SCOTT FAMILY

Lancaster County, Virginia

1.    Catherine Scott, born say 1675, a "Molattoe Woman," was the servant of Elizabeth Spencer, widow of George Spencer. Elizabeth Spencer had married William Man by 8 September 1697 when Catherine petitioned the Lancaster County court for her freedom. Catherine claimed that John Beaching had purchased her and her son Daniel from Elizabeth Spencer with the intention of marrying her but had died about a year after the purchase. The jury found in Catherine's favor [Orders 1696-1702, 26, 27, 42-4]. She was the mother of

i. Daniel, born say 1695.

 

Henrico County

The Scott family of Henrico County may have descended from Joane Scott who entered bond on 2 December 1695 for her appearance in Henrico County court [Orders 1694-9, 81]. She may have been the ancestor of John, James, and Nicholas (no family name) who were "Mulatto" servants of John Woodson, Jr., in August 1724 when they were ordered to serve him additional time for running away [Minutes 1719-24, 352]. Two members of the Scott family owned adjoining land in Henrico County in 1735. They were

1        i. Anne1, born say 1685.

2        ii. Jane1, born say 1690.

 

1.    Anne1 Scott, born say 1685, made a deed of gift of fifty acres in Henrico County adjoining John Scott, Abram Childers and Jane Scott to her son Benjamin Scott on 4 August 1735. This was the lower half of 100 acres which she had purchased from John Price. She had already given the other half to her son John Scott [Miscellaneous Court Records, Vol. 3, 1727-37, 757]. She was the mother of

3        i. John1, born say 1712.

ii. Benjamin1, born say 1714, perhaps the Benjamin Scott who was taxable in the Lunenburg County household of Thomas Maclin in 1752 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 192].

4        iii. ?Elizabeth1, born say 1720.

 

2.    Jane1 Scott, born say 1690, sold 100 acres on the north side of the James River in Henrico Parish, Henrico County, adjoining Benjamin Scott to John Pleasants, Jr., on 10 April 1747 [DB 1744-8, 331]. She sued five men in Henrico County court on 3 October 1752 for chasing and driving away her horse. The court awarded her ten pounds damages. She was presented by the court on 6 November 1752 for failing to list herself as a tithable but was acquitted after "being heard." Perhaps she was excused due to old age. She may have been identical to Joana Scott who was security for Pat Scott in the suit brought against her by the churchwardens on 2 April 1753. She was called Jane Scott the following day on 3 April when she pleaded not guilty to Benjamin Burton's suit against her for dealing with his slaves. The court ordered that she remain in prison for a month and then find security of 10 pounds for her good behavior for a year [Minutes 1752-5, 7, 19, 27, 51, 67, 102]. She may have been the ancestor of

5        i. Elizabeth2, born say 1722.

6        ii. Pat, born say 1725.

iii. Lucy1, born say 1730, presented by the Henrico County court on 6 November 1752 for failing to list herself as a tithable. She was fined 500 pounds of tobacco. On 21 January 1764 she was ordered to appear at the General Court in Williamsburg to give testimony against David Scott who was tried for breaking into Isaac Youngblood's warehouse and stealing goods valued at 8 pounds. Jacob Burton posted her bond of 20 pounds [Minutes 1752-5, 19, 27; 1763-7, 176].

7        iv. Sarah, born say 1731.

8        v. Agnes, born say 1735.

9        vi. Ann2, born say 1736.

vii. Joseph1, born say 1738, bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish in February 1744/5 [Orders 1737-46, 295].

10      viii. Susannah, born say 1739.

ix. Betty/ Elizabeth3, born say 1740, a "Mulatto" ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish in February 1744/5 [Orders 1737-46, 295], perhaps the Elizabeth Scott who married William Lansford, "Mulattoes, he in this parish (Goochland County) and she in Hanover," on 24 December 1761 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347].

11      x. Phebe, born say 1742.

12      xi. Molly, born say 1747.

 

3.    John1 Scott, born say 1712, may have been identical to John (no family name), the "Mulatto" servant of John Woodson, Jr., in August 1724 when the Henrico County court ordered him to serve additional time for running away [Minutes 1719-24, 352]. He received 50 acres in Henrico County from his mother Anne Scott before 4 August 1735. His suit against Miliner Redford, executor of John Redford, was dismissed by the court on 6 November 1752. On 6 November 1752 he was presented for not listing his "Mulatto" wife Hannah as a tithable and was fined 500 pounds of tobacco. Perhaps Hannah was the Hannah Scot who entered a petition in court against John Redford in December 1743. On 2 December 1754 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out John Scott's children Ezekiel and Sarah Scott (no race indicated). He may have been the father of Sarah, Jane and Kizia Scott, "Mulatto's," who the court ordered bound out on 3 February 1755 [Minutes 1752-5, 19, 20, 28, 237; 1737-46, 241, 244; Orders 1755-62, 239]. He was the father of

13        i. Robert, born about 1735.

ii. Ezekiel1, born say 1748.

iii. Sarah, born say 1750, daughter of John Scott bound out on 2 December 1754, perhaps the Sarah Scott, a "Mulatto" bound apprentice on 3 February 1755.

14      iv. ?Jane2, born say 1752.

15      v. ?William, born about 1753.

vi. ?Kesiah, born say 1754, a "Mulatto" bound apprentice on 3 February 1755, perhaps the Kesy Scott who was the parent of James Scott, a "Mulatto" who was bound to Didier Colin in Richmond for four years to become a barber on 4 April 1791 [Hustings DB 1:506-7].

 

4.    Elizabeth1 Scott, born say 1720, was living in Henrico County in February 1743/4 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Henrico Parish to bind out her children Harry and Jenny Scott (no race indicated) [Orders 1737-46, 246]. She was presented by the court on 6 November 1752 for failing to list herself as a tithable and fined 500 pounds of tobacco [Minutes 1752-5, 19, 27]. She was the mother of

i. Harry, bound apprentice in February 1743/4.

ii. Jane2/ Jenny, daughter of Elizabeth bound apprentice in February 1743/4 (no race indicated).

 

5.     Elizabeth2/ Betty Scott, born say 1722, was living in Henrico County in June 1744 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Henrico Parish to bind out her son Jack (no race indicated). He was a seven-year-old "Mulatto Boy" ordered bound to John Coles in August the same year [Orders 1737-46, 264, 276]. She was presented by the court on 6 November 1752 for failing to list herself as a tithable and fined 500 pounds of tobacco [Minutes 1752-5, 19, 27]. She was the mother of

i. Jack/ John2, born about 1737, a seven-year-old "Mulatto" boy ordered bound apprentice in August 1744.

 

6.    Pat Scott, born say 1725, was presented by the court on 6 November 1752 for failing to list herself as a tithable and fined 500 pounds of tobacco. She was sued by the churchwardens for debt on 2 April 1753, probably for having an illegitimate child [Minutes 1752-5, 19, 27, 51, 112]. She may have been the mother of

16      i. Elizabeth4, born say 1750.

ii. Frances, born say 1752, a "Mulatto" (no parent named) ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish on 7 April 1755 [Minutes 1752-55, 286].

iii. John3, born say 1753, a "Mulatto" bound out by the court on 6 January 1755 [Minutes 1752-5, 238]. He was taxable in Henrico County from 1783 to 1713: taxable on 2 horses and 3 cattle in 1783; listed as a "free Negro" starting in 1806; listed as a "Mulatto" in 1809 and 1810; taxable on a horse in 1814 but exempt from personal tax [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 39, 185, 243, 436, 518, 622, 689, 707, 775, 793]. He and John Scott, Jr., were among the hands ordered by the Henrico County court to keep in repair the road from Cornelius's to Four Mile Creek bridge on 3 August 1789 [Orders 1789-91, 35]. He refused administration of the estate of Ann Scott, deceased, before 5 September 1791 when Francis Scott provided security of 200 pounds for John James's administration of the estate [Orders 1787-9, 430, 583; 1789-91, 35, 608]. He was taxable on 50 acres in the lower district of Henrico County in 1801 and 1802; taxable on 50 acres and another 140 acres which had been transferred to him by Goodin in 1803; taxable on 90 acres after he and his unnamed wife transferred 55-1/2 acres to Jesse Frayser in 1804; taxable on 90 acres from 1805 to 1809, called John Scott, Sr., in 1809; a "Mulatto" taxable on 80 acres in 1811; taxable on 50 acres near Talman's Tavern in 1815 [Land Tax List, 1799-1816].

17      iv. Zachariah, born say 1754.

 

7.    Sarah1 Scott, born say 1731, was presented by the Henrico County court on 6 November 1752 for failing to list herself as a tithable. She was fined 500 pounds of tobacco [Minutes 1752-5, 19, 27]. On 7 November 1757 the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her sons Pompey and Sampson Scott. The court ordered her son Isaac bound out on 4 April 1765 and her daughter Milley on 2 February 1767 [Orders 1755-62, 207; 1763-67, 441, 463, 646]. She was said to have been deceased on 7 July 1788 when the court ordered her son Archer bound out [Orders 1787-9, 347]. Her children were

i. Pompey, born say 1754, ordered bound out on 7 November 1757 and on 3 June 1765.

ii. Sampson, born say 1756.

18        iii. Benjamin2, born say 1758.

iv. Isaac, born say 1760, son of Sarah Scott bound out on 4 April 1765.

v. Milley, born say 1764, "Mulatto child of Sarah Scott" ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 2 February 1767 [Orders 1763-67, 646].

vi. James/ Jemmy, born say 1765, child of Sarah Scott (no race mentioned), ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 7 August 1769 [Orders 1767-69, 491]. He petitioned the court on 1 December 1788 against his master Alexander Young for misusage. The court ruled that he was above the age of twenty-one and was therefore free and should be paid 3 pounds, 11 shillings (his freedom dues). He was one of the hands ordered by the Henrico County court to keep in repair the road from Cornelius's to Four Mile Creek bridge [Orders 1787-9, 496; 1789-91, 20, 35]. His Henrico County tax was charged to Zachariah Valentine in 1789 and he was charged with his own tax in 1790 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 185, 243]. He married Betsey Clarke, 14 December 1790 Henrico County bond, surety Thomas Clarke.

vii. Fatha, born say 1766, child of Sarah Scott (no race mentioned), ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 7 August 1769 [Orders 1767-69, 491].

viii. Archer, born say 1778, orphan of Sarah Scott ordered bound out on 7 July 1788, ordered bound to Daniel Vanderval on 5 January 1789 [Orders 1787-9, 347, 508]. He may have been the Archer Scott who was taxable in the upper district of Goochland County in 1792, 1797 and 1798 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frame 303, 471, 487]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Henrico County from 1799 to 1814, called Archibald in 1802 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 380, 411, 436, 519, 560, 579, 622, 689, 708, 793; Land Tax List, 1799-1816 (includes Personal Property Tax lists)].

ix. William, orphan of Sarah Scott, ordered bound apprentice in Henrico County on 6 May 1783 [Orders 1781-4, 280].

