Parish of Norfolk County in 1816 and 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 187, 226].

iii. Hannah, born 7 August 1757, a four-year-old "Mullatto" bound to Benjamin Dingly Gray by the Princess Anne County court on 18 March 1761 to learn to read, sew and spin [Minutes 1753-62, 420]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 10 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354].

5        iv. Charity, born about 1764.

v. Daniel2, born say 1766, a "F.N." tithable in Isle of Wight County in 1797 and from 1804 to 1809: taxable on 4 slaves and a horse in 1804, 6 slaves and 2 horses in 1805, 5 slaves and 3 horses in 1806, 6 slaves and 5 horses in 1807, 3 slaves and 4 horses in 1809 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 412, 641, 703, 742, 761, 819].

vi. Randall, born say 1774, a "F.N." tithable in Isle of Wight County in 1797 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 412].

vii. Henry, born say 1776, married Dinah Bevans 17 November 1797 Norfolk County bond, Francis Drake security. He was a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1806 to 1809 [PPTL 1782-1810, frames 742, 761, 819].

 

4.    Dorothy2 Sample, born say 1750, was sued by Teackle Robins in Accomack County court on 27 July 1774. The suit was abated by the death of the plaintiff [Orders 1774-7, 226, 254]. She may have been the Dorothy Sample who was living in Princess Anne County on 8 July 1779 when her "free Mulatto" children Christopher and Dorothy were bound by the court to William Hancock. And she may have been identical to "Daurothy" whose infant free "Mulatto" daughter Rose was bound by the Princess Anne County court to Mary Burch on 12 November 1778 [Minutes 1773-82, 401]. She married James Whitehurst, 4 October 1786 Princess Anne County bond, George Smyth surety. On 14 April 1787 the Princess Anne County court bound her son Christian Sample to her "free Mulatto" husband James Whitehurst to learn the trade of shoemaker [Minutes 1787-8, 159]. Dorothy was the mother of

i. Rose, born say 1773, an infant "free Mulatto" bound to Mary Burch on 12 November 1778, called Rose Sample when her son Frank Sample was bound to William Nummo to learn the occupation of farmer on 11 September 1788 [Minutes 1788-9, 120].

ii. Christopher, born say 1775, in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County in 1812 and 1814 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 802; 1813-24, frame 67].

iii. Dorothy3, born say 1777.

iv. Sebria, daughter of Dorothy Sample, bound to Richard and Hannah Sparrow by the Princess Anne County court on 15 February 1782 [Minutes 1782-4, 43].

 

5.    Charity Sample, born about 1764, married Jacob Carter, 6 December 1787 Princess Anne County bond, James Whitehurst security. Jacob Carter was head of a Petersburg Town household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:119b]. She was still called Charity Sample when she registered in Norfolk County on 19 July 1814: 5-3 inches, 50 years of age, of a light complexion [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no.94]. She may have been the mother of

i. Caesar, born about 1782, registered in Norfolk County on 14 July 1810: 5 feet 2 Inches, Twenty eight years of age of a dark Complexion [Register, no 8].

ii. Ned, born about 1789, registered in Norfolk County on 20 July 1812: 5 feet 6 Inc., 23 years of age of a Yellowish Complexion, Born free by the affidavit of Matt Halstead [Register, no. 74].

iii. Mary, born about 1790, registered in Norfolk County on 22 September 1812: 4 ft. 9 Inc., 22 Years of age of a Yellowish Complexion, Born free [Register, no. 87].

 

