SALMONS/ SAMMONS FAMILY

1.    Jane Salman/ Salmond, born say 1683, was the indentured servant of Francis Makemie on 3 December 1701 when she was presented by the Accomack County, Virginia Court for having an illegitimate "Mullatto" child. On 2 March 1702/3 she testified that "Peter Negro belonging to the sd Makemie" was the father of her child. She was convicted again of "haveing a basterd Child borne of her body begat by a Negro" on 4 October 1704, 5 June 1706, and on 4 May 1707. The court ordered that she be sold to pay her fine [Orders 1697-1703, 122a, 126a, 140a; 1703-9, 35a, 66, 72, 107a, 114]. She was probably the ancestor of

2         i. Joseph, born say 1747.

3        ii. Benjamin1, born say 1748.

4        iii. Solomon, born say 1750.

 

2.    Joseph Salmons/ Sammons, born say 1747, was taxable in Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1770, 1774, and 1777. He and his wife, Ann, registered the 14 December 1772 birth of their daughter Nela at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. He was a "Melatto" taxable in Broadkiln Hundred in 1788. In 1789 he was listed as an Indian River delinquent taxpayer with the notation that he had paid in Broadkiln Hundred and he was also listed as a "Melatto" in the list for Broadkiln in 1789 (called Joseph Salmon). In 1800 he was called Joseph Sammons, head of a Delaware household of 7 "other free" [DE:328]. He was the father of

i. Nela, born 14 December 1772, baptized 13 June 1773.

 

3.    Benjamin1 Salmons/Sammons, say 1748, was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1770, in Little Creek in 1777, in Nanticoke Hundred in 1787 and 1789 (with Benjamin Sammons, Jr.), and a delinquent taxpayer in Little Creek Hundred in 1790. In 1796 he was taxable on 50 acres in Little Creek. He was head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:343] and 11 in 1810 [DE:363]. He may have been the Benjamin Salmons who died before 31 March 1812 when (his wife?) Pruda Salmons was granted administration on his Sussex County estate which was valued at $182. After payment of debts, she and his thirteen children divided the balance of $76.42 [DSA, RG 4545.009, reel 217, frames 154-160]. He may have been the father of

i. Benjamin2, born 1776-1794, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:220].

 

4.    Solomon Sammons, born say 1750, was taxable on the southside of Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1770 and a "Molat" taxable on 50 acres in Little Creek Hundred in 1796. He received a certificate for 4 acres in Sussex County in 1795 [DB 20:11]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:343]. He may have been the Solomon Sammons who married Jinny Veezy on 19 January 1784 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 131]. He may have been the father of

i. William2, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:368].

 

Other members of the Salmons/ Sammons family in Delaware were:

i. Isaac1 Sammons, born say 1760, taxable in Indian River in 1789. He was head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:328] and 8 in 1810 [DE:374].

ii. Isaac2, Jr., born say 1769, taxable in Indian River Hundred in 1789, head of a Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:375].

iii. Eli, born say 1770, taxable in Broadkiln Hundred in 1790, a "Mul." taxable in Broadkiln in 1791, and head of a New Castle County household of 12 "other free" in 1800, called "Elihu Sammons & Co. N. (Negro)" [DE:154].

iv. William1, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [DE:375]

v. John, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:424] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:380].

vi. Nathan, head of a Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:106] and 8 "free colored" in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, in 1820 [DE:7].

vii. James1, born before 1776, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372].

viii. Moses, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437].

ix. Cyrus, head of a Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:467].

x. Benjamin3, born 1776-1794, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:212].

xi. Zachariah, born 1776-1794, head of Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:230].

xii. James2, born 1776-1794, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:208].

xiii. Henry1, born before 1776, head of a Dover Hundred household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:32].

xiv. Henry2, born 1776-1794, head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:71].

 

Members of the family in Maryland were

i. Thomas, head of a Frederick County household of 5 "other free" and 1 white woman in 1800 [MD:828], perhaps the father of Joseph2 Salmon who obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 7 September 1821: a yellow Man, aged about Twenty nine years, five feet six Inches high, a Mulatto ... free Born as appears by the affidavit of George Littlejohn [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 121].

ii. Sampson, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:348].

 

SAMPSON FAMILY

Members of the Sampson family of the Eastern Shore of Maryland were probably the mixed-race children of a white servant woman of Thomas Martin of Talbot County. The 27 September 1734 inventory of his estate listed the following Sampson family members [Prerogative Court Inventories 1734-6, 19:156-9]:

i. Elizabeth, born about 1707, a "Molattoe" having 4 more years to serve in 1734.

ii. Mag, born about 1715, a "Molatto" having 11 or 12 more years to serve in 1734.

iii. William, born about 1716, a "Molattoe" having about 13 years to serve in 1734, perhaps the William Sampson who was a "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1790.

iv. Sisly, born about 1721, a "Molattoe" having about 17 or 18 years to serve in 1734.

v. Priscilla, born about 1724, a "Molatto" having about 21 or 22 years to serve in 1734.

 

The inventory of the Calvert County estate of Henry Broome listed 1 "Molatta Boy named James Sampson" (not identified as free) on 16 December 1736, and the inventory of the Calvert County estate of John Broome listed "Mulatto Jams Simpson 2-1/2 yrs to serve] [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, 1736-7, 147-9; 1749, 335-7].

 

Other members of the Samspon family were

i. Mary, a "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in Baltimore City in 1800 [MD:358].

ii. Sarah, a "Mulatto woman" manumitted by John Cadwalader by deed of manumission in Kent County on 20 October 1783 [Chattel Records Liber DD, no.3, 138] and a "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

iii. James, a "Negro man" set free by John Cadwalader by deed of manumission in Kent County on 20 October 1783 [Chattel Records Liber DD, no.3, 137].

iv. Jacob, head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:670].

 

SAUNDERS FAMILY

1.    Rebecca Saunders, born say 1680, was convicted by the Kent County, Delaware Court in November 1705 for cohabiting with a "Negro Man slave" belonging to Adam Jonson secretly in caves from May 1700 to November 1705 and pilfering hogs, cattle, corn and other goods. She was given 31 lashes and made to stand in the pillory for an hour [Court Records 1703-17, 32a]. Members of the Saunders family on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and in Delaware were

i. Ann, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:154].

ii. Richard, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:166].

iii. William, head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:166], perhaps the Bill Sanders who was head of a New Castle County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:250] and 2 "free colored" in Pencader Hundred, New Castle County, in 1820 [DE:100].

iv. Daniel1, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:19] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:45].

v. Daniel2, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:23].

vi. John2, born say 1751, a delinquent "Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred from 1771 to 1772, taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1774, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Dover Hundred in 1797 and 1798, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:24].

vii. Isaac, head of a New Castle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:283].

viii. Caesar, "free Negro" head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:186] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:140].

ix. Asa, born before 1776, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:27].

x. Perry, born before 1776, head of a Pencader Hundred, New Castle County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:24].

 

Another Saunders family:

1.    Elizabeth Saunders, born say 1716, appeared before the Caroline County, Virginia court on 12 September 1735 and identified Thomas Lantor as the father of her illegitimate child. The court ordered the child bound to Samuel Coleman and on 8 October 1736 ordered her to serve her master Samuel Coleman additional time for having an illegitimate "mulatto" child [Orders 1732-40, 307, 378]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Elizabeth Lantorn, testified in Kent County, Delaware, on 22 November 1769 that (her son?) Peter Lantorn, who was assessed as a tithable the previous year, was born on 8 April 1750, and therefore should not have been tithable [Kent County Levy Assessments, 1768-84, Reel no.3, frame 38]. She married Robert Game before September 1782 when Robert named her (called Elizabeth Lanthorn) and her daughters Mary and Sarah in his Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware will [WB L-1, fol. 267-8].

ii. John1, born about 1734, a 23 year old "Mulatto" who ran away from William Pickett of Prince William County, Virginia, on 27 March 1757 according to the 2 September 1757 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 299], perhaps the John Sanders who was head of a Somerset County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:466].

iii. Rebecca, married Charles Game, 15 September 1812 Worcester County bond.

 

SAVOY FAMILY

1.   Mingo Savoy, born say 1680, was a planter living in Anne Arundel County in August 1705 when John Edwards and the court sued him for two thousand pounds of tobacco for trading with a slave named Mingo belonging to Edwards. He was found not guilty. He appeared in court in November 1709 in accordance with his bond of ten pounds, but no one appeared to prosecute him. In June 1717 he petitioned the court saying that he had inadvertently bound his grandchildren to John Durden and that they were being misused by Samuel Burgess who had become their master. The court bound his "Negroe" grandchildren to Burgess, the boy until twenty-one and the girl until sixteen. In June 1719 he was among twenty residents of the county who were ordered to work on the road for South River Hundred. In June 1723 he bound his daughter Judy to Humphrey Godman for six years, ending 1 November 1729 [Judgment Record 1705-6, 80; 1708-12, 8; 1717-9, 13-14, 553; 1722-3, 22-3]. He paid 4 shillings to the Anne Arundel County estate of Thomas Simpson before 5 August 1710 [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Vol. 32A, 342]. He was probably the ancestor of the members of the Savoy family who won their freedom after bringing suit in the General Court of Maryland [Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning Slavery, IV:54]. He was the father of

2        i. ?Arthur, born say 1712.

3        ii. Judith, born 1 November 1713.

iii. ?Sarah, married William Barton on 25 October 1731 in All Hallow's Parish, Anne Arundel County [Wright, Anne Arundel County Church Records, 45].