 

8.    Agnes Scott, born say 1735, may have been identical to "Aggy, a poor orphans girl," who was bound out by the churchwardens of Dale Parish, Henrico County, in March 1738 [Orders 1737-46, 76]. She was sued by the churchwardens for debt on 7 May 1753, probably for having an illegitimate child [Minutes 1752-5, 76, 114]. Her "Mulatto" son Jacob Scott was bound out in Henrico County in May 1759 [Orders 1755-62, 324]. Her children were

i. Jacob, born say 1756, a "Mulatto" son of Agnes Scott ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish in May 1759 and again on 5 May 1760 [Orders 1755-62, 324, 420].

ii. Sarah, born say 1758, a "Mulatto" child of Agnes Scott ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish on 7 April 1760 and on 7 May 1764, perhaps the Sarah Scott, an orphan girl, who was bound to Elizabeth Woodson until the age of twenty-one on 4 July 1764 [Orders 1755-62, 324, 409; 1763-7, 239]. She may have been the Sarah Scott, "free Negro," who was taxable with "free Negro" Rosetta in Richmond City in 1787 [PPTL 1787-99].

 

9.    Ann2 Scott, born say 1736, was a "Mulatto" ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish, Henrico County in February 1744/5 [Orders 1737-46, 295]. She may have been the Nanny Scott whose "Negro" son Thomas complained to the Cumberland County court on 24 November 1760 against his master John Burch [Orders 1758-62, 285]. And she may have been the Ann Scott whose children Joseph and Sarah (no race mentioned) were ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico County about fourteen years later on 4 July 1765. On 3 August 1767 the Henrico County court bound out her children Benjamin and Squire Scott [Orders 1763-7, 474; 1767-9, 93]. Nanny Scott was living in Cumberland County on 27 April 1767 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind her "mulattoe" children Drury and John Scott to Robert Moore. On 3 August 1767 the Cumberland County court bound her "mulattoe" daughter Charity Scott to Edward Clements, and on 27 February 1769 the court summoned Robert Moore to court to answer a complaint regarding his usage of orphan children John and Drury Scott who were bound to him [Orders 1764-7, 459; 1767-70, 62, 307]. On 2 June 1777 she purchased for 16 pounds a tract of land in Henrico County containing 10-3/4 acres and sold this land for 20 pounds to "free Mulatto" Ben Bettis on 18 September 1786 when the land was located in the town of Richmond [Hustings DB 1:92-3]. She may have been the Nanny Scott who testified with Andrew Scott in Henrico County on 4 February 1788 that Axom (Exum) Scott was the legal representative of John Scott, a soldier who died in the service of the state [Orders 1787-91, 169]. Her children were

i. ?Jesse, born 11 September 1747, registered in Petersburg on 26 January 1798: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, stout well made, short thin black hair & rather inclined to be a little bald on top of his head, was born free, age fifty years 11 September 1797 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 129]. He was the administrator of Ann Scott, deceased, on 7 July 1783 when William Scott sued him in Henrico County court [Orders 1781-4, 308].

ii. Thomas, "Negro" son of Nanny Scott.

19      iii. ?Francis, born say 1750.

iv. Joseph2, born say 1755, son of Ann Scott, ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 7 November 1757 (no race mentioned) [Orders 1755-62, 207] and bound out again with his sister Sarah by the court on 4 July 1765 [Orders 1763-67, 474]. He was taxable in Henrico County from 1783 to 1801 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 21, 82, 111, 168, 185, 243, 260, 297, 309, 322, 335, 347, 359, 391, 436].

v. Sarah, born say 1757, ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 7 November 1757 and on 4 July 1765 [Orders 1755-62, 207].

vi. Benjamin3, born say 1759, son of Ann Scott ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 3 August 1767 [Orders 1767-9, 93]. He may have been the Benjamin Scott who was security for the 18 November 1796 Henrico County marriage of Mary Scott and Adam Armstrong. He was taxable in Henrico County from 1794 to 1796 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 78, 95, 111, 168, 185, 322, 336, 347] and head of a Buckingham County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:835]. On 10 January 1797 he and Zachariah Goff were charged in Botetourt County court with stealing a "Negroe woman slave the property of Thomas Rowland by the name of Dinah," but they were found not guilty [Orders 1793-7, 426].

vii. Squire, born say 1761, son of Ann Scott ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 3 August 1767.

viii. John, born say 1762, "mulattoe" son of Nanny Scott, bound as an apprentice blacksmith to Robert Moore in Cumberland County on 27 April 1767 [Orders 1764-7, 459]. He may have been the John Scott who was a soldier that died in the service of the state according to testimony of (his mother?) Nanny Scott and (brother?) Andrew Scott in Henrico County court on 4 February 1788 [Orders 1787-9, 169].

ix. Drury, born say 1763, "mulattoe" son of Nanny Scott bound as an apprentice blacksmith to Robert Moore on 27 April 1767 [Orders 1764-7, 459]. He was called Andrew Scott when he married Milender Scott, "daughter of Robert Scott and Mary Scott," 14 August 1787 Henrico County bond, Edward Bowman and John Scott sureties. Andrew was taxable in Henrico County from 1784 to 1799 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 81, 111, 168, 185, 243, 261, 296, 309, 322, 336, 347, 358, 392]. He and Nanny Scott testified on 4 February 1788 that Axom Scott was the legal representative of John Scott, a soldier who died in the service of the state. Andrew's suit against Francis Scott was dismissed by the court on 3 March 1790 on agreement of the parties. His suit against Claiborne Evans was dismissed by the Henrico County court on 8 February 1791 because his attorney was not prepared to prosecute [Orders 1787-9, 169; 1789-91, 184, 417, 430]. Drury was taxable in the southern district of Bedford County from 1800 to 1809: called a "free N" in 1807, listed in the same district as (his son?) Daniel in 1802 who was called a "free N" in 1807, 1813 and 1814 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 463, 479, 496, 531, 658; 1806-16, frames 30, 100, 153, 219, 288, 402, 469]. He may have been the Andrew Scott who married Lucy Scott, 10 July 1810 Goochland County bond, Samuel Martin surety, 19 November return [Ministers' Returns, 301]. He was a "Mulatto" farmer living with his wife Lucy on Ben Sadlers land in Goochland County in 1813 and 1814 [PPTL, 1810-32, frames 108, 174, 207].

x. Charity, born say 1767, "mulattoe" daughter of Ann Scott bound out in Cumberland County on 23 November 1767.

xi. Lewis, born say 1764, orphan of Nanny Scott, ordered bound out the Henrico County court on 7 October 1782 [Orders 1781-4, 103]. He was taxable in Henrico County in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 186].

 

10.    Susannah Scott, born say 1739, was the mother of "orphan" children Ezekiah and Milner Scott who were in Prince Edward County on 15 March 1773 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Patrick's Parish to bind them out [Orders 1771-81, part 1, 218]. They were probably identical to Ezekiel and Milner Scott, "Melatto" boys named in the 7 January 1774 Chesterfield County will of Daniel Stone [WB 2:342]. Susannah was the mother of

i. ?Priscilla, born about 1766, an apprentice bound to Daniel Stone by the Henrico County court until the age of twenty one and serving him when he made his 7 January 1774 Chesterfield County will by which he left her remaining time and service to his daughter Charity Stone [WB 2:342]. On 3 May 1790 the Hustings Court of Petersburg indicted her for keeping a disorderly house and entertaining slaves [Orders 1784-91, 316]. She registered in Petersburg on September 1, 1794: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet two and a half inches high, twenty eight years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 90].

ii. Ezekiel2, born say 1760, a "Mellato boy" bound to Daniel Stone by the Henrico County court until the age of twenty one and serving him when he made his 7 January 1774 Chesterfield County will by which he left Ezekiel's remaining time to his son Daniel Stone [WB 2:342]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1792 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 125, 491, 644, 689], counted as a "FB" in Powhatan County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1787-1825, frame 444].

iii. Milner, born say 1762, a "mellatto boy" bound to Daniel Stone by the Henrico County court until the age of twenty one and serving him when he made his 7 January 1774 Chesterfield County will [WB 2:342].

 

11.    Phebe Scott, born say 1742, was a "Mulatto" ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish in February 1744/5 [Orders 1737-46, 295]. She was the mother of

i. Elizabeth5/Betty, born say 1763, daughter of Phebe Scott, bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish on 7 October 1765 (no race indicated) [Orders 1763-67, 525]. She was taxable on 2 horses and Anderson Scott's tithe and 2 horses in the lower district of Henrico County in 1803 [Land Tax List, 1799-1816 (includes Personal Property Tax lists)].

 

12.    Molly Scott, born say 1747, was living in Henrico Parish on 2 May 1768 when her "Mulatto" children were bound out by the court. Her children were

i. Walter, born say 1766, a "Mulatto" child of Molly Scott ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 2 May 1768. On 7 June 1790 Richard Timberlake recorded a certificate in Henrico County court which he had written for Walter on 6 October 1787: This is to certify that Walter Scott is free and that he has been a good and faithful servant and whoever employs him will find him so [Orders 1767-69, 237; 1789-91, 296; DB 3:220]. He married Sarah Nichols who consented, 23 July 1790 Henrico County bond, surety Peter Hay.

ii. Lucy3, born say 1766, a "Mulatto" child of Molly Scott ordered bound out by the Henrico County court on 2 May 1768 [Orders 1767-69, 237]. She married James Baker, 7 April 1787 Henrico County bond.

 

13.    Robert Scott, born say 1735, mortgaged 100 acres in Henrico County adjoining Hayse Whitlow, Robert Pleasants and William Frazier on 19 June 1756 to secure a 30 pound debt he owed William Frazier. The land was sold to Frazier for 35 pounds on 26 April 1765 [Miscellaneous Court Records 6:1949-50]. He was taxable with (his brother?) John Scott, "Mulattos," in Norfolk County in the district of Portsmouth and Southern Branch in 1767, living near (their sister?) Betty Scott, a "negro" tithable in David Cross's household [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1766-80, 45, 47]. Esther Mayo's suit against him for debt was dismissed by the Henrico County court on 6 October 1788 at his costs [Orders 1787-9, 430]. He was taxable in Henrico County from 1786 to 1794: taxable on his own tithe, a free male 16-21, 2 horses and 4 cattle in 1786; taxable on his own tithe, John Scott and 3 horses in 1788 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 82, 168, 243, 260, 297, 309, 322]. He married Martha Scott who consented, 23 October 1793 Henrico County bond, Edward Bowman surety. He was probably over the age of sixty on 6 July 1795 when the Henrico County court excused him from paying taxes [Orders 1794-6, 394]. Robert was the father of

i. Catherine, "daughter of Robert and Mary Scott," married Edward Bowman, 28 December 1786 Henrico County bond, John and Andrew Scott sureties.

ii. Milender, "daughter of Robert Scott and Mary Scott," married Andrew Scott, 14 August 1787 Henrico County bond, Edward Bowman and John Scott sureties.

iii. John, born say 1767, married Charity Scott, with the consent of their parents Robert Scott and Sarah Scott, 4 January 1788 Henrico County bond.

iv. Mary, married Edward B. Edwards, 14 February 1789 Henrico County bond, John Scott and Edward Bowman sureties.

v. Abby, born about 1787, a poor orphan of Robert Scott, deceased, bound out by the overseers of the poor of the lower district of Henrico County to Francis and Mildred Williams on 12 May 1798 [Orders 1798-9, 97]. She registered in Henrico County on 11 November 1831: age 44, a mullatto woman, 5 feet 1 inch, Born free per register of the Richmond Hustings Court [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.4, no.635].