SAMPSON FAMILY

1.    John1 Sampson, born say 1690, was sued by Edward Myhill of Elizabeth City County for 300 pounds of tobacco on 21 September 1715. Myhill was security for the payment of a 20 pounds sterling debt John owed William Armistead, Jr. The court ordered him held in custody on 17 November 1715 when he appeared and denied he owed the plaintiff anything. The case was dismissed on 17 May 1716 when the parties reached agreement. He apparently bound himself as a servant to Samuel Sweny sometime that year because the following January the court ordered him to serve Sweny another 60 days for being absent thirty days. The court also ordered him to serve Sweny another two months in exchange for Sweny paying his levy for the year. Edward Mihill testified for John at his trial. On 20 March 1716/7 he sued Robert Armistead for 1000 pounds of tobacco damages for a house John had built for Armistead [Orders 1715-21, 9, 16, 23, 27, 42, 55, 59, 78]. He was called "a Molatto man named John Sampson belonging to Samuel Swinney" on 17 April 1718 when John Berry produced a certificate in Middlesex County court for taking him up as a runaway [Middlesex County Orders 1710-21, 370]. He testified in Elizabeth City County in May 1724 that Joshua Myhill had sworn or cursed profanely. Francis Mallory sued him in January 1724/5 but failed to prosecute. He sued Joshua Myhill for trespass and 50 pounds damages in May 1725, but the court found against him. He paid Humphrey and Matthew Ward as his evidences and William Cattilla testified for Myhill. On 20 January 1725/6 he bound himself to serve Philip Mallory for a year in exchange for 1,000 pounds of tobacco, apparently to pay his debts. On 6 May 1726 he was granted a certificate for taking up a runaway servant named Sawney belonging to William Tapley of Essex County [Elizabeth City County Orders 1724-30, 13, 74, 103, 146, 148, 164]. Ten days later on 16 May 1726 John Mundell presented a claim to the York County court for taking up a "free runaway Mulatto man servant named John Sampson belonging to Francis Mallory of Elizabeth City County above ten miles distance from his said master's habitation." He brought an action of trespass upon the case against Sarah Hobson which was dismissed by the York County court on 16 August 1742 when both parties reached agreement, and he brought a case against Rebecca Hulet which was dismissed on 15 November 1742. Sarah Pegram testified for him, and Sarah Hobson testified for Rebecca Hulet [York OW 16, pt. 2, 383; W&I 19:121, 131, 132]. He may have been the ancestor of

2        i. John2, born say 1740.

3        ii. Sylvia, born say 1745.

iii. Nanny, born say 1752, a "negro" tithable in James Atchinson's household in Elizabeth River Parish, Norfolk County in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 80].

iv. James, head of a Guilford County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:153].

v. Joshua, head of a Pasquotank County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:29].

vi. Lovey, "a Free woman of Colour," purchased her husband David from Jeremiah Symons and petitioned the Pasquotank County court in June 1797 for permission to manumit him, saying that she had "some years agoe took to Husband a Mulatto man Slave named David late the property of a certain Jeremiah Symons" [Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 198].

 

2.    John2 Sampson, born say 1740, was a Pamunkey Indian who attended William and Mary College in 1764 [Rountree, Pocahontas's People, p. 336, note 304]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Charles, registered in Petersburg on 2 April 1817: a free man of Colour, five feet nine and a half inches high, dark brown complection, born free in King William County, Registered at Request of his mother Sall Major [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 843].

ii. John3, born about 1798, registered in Petersburg on 18 October 1817: a lad of Colour (son of Sally Major, a free woman) about nineteen years old, five feet nine inches high, of a light yellow brown Complection, has strait hair, cow lick in his hair, born free in King William County, said to be of Indian descent & by trade a shoemaker. Registered by desire of his mother [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 877].

 

3.    Sylvia Sampson, born say 1745, was a "free negro Woman" living in Carteret County, North Carolina, on 17 September 1771 when her unnamed two-year-old son, a "Negro boy," was bound to Reuben Benthall [Minutes X:403]. Perhaps her children were

i. Isaac, head of a Carteret County household of 6 "other free" in 1800, received a discharge for twelve months service in the North Carolina Infantry in Captain Brevard's Company on 1 May 1782 [NCGSJ XV:231].

ii. Polly, head of a Carteret County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 and 6 in 1810 [NC:447].

iii. Frances, married Anthony Brown, 23 September 1808 Craven County bond with Peter George bondsman. Anthony was head of a Craven County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:67].

iv. Esther, married Asa Spelman, 6 June 1819 Craven County bond, Aaron Spelman bondsman.