 

2.    Arthur Savoy, born say 1712, was a defendant in Anne Arundel County court in August 1735 when he was required to post bond of ten pounds for his appearance in court and for his good behavior towards John Mariarte. He was discharged when on one appeared against him. He was called a "labourer" in August 1737 when he was acquitted by the Anne Arundel County court of stealing a cow which belonged to Ann Jones. In August 1741 he was convicted of stealing a mare from Robert Killeson on testimony of Anthony Hill and Peter Impey. He was given thirty-five lashes and ordered to pay four-fold the value of the mare. In March 1741/2 he was ordered to serve John Watkins, administrator of John Mariartee, for two years for a debt of 1,643 pounds of tobacco. Watkins was ordered to deliver him up to the court at the end of his servitude to serve the county for criminal fees. In June 1744 Matthew Elliott undertook to pay 714 pounds of tobacco which he owed the county. In August 1746 he was presented by the court for failure to list his wife as a taxable [Judgment Record 1734-6, 283a, 304, 374; 1736-8, 249; 1740-3, 237, 248, 251, 401; 1743-4, 472; 1746-8, 214, 285]. He was living in Prince George's County on 23 November 1756 when he was presented by the court for not listing his wife and daughter as taxables by information of William Bright, constable for Mattapony Hundred. He submitted to the court and was discharged after paying court fees. He and his wife Jane, by their attorney, Attorney General Henry Darnell, sued Bright for assault. The court found in favor of Bright for the assault on Jane but against Bright for the assault on Arthur [Court Record 1754-8, 350, 372-4, 456]. He was among seventy-eight persons imprisoned for debt who were released by an act of the Assembly on 19 December 1769 after surrendering up all their real property [Archives of Maryland 62:169]. Arthur and Jane may have been the ancestors of

i. Archibald, born say 1755, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County, Maryland household of 9 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Philip, born say 1760, a "man of collour" who served in the 4th Maryland Regiment. He was living in Anne Arundel County with his wife and ten children in 1818 when he applied for a pension [National Archives pension file 535057 cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 181].

iii. William1, born say 1762, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 8 in 1800 [MD:568].

iv. Jane, born about 1765, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 28 April 1807: about the age of forty two years ... Complexion a bright Mulatto was born free ... born & bred in the City of Annapolis [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 11].

v. Francis, born say 1768, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and a "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:262]. He married Mary Curtis on 16 February 1795 in St. Mary's Mattawoman Parish, Charles County [Colonial Dames of America, Records of St. Mary's Parish, 1793-1861, 162].

vi. Martha, born say 1769, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

4        vii. Thomas, born say 1775.

5        viii. Milly, born say 1778.

 

3.    Judith Savoy, probably born 1 November 1713, was bound apprentice by her father Mingo Savoy to Humphrey Godman in Anne Arundel County until 1 November 1729. She was a "free Negro" who petitioned the Anne Arundel County court in November 1740 saying that Walter Phelps was holding her as a servant for debts he had paid for her eight or nine years previously. They included her fine for having an illegitimate child. She was presented for bastardy again in June 1743 [Judgment Record 1740-3, 90, 131, 224; 1743-4, 7]. She was probably the mother of

i. Sarah, a "free Negro" who was bound to Walter Phelps in November 1741 until the age of twenty-one with the consent of her unnamed mother [Judgment Record 1740-3, 319].

 

4.    Thomas1 Savoy, born say 1775, was a "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:259]. He may have been the husband of Katherine Savoy and father of

i. Harry, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 10 July 1828: a bright mulatto man, about 30 years old, and 5 feet 10-1/2 inches tall ... son of Negro Kitty, a free woman of color.

ii. William3, born about 1801, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 26 August 1826: a bright mulatto man, about 25 years old, and 5 feet 10-3/4 inches tall ... born free in Prince George's County, being the son of Katherine Savoy, a free woman of color [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 59, 74].

 

5.    Milly Savoy, born say 1778, obtained a certificate of freedom in the District of Columbia on 14 August 1823, for herself and sons, Elijah and Horatio, on testimony of James Barron. He swore that he had known her for about forty years and that she was born on his grandfather's plantation in Charles County. She was free-born because her grandmother was a white woman [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 25]. She may have been identical to Milly Savoy whose son Thomas obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 19 September 1827. She was the mother of

i. Elijah, born about 1802.

ii. Horatio, born about 1805.

iii. Thomas2, born about 1806, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 19 September 1827: a black man, about 21 years old, and 5 feet 9 inches tall ... born free in Prince George's County ... son of Milly Savoy, a free woman of color [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 69-70].

 

Other members of the family in Maryland were

i. Peter, born say 1770, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:971].

ii. Samuel, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:983].

6        iii. William2, born say 1780.

iv. Juliet, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 20 April 1807: about the age of twenty two years ... Complexion brown, was born free, her mother and grand mother being free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 10].

v. Mary, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 15 June 1807: aged twenty years ... complexion black ... raised in Anne Arundel County [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 38]. She may have been the Mary Savoy who was married to John Allerson's slave named Francis when their son John Savoy, born 17 March, was baptized in St. Mary's Parish, Charles County, on 26 April 1807 [Colonial Dames of America, Records of St. Mary's Parish, 1793-1861, 16].

vi. Richard Savoy Garrett, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 25 January 1819: aged about twenty seven years ... brown complexion ... free born. He was probably related to Peggy Garrett who obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 6 February 1819: aged about nineteen years ... brown Complexion ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 126, 127].

 

6.    William1 Savoy, born say 1780, and his wife Hannah, "free blacks," registered the birth and baptism of their daughter Harriet in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore. Their daughter was

i. Harriet, born August 1803, baptized 4 January 1804 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, II:26].

 

SCARLET FAMILY

1.     Susannah Scarlett, born say 1734, was the servant of Robert Dade in November 1753 when she confessed to the Charles County court that she had an illegitimate "Molatto" child. The court ordered her sold for seven years, ordered her to serve her master another year for the trouble of his house, and sold her son Lawrence Scarlett for thirty-one years to her master for 3 pounds, 4 shillings [Court Records 1753-4, 221]. She was called a white woman servant named Susan with two years to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the Charles County estate of Captain Robert Dade on 27 July 1756 [Prerogative Inventories 62:27-8]. She was the servant of Dade's widow Eliza Dade on 9 March 1757 when she was presented by the court for having another "Molatto" child. She confessed to the charge and was ordered to serve seven years and another year for the trouble of the house. In November 1758 she was indicted for having "Mulatto" twins [Court Record 1755-6, 382; 1756-7, 205; 1757-8, 566]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born about 1750, a six-year-old "Mulatto" girl to serve until the age of thirty-one when she was listed in the inventory of the Charles County estate of Robert Dade in 1756.

ii. Lawrence, born about 1753, a three-year-old "Mulatto" boy to serve until the age of thirty one when he was listed in the Charles County estate of Robert Dade in 1756.

iii. a child, born about 1757.

iv. twins, born about 1758.

 

SCOTT FAMILY

1.    Anne Scott, born say 1695, was the servant of Philemon Hemsley on 10 November 1713 when she was presented by the Charles County court for having a "Mallato" child by information of John Sanders [Court Record 1711-5, 318]. She was probably the mother of

2        i. Mary, born say 1713.

 

2.    Mary Scott alias Flemer, born say 1713, a "Mallatto Girl" born of a white woman, was living in Charles County on 13 August 1728 when the court ordered that she serve John Bruce ("with whom she had been brought up from a child") until the age of thirty-one. She was listed in the She was listed in the inventory of the Charles County estate of Mr. John Bruce on 8 April 1737: "Mallato Mary 18 pounds, Mallato Judith 30 pounds, Negro Luke 25 pounds, Mary Scott for 12 years 18 pounds" [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1736-1737, 280]. She was called "Scotty a Mullatto Woman of Mrs. Sarah Bruce" on 8 November 1737 when the Charles County court presented her for having an illegitimate "Malatto" child by information of George Hatton and called Mary Scott on 13 June 1738 when she was convicted of having a male "Mullatto" child by information of George Hatton [Court Record 1727-31, 153; 1734-9, 382, 459, 494]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Joshua, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 2 in 1800 [MD:513].

ii. Crecy, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iii. ?Charles, head of a Frederick County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [MD:798].

iv. Robert, head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:383].

v. Ann, head of a Frederick County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:849].

 

1.    Judith Scott, born say 1717, was a "Mullatto" woman living in Queen Anne's County in June 1737 when she was convicted by the court of having an illegitimate child. She was called a spinster of Saint Paul's Parish in November 1739 when she had another child [Judgment Record 1735-7, 308; 1740, 18].

i. Timothy, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 3 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1800 [MD:176].

ii. John, "Negro" head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 7 in 1810 [MD:912].

iii. Hannah, head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:522].

iv. Thomas, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:166].

v. Richard, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:176] and 3 in 1810 [MD:911].

vi. Abraham, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:859].

 

SHAVER FAMILY

1.    Tabitha Shaver, born say 1738, was the indentured servant of William Pullitt in June 1757 when she admitted in Somerset County court that she had an illegitimate child by a "Negro." The court ordered that she serve an additional seven years and bound her daughter Rachel until the age of thirty-one [Judicial Records 1757-60, 40b]. She was the mother of

i. Rachel, born about 1757.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Samuel, born before 1776, head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:83] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:71].

 

SHAW FAMILY

1.    Mary Shaw, born say 1690, a "free Negro," was indicted by the Baltimore County court in March 1710/1 for having an illegitimate child [Liber IS#B, 205, 214, cited by Barnes, Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759, 574]. She was apparently the mother of

2        i. Catherine1, born say 1710.

ii. Hannah, born say 1720, indicted for bastardy in Baltimore County court in June 1739 and November 1741. In March 1741/2 she was the servant of William Grafton when she confessed to having a child by a slave. Her one-year-old child was sold to Grafton until the age of thirty-one. She was indicted again in March 1746/7 [Liber HS#6, 401; TB#TR, 152, 333; TB#TR#1, 378, cited by Barnes, Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759, 573-4].

 

2.    Catherine1 Shaw, born say 1710, had an illegitimate child before August 1728 when John Moorcock paid her fine in Baltimore County Court. She was indicted for the same offense in August 1733 and March 1736. She was the servant of William Grafton of Baltimore County in March 1737/8 when she had a child by a slave. Her daughter Ruth was bound by the court to Grafton in March 1744/5. On 6 August 1745 she confessed in court that she had a "Negro Basterd lately borne of her body." The court ordered her to serve Grafton an additional seven years and sold her daughter Temperance to her master until the age of thirty-one. She had another child by a slave before June 1750 when she was sold for another seven year term [Liber HS#6, 22, 74; Liber HWS#9, 69; Liber HWS#1A, 35, 173, 321; Liber TB#TR#1, 220; Liber TR#5, 10, cited by Barnes, Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759, 573; Proceedings 1743-6, 473, 645]. She was the mother of

i. ?Susannah, born 28 February 1724/5, a "Mulatto" child bound to Thomas Biddison by the Baltimore County court in August 1729. She was indicted for bastardy in November 1745 and November 1746 [Liber HS#6, 274; TB#TR#1, 220; Proceedings 1743-6, 734].

ii. Ruth, born before March 1744/5.

iii. Temperance, born about 1745.