 

14.    Jane Scott, born say 1752, was a "Mulatto" bound out in Henrico County on 3 February 1755. Her grandson Samuel Scott proved to the Davidson County court that she was a "dark complected woman" (also referred to as a "girl") who was brought to North Carolina from Henrico County by James Alley about 1771. Alley bound Jane out to a man named Creson and Jane "married one of Creson's negro fellows and had several children" including a daughter named Jemima. The Surry County, North Carolina court ordered Jane's unnamed children bound out in 1779. Jemima was bound to Joseph Williams, Sr., in Surry County, North Carolina, in 1789. She was the mother of

i. Jemima, born say 1775, indentured to Joseph Williams, Sr., in Surry County, North Carolina, in 1789. She was the mother of Samuel Scott who sued for his freedom from Joseph Williams, Jr., in Davidson County, North Carolina Superior Court in Spring Term 1828 [Minutes vol. 1, n.p.]. The case was appealed to the North Carolina Supreme Court [North Carolina Supreme Court 12 NC 376].

 

15.    William Scott, born about 1753, was a "yellow" complexioned soldier listed in the size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Courthouse [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 153]. He sued Jesse Scott, administrator of Ann Scott, deceased, on 7 July 1783 in Henrico County court [Orders 1781-4, 308]. He may have been the William Scott, a "free Mulatto," who was charged by the Richmond City court on 11 December 1789 with stealing several turkeys and a shoat, the property of John Harvie, Gent. He chose to receive thirty-nine lashes rather than be sent for trial at the capitol [Orders 1787-92, 467]. He registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a light Mulatto man five feet six inches high, about forty one years old, who served in the American Army during the Revolution [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 10]. He may have been the William Scott, a "free Mulatto," who was paid $3 for 3 months out of the public taxes by the Petersburg Hustings Court on 4 April 1796 [Orders 1791-7, 164b]. His wife Sarah registered in Petersburg on 13 August 1800: a bright yellow Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, thirty eight years old, bushy hair, born free by the name of Spruce & raised in York County, had afterwards married to William Scott [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 154]. He was taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1783 to 1810: taxable on a slave from 1789 to 1791; called William Scott, Sr., from 1792 to 1795; taxable on his son Jack in 1801; taxable on his sons Jack and William Scott, Jr., from 1802 to 1804, called a "Mulatto" in 1803 and 1804. He was taxable on 25 acres in the lower district of Henrico County on the Four Mile Creek near Talman's tavern from 1799 to 1816; called William Scott, Senr., in 1800; a "Mulatto" in 1809, 1810, and 1812 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 32, 62, 77, 111, 186, 243, 260, 309, 322, 424, 436, 468, 518, 560, 579, 622; Land Tax List, 1799-1816 (includes Personal Property Tax lists)]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:989]. He was the father of

i. John/ Jack, born say 1783, taxable in Henrico County from 1801 to 1812: listed as a "Mulatto" in 1809 and 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 518, 580, 623, 689, 707], head of Henrico County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:992].

ii. William, Jr., born say 1785, taxable in Henrico County from 1802 to 1813: [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 468, 518, 560, 580, 623, 689, 707, 775], perhaps the Billy Scott who was head of a Henrico County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:992]. He may have been the William Scott whose seven children registered in Henrico County on 6 July 1840. The oldest was Ellen Charity: late Ellen Scott (daughter of Wm and Frances Scott), age 17, a woman of very light complexion, has long straight hair, 4 feet 11-1/2 inches, Born free as appears from evidence of Ro: H. B. Taylor [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.35, nos. 956-62].

 

16.    Elizabeth4/ Betty Scott, born say 1750, was a "Mulatto" bound out by the Henrico County court on 6 January 1755 [Minutes 1752-5, 238]. She was a "Mulatto" living in Henrico County on 2 January 1769 when the court ordered her daughters Caroline and Lucretia bound out [Orders 1767-69, 377]. She may have been the Betsy Scott whose son Arvey Scott was bound out in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on 15 April 1788 [Orders 1787-92, 176]. She was probably related to Francis Scott, a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County from 1784 to 1792 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 64, 330, 383, 451]. She was the mother of

i. Caroline, born say 1765, ordered bound out on 2 January court 1769.

ii. Lucretia, born say 1767, "Mulatto" daughter of Betty Scott bound out in Henrico County on 2 January 1769.

iii. Phebe, born say 1780, daughter of Betsey Scott, married Jacob Chavous, 24 December 1800 Charlotte County bond and 8 December 1800 Mecklenburg County bond, Thomas A. Jones & James Wilson security, with a note from James Wayne.

iv. Arvey, born say 1787, called "Avory Scott a bastard child at John Cox's Senr" on 15 May 1787 when the Mecklenburg County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind him out and called "bastard of Betty Scott, deced" on 15 April 1788 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind him out. He was bound to Lewis Burwell on 9 December 1799 and to Thomas Rowlett on 8 December 1800 [Orders 1787-92, 29, 176; 1798-1801, 283, 472]. He was to marry Elizabeth Chavous, 9 January 1809 Mecklenburg County bond, with the permission of Elizabeth Chavous (widow of Jacob) but married her sister Martha instead. He and his wife Martha Scott released their rights to land due to her from the estate of her father Jacob Chavis, Sr., to her brother Jacob Chavis, Jr., of Charlotte County by deed proved in Mecklenburg County on 10 July 1809 [DB 14-107, 308].

 

17.    Zachariah Scott, born say 1754, was a "Mulatto" (no parent named) living in Henrico Parish on 7 August 1758 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him out [Orders 1755-62, 273]. On 7 August 1788 he purchased 10 acres in Henrico County adjoining William Young and Jackson Fraser from Samuel Red who stated in the deed that he had purchased the land from Francis Scott. Actually, Red's 2 June 1783 deed says it is from Jackson Frayser, so perhaps the land at one time belonged to Francis Scott [DB 2:113, 649-50]. Zachariah was one of the hands ordered to keep the road in repair from Cornelius's to Four Mile Creek bridge on 3 August 1789 [Orders 1787-9, 430; 1789-91, 35]. He was taxable in Henrico County from 1783 to 1802: taxable on 2 horses and 3 cattle in 1783; taxable on James Scott in 1789; taxable on son Peter and 3 horses in 1801 and 1802; taxable on a slave and 3 horses in 1803 and 1804; taxable on 10 acres in the lower district from 1799 to 1804. In 1804 he was taxable on an additional 50 acres which had been transferred to him by John Scott. His estate was taxable on the 10 and 50 acre tracts from 1805 to 1807. In 1809 John Scott, Jr., "Mulatto," was taxable on the two tracts [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 76, 111, 168, 185, 243, 260, 297, 309, 322, 335, 391, 437, 468; Land Tax List 1799-1816]. His 7 March 1805 Henrico County will was proved on 2 September 1805. He left his wife Lucy and daughters Fanny, Polly, Kesiah, and Eliza Scott his land during their single lives, and at the death or marriage of his wife the land was to go to his son John Lansford Scott. His son John L. Scott was to pay his son Harrad Scott ten pounds on his twenty-first birthday. He named his son Elijah Scott and Jesse Frayser executors and asked that they relinquish a proper right to the land he had sold William Young by his paying $6 per acre and that they get a right for the lands he had purchased from Edward Bowman and relinquish the same to his son John L. Scott [WB 3:196-7]. He was the father of

i. Peter, born say 1784, taxable in Henrico County from 1801 to 1814: listed as a "Mulatto" in 1803 and from 1812 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 518, 560, 580, 708, 775, 794; Land Tax List 1799-1816], head of a Henrico County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:1009].

ii. ?John, called John Lansford Scott when he was taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1797 and 1799, called John Scott, Jr., a "Mulatto," when he was taxable in 1809 on tracts of 50 and 10 acres in Henrico County which had been charged to the estate of Zachariah Scott from 1805 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 358, 391; Land Tax List, 1799-1816]. He and his wife Lucinda mortgaged 10 acres adjoining William Randolph Bottom's land in Henrico County for $49 on 7 December 1807 [DB 8:161]. He was taxable on 50 acres from 1810 to 1813 and his estate was taxable on 50 acres near Hith's Mill in 1814 and 1815 [Land Tax List, 1799-1816].

iii. Elijah, born say 1784, a "free Negro" taxable in Henrico County from 1800 to 1809; taxable in Bowler Cocke's household in 1801 and 1802, called a "free Mulatto" in 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 424, 461, 518, 560, 579; Land Tax List, 1799-1816 (includes Personal Property Tax lists)].

iv. Harrad, not yet twenty-one in March 1805.

 

18.    Benjamin2 Scott, born say 1758, was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish in March 1759, no parent or race mentioned [Orders 1755-62, 319], called son of Sarah Scott (no race mentioned) when he was ordered bound out by the court in March 1767 [Orders 1763-67, 715]. He was taxable in Henrico County from 1785 to 1789 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frames 78, 95, 111, 168, 185]. He was one of the hands ordered by the Henrico County court to keep the road in repair from Cornelius's to Four Mile Creek bridge on 3 August 1789 [Orders 1787-9, 430; 1789-91, 35]. He was living in Petersburg on 7 March 1791 when grand jury of the Hustings Court indicted him for having a log house with a wooden chimney. He died before 7 November 1791 when his son Griffin was bound out by the court. On 4 March 1792 Jacob and Aaron Brandon were granted letters of administration of his estate on 20 pounds bond. Plato Cook, Griffin Scott, David Scott, and Isaac Scott, sons of Benjamin Scott, deceased, purchased property by deed proved in Petersburg Hustings Court on 6 October 1794 [Minutes 1791-7, 27, 94; Orders 1791-7, 136, 147]. His orphans John and Elisha Scott were bound out by the Henrico County court to Joseph Goode, farmer, on 5 October 1795 [Orders 1794-6, 496]. He was the father of

i. Griffin, born 25 May 1780, orphan of Ben Scott, bound out by the Petersburg Hustings Court on 7 November 1791 [Orders 1791-7, 8]. He registered in Petersburg on 30 December 1805: a dark brown free Negro man, five feet eight inches high, twenty four years old the 25th May last, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 370]. He married Lavina Ash, 21 June 1817 Petersburg Hustings Court marriage.

ii. Isaac, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 29 July 1807: a dark brown free Negro man, five feet seven 3/4 inches high, twenty two years old, brought up in the tanners business, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 414]. He was head of a Petersburg household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121b].

iii. John, born say 1785.

iv. Elisha, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 20 May 1818: a free man of Colour, dark brown Complection, five feet seven and a half inches high, thirty one years old, born free p. certificate of the City of Richmond [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 909].