 

SANDERLIN FAMILY

1.    James Sanderlin and his wife Sarah were living in Bertie County on 9 November 1731 when Susannah Clements claimed in Bertie court that they brought their female infant child to her for support but refused to bind the child to her. Susannah appeared in court again on 8 February 1732 when the court agreed to bind "Nany, a Molatto child mentioned in the last court order" to her [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, I:39, 46]. James and Sarah's child was

2        i. Nany, born about 1731.

 

2.    Ann Sanderlin, born say 1731, was a "free Mullatta Woman" living in Bertie County when several of her children were bound apprentices. They were

3        i. Mariah, born about 1748.

4        ii. Diana, born about 1750.

5        iii. Hecuba(?)/ Hunba(?), born about 1751.

iv. Amiah, born about 1753, three years old on 29 April 1756 when she was bound an apprentice to Elizabeth Lockhart [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:167-8].

v. ?Lazarus Summerlin, born say 1760, a taxable "free molattor" in Jonathan Standley's 1764 Bertie tax list [CR 10.702.1].

 

3.    Mariah Sanderlin, born about 1748, was eight years old on 29 April 1756 when she was bound an apprentice to Elizabeth Lockhart [CR 010.101.7 by NCGSJ XIII:169]. Her children were

i. Prince, born in August 1779, "___ son of Mariah" ordered bound to Thomas Sutton to be a cooper in August 1783, discharged from his indenture in August 1790 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:458; VI:833].

ii. ?King, born 7 August 1780, no parent named, ordered by the November 1790 Bertie court bound to Parrott Hardy to be a hatter, and then bound to William Ashburn to be a blacksmith [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:828, 837]. He married Rachel Brantley, 21 December 1805 Bertie County bond with Richard Demsey bondsman.

iii. ?Caesar, no parent named, ordered bound by the August 1786 Bertie court to Frederick Lawrence to be a house carpenter [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:596].

iv. ?Patt Sanderlin, no parent named, ordered by the February 1787 Bertie court bound to Frederick Lawrence [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:631].

 

4.    Diana Sanderlin, born about 1750, was six years old on 29 April 1756 when she was bound an apprentice to Elizabeth Lockhart [NCGSJ XIII:168]. She was mentioned in the 1754 Bertie County will of Thomas Allday, probably the "Free Mulatto, Dianah" taxed in the 1775 Bertie Tax Lists of Ann Lawrence and her son Frederick Lawrence in the list of George Lockhart. Her "Mulatto" children bound out by the court were

i. Mariah, daughter of Dinah, born circa 1780, ordered bound to Humphrey Nichols by the May 1786 Bertie court. However, the same court issued a citation to Nichols to show cause why the child should not be bound to Frederick Lawrence who had raised the child and had the mother's consent and desire that she be bound to him. The November Bertie court bound her to Frederick Lawrence [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:580, 585, 617]. She was head of a Bertie County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:75].

ii. Jack, born about 1775, bastard of Dianah, bound to Thomas Baker to be a mariner by the August 1781 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:393].

iii. Conweth(?), "bastard Mulatto of Diannah" born about December 1773 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:91].

 

5.    Hunba Sanderlin, born about 1751, was five years old on 29 April 1756 when she was bound an apprentice to Elizabeth Lockhart [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:170]. She was not mentioned in the Bertie Tax Lists, but her "Mulatto" children were bound out by the court:

i. Moses, born about 1772, "bastard Mulatto of Hunba Sanderlan," ordered bound to Aaron Boulton by the August 1774 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:91]. He married Mourning Demsey 13 July 1805 Bertie County bond with William Sanderlin bondsman.

ii. Milley, born 1775, ordered bound to Aaron Boulton by the May 1784 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:486].

iii. ?Jenny, born circa 1775, no parent named, ordered bound to Aaron Boulton by the November 1779 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:334], head of a Edenton household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:130].

iv. ?Harry, born 1779, no parent named, ordered bound to Aaron Boulton by the November 1779 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:334]. He was bound out a year later on 17 August 1780 to Jeremiah Fleetwood [NCGSJ XIV:36]. He was head of a Bertie County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [NC:75].

v. ?David, born about 1778, no parent named, bound to Jeremiah Fleetwood to be a shoemaker on 17 August 1780 [NCGSJ XIV:36].

vi. ?William, born 1783, no parent named, ordered bound to Aaron Boulton by the November 1784 Bertie court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:509] and bound out a second time on 14 November 1796 to Hardy Fleetwood to be a cooper [NCGSJ XV:34]. He married Betsy Dempsey, 13 July 1805 Bertie County bond with (his brother?) Moses Sanderlin bondsman. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:129].