 

Other members of the Shaw family were

i. Cate2, head of a Baltimore City household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:336]. She may have been identical to Catherine Shaw who obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington, D.C., on 28 March 1806 in which Robert Brent certified that she and her children, Oswald, Henry, Peter, Thomas, Grace and Betsy, were freed by their suit brought against Notley Young in the General Court of Maryland [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 169].

ii. Joshua, head of a Baltimore City household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:360].

iii. Eleanor, born say 1767, married Moses Stevenson on 21 April 1789 in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:52].

 

SHEPHERD FAMILY

1.    Mary Shepherd, born say 1705, was the servant of William Powell on 22 March 1725 when she was presented by the Prince George's County court for having a "malatto" child [Court Record 1723-6, 557]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Margaret, "Negro" head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1790.

ii. York, "Negro" head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1790 and 3 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:833, 912].

iii. Benjamin, a "mulatto" taxable in Upper Langford Bay, Kent County, Maryland in 1783 [MSA 1161-7-2, p.11], head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:177] and 11 in 1810 [MD:842].

iv. John, a "mulatto" taxable in Upper Langford Bay, Kent County, Maryland in 1783 [MSA 1161-7-2, p.11], head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:844].

v. Margaret, born about 1767, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 9 June 1807: freeborn about forty years of age, her complexion is black ... raised at the fork of Patuxent [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 87].

vi. Samuel, born say 1770, married Sarah Orrick, "free blacks," on 28 April 1792 in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:65].

vii. James, born before 1776, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:849] and head of a Northwest Fork, Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:262].

viii. Sarah, born 1776-1794, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:6].

ix. Joseph, "negro" head of a Caroline County household of 22 "other free" in 1810 [MD:187].

x. Polly, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:169].

xi. Emery, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:169].

 

Another Shepherd family:

1. Ann Shepherd, born say 1703, was a "Christian white woman" who was presented by the Accomack County, Virginia Court for having an illegitimate child. When required to identify the father of her child on 6 June 1721, she told the Accomack County court that it was "Indian Edmund," but on 6 July 1721 she admitted that it was Henry Jackson "a Mullatto." The court ordered that she be sold for five years [Orders 1719-24, 33].

 

SHORTER FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth1 Shorter, born say 1662, was the servant of William Roswell of St. Mary's County in 1681 when she was married to Little Robin, a "negro man," by a priest named Nicholas Geulick. Roswell gave the couple to Anthony Neale of Charles County, and at Neale's request, Rev. Geulick made an affidavit on 15 June 1702 that he had performed the marriage. On the same date Roswell's wife, Emma Roswell, deposed the same facts about the marriage and added that Elizabeth and Robin had three "mulatto" children: Mary, Jane, and Martha. Both affidavits were recorded in the registry of King and Queen Parish, St. Mary's County. Elizabeth was the mother of

2        i. Mary, born say 1683.

ii. Jane1, born say 1685, transferred to Roswell Neale in 1723 by the St. Mary's County will of his father Anthony Neale.

3        iii. Martha, born say 1687.

 

2.    Mary Shorter, born say 1683, was the daughter of Elizabeth Shorter according to Emma Roswell's testimony on 15 June 1702 which was offered into evidence in a suit brought before the General Court of Maryland by Basil Shorter in October 1794 and another Shorter descendant in the Court of Appeals in 1808. According to testimony at the case held in 1808, Martha Shorter was devised in 1723 to Edward Neale by the will of his father Anthony Neale. Mary may have been identical to the "Malatta woman called Mary" who was valued at 28 pounds in the inventory of the Charles County estate of Anthony Neale in 1724 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1723-1724, 327-8]. According to Basil Shorter's October 1794 suit for freedom in St. Mary's County, Mary was the mother of

4        i. Linda, born say 1710.

 

3.    Martha/ Pat Shorter, born say 1687, was given to Raphael Neale by the St. Mary's County will of his father Anthony Neale in 1723. Raphael Neale gave Martha to John Lancaster after he married Neale's daughter Elizabeth according to testimony of Mary Lancaster on 24 August 1803. The petitioner in the 1808 appeals case testified that Martha was the mother of Betty, who was the mother of Sarah, who was the mother of Betty, who was the mother of the petitioner. Martha was the mother of

5    i. Elizabeth2/ Betty, born say 1710.

 

4.    Linda Shorter, born say 1710, was the mother of Basil Shorter who sued for his freedom in St. Mary's County in 1794. She was the mother of

i. Basil, sued for his freedom in St. Mary's County in 1794.

6        ii. ?Rachel, born say 1745.

 

5.    Elizabeth2/ Betty Shorter, born say 1710, was the mother of

7        i. Sarah, born say 1735.

 

6.    Rachel Shorter, born say 1745, was head of a Washington, D.C., household of 5 "other free" in 1800. She obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington County on 7 October 1807 and registered it in the Court of the District of Columbia in Alexandria on 30 May 1815: I do certify that to the best of my recollection Rachael Shorter and her children Matilda, Anna, Belinda, Catherine, John and Barrett obtained their freedom sometime in May 1795. M. H. Rozer [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, no. 29, p.27]. She was the mother of

i. Matilda.

ii. Anna.

iii. Belinda.

iv. Catherine, born say 1770, obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington, D.C., on 28 March 1806. Robert Brent certified that she and her children Oswald, Henry, Peter, Thomas, Grace and Betsy were freed by Notley Young by the judgment of the General Court of Maryland [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 169].

v. John.

vi. Barrett.

 

7.    Sarah Shorter, born say 1735, was the daughter of Betty Shorter. John Lancaster gave her to Henry Digges of Charles County who married Lancaster's daughter Henrietta. Digges sold Sarah's daughter Betty to Boswell, the defendant in the court of appeals case in 1808 [Cases in the General Court and Court of Appeals of Maryland, 238-40; Cases in the Court of Appeals of Maryland, 359-62]. Sarah was the mother of

i. Elizabeth3/ Betty, born say 1760.

 

They were the ancestors of

i. Edward, born about 1752, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 15 May 1807: of the age of fifty two years, his Complexion black, was born and bred in Charles County and now resides in the City of Annapolis [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 19].

ii. Jane2, born say 1760, obtained her freedom from the Mathews family. She was the mother of Monica Shorter and grandmother of Theresa Shorter who married Joseph Colson on 4 November 1819 and registered as a free Negro in Washington, D.C., on 28 June 1821 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 4].

iii. Clement, born say 1765, registered his granddaughter Mary Ann Shorter in Washington, D.C., on 9 June 1825. He was called a "free black man," husband of Phillis Shorter, "a free mulatto woman." They were the parents of Letitia Shorter Dorsey, mother of Mary Ann Shorter. Mary Ann was born about 1808 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 39]. Members of the Dorsey family were heads of "other free" households in 1810 in Annapolis (Nicholas and Samuel Dorsey [MD:116]) and Baltimore (Bill, John and Isaac Dorsey [MD:421, 517, 641]).

iv. Ignatius, born about 1767, registered in Frederick County on 21 April 1807: at a Court in Frederick Town the sixteenth day of November 1795, Ignatius Shorter was set free and discharged from the servitude of a certain William Emmit his then master. Said Ignatius Shorter (is) five feet four and a half Inches high, about forty years of age, middling black [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 4]. He was head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:889].

v. Elizabeth4/ Betty, head of a Frederick County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:901].

vi. Nelly, born about 1772, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 13 August 1810: about Thirty eight years of age, a dark Mullatto, about Five feet six and three quarter inches high, slender made ... by the Judgment of the said Court August Term Eighteen hundred and Ten was adjudged free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 21].

vii. Charity, head of a Charles County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:564].

viii. Thomas, "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:301] and 7 in 1810 [MD:71].

ix. Henry, "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:174].

x. Henny, born about 1790, "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:191], obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 12 August 1812: aged twenty two years ... complexion not very black - hair long & woolly ... born free being the daughter of Lucy Shorter who obtained her freedom in the late General Court of Maryland from Henry Neal [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 19].

xi. Joe, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 22 October 1818: a dark Mulatto, about five feet Six and a half Inches high, twenty seven years of age ... has always since his arrival ta the age of twenty one years passed as a free man ... as appears from the affidavit of Col. John Huston [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 86].

 

SIMITER FAMILY

1.    Catherine Scimter, born say 1688, was a "free woman" and wife of "Negroe John," slave of Colonel Ernault Hawkins, on 23 November 1731 when she confessed in Queen Anne's County court that she had received stolen goods from two servants of Mr. Walter Carmichel & Company. She was ordered to pay 2,000 pounds of tobacco for each of the two offenses. Otho Coursey, John Holden, Richard Holden and Joseph Elliott gave bond on 24 March 1732 to appear in court to testify against Catherine Cymeter, Jonathan Cymeter, and Solomon Cymeter. The sheriff won a judgment against her for his part of the 2,000 pounds of tobacco in November 1733, and he recorded a list of her property which included a small horse, old mare, two 3-year old horses, eight sows, two old feather beds, an old prayer book, an old gun, two feather beds and other household items. The court rejected her petition to be maintained by the county in June 1739 but called her a poor old woman when it allowed Peter Marnie Columbell 1,000 pounds of tobacco to maintain her in March 1747 until November that year. The court also allowed for her maintenance in 1747 and 1748 [Judgment Record 1730-32, 329-30; 1732-5, 2, 40, 93-4, 364, 423-5; 1735-9, 488; 1746-7, 144; 1747-8, 39, 238]. She owed the Queen Anne's County estate of Solomon Clayton (who died in 1739) a debt of 4 shillings [Prerogative Inventories Liber 98:18-22]. Her husband was apparently John Symeter who was about 72 years old when he was listed as a slave in the inventory of the Queen Anne's County estate of Mr. Edward Neal on 8 February 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 81:260-1]. They were apparently the parents of

2        i. Jonathan Simeter, born say 1705.

ii. Solomon1, born say 1710, gave bond on 25 March 1732 to appear in Queen Anne's County court. He was called Solomon Simiter Labourer of St. Paul's Parish, in June 1732 when the court found him not guilty of spoiling twenty wooden logs set aside by Otho Coursey, Gentleman, for building a house and when Matthew Dockery won a suit against him for 4,000 pounds of tobacco [Judgment Record 1732-5, 2, 3, 413, 436].