 

19.    Francis Scott, born say 1750, was ordered bound to a trade by the Chesterfield County court on 7 September 1764 [Orders 1759-67, 580]. He and his wife Elizabeth of Henrico County sold 33 acres in Henrico County adjoining John Depriest, Peyton Randolph and William Young on 6 March 1786 [DB 2:293-4]. He was taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1783 to 1800: taxable on 2 horses and 4 cattle in 1783; taxable on slaves Lucy, Mark, Jupiter and Phillis in 1784; charged with Andrew Scott's tithe in 1784 and with Anderson Scott's tithe from 1786 to 1788 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 21, 68, 82, 111, 111, 168, 185, 243, 261, 296, 309, 322, 335, 347, 358, 392, 436]. Joseph Bailey sued him in Henrico County court on 8 April 1789 for 4 pounds due by note. He, Andrew and Anderson Scott were among the hands ordered to keep the road in repair from Cornelius's to Four Mile Creek bridge on 3 August 1789. On 5 September 1791 he provided security of 200 pounds for John James's administration of the estate of Ann Scott, deceased, after John Scott refused to administer it [Orders 1787-9, 430, 583; 1789-91, 35, 608]. He married Rachel Scott, "widow," with the consent of her sister Patience Scott, 25 February 1792 Henrico County bond, Andrew Scott security. Rachel was taxable on a horse in Henrico County in 1790, perhaps the Rachel Scott who was counted in the list of "Blacks free above the age of sixteen" in the upper district of Henrico County with her unnamed daughter in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 243, 760]. Francis was probably the father of

i. Anderson, born say 1769, taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1786 to 1810: his tax charged to Francis Scott from 1786 to 1788; his tax charged to Elizabeth Scott in 1803; called "free" when he was taxable on a horse in 1804; listed as a "free Negro" starting in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 82, 111, 168, 185, 261, 309, 322, 335, 347, 358, 391, 436, 518, 579, 622]. The Henrico County court awarded him 30 pounds in his suit against Francis Gaddy on 10 March 1791 [Orders 1789-91, 484].

 

Other members of the Scott family in Henrico and the surrounding area were

i. Nicholas, born say 1715, a "free Mulatto man" living in Halifax County, Virginia, on 6 May 1758 when he was tried for having shot and killed John Herring with Jacob Cogar as his accomplice. He was sent to Williamsburg for further trial where he was reprieved by the Governor but ordered to leave Virginia. The Halifax County court bound out his children John, Mary, and Elizabeth to William Wright of Antrim Parish. In July 1759 Scott was accused of being frequently in Virginia and threatening the life of William Wright because he still held Scott's children. In August 1759 his suit against James Collings was dismissed by the court because he was not a resident of Virginia [Pleas 2:330, 336, 452, 471].

20      ii. James, born about 1738.

iii. Nicholas, born say 1748, a "yellow" complexioned soldier born in Henrico County but living in Charles City County when he was listed in the size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Courthouse [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 153]. He may have been the Nicholas Scott who was living in Henrico County on 6 March 1769 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out his son Exum Scott [Orders 1767-9, 384].

iv. Lucy2, born say 1753, a "Mulatto" (no parent named) ordered bound out by the churchwardens of Henrico Parish on 4 February 1754 [Minutes 1752-55, 161] and again on 7 November 1757 [Orders 1755-62, 207]. She may have been the Lucy Scott who was a "free Negro" taxable on 3 horses in the lower district of Henrico County in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 518].

v. William, born say 1760, an "Indian," taxable on 2 horses in the lower district of Henrico County in 1783, 1786, and from 1802 to 1804: taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1803; taxable on his own tithe in 1804 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 21, 82, 468; Land Tax List 1799-1816].

vi. Jesse, born about 1760, registered in Petersburg on 16 August 1794: a light Mulatto man five feet six & 1/2 inches high who served as a Soldier & a free man during the American Revolution about thirty four years old [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 9]. He was taxable in Henrico County in 1786 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 93]. He acknowledged a debt of 5 pounds to James Stevens in Henrico County court on 2 August 1790 [Orders 1789-91, 321].

vii. Littleberry, born about 1761, registered in Petersburg on 2 June 1801: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet four inches high, forty years old, born free & raised in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 256]. He was a "yellow" complexioned soldier born in Charles City County who served in the Revolution from Henrico County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 153].

viii. Polly (Mrs.), married Samuel Redd, 20 July 1798 Henrico County bond. Samuel was emancipated by deed of Robert Pleasant acknowledged in Henrico County court on 4 November 1782 [Orders 1781-4, 114].

21      ix. Hannah, born about 1763.

x. Benjamin, born say 1764, taxable in Henrico County from 1785 to 1789 and from 1794 to 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 78, 95, 111, 168, 185, 322, 336, 347].

xi. Abby2, born say 1765, married Isaac Wood, 18 December 1789 Henrico County bond. Isaac was a "Negro slave" emancipated by John Orr's deed proved in Henrico County court on 7 July 1788 [Orders 1787-9, 346].

xii. Mary, born say 1765, married Thomas Gilliat, 12 November 1789 Henrico County bond. She may have been the Mary Scott whose orphan "Mulatto" children Anthony and James were ordered bound by the Henrico County court to Edward Clarke on 3 September 1787 and again on 6 July 1789 [Orders 1787-9, 135; 1789-91, 20]. Anthony was taxable in Henrico County in Edward Clarke's household in 1799 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 387].

xiii. Anne, born say 1766, married Johnson Smith, 10 August 1787 Henrico County bond.

xiv. Jeffrey, born say 1767, taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1788, 1791, 1806, and 1807 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 168, 260, 518, 560], a "free Negro or Mulatto" taxable in Richmond City in 1793, 1796, and 1797 listed near "free Negro or Mulatto" John and Claiborn Scott [PPTL 1787-99].

xv. Joshua, born about 1770, registered in Petersburg on 27 August 1800: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet six and a half inches high, thirty years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 197].

xvi. Nancy, born say 1771, married David Cooper, 11 August 1792 Henrico County bond, surety Robin Smith. David Cooper was a "free Negro" taxable in Henrico County in 1790 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 213].

xvii. Charles, born say 1774, a poor orphan bound out in Henrico County to William Woodfin on 4 September 1786 [Orders 1784-7, 569]. He married Betsy Howell, "daughter of Isaac Howell," 3 June 1800 Goochland County bond, consent for Betsy by Judith Howell, Junior Howell surety. Charles was taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1789 to 1814: his tax charged to George Williamson in 1792 and 1793; called a Mulatto" in 1803, "free" in 1804; listed as a "free Negro" starting in 1806, a "Mulatto" in 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 185, 243, 261, 298, 310, 336, 347, 424, 436, 468, 518, 560, 579, 622, 689, 708, 775, 793]. His suit against Andrew Scott for trespass, assault and battery was dismissed by the Henrico County court on 5 March 1798 when his attorney stated that he had not been instructed by his client [Orders 1796-8, 594]. He was head of a Henrico County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:989].

xiii. James, born say 1775, his Henrico County tax charged to Alexander Young in 1792; charged to Andrew Frayser in 1793 and 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 299, 303, 316].

xix. Daniel, born say 1775, a "free Negro" taxable in Richmond City in 1793 and 1796 [PPTL 1787-99], a "F.N." taxable in the upper district of Henrico County from 1801 to 1807 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 452, 495, 540].

xx. Jephtha, born say 1776, taxable in Henrico County in 1792 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frame 297].

xxi. Nicholas, born about 1777, registered in Petersburg on 9 July 1798: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet five and a half inches high, bushy hair, twenty one years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County near the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 141]. He purchased 2 acres in Petersburg from John Lee and was taxable on the land in 1799 [1799 Land Tax List A, p.12]. He was a "free Negro" shoemaker in Dinwiddie County n 1802 and 1803 [Personal Property Tax List, 1802 B, p.20; 1803 A, p.22].

xxii. Ned, born say 1778, bound apprentice to Joseph Goode on 2 October 1786 [Orders 1784-7, 580], a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1794 to 1814: listed with Samuel Red in 1794; charged with his own tax in 1806 and 1807; listed with his unnamed wife in the upper district of Henrico County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 321, 518, 560, 759, 824].

xxiii. Abraham, born say 1780, bound apprentice to Arthur Giles on 2 October 1786, paid by the sheriff of Henrico County on 6 February 1797 for digging a grave and burying "Negro Harry, an old negro who died in jail" [Orders 1784-7, 580; 1796-8, 232].

xxiv. Ritter, head of a Henrico County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:998].

xxv. Susan, a "free Negro" taxable on a slave and a horse in the lower district of Henrico County in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frame 560].

xxvi. Polly, born about 1782, registered in Petersburg on 7 June 1810: a yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, twenty eight years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 521].

xxvii. Christian, born 15 August 1783, registered in Petersburg on 28 June 1806: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet six inches high, twenty two years old 15 August last, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 384]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:122b].

xxviii. Buck, born say 1790, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Henrico County from 1807 to 1814: his tax charged to Miles Turpin in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 560, 579, 622, 707, 751, 775, 793].

xxix. Lenn, born say 1792, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Henrico County in 1809, 1813 and 1814: his tax charged to Bowler Cocke in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 579, 767, 794].

xxx. Aaron, born say 1793, a "Mulatto" taxable in Henrico County from 1810 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1814, frames 623, 689, 708, 775, 794], head of a Henrico County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:998]. He was taxable on a lot in Port Mayo near Rockett's from 1812 to 1816 [Land Tax List, 1799-1816].

 

20.    James Scott, born about 1738, registered in Petersburg on 23 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, fifty six, born free & raised in James City [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 81]. He may have been the father of

i. Harriet, born about 1776, registered in Petersburg on 28 August 1804: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet five inches high, twenty eight years old, short bushy hair & holes in her ears, born free in James City [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 280]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121a].

 

21.    Hannah Scott, born about 1763, registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a stout, thick made brown Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, thick bushy hair, thirty seven years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 168]. She was the mother of

i. Rebecca, born about 1778, registered in Petersburg on 27 September 1797: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, nineteen years old, short bushy hair, straight & well made, born free daughter of Hannah Scott of the Town of Petersburg & raised in the sd. Town [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 124].

ii. Christian, born 15 August 1783, registered in Petersburg on 2 June 1801: (son of Hannah Scott, a free woman) a brown Mulatto lad, seventeen years old 15 Aug. last, five feet three inches high, short bushy hair [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 216].