 

SANTEE FAMILY

1.    Samuel1 Sante, born say 1670, was one of Robert Caufield's "negro slaves." By his 2 January 1691 Surry County, Virginia will, Caufield directed that Samuel was to be free after four years of service. On 11 January 1695/6 Elizabeth Caufield confirmed his manumission in Surry County court [DW 1694-1709, 84b]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Samuel2, born say 1735, sued by Robert Webb in Sussex County court in June 1755 for 3 pounds, 18 shillings due by bond with interest computed from 11 September 1752(3?) [Orders 1754-6, 193-4; Court Papers, 1754-5, frames 710-15, LVA microfilm no. 35]. He and John Santee were tithable in Sussex County in 1756. He, Amos Newsom, John Muns, and James Pompey were paid on 21 June 1757 for 2 to 6 days diet as county soldiers and guards; and he was an insolvent ttithable in 1758 [Court Papers, 1755-6, frame 528, LVA microfilm no. 37; Court Papers, 1757, frame 747, LVA microfilm no. 39; Court Papers, 1758, frame 36, LVA microfilm no. 40]. He was tithable in Sussex County in 1764 and took the oath of allegiance in Sussex County in 1777 [Tithables, 1753-82, frames 700, 824, LVA microfilm no. 90].

ii.  Timothy, born say 1737, listed with Benjamin Tann as a credit of 7 shillings in the account John Jeffries had with merchant Howell Briggs before Decenber 1754 when the account was proved in Sussex County. He was tithable in Sussex County in 1766 [Court Papers, 1754, frames 467-8, LVA microfilm no. 34; Court Papers, 1755-6, frame 59, LVA microfilm no. 38]. He was godparent with Samuel and Sarah Blizzard to Joseph Cannady, son of Hugh and Anne Cannady, when Joseph was baptized on 3 July 1768 in Albemarle Parish, Sussex and Surry counties [Richards, Register of Albemarle Parish, 145]. He was tithable in Sussex County in 1775 [Tithables, 1753-1782, frame 765, LVA microfilm no. 90].

2         iii. William, born say 1756.

iv. Caesar, born say 1760, enlisted in the 2nd North Carolina Regiment. He was granted a land warrant for 640 acres in 1783 [Crow, Black Experience, 102].

3        v. John1, born say 1767.

vi. John2, born say 1767, head of a Northampton County, Pennsylvania household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 3 "other free" and a white woman aged 26-45 in 1800. His birthplace was given as North Carolina in the 1880 census entry for his white son John Santee in Liberty, Licking County, Ohio [Census p.112, entry 4281].

vii. Nancy, a spinner living on Sally Newsom's land in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" for Sussex County in 1802 and 1804 [List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1801-1812, frame 9, 19, LVA micrfofilm no. 221].

viii. Lucy, a spinner living on Sally Newsom's land in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" for Sussex County in 1802 and 1804 [List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1801-1812, frame 9, 19, LVA micrfofilm no. 221].

 

2.    William Santy, born say 1756, took the oath of allegiance in Sussex County on 24 November 1777 [Tithables, 1753-1782, frame 824, LVA microfilm no. 90]. He married Mazy Blizzard, 7 February 1786 Sussex County, Virginia bond. He was taxable in St. Andrew's Parish, Greensville County, from 1792 to 1794 [PPTL, 1782-1830, frames 149, 156, 172] and was in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" for Sussex County from 1804 to 1806: with (wife) Mason Santy and children Betsy and Lucy [List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1801-1812, frames 17, 23, 32, LVA micrfofilm no. 221]. William and Mason were the parents of

i. Betsy, born say 1790.

ii. Lucy, born say 1795.