 

2.    Jonathan Simeter, born say 1705, gave bond on 25 March 1732 to appear in Queen Anne's County court [Judgment Record 1732-5, 2]. He owed the Queen Anne's County estate of Solomon Clayton (who died in 1739) a debt of 1 pound [Prerogative Inventories Liber 98:18-22]. In 1741 the constable for Worrell Hundred testified that he failed to list a member of his household (his wife?) Mary Cymiter, a taxable person of the age of sixteen and upwards, but the court found him not guilty. He died before March 1747 when his sons Solomon and William Simmiter were bound by the court to David Register until the age of twenty-one. Perhaps his wife or daughter was the Mary Scymiter to whom Joseph Dockery owed 3 pounds, 13 shillings in August 1767 [Judgment Record, 1741-2, 184, 267; 1746-7, 146; 1767, 68-9]. He was the father of

3        i. ?Elizabeth, born say 1731.

ii. Solomon2, born 2 February 1738, eight years old when he was bound out to be a blacksmith in 1747. His master David Register was indicted for abusing him and William Simmater but not further charged in November 1749 [Judgment Record 1749, 266].

iii. William, born 12 May 1743, four years old when he was bound to David Register to be a blacksmith in March 1747.

iv. Mary, born about 1746, "poor orphan" "Daughter of Jonathan Simmater" maintained by the county in 1748, bound to John Clemmonds until the age of sixteen in March 1749 [Judgments 1747-8, 238; 1749, 20].

 

3.    Elizabeth Simiter, born say 1731, had an illegitimate child before March 1752 when John Nabb was her security in Queen Anne's County court that her daughter Susanna would not become a charge to the county and before November 1754 when he was security of her illegitimate daughter Frances. She was called a "Mulatto" woman in court when she had an illegitimate child before 26 August 1760 by an unknown person. The court ordered that she receive fifteen lashes. She had another child before August 1762 when Joseph Nabb was her security that her daughter Sarah would not become a charge to the county; in March 175 [Criminal Record 1751-9, n.p.; 1759-66, 50, 149]. She was the mother of

i. Susanna, born about 1751.

ii. Frances, born about 1754.

iii. Sarah, born about 1762.

 

They were probably the ancestors of

i. John, presented by the Kent County, Maryland court in Novmeber 1775 for not giving in his tax [Criminal Dockets 1774-6, no.37]. He was head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:154].

ii. Hannah Simmeter, "F.N." head of a Queen Anne's County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Darkey Simmeter, "F.M." head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

iv. Hager Simiter, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:196].

v. Doney Simiter, head of a Baltimore City household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:192].

 

SISCO FAMILY

See the Francisco Family

 

SKINNER FAMILY

1.    Mary Skinner, born say 1740, deserted her white husband and went to live with a slave who was the father of her child according to a notice placed by her husband in the 12 October 1769 issue of the Maryland Gazette. She was probably the mother of

i. Salada, head of a Dorchester County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:691].

2        ii. Harry, born say 1770.

 

2.    Harry Skinner, born say 1770, was head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:521]. He may have been the father of

i. Thomas, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 21 October 1815: a mulatto man ... about 24 years of age ... born free & raised in the County.

ii. Henry, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 15 June 1816: born free and raised in the County ... about 20 years of age ... of a light Complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1815-28, 7, 33].

 

SMITH FAMILY

1.    Ann Smith, born say 1740, was the servant of John Fendall, Esq., on 12 February 1759 when the Charles County court presented her for having an illegitimate "Melato" child [Court Record 1759-60, 175]. She may have been the mother of

i. Eleanor, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

 

1.    Mary Smith, born say 1747, was the spinster servant of Robert Goldsborough of Talbot County in August 1761 when the court sold her daughter Sarah to her master for 33 shillings and ordered her sold for seven years after the completion of her service for having a child by a "Negro." The court sold her for seven years to Adam Gray in November 1766 for 2,350 pounds of tobacco for having an illegitimate child by a "Negro." She was the servant of Jonathan Nichols in March 1767 when she was convicted of the same offense [Criminal Record 1761-7, 493, 505, 536]. She may have been identical to Poll Smith who was head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1790. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born about 1761.

ii. ?Moses, head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 and 10 in 1800 [MD:518].

iii. ?Lucy, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

iv. ?Ben, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:532].

 

Another Smith family was

i. James, taxable on "Mulatto" Mary Smith in Pocomoke Hundred of Somerset County from 1756 to 1759 [List of Tithables, 1757], perhaps related to Linah Smith, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:657].

 

Delaware

1.    John Smith, born say 1730, was called Smith John Lower(?), a "Molatto" when David Ford gave security to the Kent County Levy court to keep him from being a charge to the county [RG 3220, MS Levy Proceedings, p.1]. He was a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1766 to 1774, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1775 and 1779 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 521, 566; 1768-84, frames 11, 27, 104, 259, 273, 337, 371]. He may have been the father of

i. Isaac Smith, a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1769 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frame 66].

i. William, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1775 and 1778 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frame 259, 273, 337].

 

SMITHER/ SMOTHERS FAMILY

1.    Sarah Smither, born say 1702, was a "free Mullatto Woman" who had a child called "Mullatto Nanny" by a white man. In August 1743 Nanny brought a successful suit against Mrs. Holland, widow of Col. William Holland, in Anne Arundel County court for her freedom [Judgment Record 1743-4, 170]. She was the mother of

i. Nanny, born say 1722, granted her freedom in August 1743.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Thomas Smothers, head of a Frederick County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:959] and 6 in 1810 [MD:557].

ii. Elisha Smothers, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:83].

iii. Diana Smother, head of a Baltimore City household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:169].

 

SNOW FAMILY

1.    Rebecca Snow, born say 1750, admitted to the Kent County, Maryland court in March 1770 that she had a "Molato" child. The court sold her son Felix to Samuel Hodges for 5,000 pounds of tobacco [Criminal Dockets 1766-71, November 1769, no. 4; appearance March 1770, no. 17]. She was the mother of

i. Felix, born about 1769.

ii. ?Ben, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:841].

iii. ?John, born before 1776, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware houshold of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:26].

 

SOCKUM FAMILY

1.    John Scokem, born say 1736, was taxable in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland, with (his wife?) Rachel Scokem in 1757 [List of Taxables]. She was probably the widow Sockem who was taxable in Dagsbury Hundred of Sussex County, Delaware, from 1784 to 1788, listed near James Sockem [DSA, RG 2535, Levy List 1780-96]. They were probably the parents of

i.James Sockum, taxable in Dagsbury Hundred of Sussex County in 1777 and from 1784 to 1796 [DSA, RG 2535, Levy List 1767-80; 1780-96], a "Negro" head of a Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425], 8 in 1810 [DE:308] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372]. He lived on land adjoining Levin Thompson in 1810, and his suit Sockum vs. Thompson was listed in the account of Levin's estate [DSA, RG 4545.009, roll 240, frame 280].

ii. Isaac, taxable in Dagsbury Hundred in 1777 [RG 2535].

iii.Lowder Sockum, taxable in Dagsbury Hundred in 1795 [RG 4200.027, Levy Court, Roll 2, frame 70], and 1796, living in the land of Robert Hopkins on 27 August 1807 when he made his Sussex County will [WB F-6:303].

iv. Stephen, "free Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1789, "runaway" in 1790 [DSA, RG 3535, Levy List 1785-1797, frames 150, 173].

 

SONGO FAMILY

Members of the Songo family, apparently descendants of a white woman, were

i. Kendall, born say April 1673, a "Mallt" servant woman having fifteen months to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Mrs. Phebe Bowdle on 14 January 1702/3 [Prerogative Inventories and Accounts 1:618-9].

ii. Sarah, born say 1675, a "Mallt" servant having three years to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Mrs. Phebe Bowdle on 14 January 1702/3.

iii. Grace,, born say 1677, a "Mallt" servant having five years and six weeks to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Mrs. Phebe Bowdle on 14 January 1702/3 [Prerogative Inventories and Accounts 1:618-9].

iv. William1, died before 5 June 1722 when Sarah and Solomon Songo signed (making their mark) the Talbot County inventory of his estate which consisted a cow and calf, 581 pounds of tobacco, 5 bushels of corn and 2 shoats [Prerogative Inventories 7:244].

1         v. William2, born say 1730.

 

1.    William2 Songo, born say 1730, was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1757, 1758 and 1766, in Little Creek Hundred from 1770 to 1771, in Duck Creek Hundred in 1772, Dover Hundred in 1773 and 1774, and in Murderkill Hundred from 1778 to 1780 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 199, 212, 228, 518; 1768-84, frames 66, 104, 120, 183, 216, 347, 376, 425, 430, 461]. He was paid 8 pounds, 6 shillings by the estate of John Durham of Little Creek Hundred before 26 February 1789 [RG 3545, roll 68, frame 615]. He may have been the father of

i. Ann, born say 1748, living in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, when the August 1768 session of the court indicted her and Isaac Durham for having an illegitimate female child [DSA, RG 3805, case papers, August 1768 indictments].

ii.  James, born about 1757, twenty-five years old on 28 January 1782 when he was described in a Delaware muster roll: 25 years, 5'7", born in Delaware, a resident of Kent County, black hair, yellow complexion. He was present for rations from 8 February to 17 February 1782, and there is another receipt signed in early September 1782 [An exact List or Roll of the noncommissioned Officers and privates inlisted for the Delaware Regiment, and Mustered by Nehemiah Tilton Esqr Commissary of Muster for the Delaware State...Nehemiah Tilton. Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783," digital image, Footnote.com (http://www.footnote.com; accessed 23 March 2009) Delaware Regiment 1777-80, Folder 11, imaged from M246, (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, image no. 62]. He enlisted on 25 December 1781 but deserted about June 1782 when an ads were placed in the Pennsylvania Journal and the Weekly Advertiser: James Songo, a Mulato, born in Kent County, Delaware state, 5 feet six inches high, has been an old soldier, and is supposed to be gone to Maryland. And an ad in the same publications on 14 September 1782 stated: James Songo, a mulatto, born in Kent County, Delaware State, 25 years of age, 5 feet six inches high, has lost some of his toes [Boyle, Joseph L, He Loves a good deal of rum...Military Desertions during the American Revolution, 1775-1783, Vol. 2, June 1777-1783, 249, 298-9]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:786].