 

Goochland County

Members of the Scott family in Goochland County were

i. Stephen, born say 1752, married Molly Ferrar, "Molattoes," on 10 November 1773 in Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347]. He may have been the Stephen Scott who was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72].

ii. Abbie1, born say 1754, married Charles Howell, "Mulattoes both," on 18 June 1775 in Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347].

1        iii. Elizabeth, born say 1755.

2        iv. Joseph, born say 1756.

 

1.    Elizabeth Scott, born say 1755, was living in Goochland County on 11 March 1790 when her daughter Barbara married Elisha Sims. She was the mother of

i. Barbara, born say 1774, "daughter of Elizabeth Scott," married Elisha Sims, 11 March 1790 Goochland County bond, George Payne surety, 27 March marriage [DB 15:452]. Elisha was head of a Goochland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:715].

ii. Fanny, born say 1775, "daughter of Elizabeth Scott," married John Lile, 18 February 1791 Goochland County bond, Elisha Sims surety, 26 February marriage [DB 16:34].

iii. ?Sally, married Francis Tyler, 15 January 1802 Goochland County bond, Henry Cockrun surety, 18 February marriage.

 

2.    Joseph Scott, born say 1756, was a "Mulattoe" taxable in Goochland County from 1787 to 1790 and from 1796 to 1816: charged with Isham Smith's tithe and 2 horses in 1787; charged with Lewis Scott's tithe in 1789; charged with Meredith and Royal Scott's tithe in 1798; a "Free Born Ditcher" living on Thomas Stratton's land in 1805; charged with Joel Scott's tithe in 1806 and 1809 and 1810; charged with Grief Scott's tithe in 1812; living with his wife Jenny on William Bolling's land in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 156, 183, 227, 245, 429, 487, 535, 554, 677, 750, 791, 834, 876; 1810-32, frames 85, 110, 174, 208, 293]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:715]. He was the father of

i. ?Riley, born say 1778, married Nancy Johns, 18 October 1799 Goochland County bond, Joseph Scott surety, 19 October marriage [Ministers' Returns, 287]. He was taxable in Goochland County from 1804 to 1816, a "Mulatto" shoemaker at Joseph Scott's in 1813 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 697, 751, 792; 1810-32, frames 17, 84, 174, 293]. Riley was head of a Goochland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:714].

ii. ?Joel, taxable in Goochland County from 1806 to 1811, listed as a "Mulatto water man" or ditcher at Joseph Scott's from 1811 to 1813, a "Mulatto" shoemaker at Rily Scott's in 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frames 791, 876; 1810-32, frames 85, 110, 175, 207].

iii. ?Grief, taxable in Goochland County in Joseph Scott's household in 1812, listed with Joseph R. Royster in 1813 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1810-32, frames 110, 173].

iv. ?Joshua, born about 1783, head of a Goochland County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:715]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 March 1823: forty years old, bright yellow complexion, blue eyes, straight hair, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 480, 598].

xii. Nancy, born say 1788, "daughter of Joseph Scott," married Harris Nichols, 24 May 1804 Goochland County bond, Edward Morris surety, 29 May marriage [Ministers' Returns, 93].

v. ?Morris, married Charity Jenkins, 7 July 1806 Goochland County bond, Harris Nichols surety, 8 July marriage.

xiv. ?Patsy, born say 1777, married Orange Freeman, 19 September 1800 Goochland County bond, Riley Scott surety, 20 September marriage. Orange Freeman was head of a Goochland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:692].

 

Caroline County, Virginia

1.    Mary Scott, born say 1720, was living in Caroline County on 13 May 1748 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Saint Margaret's Parish to bind out her "mulatto" children Sarah, Nicholas and James Scott to Thomas Wild, Gent. On 10 March 1748/9 the court ordered her son Tom (no race indicated) bound to Thomas Wild [Orders 1746-54, 81, 131]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born say 1743.

2        ii. Nicholas, born say 1745.

iii. James, born say 1747.

iv. Tom, born say 1748, son of Mary Scott ordered bound to Thomas Wild on 10 March 1748/9.

 

2.    Nicholas1 Scott, born say 1745, was a resident of Prince George County on 22 October 1776 when he purchased 60 acres in Surry County, Virginia, adjoining Simmons [DB 10:492]. He was head of a Surry County household of 9 persons in 1782 [VA:43], 11 in 1784 [VA:78] and 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:616]. He was taxable in Cabin Point district of Surry County from 1782 to 1815: taxable on 2 horses and 8 cattle in 1782; charged with Drury Walden's tithe in 1790; taxable on slave George in 1798; taxable on John Scott's tithe and slave George in 1800; taxable on John and Graham Scott's tithes in 1803 and 1804; free from personal tax in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 351, 379, 398, 558, 605; 1791-1816, frames 116, 167, 346, 424, 500, 543, 617, 657, 675, 695, 829]. He was called a "mulatto" in Surry County on 21 June 1814 when he made an affidavit as to Elizabeth Peters' age and was surety for her marriage bond to Randolph Valentine. His will was proved in Surry County in 1816 [Wills, Etc. 3:111-2]. He was the father of

i. ?William, born say 1766, taxable in Surry County from 1787 to 1814: taxable on Alexander Charity's tithe in 1795; taxable on John Charity's tithe from 1799 to 1802; taxable on 2 slaves from 1805 to 1807; listed with 1 "free Negro & Mulatto above the age of 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 481, 605; 1791-1816, frames 117, 243, 271, 346, 385, 426, 463, 575, 599, 617, 714, 755]. He married Edy Charity, 28 December 1792 Surry County bond, Major Debrix surety, 30 December marriage [Ministers' Returns, 35]. John Charity was taxable in William's Surry County household in 1800 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816]. Edy Scott, born before 1776, was a "free colored" woman living alone in Surry County in 1830.

ii. ?Judah, married Caesar Parham, 13 November 1788 Sussex County marriage by Reverend Jesse Lee [Ministers' Returns, 261]. Caesar was head of a Sussex County household of 11 "other free" in 1810, probably the "free negro" Cezar (no last name), born about 1762, who obtained a certificate in Sussex County on 9 June 1810: dark brown complexion, 5'4-1/4", freed by July 1784 deed of Steth Parham [Sussex County "Certificates granted to Free negroes & mulattoes," no.84].

iii. ?Nicholas2, born about 1773, registered in Surry County on 12 August 1812: a mulattoe man of Surry County who was born of free parents of said County of a bright complexion aged about 39 years ... is 5'6-1/4" hight ... and has rather a thin visage [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 48]. He may have been identical to Nicholas G. Scott who was taxable in Surry County from 1810 to 1816 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, 676, 714, 867].

iv. Hannah, born say 1773, "daughter of Nicholas Scott," married Drewry Walden, 29 July 1790 Surry County bond, Armstead Peters surety, 1 August marriage in Southwark Parish [Ministers' Returns, 29].

v. ?Milley, married Aaron Taylor, 24 December 1793 Surry County bond, Armstead Peters surety, 29 December marriage [Ministers' Returns, 37].

vi. ?Tabitha, married Joseph Canada, 23 December 1797 Surry County bond, William Scott surety.

vii. ?Fanny, married Jones Cannada /Cannady, 20 February 1799 Surry County bond, William Scott surety.

viii. Polly, "daughter of Nicholas Scott," married David Johns 23 January 1802 Surry County bond, Drewry Walden surety, William Simmons witness.

ix. ?Nancy, married David Debrix, 25 December 1802 Surry County bond, William Scott surety, 26 December marriage.

x. ?Lucy, married Samuel Stewart, 11 October 1808 Surry County bond, David Charity surety.

xi. Grayham, born about 1786, married Patsey Andrews, daughter of Beckey Andrews, 20 April 1810 Surry County bond, David Charity surety. He registered in Surry County on 28 July 1807: a free Mulatto Man who is the Son of Nicholas Scott aged 21 years or there abouts, tolerable bright Complexion ... 5'11" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 35].

xii. ?John, taxable in Surry County from 1801 to 1808 and from 1810 to 1816: his tax charged to Nicholas Scott in 1801 and 1803; listed with 1 "free Negro & Mulatto above the age of 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 463, 543, 676, 759, 829, 867]. He was a "Molatto" taxable in Sussex County in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frame 758].

xiii. ?James, a "Molatto" taxable in Sussex County from 1806 to 1809 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 686, 710, 758].

 

North Carolina

The Scott family of North Carolina may have originated in Henrico County, Virginia. A Francis Scott was sued for trespass in Henrico County court on 2 September 1708 by Bartholomew Chavis who was sued by Thomas Evans for debt in October that year [Orders 1707-9, 74, 92]. Francis and Abraham Scott were listed (consecutively) in the Edgecombe County, North Carolina muster of militia with members of the Chavis and Evans families in the 1750s: Willm Allen, Francess Scoot, James Evens, Benjamine Cheavers, Abraham Scoot [North Carolina Archives Troop Returns, 1-12, last page]. Three members of the Scott family were

1        i. John, born say 1700.

2        ii. Abraham, born say 1710.

3        iii. Francis, born say 1720.

 

1.    John1 Scott, born say 1700, was a "free Negro" living in Berkeley County, South Carolina, when he sent an affidavit to the Orange County, North Carolina court on 12 March 1754:

Joseph Deevit Wm. Deevit & Zachariah Martin, entered by force, the house of his daughter, Amy Hawley, and carried her off, by force, with her six children, and he thinks they are taking them north to sell as slaves.

One of the children, "a mulatto boy Busby, alias John Scott," was recovered in Orange County, and on 12 March 1754 the court appointed Thomas Chavis to return the child to South Carolina [Haun, Orange County Court Minutes, I:70, 71]. John purchased land from John Chavous by deed proved in South Carolina in 1753 [DB N-N:446]. He was granted 200 acres in Berkeley County on 7 May 1767 [S.C. Archives series S213019, vol. 14:357]. One of his children was

i. Amy Hawley, who was probably the wife of William Hawley of Northampton and Granville counties, North Carolina.

 

Perhaps John Scott's other descendants were those living in or near South Carolina:

i. James, head of a St. Bartholomew's Parish, Charleston District household of 13 "other free" in 1790.

ii. John3, a "Mixt Blood/ Free Negro" taxable in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:94].

4        iii. Israel, born say 1755.

iv. Abraham, head of a South Orangeburg District household of 9 "other free" in 1790. He was a man of color who served in the Revolution [Moss, Roster of South Carolina Patriots, 1849; NSDAR, African American Patriots, 183].

v. Moses, head of a Beaufort District household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [SC:11].

vi. William, head of a South Orangeburg District household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

vii. William, head of a St. Bartholomew's Parish, Charleston District, household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

viii. Winna, "Negro" head of a Cheraw District household of 2 "other free" males under 16 and 2 "other free" females in 1790 [SC:369].