 

3.    John1 Santee, born say 1767, was head of a Bladen County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1800, 5 in 1810 (called John, Sr.) [NC:191], perhaps the John Santee who was head of a Bladen County household of 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:154]. He may have been the father of

i. John3, Jr., head of a Bladen County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:191].

 

SAUNDERS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Saunders, born say 1717, appeared before the Caroline County, Virginia court on 12 September 1735 and identified Thomas Lantor as the father of her illegitimate child. The court ordered the child bound to Samuel Coleman. The 8 October 1736 Caroline County court ordered her to serve her master Samuel Coleman additional time for having an illegitimate "mulatto" child [Orders 1732-40, 307, 378]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. John1, born about 1734, a twenty-three-year-old "Mulatto" who ran away from William Pickett of Prince William County, Virginia, on 27 March 1757 according to the 2 September 1757 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 299].

ii. John2, a free man of color born in Hanover County who served in the Revolution from Henrico County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 153]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:980].

iii. Sam, head of a Fluvanna County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:474].

 

Norfolk County

1.    Hannah Saunders, born say 1745, was the mother of a "free Negro" boy named Saunders Saunders who was bound apprentice in Norfolk County on 21 March 1771. She was the mother of

i. Saunders, a "free Negro" son of Hannah Saunders bound to James Jollif by the churchwardens of St. Brides Parish by order of the Norfolk County on 21 March 1771 and bound instead to Scarbrough Tankard with the consent of Jollif on 21 November 1771 [Orders 1768-71, 233; 1771-3, 38].

 

SAVEE/ SAVOY FAMILY

1.    Abraham1 Savoy, born say 1613, was called Abraham Saby, a "negro," when the Elizabeth City County court granted his petition to be levy free on 29 September 1693 on consideration of his great age, claiming that he was one hundred years old. He may have been identical to Abraham Savoy who a few years later on 18 August 1696 brought suit in Elizabeth City County against Lewis Burell and Thomas Goddin, executors of Col. John Lear, for 5 pounds currency and 600 pounds of tobacco by account. On 18 May 1698 the court ordered that Abraham Savoy be levy-free by reason of his extreme old age [Orders 1692-9, 18, 97, 132]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Francis Savoy, born say 1675, sued in Elizabeth City County court before 18 February 1694/5 when his attorney William Mallory confessed judgment for 400 pounds of tobacco he owed Major William Wilson. He brought a successful suit against Michael Brittonell for a mare on 19 June 1699 [Orders 1692-99, 53, 151]. He appointed Charles Mallory as his attorney to sell land on the north side of the Mattaponi River in King and Queen County which he bought from Michael Bartlett of New Poquoson in York County (no date indicated) [DW 1688-1702, original p. 256, restored p.171]. He left 50 acres on the Poquosin River bounded by the land of Thomas Wythe and John George to his three sisters by his Elizabeth City County estate. His sister Hannah Francis exchanged her third part of the land on 7 March 1740/1 [DW 1737-56, 101].

2        ii. John, born say 1677.

 

2.    John Savoy, born say 1677, was married to Patience on 2 May 1695 when the birth of their son Abraham was recorded in Charles Parish, York County [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 171]. Patience Savey petitioned the York County court on 20 August 1744 for relief from paying taxes. The court rejected her petition [W&I 19:301]. They were the parents of

i. Abraham2, born 2 May 1695.

3        ii. Mary1, born say 1696.

4        iii. ?John2, born say 1700.

 

3.    Mary1 Savoy, born say 1696, sued Michael Pierce in Elizabeth City County court for 3 pounds on 18 July 1717. On 15 June 1720 she confessed in Elizabeth City County court that she had a bastard child [Orders 1715-21, 94]. She may have been the mother of

i. Tomerson, born say 1730, presented by the York County court on 20 May 1754 for having a bastard child (no race indicated) [Judgments & Orders 1752-4, 419, 451].