2         iii. Daniel, born say 1765.

 

2.    Daniel Songo, born say 1765, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1788 to 1789, in the list of "Mulatto's & Negro's" in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1784-97, frames 75, 107, 138, 75, 473]. He was paid 8 pounds by the estate of John Durham of Little Creek Hundred before 26 February 1789 [RG 3545, roll 68, frame 615]. He was not taxed in Little Creek Hundred in 1800 because he was "sickly" [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1798-1800, frame 414]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33] and 2 "free colored" (a man and woman born before 1776) in 1820 [DE:25]. He was bondsman for the Delaware marriage of Asa Street and Rebecca Durham on 23 January 1811 [Marriage Records 18:292]. He may have been the father of

i. Isaiah, born 1776-1794, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:29].

 

SOUTHWOOD FAMILY

1.    Sarah Southwood, born say 1749, was the servant of Benjamin Richardson in August 1768 when she admitted in Queen Anne's County that she had a "Mulatto" child about November 1766 [Judgment Records 1766-7, part 1, CD image 102]. She may have been the mother of

i. Mary, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:165].

 

SPARKSMAN FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Sparkman, born say 1692, was the servant of Nathaniel Roach of Coventry Parish at Annamessex on 8 March 1711/2 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by Indian Robin. The court ordered that she receive 20 lashes, serve her master another two years for the trouble of his house and the court fees and bound her son George to her master. She was the servant of Alexander Hall of Annamessex on 22 May 1718 when she pled guilty to having another illegitimate child [Judicial Record 1711-13, 133-4; 1718, 91]. She was the mother of

2            i. George1, born 6 August 1711.

 

2.    George1 Sparkman, born 6 August 1711, and Jonas Hodgskin paid a fine of 6 pence for assaulting Henry Reynolds in Somerset Parish in 1735 [Judicial Record 1711-13, 133-4; 1735-7, 98]. He was taxable in Henry Scholfield's Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County household in 1739 and 1740 [List of Tithables]. He was probably the father of

3         i. Stephen, born say 1737.

 

3.    Stephen Sparksman, born say 1737, was taxable in the Somerset County, Maryland household of Thomas White in 1753 [List of Tithables] and was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1765 to 1797 when he was a "Mulattoe struck off" the list (probably due to old age). He was called a cordwainer in May 1772 when the Kent County grand jury found in his favor when he was accused of stealing eight bushels of corn from William Corse [DSA, RG 3805, MS case files, May 1772 indictments]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:32]. Perhaps he was the father of

i. Caleb, a delinquent taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County in 1781.

ii. George2, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.


Another member of the Sparksman family was

i. Leah, born say 1778, a "free Mulatto," married William Wilson, a slave, on 24 March 1799 in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore, Maryland [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:126].

 

SPEARMAN FAMILY

1.    Mary Spearman, born say 1710, confessed to the March 1730/1 Kent County court that she had an illegitimate child by a "Negro." The court ordered that she be sold for seven years. She was the servant of Richard Davis in March 1733/4 when she was convicted of stealing goods which belonged to Mrs. Margaret Shippey [Criminal Proceedings 1728-34, 160, 185, 489]. She was the ancestor of

i. Peter, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:154].

ii. Philip, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:154].

 

SPENCER FAMILY

1.    Sarah Spencer, born say 1752, confessed to the Kent County court in March 1762 that she had a "molatto" child. The court sold her and her child Jere to Kinvin Wroth [Criminal Record 1761-72, 24]. She was the mother of

i. Jere, born about 1762.

ii. ?Samuel, head of a Baltimore City household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:186].

iii. ?James, head of a Montgomery County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:966].

iv. ?Pambla, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:148].

v. ?Isaac, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:908].

 

STANLEY FAMILY

1.    Mary Stanley, born say 1708, a "Spinster" of Great Choptank Parish, Dorchester County, confessed on 12 November 1728 that she had a "Molatto" child by a "Negro." The court ordered her sold as a servant for seven years after the completion of her indenture [Judgments 1728-9, 84]. She was probably the ancestor of

2        i. Jane, born about 1748.

3        ii. James1, born say 1760.

iii. George, born say 1761, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" in 1790. On 25 February 1792 he manumitted three slaves he purchased from Daniel Parker: Rachel to be free immediately, Leah Standly to be free at sixteen and Jonathan Standly to be free at twenty-one [DB HD 6:428]. Perhaps he was deceased in 1800 when Rachel Standley was head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" [MD:686].

4        iv. Salady, born say 1762.

v. Sophia, born say 1763, purchased a forty-year-old "Negro" man named Jerry then in her possession by Dorchester County deed from Elizabeth Ennalls for 50 pounds on 27 May 1799 and set him free [DB HD-15:18, 23].

vi. Ezekiel1, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 8 in 1800 [MD:726].

vii. Ezekiel2, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:736]. He mortgaged 30 head of sheep, 4 cows, 5 heifers, 3 mares, a horse, 3 colts and 15 hogs for $300 on 15 August 1814 [DB ER-3:123].

viii.Robert2, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:725] and 8 "free colored" in 1830. On 13 March 1798 he manumitted his wife Easter and her daughter Easter whom he had purchased from Daniel Parker [DB HD-12:607].

ix. Ailse, head of a Dorchester County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

x. Elizabeth, head of a Bohemia, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

5        xi. John, born about 1771.

xii. Draper, born about 1774, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 17 September 1807: of a Chesnut Colour ... born free ... aged about 33 years.

xiii. Joseph, manumitted his "negro woman" Alce Pendergrass by Dorchester County deed on 17 October 1805. He purchased 12 acres in Dorchester County called Turkey Swamp from Joseph Ennalls on 3 February 1808 [DB HD-23:112; 24:577].

xiv. Levin, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 15 June 1807: copper colour ... born free ... aged about 25 years.

xv. William, a "free Mulatto," bound himself to serve David Harvey of Dorchester County for three years on 1 August 1802 [DB HD-20:92].

xvi. Harriet Hopkins, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 August 1836: of a chesnut colour ... born free ... daughter of Betsey Stanley who was also born free, aged about 36 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 4, 5, 106].

 

2.    Jane Stanley, born about 1748, was a "Molatta" woman with ten years to serve on 5 January 1769 when she was listed inventory of the Dorchester County estate of James Hodson with a five-year-old "Molatta" boy bound until the age of thirty-one [Prerogative Inventories, 311-4]. She may have been the mother of

6        i. Robert1, born say 1764.

ii. Sall, a "Mulatto" girl valued at 20 pounds in the 3 September 1772 Dorchester County estate of William Langrell [Prerogative Inventories 105:410-11].

 

3.    James1 Stanley, born say 1760, was head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790, 7 in 1800 [MD:686], and 7 in 1810 (called James, Sr.) [MD:402]. He and his wife Rachel were the parents of

i. Esther, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 26 July 1830: Dark complected ... raised in Dorchester County and is the Daughter of Rachel and James Stanley, about 30 years of age [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 67].

 

4.   Salady Stanley, born about 1756, was probably identical to the "Negro Boy named Salady" who still had seven years to serve when he was listed in the 7 June 1770 Dorchester County estate of Edward Smith [Prerogative Inventories 105:144]. He was a "coloured man" who enlisted in the 4th Maryland Regiment on 4 September 1781 and was discharged at Fredericktown at the end of the war. He appeared in Dorchester County court on 4 April 1821 to apply for a pension, stating that he was about sixty-seven, had served for three years and had nine people in his family including his wife Sally (aged thirty years), son Charles (aged twelve), son Garretson (aged ten), daughter Sally (aged nine), Mary (aged seven), Priscilla (aged six), son Jim (aged five years) and son Joe (aged three years). He died on 31 November 1831. Charles Cornish testified on 15 August 1853 that Saladda was in the Revolution, that his wife died on 15 August 1853, and that he assisted in her burial. Garrison Stanley, "free negro," was granted administration on the estate of Sarah Stanley, "free Negress," on 12 August 1857. He filed for the widow's pension of Sarah and included a statement from Matthew Dixon, an "old Negro man" aged one hundred and three, that her maiden name was Blake and that they were married by and Episcopalian mininster in Cambridge on 25 December 1792 [Pension file R10057, http://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "Free Negro or Mulatto" over 16 and 5 slaves in 1790 [MD:439] and 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:657]. His children were

i. Charles.

ii. Garretson.

iii. Sally.

iv. Joe.

v. Mary.

vi. Priscilla.

vii. James2.

 

5.   John Stanley, born about 1771, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 21 August 1810: of a yellowish colour ... born free, raised in Dorchester County, aged about 39 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 14]. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. He and his wife Sally were the parents of

i. John, born about 1811, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 15 May 1832: of a chesnut colour ... free born and is the son of John and Sally Stanley who were also free born, aged about 21 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 83]. He was probably the John Stanley whose request for free papers so that he could trade in Baltimore was recorded in Dorchester County court on 4 May 1832 [Court Papers 1743-1846, MSA C695-1].

 

6.   Robert1 Stanley, born say 1764, was a "Mulatto" boy valued at 20 pounds in the Dorchester County inventory of William Langrell on 3 September 1772 [Prerogative Inventories 109:410-11]. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 9 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:736]. He purchased and manumitted "negro woman" Dianna from Hannah Hodson for 50 pounds by Dorchester County deed on 29 December 1798 and purchased "negro woman" Rhoda and her children Hannah and Ben from William Whittington for 18 pounds on 4 January 1799. He may have been deceased on 22 June 1805 when (his wife?) Dinah Stanley purchased a "Negro girl Nancy Standley" by Dorchester County deed from Hannah Robertson and manumitted nineteen-year-old Nancy Stanly on 29 November 1810 [DB HD 14:385-9; 21-723; 23:48; ER 3:606]. He may have been the father of

i. Nancy, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 22 December 1815: of a chesnut colour...raised by Robert Stanley and manumitted by Dinah Stanley on the 19 December 1816, aged about 24 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 30].