 

2.   Abraham1 Scott, born say 1710, bought land on 26 September 1738 on Bear Branch in North West Parish of Bertie County. Northampton County was formed from this part of Bertie County in 1741. He gave 100 acres of this land to Martha Bray, wife of Peter Bray, for "love and affection" on 22 September 1747, 100 acres on the north side of Falling Run near Abrams Branch and the river to his son Abraham, Jr., on 30 December 1755, 100 acres to his son George Scott, near his sister Martha Bray, on 3 August 1761, and 75 acres near Abraham's line to his son David Scott on 27 August 1761. This land had been deeded to Highland Scott in 1738 [DB 1:330; 2:240; 3:134, 145]. He may have been the Abraham Scott who was in Hertford County court in July 1763 when Joseph Scott of Southampton County proved his account for 3 pounds, 11 shillings for goods purchased on his store: Irish linen, handkerchiefs, sugar, cotton, and Irish linen [Southampton County Judgment Papers, 1763-4, frames 878-833]. On 29 October 1773 Cordall Norfleet was paid by the churchwardens of St. George Parish for finding and maintaining him [CR 071.927.1, fols. 1, 2]. His children were

i. Martha Bray, born say 1730, wife of Peter Bray, a white man.

5        ii. Abraham2 Jr., born say 1735.

iii. George, who sold the 100 acres deeded to him by his father on 19 July 1766 [DB 3:452].

6        iv. David1, born say 1740.

v. ?Randall, a Northampton County taxable on an assessment of 100 pounds in 1780 [GA 46.1], head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72] and 11 in Martin County in 1800 [NC:410].

vi. John2, born say 1750. He and his wife Nancy sold 100 acres in Northampton County on 11 October 1774 "that Arthur Oneal bought of Edward Earp 14 Feby 1756" [DB 6:3]. This was land given to Nancy before her marriage by her father Arthur O'Neill by deed of 22 February 1758 to take effect after his death [DB 2:447]. John and Nancy bought 100 acres in Halifax County adjacent to Jonathan Carpenter 10 days later on 21 October 1774. On 19 November 1781 he bought a further 100 acres adjacent to "Jenitoe" Swamp, and he and Nancy sold this land on 9 June 1783 [DB 13:202; 14:552; 15:65]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:65], 6 in 1800 [NC:338], and 6 in 1810 [NC:50].

vii. ?Sterling, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72].

 

3.    Francis Scott, born say 1720, purchased 200 acres on the north side of the Tar River joining Burnt Coat Swamp in Edgecombe County on 19 February 1747 [DB 3:269]. And on 4 November 1757 he purchased another 9 acres on the south side of Burnt Coat Swamp which is the part of Edgecombe County from which Halifax County was formed in 1758 [DB 6:320]. He was charged in Edgecombe County in November 1756 with concealing his tithables, probably failing to pay tax on his wife and daughters [Haun, Edgecombe County Court Minutes, I:133, 135]. Samuel Jones sued him in Halifax County court in May 1770 and the court issued a subpoena to Margaret Scott (his wife?) [Gammon, Record of Estates II:13]. His 10 August 1771 Halifax County will, proved May 1774, lent land between the Spring branch and Horessen(?) Branch to his wife Sarah, and then to "Acsom" with 5 shillings each to his other unnamed children [WB 1:339]. His children were

7        i. Exum, born say 1754.

ii. ?Emanuel, born say 1758, taxable on an assessment of 100 pounds in Northampton County in 1780 [GA 46.1] and taxable on one free poll in District 4 of Halifax County in 1782. He made a deposition in Halifax County court on 22 August 1789 that he was a twelve months soldier in the Continental Line [NCGSJ XV:232]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" in 1790, 2 in 1800 [NC:342], and 6 in Cumberland County in 1810 [NC:599].

iii. ?Isham2, born about 1763, head of a Halifax County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:342] and 8 in 1810 [NC:49]. He married Rebecca James, widow of Jeremiah James, according to her application for Jeremiah's Revolutionary War pension. Isham Scott made a declaration in order to obtain a Revolutionary War pension before the Halifax County court at the age of sixty on 19 May 1823. He stated that he was a servant to Major Hogg and was at the skirmish at Halifax. He rented one third of 60 acres and had a wife and two children, one girl twenty-one years of age and a son who was of age and self supporting. James Jones testified that he was in the service with him. He died 19 March 1837 [M804-2136, frame 0433].

iv. ?James, taxable on one free poll in District 4 of Halifax County in 1782 and head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61].

v. ?Priscilla, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County household of 3 in 1800 [NC:340], 4 in 1810 [NC:49], and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:164].

 

4.    Israel1 Scott, born say 1755, was a "Mixt Blood/ Free Negro" taxable in Bladen County in 1776 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:94]. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:55], 6 in 1800 (called "Free Negro"), 5 in 1810 [NC:776], and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:94]. He owned 100 acres on both sides of Mercer's Mill in Edgecombe County when he died on 22 September 1825, leaving a wife Elizabeth and heirs (children?): Israel, Betsy, Creasy, Priscilla, and Maalsy Lowrie Scott, a minor [Gammon, Record of Estates Edgecombe County, 85]. He may have been the father of

i. William1, born say 1778, head of an Edgecombe County household of 2 "other free" in 1800, called "Free Negro" [NC:241], 5 in 1810 [NC:775] and 5 "free colored" in Wake County in 1840 [NC:28].

ii. Israel2, married Sally Lomack, 26 April 1820 Cumberland County bond, Berry Lucas bondsman.

iii. Betsy.

iv. Creasy.

v. Maalsy Lowrie, a minor in 1825.

 

5.    Abraham2 Scott Jr., born say 1735, received 100 acres on the north side of Falling Run at the mouth of Abrams Branch in Northampton County from his father on 30 December 1755 and sold this land for 100 pounds on 19 February 1784 [DB 2:240; 7:219]. About a year later he moved to Halifax County where he bought 200 acres joining Barrot for 100 pounds on 10 May 1785 [DB 15:382]. He sold this land to William Burt on 2 March 1797 and purchased 200 acres between Buck and Beaverdam Swamp on the south side of Little Swamp later that month on 28 March 1797 from Richard Burt [DB 18:144, 149]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:61] and 7 in 1800 [NC:344]. His 13 June 1799 Halifax County will, proved in February 1803, mentioned his wife Sally and children [WB 3:400]:

i. Sally.

ii. Hardemon, executor of his father's will. He was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 (Hardy Scott) [NC:73] and 12 in 1800 [NC:479]. Mary Hucks, a single woman, charged him in the 20 February 1800 Halifax County court with begetting her bastard child [Minutes 1799-1802, 95]. On 4 March 1800 he purchased 231 acres in Northampton County near Occoneechee Swamp and mortgaged this land on 25 December 1804 [DB 10:490; 11:154].

iii. Judea, perhaps the Judy Scott, born before 1775, head of a Halifax County household of two "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Tabitha.

v. Saul, head of a Northampton County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:72].

vi. Rhody, head of a Halifax County household of "3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:50].

vii. Lydia, head of a Northampton County household of 4 "other free in 1800 [NC:479].

viii. Dicey.

ix. Abigail, called Abigail Richardson, formerly Abigail Scott, when she charged Samuel Hawkins in Halifax County court on 24 November 1796 with being the father of her unnamed base born child [Minutes 1784-87].

x. Mary.

xi. Simon, who received the "land that lies on north side of the branch that divides the two fields" by his father's will.

 

6.    David1 Scott, born say 1740, received 75 acres near Abraham's line in Northampton County from his father Abraham1 Scott on 27 August 1761 [DB 3:145]. He was head of a Northampton County household of one male 21-60 years old, 2 males less than 20 or more than 60, and one female in Captain Williams' District for the 1786 State Census, 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:72], and 3 in 1800 [NC:477]. His children may have been

i. Isaac, born say 1761, received a grant for 48 acres on the side of Licking Branch in Northampton County on 29 October 1782 [DB 7:180]. He purchased 72 acres adjoining Robert Finny on 28 May 1797 and sold this land on 12 January 1799 [DB 10:312, 446]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:73] and 4 in 1800 [NC:479].

ii. David2, Jr., born say 1770, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:479], 7 in 1810 [NC:747], and 10 "free colored" in Halifax County in 1820 [NC:166].

 

7.    Exum Scott, born say 1754, received his father's land in Halifax County, North Carolina, after the death of his mother. On 15 March 1775 he sold 10 acres on both sides of Burnt Coat Swamp in Halifax County joining "Scott's Mill Place" for 10 pounds [DB 13:548]. He was taxable on 158 acres in District 10 of Halifax County in 1782 and 140 acres and one free poll in 1790. He was head of a Halifax county household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:63], and in 1800 he was called "Axiom" in Cumberland County, head of a household of 9 "other free." He testified in Wake County in 1818 in support of Allen Sweat's application for a Revolutionary War pension, stating that he was acquainted with him from his infancy when Sweat was living on his plantation in Roanoke [National Archives microfilm M804-2332]. His widow Alley Scott was ninety years old on 23 June 1845 when she made a declaration in Granville County to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. She testified that they were married in Halifax County, North Carolina, in March 1774, had two children before independence was declared, that her husband removed from Halifax to Wake County about 1801, and he died about 1823. Her son Zachary testified in Wake County court on 11 November 1845 that his mother died on 15 September 1845 leaving children Zachary, Guilford, and Barney Scott. He also testified that his mother's name before her marriage was recorded as Alley Sweat in a bible one of his brothers took with him when he moved to Indiana. George Pettiford testified in Granville County on 27 February 1846 that he was well acquainted with Exum Scott [National Archives file no. W5994, http://www.fold3.com]. Exum was the father of

i. Zachary, born about 1774.

ii. Guilford, born say 1776.

iii. Barney, born about 1777, testified on 23 July 1845 for his mother's pension application that he was the son of Exum and Alley Scott. He was head of a Wake County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:53] and 8 in 1840.