 

4.    John2 Savee, born say 1700, had a child by Ann Combs in Charles Parish on 24 February 1724 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 171]. On 21 February 1738/9 Anne was called Anne Savoy, "the Mother of Jane Savoy," when she complained to the Elizabeth City County court against Nehemiah Nichols [Orders 1731-47, 200]. John and Anne's children were

5        i. Mary2, born 30 March 1721.

ii. Jane, born 24 February 1724, baptized 3 October 1725. The York County court presented her on 20 November 1749 for failing to list herself as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 256, 277].

 

5.    Mary2 Savoy, born 30 March 1721, "daughter of Ann Combs a bastard child," was baptized in Charles Parish, York County, on 6 May 1721 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 171]. She was presented by the grand jury of Elizabeth City County for having a bastard child, but the case was dismissed because the child was born in another county. On 4 September 1751 she was sued for slander by Thomas and Anne Pinnell in Elizabeth City County [Orders 1747-55, 260]. Anne Pinnell was apparently identical to Ann Pannel who was paid by the vestry of Elizabeth City Parish paid for keeping Sary Combs from 14 December 1756 to 18 December 1758. On 11 October 1753 the vestry paid Mary Combs for keeping Mary Savoy [von Doenhoff, Vestry Book of Elizabeth City Parish, 23, 66, 75]. She may have been the mother of

i. Martha, born say 1748, still a child on 9 October 1755 when the vestry of Elizabeth City Parish paid Thomas Jennings for keeping her [von Doenhoff, Vestry Book of Elizabeth City Parish, 46].

 

SAWYER FAMILY

1.    Joanna/ Hannah Sawyer, born say 1745, was the mother of six unnamed children bound to David George in August 1777 when he posted 1,000 pounds bond in Granville County, North Carolina court to appear in court in Ninety-Six District, South Carolina, to answer the charge that he had "disposed of her children" [Granville County Minutes 1773-83, August 1777 dockets]. She was called Hannah Sawyer and was living in Halifax County, Virginia, on 25 June 1792 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor of the upper Southern District to bind her sons Job, Charles, and Billy Sawyer to Benjamin Ward; but she was called Joannah Sawyer when the order was rescinded the following month [Pleas 1790-2, 471, 502]. Joannah was a "Mo" or "FN" taxable on a horse in the lower district of Halifax County in 1792 and from 1798 to 1813: called Hannah Sawyer in 1799, 1801, and from 1809 to 1811 [PPTL 1782-99, frames 424, 833, 925; 1800-12, frames 159, 207, 818, 868, 965, 1042]. She was a "black" taxable in Pittsylvania County on a free male tithable and a horse in 1795 and 2 free males, a horse and a slave in 1796 [PPTL 1782-1797, frames 703, 728]. She was the mother of

i. ?Susanna, born say 1772, married Thomas Good, 24 June 1793 Halifax County, Virginia bond. Thomas was emancipated by a February 1785 Halifax County bill of freedom from Charles Kennon [Pleas 1783-6, 243].

ii. Job, taxable in Halifax County, Virginia, in 1798 [PPTL 1782-99, frame 833], head of a Chatham County household of 1 "other free" in 1800.

iii. Charles, born say 1785, a "FN" taxable in the lower district of Halifax County, Virginia, in 1801 and 1802, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1805 [PPTL 1800-12, frames 159, 207, 537].

iv. William.

v. ?Polly, married Jesse Hood, 18 May 1807 Caswell County bond, Henry Curtis security.

vi. ?Edmund, born about 1802, registered in Halifax County, Virginia, on 22 November 1830: a dark mulatto man, about 28 years of age last spring, with black hair a little inclined to be straight, born free. His wife was probably Frances Sawyer who registered the same day: otherwise Frances Wilson, a bright mulatto who was born free, 29 years of age, 5 feet 6 inches high with straight black hair [Register of Free Negroes, nos. 93, 126, 137].

 

Other members of a Sawyer family were

i. William, born March 1776, a "Free Negro Boy" living in Craven County, North Carolina, on 17 September 1784 when the court ordered him bound to Sylvester Pendleton to be a seaman [Minutes 1784-6, p.5d].

ii. Robert, born before 1776, head of a Newbern, Craven County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:78].

iii. Sarah, born before 1776, head of a Gates County, North Carolina household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:154].

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