 

STEVENSON FAMILY

1.    Moses1 Stevenson, born say 1745, a "Malotto Man," and his wife, Eleanor, registered the birth of their children in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore, Maryland [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:53]. They were the parents of

i. Eleanor, born 12 February 1766.

ii. Moses2, born 17 August 1767, married Eleanor Shaw, 21 April 1789 in St. Paul's Parish [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:52]. He was head of a Baltimore Town household of 3 "other free" in 1800.

iii. Meshack, born 28 June 1768, married Esther Jones, "free negroes or mulattoes," on 21 April 1794 in St. Paul's Parish [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:78]. He was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:63].

iv. John, born 28 January 1770.

v. William, born 31 July 1771.

vi. Samuel1, born 5 April 1776, married Elizabeth Feathers in St. Paul's Parish on 5 July 1795. They were the "free Mulato" parents of Rachel, born 27 May 1798 and baptized 13 February 1799 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:52, 89, 125]. Samuel was head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:378].

vii. Shadrack, born 18 February 1781, registered in Baltimore on 21 November 1839: personally appeared Mrs. Ellen Webb who made oath that Shadrick Stevenson, aged 56 years, light complexion, hair very thin on top of head, was born free in Maryland and raised in Baltimore [Negroes Manumitted & Born Free, 1829-1840, MdHR microfilm CR 12,262-2].

viii. Jacob, born 1 March 1783.

ix. Jesse, born 1 March 1785.

x. Charlotte, born 28 January 1789.

 

Other members of the family were

i. Nace, head of a Baltimore City household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:391].

ii. Joshua, head of an Eastern Precinct, Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:503].

iii. Samuel2, head of an Eastern Precinct, Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:523].

 

STEWART FAMILY

Queen Anne's County

1.    Jane Steward, born say 1690, was convicted of having a "Malatto" child during her term of service to Major William Turlo. She had completed her service to Turlo on 26 November 1712 when he brought her into Queen Anne's County court, and the court bound her to John King for seven years to commence on 24 October 1712. King agreed to set her free one year early and to pay her freedom dues at the end of her service [Judgment Record 1709-16, 200]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Charles, had of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

ii. John, head of a Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:154].

 

Baltimore County

1.    Elizabeth Stewart, born say 1696, was a runaway servant whose "Mulatto" child Elizabeth was bound until the age of thirty-one to John and Ann Norris by the Baltimore County court in November 1716 [Liber IS#IA, 61, cited by Barnes, Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759, 610]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Ark, head of a Baltimore City household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:350].

ii. Samuel, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:376].

iii. John, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:348].

 

STREET FAMILY

1.   David Street, born about 1736, was a twenty-three-year-old, born in Sussex County, who was listed in the 11 May 1759 muster of Captain John Wright's Company in the French and Indian War, in the same list with Samuel and Thomas Hanzer of Sussex County and Andrew McGill, an Indian born in Maryland [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 278-9]. He and his wife Mary had a daughter Hannah who was born in 1770 and baptized in St. George's Episcopal Church in Indian River Hundred in 1785 (called David Strite) [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He purchased land in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from Smith Frame on 15 February 1777 and sold it on 21 April 1783 [DB N-13:2]. He was taxable on the north side of Broadkill Hundred in 1770, in Indian River Hundred in 1784, and a delinquent taxable there in 1787 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 1 & 2]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:454]. He died before 11 March 1816 when administration on his Sussex County estate was granted to Jeremiah Street. His inventory totaled $130 [DSA, RG 4545, frames 758-767]. He may have been the father of

2        i. Jeremiah, born before 1776.

 

2.    Jeremiah Street, born say 1763, was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1784 and 1789 [DSA, RG 2535], head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438], 8 in 1810 [DE:454] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:208]. He was administrator of the Sussex County estate of David Street. In his account of the estate he listed a debt David owed him for eight months work his son Haslet did for David as well as feeding his cattle, providing corn and fire wood for him [DSA, RG 4545, frames 758-9]. He or perhaps a son by the same name and Betty Clark (Colour'd) married in Sussex County on 19 December 1816 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 327]. He was a ninety-seven-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the Indian River Hundred census for 1850 with (his son?) Wingate Street [family no. 24]. He was the father of

i. Hazlet, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:206]. He and Jenny Harmon (Colour'd) married in Sussex County on 23 December 1812 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 323]. He was called a "Negro" when administration on his Sussex County estate was granted to Jacob Tingle "Negro" in December 1833 [DSA, RG 4545, frames 786-789].

ii. ?Priscilla, born about 1780, a seventy-year-old "Mulatto" woman counted in the 1850 census for Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, with Major and Letty Drigas [family no. 106].

iii. ?Wingate, born about 1782, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [DE:454]. He was married to Mary Thompson on 16 February 1816 when they received a legacy of $34.58 from her father's estate. On 29 March 1817 they sold for $170 their rights to Tresham's Mill which Mary received by the will of her father Levin Thompson, a "Blackman" [DB 33:299; DSA, RG 4545.009, roll 240, frames 264-78]. Wingate was head of an Indian River household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:206], and a sixty-eight-year-old "Mulatto" farmer with $500 real estate counted in Indian River Hundred with (wife?) Nancy in 1850 [family no. 24].

iv. ?Asa, married Rebecca Durham, 23 January 1811 bond, Asa Street (signing) and Daniel Songo bondsmen [DSA, Marriage Records 18:292].

 

STRICKLAND FAMILY

1.    Margaret Strickland, born say 1702, was the mother of a "Mallatto" daughter who was sold by the Charles County court on 13 November 1722 to Rando. Morris until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1723-4, 4]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. David, "f. Negro" head of a Fairfax County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" and 1 slave in 1810 [VA:301].

 

SUITOR FAMILY

1.    Grace Suitor, born say 1730, a spinster "Mullatto" had an illegitimate "Molatta" child by a "Negroe." The Queen Anne's County court sold her to John Falkner for 1,587 pounds of tobacco in June 1751 [Judgment Record 1750-1, 269; Criminal Record 1751-9, 26-8]. She was the mother of

i. Edward, born 1 January 1749/50, "Malatto" son of Grace Suitor sold by the Queen Anne's County court to Mr. John Downes, Jur, for 1,225 pounds of tobacco in June 1751.

 

SUMMERS FAMILY

1.    Sarah Summers, born say 1742, was the servant of Edward Kelly in November 1760 when the Kent County, Maryland court presented her for having a "Molatto Bastard" child. She confessed to the charge in March 1771 and was ordered to serve seven years as punishment [Criminal Record 1761-72, 2]. She was apparently the ancestor of

i. James, a "N." head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:101], 7 in 1810 [MD:37] and 5 "free colored" in Murderkill Hundred in 1820 [DE:3], probably the father of Thomas Summers, head of a Murderkill Hundred household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:3].

ii. Jesse, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:177].

 

SWANN FAMILY

1.    Sarah Swann, born say 1688, was a "Mollatto Hired woman" servant of Col. Hoskins on 9 September 1707 when the Charles County, Maryland Court presented her for having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." She admitted her guilt to the same offense on 8 June 1714, and the court ordered that she serve her master an additional four years. On 10 June 1718 the court presented her for having another illegitimate child, and on 12 August 1718 the court sentenced her to 12 lashes "so that ye blood appear" because she had no one to pay her fine. Jacob Miller, innholder, was security for the payment of her court fees. On 11 November 1718 the court rejected the petition of William Hoskins that his "mollatto" servant Sarah Swann had born a child in his house for which he had received no reparation [Court Record 1704-10, 373; 1711-5, 402; 1717-20, 104, 142]. She was the ancestor of

i. Mary, Jr., "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 and a 9 in 1800 [MD:497].

ii. Leonard, father of an illegitimate child by Sarah Lenkins in Charles County before March 1769 [Court Records 1767-70, 405A].

iii. Elizabeth, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

iv. Elizabeth, Jr., "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

v. Jennett, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

vi. William, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

vii. Linder, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

viii. Charity, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ix. Richard, a "molatto" taxable in the 2nd District of Charles County in 1783 [MSA 1161-4-8, p.7] and head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:524].

x. Ann, "free Mulatto" head of a Prince George's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:266].

xi. Polly, head of a Charles County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:563].

 

TAYLOR FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Taylor, born say 1690, confessed in Prince George's County court on 27 August 1711 that she had an illegitimate child by Mr. Thomas Wainwright's "Negro George." In November that year the court bound her five-month-old "Mallatto" daughter Sarah to James Gibbs until the age of thirty-one. On 22 June 1714 and 6 March 1716/7 she confessed to having "Mallotto" children, and the court sold her and her children to William Marshall, she for a total of fourteen years and her children until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1710-5, 80, 126, 611; 1715-20, 181, 185]. She was the ancestor of

i. Sarah, born about June 1711.

ii. ?William1, a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1790, perhaps identical to William Taylor who was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1800 [MD:381].

iii. ?John, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:167].

iv. Henny, born say 1770, mother of Sarah Ann Myers who was born about 1791 and obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 15 November 1819: a bright Mulatto ... about twenty eight years of age ... free born woman and the daughter of Henny Taylor as appears from the affidavit of John Reign [Certificates of Freedom 1807-28, 100].

 

THOMAS FAMILY

Charles County:

1.    Elizabeth Thomas was a free white woman who had a child by an African American in Maryland [Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning American Slavery and the Negro, IV:52]. She was the ancestor of

2        i. Mary, born about 1772.

3        ii. Terry, born say 1775.

iii. ?Henry1, head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:511].

iv. ?Eleanor, head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:564].

 

2.    Mary Thomas, born about 1772, won a judgment against her master Thomas Lancaster in the General Court of the Western Shore in October Term 1795. She recorded a copy of the judgment in Charles County court on 9 September 1805: about twenty-three years old, 5 feet four inches ... a tolerable bright mulatto. She also recorded the birth dates of her children [Land Records IR#6, 452-3]. Her children were

i. Letty, born 10 August 1788.

ii. Robert, born 4 October 1791.

iii. John, born 14 July 1793.

iv. Richard, born 18 September 1795.

v. Elizabeth, born 6 February 1797.

vi. Baptist, born 26 May 1799.

vii. Sarah, born 7 March 1801.

viii. Edward, born 24 June 1804.

 

3.    Terry Thomas, born say 1775, may have been the sister of Mary Thomas since Mary made a deposition in Charles County on 30 August 1805 in which she recorded the birth dates of Terry's children [Land Records IR#6, 452-3]. Terry was the mother of

i. William, born 30 December 1793.

ii. Henry2, born 14 February 1796.

 

Prince George's County:

1.    Katherine Thomas, born say 1728, the servant of Philip Mason, confessed in Prince George's County court in August 1747 that she had a "Mulatto" child. The court sold her for seven years and sold her son Jesse to her master until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1746-7, 606; 1747-8, 91-2]. She was the mother of

i. Jesse, born 3 February 1746/7.