 

8.    Isham1 Scott, born say 1760, was head of an Edgecombe County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:55] and an insolvent taxpayer in Edgecombe County in 1798 [Minutes 1797-1800, August 1799 court]. His children were

i. Isham3, born about 1783, the "son of Isham" ordered bound an apprentice in Edgecombe County by the Wednesday session of the August 1799 court [Minutes 1797-1800]. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:741].

ii. Abraham3, born about 1787, the "son of Isham Scott," twelve years old in August 1799 when he was ordered bound an apprentice to David Davidson to be a farmer and shoemaker by the Edgecombe County court. He may have been the Abraham Scott who married Lucinda Walden, 22 October 1822 Wake County bond, Zachariah Scott bondsman. He moved to Cumberland County where he was mentioned in the court minutes in the 1830s and 1840s. He was the grandfather of Julia Jasper, a ten-year-old free girl of colour, who was bound to him on 3 June 1840. He was issued a permit to carry his gun in Cumberland County on 4 March 1841. He posted security bond for Sewell Pettiford in a 6 June 1842 case against him in Cumberland County court. Since Pettiford did not appear, Abram had to pay the judgment against him [Minutes 1842-44]. He also posted bond in a famous case against Elijah Newsom who was charged with carrying his gun without a license. Newsom was found guilty, but the judgment was arrested on the grounds that the law requiring free persons of color to obtain licenses was unconstitutional. However, on appeal the State Supreme Court ruled the law constitutional [Franklin, Free Negro in North Carolina, 77-78].

iii. William2, born about 1791, eight-year-old "son of Isham Scott" bound an apprentice by the August 1799 Edgecombe County court. He was granted free papers in Fayetteville on 6 February 1844, signed by (his brother?) Abram Scott, and recorded them in Logan County, Ohio. They described him as: aged about 52 years, 5 feet 6 inches, common laborer, was free living in Edgecomb County [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 13].

 

Caroline County, Virginia

1.    Mary Scott, born say 1720, was living in Caroline County on 13 May 1748 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Saint Margaret's Parish to bind out her "mulatto" children Sarah, Nicholas and James Scott to Thomas Wild, Gent. On 10 March 1748/9 the court ordered her son Tom (no race indicated) bound to Thomas Wild [Orders 1746-54, 81, 131]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born say 1743.

2        ii. Nicholas, born say 1745.

iii. James, born say 1747.

iv. Tom, born say 1748, son of Mary Scott ordered bound to Thomas Wild on 10 March 1748/9.

 

2.    Nicholas1 Scott, born say 1745, was a resident of Prince George County on 22 October 1776 when he purchased 60 acres in Surry County adjoining Simmons [DB 10:492].(1) He was head of a Surry County household of 9 persons in 1782 [VA:43], 11 in 1784 [VA:78] and 6 "other free" in 1810. He was taxable on one tithe, 3 horses, and 8 cattle in Surry County in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 931]. He was called a "mulatto" in Surry County on 21 June 1814 when he made an affidavit as to Elizabeth Peters' age and was surety for her marriage bond to Randolph Valentine. His will was proved in Surry County in 1816 [Wills, Etc. 3:111-2]. He was the father of

i. ?William, born say 1766, his Surry County personal tax charged to Nicholas Scott in 1787. He married Edy Charity, 28 December 1792 Surry County bond, Major Debrix surety, 30 December marriage [Ministers' Returns, 35]. Edy Scott, born before 1776, was a "free colored" woman living alone in Surry County in 1830.

ii. ?Judah, married Caesar Parham, 13 November 1788 Sussex County marriage by Reverend Jesse Lee [Ministers' Returns, 261]. Caesar was head of a Sussex County household of 11 "other free" in 1810, probably the "free negro" Cezar (no last name), born about 1762, who obtained a certificate in Sussex County on 9 June 1810: dark brown complexion, 5'4-1/4", freed by July 1784 deed of Steth Parham [Sussex County "Certificates granted to Free negroes & mulattoes," no.84].

iii. ?Nicholas2, born about 1773, registered in Surry County on 12 August 1812: a mulattoe man of Surry County who was born of free parents of said County of a bright complexion aged about 39 years ... is 5'6-1/4" hight ... and has rather a thin visage [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 48].

iv. ?Milley, married Aaron Taylor, 24 December 1793 Surry County bond, Armstead Peters surety, 29 December marriage [Ministers' Returns, 37].

v. ?Tabitha, married Joseph Canada, 23 December 1797 Surry County bond, William Scott surety.

vi. ?Fanny, married Jones Cannada /Cannady, 20 February 1799 Surry County bond, William Scott surety.

vii. Hannah, born say 1784, "daughter of Nicholas Scott," married Drewry Walden, 29 July 1790 Surry County bond, Armstead Peters surety, 1 August marriage in Southwark Parish [Ministers' Returns, 29].

viii. Polly, "daughter of Nicholas Scott," married David Johns 23 January 1802 Surry County bond, Drewry Walden surety, William Simmons witness.

ix. ?Nancy, married David Debrix, 25 December 1802 Surry County bond, William Scott surety, 26 December marriage.

x. ?Lucy, married Samuel Stewart, 11 October 1808 Surry County bond, David Charity surety.

xi. Grayham, born about 1786, married Patsey Andrews, daughter of Beckey Andrews, 20 April 1810 Surry County bond, David Charity surety. He registered in Surry County on 28 July 1807: a free Mulatto Man who is the Son of Nicholas Scott aged 21 years or there abouts, tolerable bright Complexion ... 5'11" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 35].

 

Endnotes:

1.    A "Mulatto" servant named Nicholas (no last name) was brought before the Henrico County court in August 1724 and ordered to serve his master John Woodson, Jr., additional time for running away for nine days [Minutes 1719-24, 352].

 

SELDON FAMILY

1.    Mary Sildom, born say 1738, was the mother of a poor orphan "Mulatto" named Milly Sildom who was bound out by the Charles City County court on 5 July 1758 [Orders 1758-62, 24]. She was the ancestor of

i. Milly, born say 1757.

2        ii. Molly, born about 1759.

iii. Robert1, born say 1760, taxable in St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, from 1789 to 1812: listed with 4 slaves and 2 horses in 1789; a "Malato" taxable on 2 free tithes, a slave and 2 horses in 1791, 2 free and 4 slaves in 1794; 2 free, 7 slaves and 4 horses in 1798; 1 free and 3 slaves in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-91, pp. 224, 267; 1792-1803, pp. 16, 29, 49, 100, 154, 215, 226; 1804-24].

iv. ?Elizabeth, head of a Charles City County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959]. She was called Elizabeth Syldom in the 11 July 1789 Charles City County will of Abraham Brown by which he allowed her the use of the house and garden on his land during her life [WB 1:16-17].

 

2.    Molly Selden, born about 1759, registered in Bedford County on 26 July 1803: aged 44, Light Mulatto, 5 feet 2 inches high, Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1803-20, p.3]. She may have been the mother of

i. Jacob, born about 1781, registered in Bedford County on 26 July 1803: aged 22, Mulatto, 5 feet 3 inches high, Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1803-20, p.3]. He was "Negr" taxable in Bedford County from 1802 to 1816 [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 531, 559, 601; 1806-16, frames 153, 401, 435, 652], and a "F.B." head of a Bedford County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:489].

ii. Sally, born about 1783, registered in Bedford County on 26 July 1803: aged 20, dark Mulatto, 5-1/4", Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1803-20, p.3], a "Negr listed in Bedford County in 1813 [PPTL 1806-16, frame 403].

iii. Robert2, born about 1794, registered in Bedford County on 24 October 1831: 5'3" high, bright mulattoe, aged 37, Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1820-60, p.16].

 

SEXTON FAMILY

1.    Hagai Sexton, born about 1749, indentured herself to William and Ann Smith in Spotsylvania County on 5 March 1770 [Orders 1768-74, 96]. She ran away from her master, and he placed an ad in the 31 October 1771 issue of the Virginia Gazette for her return:

RUN away from the Subscriber, in April last, dark Mulatto Woman named HANKEY, alias HAGAI SEXTON, between two and three and twenty Years of Age, about five Feet high, has long black curled Hair tied behind, remarkable bow Legs, and is very talkative; she had on, when she went away, a cross barred Pompadour Ground Stuff Gown, an Osnabrug Shift and Petticoat, and an old dressed Gauze Cap. She was born in Caroline County, is well known about Port Royal, at which Place she has several Times been seen since her Elopement, and in July last was entertained at the Plantation of Mr. John Macon in that County, but has since left that Place, and is supposed to be gone towards Williamsburg [Virginia Gazette, Purdie & Dixon edition].

Smith recovered her by 21 May 1772 when the Spotsylvania County court ordered her to serve him an additional twenty-six months [Orders 1768-74, 192]. She may have been identical to Agnes Sexton who was head of a Charlotte County household of 2 free persons in 1782 [VA:15]. An Agnes Sexton married John Day, 3 January 1787 Greensville County, Virginia bond. She may have been the mother of

i. Ransom, head of a Warren County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:758].

 

SHAW FAMILY

1.    Margaret Shaw, born say 1665, was taxable in the Surry County household of Anthony Cornish in 1698 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol. 24, no.2, p.73], perhaps the Margaret Cornish who was taxable in John Hencock's Lawns Creek Parish household in 1703 [DW 5:291]. She may have been the mother of

i. Mary, born say 1685, a "malato wife to a negro man of Mr. Thomas Howlett" who indentured herself in Henrico County to William Soane for two years starting 3 March 1707 for 600 pounds of tobacco per year. She was apparently in debt to the churchwardens for having an illegitimate child. The indenture specified that she would have to serve additional time at the same rate if she incurred any more debts during her service [Deeds, Wills, Etc. 1697-1704, 115]. She may have been identical to Mary Shaw, "a Mollatto," who died on 9 April 1746 in Stafford County [Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Register, 1724-1776, 123].

 

SHEPHERD FAMILY

1.    Ann Shepherd, born say 1703, was a "Christian white woman" who was presented by the Accomack County, Virginia court for having an illegitimate child. When required to identify the father of her child on 6 June 1721, she told the Accomack County court that it was "Indian Edmund," but on 6 July 1721 she admitted that it was Henry Jackson, "a Mullatto." The court ordered that she be sold for five years [Orders 1719-24, 33]. Her descendants may have been

2        i. James1, born say 1730.

ii. George, head of an Accomack County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:60].

iii. James2, a "free Negro" taxable in Nansemond County in 1815.

 

2.    James1 Shepherd, born say 1730, (no race indicated) complained to the Granville County, North Carolina court that Robert Chandler unlawfully detained him as a servant sometime between 1749 and 1759 [CR 044.101.2, undated 1749-1759 indenture bond]. He may have been the father of

i. William, born before 1776, head of a Stokes County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:370].

ii. Byrd, married Mavel Stewart, 20 April 1815 Person County bond. She was the daughter of Thomas Stewart, who mentioned her in his May 1818 Person County, North Carolina will [WB 8:77].

 

Fairfax County, Virginia

1.    Richard Shepherd, born about 1750, was a "Mullatto Boy" living in Truro Parish, Fairfax County, on 21 August 1752 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him to Henry Collem until the age of thirty-one [Orders 1749-54, 234]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Frank, head of a Richmond City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:317].