 

Baltimore:

1.    George Thomas, born say 1750, was head of a Baltimore City household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:370]. He may have been the father of

i. Abby, married John Smith, "free Mulattoes," on 25 May 1799 in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:115].

 

Members of the Thomas family in Kent County were

i. Rachel, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Surey, head of a Cecil County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Grace, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

 

THOMPSON FAMILY

Members of the Thompson family in Maryland were

1        i. Thomas, born say 1710.

ii. Simon, born say 1713, married Savory Lett, "negroes," on 10 November 1734 at St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:31].

iii. Catherine, born say 1734, a "Melater" who was presented by the Grand Jurors of Prince George's County on 26 March 1754 for having an illegitimate child by information of Benjamin Duvall, the constable of Western Branch Hundred [Court Record 1751-4, 540]. She may have been identical to Catherine Thomson who was head of a Baltimore County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:489].

iv. Elijah, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

v. Aquilla, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

vi. Rosalin, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 3 in Washington County in 1800 [MD:638].

vii. Jacob, born about June 1756, a "Mullatto" living with Peter Becraft on 13 March 1764 when the Frederick County court bound him to Becraft as an apprentice until the age of twenty-one. Becraft was ordered to give him one year of schooling and provide him with a suit of clothes worth five pounds at the end of his apprenticeship [Court Minutes 1763-8, June 1763, March 1764 (n.p.)].

viii. Samuel2, head of a Frederick County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:955 & MD:961].

ix. Charles, head of a Jefferson County, Virginia household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:78].

x. Daniel, head of a Shenandoah County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810.

xi. Delilah, born about 1771, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County, Maryland on 13 September 1826: about fifty five years of age ... a bright Mulatto Woman ... free Born as appears by the affidavit of Nicholas Willson [Certificates of Freedom 1808-42, 187].

xii. Samuel1, head of a Charles Town, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

xiii. Joseph, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:419].

xiv. John, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:410].

xv. Pheaton, head of a Baltimore City household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:368].

xvi. Benjamin, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:384].

 

1.    Thomas Thompson, born say 1710, was a "Mullatto" who was acquitted by the Charles County court on 10 August 1736 of stealing goods worth five pounds cash from Mary Ancrum. Timothy Carrington and James Glascock were his securities. Samuel Hanson sued him and Benjamin Day in Charles County court for a debt of 4,020 pounds of tobacco on 13 November 1770. He was called "Thomas Thompson Mulatto" when William Cunningham & Company sued him for a 12 pound debt in November 1773. He sued James Gates on 8 August 1774 in a case that was agreed to before coming to trial [Court Record 1734-9, 228-9; 1770-2, 216; 1772-3, 174, 577; 1773-4, 60, 519, 695]. He was probably identical to Thomas Thompson, a "Mul.," who took the oath of fidelity in Charles County in 1778 [Liber X-3:641-51] and was head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790. He was the father of

i. ?Henry, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790, 10 in 1800 [MD:525] and 15 in 1810 [MD:333].

ii. Thomas, born say 1760, one of four "Black Persons being Soliders (of the Maryland Line), VIZT. Thomas Thompson, Leonard Turner, Valentine Murrin, and John Adams," who were arrested by the local authorities in Orange County, North Carolina, in December 1780 for breaking into someone's house. They were forcibly rescued by the Continental Army [Orange County court Minutes 1777-8, Part I, Dec. 19 and 23, 1780, cited by Crow, The Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 68].

iii. Mary, called "daughter of Thomas Thompson" on 12 November 1771 when she was presented by the Charles County court for having an illegitimate child [Court Record 1770-2, 169, 492; 1772-3, 174]. She was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

iv. ?Jane, confessed to the Charles County court on 8 August 1774 that she had an illegitimate child. Thomas Thompson "Mulatto Planter" was her security [Court Record 1773-4, 389].

v. ?William, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vi. ?Alexander, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vii. ?Joseph, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

viii. ?Ann, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

Members of the Thompson family on the Eastern Shore of Maryand and in Delaware were

1        i. Levin, born say 1750.

ii. Rachel, born say 1770, mother of Jane Thompson (born about 1791) who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 31 May 1815: aged about 24 years ... born free and raised in Dorchester County, Daughter of Rachel Thompson a free woman [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 26].

iii. Charles, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:155].

 

1.    Levin Thompson, born say 1750, was offered as a witness in a suit between two white men (Collins vs. Hall). When the case was heard by the Delaware Supreme Court in November 1793, he was called "Levin Thompson negro ... a freeman." His mother and grandmother had been free and had lived in and come from Maryland [Catterall, Judicial Cases IV: 217]. He may have been identical to Levin Game (alias Thompson) who was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, from 1777 to 1791. As Levin Thompson he was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, in 1795, taxable on 100 acres there in 1796, 40 of them cultivated, with a house and kitchen, a yoke of oxen, and four horses [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:375] and in 1810 listed as heads of two households: one with 18 "other free" producing 200 yards of linen and 60 yards of woolen cloth per year [DE:308] and another with 13 "other free" [DE:313]. He made a large number of land purchases in Sussex County near Laurel, identified in some of them as a "free black" or "black man":

two parcels of land for $35, 53 acres on Broad Creek in Little Creek Hundred on the south side of the mill that formerly belonged to James Tresham and land called "Providence" on 7 February 1808:

1/8th part of Tresham's Saw Mill in Little Creek Hundred with 1/4th part of the pond belonging to it on 3 November 1808 for $162.50.

1/8th part of Tresham's Mill on 4 September 1809 for $130.

128-1/2 called "Wood's Grove" for $300 on 4 October 1809.

12 acres and improvements on Broad Creek formerly belonging to James Tresham for $25 on 6 November 1809.

42-1/2 acres in Broad Creek Hundred on 14 June 1811.

1/4th part of Tresham's saw and grist mill with its pond for $250 on 2 March 1814.

what appears to be the remainder of the grist mill and pond on 30 July 1814 for $155.

He purchased 200 acres east of Laurel in Sussex County and had acquired 428 acres in Little Creek Hundred which included a sawmill and gristmill and 135 acres in Dagsboro Hundred by 1816 [DB 17:269; 19:509; 24:273; 25:103; 27:318; 28:251, 425; 31:210, 366; 33:54, 180, 216; WB 7:75-7; Williams, Slavery & Freedom in Delaware, 204]. He called himself a "Blackman" in his 11 October 1806 will and added two codicils as he acquired more land, the last one on 7 October 1810, proved by Betsey Thompson on 16 February 1816. He left his land on the road from Laurel to Tresham's Mill to his wife Leah during her lifetime and widowhood and then to his son Isaac. He left his daughter Betsy 2 acres, left son Clemmon the place where James Sockam formerly lived with 5 acres and a house for his daughter Lovey and divided his carriage between his daughters Mary and Nancy. He gave a bull yearling to Nathan Harmon's son Zadock. In a codicil he divided land in "Sockum" between his daughters Lovey and Betsey, but if they died the land was to go to Zadock Harmon. He left $40 to his son James and left his daughter Mary 8 acres of "Chauncy" where Eady Short(?) Street (?) was then living. He named his children Littleton and Betsy executors, but Littleton refused. And he asked that his part of the mills be rented out to pay his debts. The estate paid Wingate Street and his wife Mary a legacy of $34.58, Littleton Thompson $12.21, Zadock Harmon $10, Leah Thompson $59.70, Clement Thompson $74.66, Lovey Thompson $19.58, Nancy Thompson $31.58, Betsey Thompson $68.50 and Peter Robinson, Esquire, $91.39 for judgment costs in the suit of Sockum vs. Thompson [DSA, Probate Files, RG 4545.009, roll 240, frames 264-280; WB 7:75-7]. Leah, born before 1776, was head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:410]. Levin was the father of

i. Isaac, born before 1776, head of a Lewis and Rehoboth household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:310].

ii. Betsy, married to a member of the Green family on 2 March 1814 when she paid Menean Bull $117.50 which completed the payment of $150 for his part of Tresham's Mills [DB 33:54].

iii. Lovey.

2        iv. Littleton, born say 1785.

v. Nancy.

vi. Mary, wife of Wingate Street. They sold their rights to Tresham's Mills on 29 March for $170 [DB 33:299].

vii. Clement, born before 1795, head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:410]. He and his wife Milly sold their rights to Tresham's Mills on 20 January 1817 for $250, and on 26 September 1817 sold two tracts in Dagsborough Hundred: one of 44 acres for $66 and one of 89 acres adjoining James Sockam for $170 [DB 33:126, 208].

viii. James.

 

2.    Littleton Thompson, born say 1785, was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:307] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:400]. He sold his rights to Tresham's Mills for $120 on 13 August 1817 [DB 33:182]. He left a 17 March 1823 Sussex County will, proved 29 March 1823, leaving his plantation to his wife Levina during her widowhood and then to William Wesley Tomson (no relationship stated) as well as a heifer from a cow formerly belonging to Sarah Harmon. If William Wesley died without heirs, the land was to go to Jeremiah Streat (?), son of Seeny Harmon. He left a bed, furniture and a loom to his daughter Eliza Cooper Tomson and divided the remainder of his property between Sarah Harmon and Eliza Tomson. The estate included a book due from Jonathan Harmon and William Harmon. Levina died before 2 August 1825 when William Woolen was granted administration on her estate with Elijah Harmon and Zadock Harmon providing security. The estate paid $4.86 to Isaac Copes, assignee of Wingate Street, and $6.96 to Leah Thompson Probate Files, RG 4545.009, roll 240, frames 291-301, 283-5]. He was the father of

i. ?William Wesley.

ii. Eliza.

 

Cecil County

1. Margaret Thompson, born say 1708, was living in Cecil County on 10 November 1730 when the court convicted her of having "Mullatto" children by a "Negro" man [Criminal Record 1730-2, 254]. She may have been the father of

i. Samuel1, head of a Charles Town, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

TILLS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Tills, born say 1704, confessed in Prince George's County court on 27 August 1723 that she had a "Malatto" child by a "negroe man named Peter" who was a slave of her master, Jonathan Covell. On 26 November 1723 Peter confessed to the offense, and the court ordered that he receive twenty-five lashes [Court Record 1723-6, 141]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Samuel, "negro" head of a Prince George's County household in 1776, taxable on one "female black" [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 129].

 

TIPPETT FAMILY

1.    Martha Tippett, born say 1713, confessed to the Kent County, Maryland Court in June 1733 that she had a "Mollatto" child by a "Negro." The court ordered that she be sold for seven years [Criminal Records 1728-34, 348, 379]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Isaac Tibbets, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:547].

ii. Shadrack Tippett, "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:229].

iii. Lias Triplett, head of a Loudoun County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:265].

 

TONEY FAMILY

1.    James Tony, born say 1698, was a "mulatto man Servant" of Thomas Jefferson (grandfather of the president). In February 1719/20 he confessed to the Henrico County, Virginia Court that he was absent from his master's service for eighteen days without permission [Minutes 1719-24, 7]. He may have been the ancestor of the Toney family of Maryland:

i. Anthony1, "Negro" head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" and one white woman in 1790, and 3 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:177].

ii. John3, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:167].

iii. William2, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:167].

iv. Abram, head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" and 1 white woman in 1800 [MD:517].

 

TOOGOOD FAMILY

1.    Mary Toogood, born say 1715, was taxable in Baltimore County in William Dullam's household in the Lower Hundred on the North Side of Gunpowder River in 1737 [Wright, Inhabitants of Baltimore County, 16]. In October 1782 Mary's descendant, Eleanor Toogood, won her freedom from Doctor Upton Scott in Anne Arundel County by proving that she was the granddaughter of a white woman, Mary Fisher, who was married to a slave in Saint Mary's County and had a daughter named Ann Fisher. Mary Toogood's descendants were

i. E. (Eleanor?), head of a Frederick County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:466].

ii. Betty, born say 1765, head of a Duck Creek, Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:9].

iii. Nicholas, head of an Anne Arundel County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:101] and 3 in 1810 [MD:59]. (And there were two other Nicholas Toogoods who were heads of Anne Arundel County households of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:60, 79]). He may have been the husband of Eleanor Toogood, born say 1750, daughter of Ann Fisher of Anne Arundel County. Eleanor won a suit for freedom from Doctor Upton Scott in October 1782 by reason of her descent from a free white woman [Cases in the General Court and Court of Appeals of Maryland, 26-31].

iv. Jacob Twogood, head of a Frederick County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:989] and 4 in Anne Arundel County in 1810 [MD:76].

v. Robert, born about 1780, received a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 31 July 1810: Robert Toogood or Robert Patterson about thirty years of age, a dark mullatto, about five feet ten inches high, stout made ... free born ... has been an apprentice to Mr. John Ross Key of the said county to learn the blacksmith trade [Certificates of Freedom 1808-42, 20, 21].

vi. Mrs., head of a Baltimore City household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:368].

vii. Joshua, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:58].

viii. Benjamin, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:79].

 

TROUT FAMILY

1.    Sarah Trout, born say 1760, was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1790. She may have been the mother of

i.  Dicey, born in May 1789, a twelve year old "Mulatto" bound to William Mills by the Buncombe County, North Carolina Court in October 1801.

ii. Andrew, born about 1790, an eleven year old "Mulatto" bound to William Mills by the Buncombe County, North Carolina Court in October 1801 [Minutes 1798-1812, 103].

 

TRUSTY FAMILY

Members of the Trusty family, perhaps children of Wealthy Gibbs or (her daughter?) Rachel Gibbs, were

1        i. William, born say 1745.

2        i. Stephen, born 28 March 1755.

iii. Rebecca, head of a taxable household in the Upper District of Queen Anne's County in 1783 [Assessment of 1783, MSA S1437, p.9], head of a Queen Anne's County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iv.Joseph, (no race indicated) owed 6 pounds to the Kent County estate of William Comegys on 13 June 1764 [Prerogative Inventories 84:11]. He was head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:155], and a New Castle County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:223].

v. Michael, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:155] and 8 in 1810 [MD:858].

vi. John, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:155] and 8 in New Castle County in 1810 [DE:299].

 

1.    William Trusty, born say 1745, called himself William Gibbs, "one of the Free Negroes and Heirs or Legatees of John Gibbs," when he sold 12-1/2 acres, called Killmannings Plains, by Forge Road in Queen Anne's County to William Clark on 18 June 1768 [DB RT-H:266]. On 9 February 1767 he called himself "William Trusty, otherwise called William Gibbs of Kent County in Delaware" when he sold to Richard Jeffereys, "free Negroe formerly servant to John Willson of Kent County in Maryland," for 10 pounds whatever remaining interest he had in 12-1/2 acres called Kilmannin's Plain sold by him to William Clark [DB RT-H:56-7]. He was a "N." taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1789 [Delaware Archvies RG 3535, Tax Assessments 1727-1850, frame 138], head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:4].

i. Abraham, a "free Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred of Kent County, Delaware, in 1785 and 1786 [RG 3535, Assessment List 1727-1850, frames 10, 46].

ii. Richard1, born before 1776, a "free Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred of Kent County, Delaware, in 1788 [Assessment List 1727-1850, frame 108], head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:44] and 2 "free colored" in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1820 [DE:38].

iii. Mary, "N." head of a Duck Creek, Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [DE:8].

iv. Jacob, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 13 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:52].

 

2.    Stephen Trusty, born free 28 March 1755, was head of a Caroline County household of 3 "other free" in 1790. He purchased 80-1/2 acres called Sansborough in Caroline County from Colonel William Whitely for 300 pounds on 18 October 1799. He was called a miller in the 20 March 1801 Caroline County deed by which he mortgaged (signing) this land to Whitely for 363 pounds. He sold this land to George Turner on 31 July 1804 for 565 pounds [DB G:322; I:40-1]. He was head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:858] and 5 "free colored" in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1820 [DE:41]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 27 July 1818: molatto man Stephen Trusty senior free born 63 years of age the twenty eighth day of March last molatto complexion...resided about twenty eight years in Caroline County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1827, p. 113]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Priscilla, born 19 January 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 19 October 1816: molatto woman...free born light complexion raised in Caroline County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1827, pp. 90-1].

ii. Jonathan, born 13 October 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 27 July 1818: free born molatto lad 18 years of age...born and raised in Caroline bright molatto complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1807-27, pp. 113-4].

iii. Henry, born 27 August 1801, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 27 July 1818: free born [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1827, p. 114].

iv. Sarah, born 22 December 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 27 July 1818: born free...molatto girl [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1827, pp. 114-5].

v. Alice, born 2 April 1806, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 27 July 1818: molatto complextion [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1827, p. 115].

vi. Stephen, born 4 July 1807, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 27 July 1818: molatto complextion born in Caroline County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1827, pp. 116-7].

vii. William, born 25 September 1810, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 27 July 1818: free born molatto boy [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1827, pp. 116].

viii. DeWitt Clinton, born 15 December 1812, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 27 July 1818: molatto boy [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1827, pp. 117].

ix. Joseph, born 25 March 1815, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 27 July 1818: free born...molatto complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1807-1827, pp. 118].

 

TUNKS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Tunks, born say 1740, was a spinster servant of Hugh Rice of Talbot County in November 1759 when the court ordered her to serve her master seven years after the completion of her indenture for having a "Molattoe" child by a "Negro." The court sold her son John to her master until the age of thirty one for 13 shillings. In June 1761 she admitted in court that she had another child by a "Negro," the court sold her daughter Anne to her master until the age of thirty one for 10 shillings and sold her for seven years to Hugh Rice for 12 pounds. She had a child by a free person for which the court fined her 30 shillings in March 1764, and in November 1766 she admitted in court that she had another illegitimate "Mulato" child named William Tunks who the court sold to Hugh Rice until the age of thirty one [Criminal Record 1755-61, 284-5, 463-4, 517; 1761-7, 254, 505]. She was the mother of

i. John, born about 1759, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 12 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Anne, born about 1761.

iii. William, born about 1766, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 2 October 1810: a Mulatto Man...about forty four years of age, five feet seven inches high...son of Eliza Tunks, a white woman...sold by the court to Hugh Rice to serve until the age of thirty one years, when he became free [Certificates of Freedom 1807-27, p.119].

 

TURNER FAMILY

1.    Mary Turner, born say 1695, was the servant of Robert Hoskins in November 1716 when she confessed in Talbot County court that she had two children by a "Negro slave named Jo." The court bound her two "Malattoe" girls to William Clayland until the age of thirty-one. Mary and Joe received thirty-one lashes for each offense. Mary was the servant of Eliza Hopkins in November 1718 when she confessed to having another child by Joseph [Judgment Record 1714-7, 147, 153-4; 1717-9, 192, 226]. They were the parents of

i. Mary, born 7 September 1715.

ii. an unnamed daughter, born about September 1716.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Margarete, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Jesse, head of a Back Creek, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Andrew, head of North Millford, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iv. William, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 18 July 1810: five feet four inches and three Quarters of an inch high ... about 17 years of age, was raised in the County afsd, is the son of Ann Turner, a Woman born free [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 118].

 

Another Turner family:

1.    Mary Turner, born say 1710, deposed in Prince George's County court on 28 November 1728 that she had a child by Peter Smith, a "Negro man belonging to William Pile." The court ordered that he receive 25 lashes "well laid on so that the blood appear." The court sold her daughter Jane to James Weems to serve him until the age of thirty-one [Court Records 1726-7, 625; 1728-9, 344-5]. She was the mother of

i. Jane, born 15 August 1728, bound to James Weems.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Leonard, born say 1760, one of four "Black Persons being Soliders (of the Maryland Line), VIZT. Thomas Thompson, Leonard Turner, Valentine Murrin, and John Adams," who were arrested by the local authorities in Orange County, North Carolina, in December 1780 for breaking into someone's house. They were forcibly rescued by the Continental Army [Orange County Court Minutes 1777-8, Part I, Dec. 19 and 23, 1780, cited by Crow, The Black Experience in Revolutionary North Carolina, 68]. Leonard was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [MD:84].

ii. Eleanor, born say 1765, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:106].

iii. James1, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 1 August 1812: aged about twenty two years ... light complexion ... free born.

iv. James2, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 22 May 1818: about twenty six years old ... brown complexion ... free born.

v. Alley, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 27 October 1818: aged about twenty six years ... yellowish Complexion ... free born.

vi. James3, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 22 May 1818: a Mulatto man ... aged about twenty two years ... yellow complexion ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 24, 115, 116, 124].

 

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