 

SHOECRAFT FAMILY

1.    William1 Shoecraft, born say 1640, was tithable in Lancaster County, Virginia, from 1697 to 1700 but was declared tax-free in April 1701, probably due to old age [Orders 1696-1702, 32, 93, 129, 134]. Lancaster County records give no indication of his race, but many of his descendants were mixed-race. He was probably the ancestor of

i. Abraham1, born say 1690, taxable in Christ Church Parish, Lancaster County, in 1713 and 1714 [Orders 1713-21, 33, 78], acknowledged in Northumberland County court on 18 July 1723 that he was indebted to Edward Nickens [Orders 1719-29, 109]. He was taxable in his own household in Norfolk County in the district above Great Bridge from 1734 to 1735 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1730-50, 127, 160, 172].

ii. William2, born say 1690, brought a successful suit against William Doggett in Lancaster County court on 9 June 1714 for wages due to him for the year he was hired to Doggett by John Enman, being a full sharing of the tobacco made by him that year. He was taxable in Lancaster County in 1715 [Orders 1713-21, 62, 117]. He was taxable in Norfolk County from 1732 to 1734 in the household adjoining Johnson Driggers, Sr., and Johnson Driggers, Jr., in the district from Suggs Mill to the Great Bridge [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1730-50, 54, 81, 131]. He purchased 50 acres in Princess Anne County adjoining Oakums for 20 pounds on 9 June 1752, and he purchased 70 acres adjoining his own land on Muddy Branch in Princess Anne County on 22 February 1768 [Deeds 1747-55, 378]. He left a Princess Anne County will on 25 April 1768 leaving his land to Dorcas Franklin, a widow, during her widowhood and to the poor of the parish after her death or marriage, with Willoughby Oakem as witness. Dorcas sold 50 acres on Pungo Ridge left to her by William Shoecraft to Thomas Franklin for 32 pounds on 10 November 1768 [DB 10:252a, 374].

2        iii. Simon1, born say 1700.

3        iv. Ann, born say 1710.

 

2.    Simon1 Shoecraft, born say 1700, was sued in Lancaster County court on 14 March 1721/2 by Thomas Greggs for 500 pounds of tobacco due by note. He was married to Lucy by 14 June 1727 when they were fined 50 shillings for the illegitimate child Lucy bore while she was single. Simon was presented by the Lancaster County court on 12 May 1731 for not going to church at Christ Church Parish the previous month. He sued James Clock in Lancaster County court on 14 March 1732/3 for 300 pounds of tobacco due by bill. On 12 February 1733/4 he made oath that he had taken up a servant man named John Defruck belonging to John Rains of Caroline County. He was a witness (with Richard and Elizabeth Weaver) to the Lancaster County will of Edward Nicken in 1735. On 8 April 1737 the court dismissed a suit against him by Thomas Edwards for one fowling piece "handsomely mounted having a brass plate to it's cock" valued at three pounds currency [Orders 1721-9, 35, 39, 242; 1729-43, 35, 76, 101, 163; D&W 12:355]. He was in North Carolina in the 1750s when he and Richard Nickens were listed in the Muster Roll of Captain Thomas Davis' Company in the Currituck County Militia [Clark, Colonial Soldiers of the South, 657-8]. Members of the Shoecraft family were counted as "other free" persons near the Nickens and Weaver families in Hertford County from 1790 to 1810. Simon was taxable in the Edmund Bridge District of Norfolk County in 1759 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 154]. His 29 December 1760 Norfolk County will, proved in November 1763, named his wife Lucy and children: William, Abraham, Rodha, Mary, and Martha Shewcraft. William Shewcraft, his oldest son, was named as executor and was to raise his children after his wife's decease [WB 2, fol.187, 220]. Lucy was a taxable head of a Norfolk County, Virginia household in St. Brides Parish: taxable with her son Abraham in 1765, taxable on 1 tithe in 1768, taxable for John Archer's tithe in 1770 on the Northside of Western Branch, taxable for (her grandson?) Cary Shewcraft's tithe in 1773 and taxable for (her grandson) Kinner Shoecraft's tithe in 1774 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 196; 1766-1780, 55, 132, 195, 225]. Simon and Lucy were the parents of

4        i. William3, born say 1732.

ii. Rodha, born say 1744.

iii. Abraham2, born say 1745, taxable in the Edmonds Bridge District household of his mother Lucy Shewcraft in 1765 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 196], counted as white in 1790, head of a Hertford County household of 2 males over 16 and 3 females in 1790 [NC:26], and head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in 1800. His wife Elizabeth Shewcraft was the sister of William Butler of Bertie County whose 16 November 1802 estate division records that she first married James Craft, had two children, but she and Craft had "parted about twenty or twenty-five years ago," and she had married second to Abraham Shewcraft [Gammon, Record of Estates, Bertie County II, 18].

iv. Mary, born say 1748, perhaps the Mary Shoecraft whose suit in Norfolk County court against Peter Cherry was discontinued at her costs on 21 March 1803 [Orders 1801-3, 240b].

v. Martha, born say 1750.

 

3.    Ann Shoecraft, born say 1710, perhaps a sister of Simon Shoecraft, was called Anne Suecraft of Christ Church Parish on 8 May 1728 when she was accused in Lancaster County court of having a bastard child. The charge was dismissed later that year on 14 August 1728 [Orders 1721-29, 270, 287]. She was called Ann Mitchell in Bertie County, North Carolina court on 24 October 1758 when her "free Mulattoe" son William Shoecraft was bound an apprentice [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:452]. Her son was

5        i. William5, born about 1749.

 

4.    William3 Shoecraft, born say 1732, was tithable in his own Norfolk County household in the district from Edmund's Bridge to the Upper Inhabitants from 1753 to 1757 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 46, 76, 98, 111]. He was called William Sucraft of Norfolk County when he purchased 30 acres in Princess Anne County adjoining John Simmons in the Muddy Branch on 13 January 1759 [DB 1755-62, 448]. He was head of a Blackwater Precinct, Princess Anne County household of 5 persons in 1783 and 5 in 1785 [VA:60, 103]. On 13 August 1789 the Princess Anne County court dismissed a grand jury indictment against him for failing to vote at an election [Minutes 1788-90, 262]. His 30 December 1792 Princess Anne County will was proved on 1 April 1793. He named his wife Mary to whom he left all the household goods that she brought to the marriage. He also named his daughter Lucy Turner and her son John. Lucy was probably the wife of one of Sampson Turner's sons. Sampson was a "F.N." taxable in Great Bridge District of Norfolk County from 1761 to 1765 and taxable in Blackwater Precinct, Princess Anne County, in 1784. He also named his son-in-law James Harmon who was a "Mulatto" bound apprentice to George Chappel in Princess Anne County on 17 July 1759 [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. He left his land to his son William and timber to his son Kinner Shewcrafts Collons and also gave have half of what fell to him from his own father's estate to Kinner [WB 1:210]. William was the father of

i. Lucy, probably the wife of Pormenus, Nicholas, or Butler Turner.

ii. William4, born say 1755, called brother to Lucy.

iii. ?Cary, born say 1757, taxable in the household of Malachi Wilson in Edmonds Bridge District in 1772 and in Lucy Shoecraft's household in 1773 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 185, 195]. The inventory of Cary's estate was proved in Princess Anne County in March 1786 [WB 1:87]. He may have been the father of Moses Shoecraft who purchased 100 acres on Smith's Creek in Norfolk County for $300 on 3 December 1799 [DB 38:157].

iv.a daughter who married James Harmon. Their son James received a heifer from his grandfather. He was probably related to Craftshoe Harmon, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806]. Shoecraft Harmon recorded a plat for 97 acres on the Pee Dee River near Marrs Bluff in Georgetown District, South Carolina, on 1 July 1793 [South Carolina Archives, Series S13190, 30:118].

v. Kinner Shoecraft Collins, born say 1758, son of William Shoecraft, was taxable in the Norfolk County household of (his grandmother) Lucy Shoecraft in 1774 and head of a household as Kinner Shoecraft in 1778 and 1780 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 225, 250, 282]. He may have been the illegitimate son of William Shoecraft by a member of the Collins family. There was an Elizabeth Collins who was taxable in Princess Anne County on a horse in 1793 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frame 74]. Kinner Shoecraft was taxable in Norfolk County from 1782 to 1787: taxable on 17 cattle and 2 horses in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 392, 417, 452, 497, 597]. Kinner Collins was taxable in Princess Anne County from 1794 to 1822: taxable on his own tithe and a 16-21-year-old tithe in 1795, taxable on his son Presley in 1796, called Kinner Shoecraft and son Presly in 1799 and 1800, taxable on son William Collins in 1802 and 1803, taxable on two 16-21-year-old tithes in 1810, taxable on his son Cary from 1811 to 1814. He was listed as white until 1820 but in 1821 and 1822 he was designated as "F.B." (Free Black) in Pungo District, the same list as James Harman who had no racial designation in the earlier lists but was listed as "F.B." starting in 1813. And a ___(?) Shoecraft alias Florry Kinner was listed as a "F.B." in Pungo District in 1821 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 86, 117, 129, 154, 164, 196, 216, 223, 259, 273, 306, 319, 354, 364, 383, 404, 436, 452, 486, 499, 502, 661, 679, 699]. On 16 April 1799 he petitioned the Norfolk County court to open a road from his land to the main road through the land of Miles Wilson. The court appointed several persons to view the road who agreed to the new road. However, he repeated his request on 17 December 1805, and the group appointed to view the road stated that the previous approval for the road had been set aside "from some irregularity" and they again approved the road. He was living in Princess Anne County on 1 May 1807 when he purchased 50 acres in Norfolk County on the north side of Indian Creek adjoining John Simmons and the Princess Anne county line and Muddy Branch from Samuel Wilson for $320, and on 5 May 1807 he (signing) and his wife Martha (making her mark) of Princess Anne County sold 20 acres in St. Bride's Parish, Norfolk County, on Deep Run near the edge of the main road adjoining Malachi Wilson's line to Samuel Wilson of Norfolk County [Orders 1797-99, 171b; 1799-1801, 32a; 1804-5, 251a; 1806, 10a-b; 1806-8, 137a; DB 43:154-6]. On 21 August 1821 he sued James Harmon his wife Lucy Harmon, and Andrew Shewcraft (a minor) in Norfolk County court to make sale of the land that formerly belonged to Moses Shewcraft. The court ordered the proceeds divided equally among them [Minutes 17:141]. Moses Shoecraft was taxable in Princess Anne County in the same list as Kinner Collins in 1802 with no racial desingation [PPTL, 1790-1822, frame 264]. He was the father of

vi. Simon2.

vii. Abraham3.

viii. Elizabeth.

 

5.    William5 Shoecraft, born about 1749, son of Ann Mitchell, "a free Mulattoe," was about nine years old on 24 October 1758 when he was bound an apprentice to James Boon by the Bertie County court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:452]. He was probably living in the part of Bertie County which became Hertford County since James Boon signed a petition to form Hertford County from Bertie County in 1759 [Journal of N.C. Genealogy, 2167]. William was taxable on one poll in Hertford County in Captain Harrell's Company in 1784 [LP 64.1]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 [NC:26], 6 in 1810 [NC:101], 4 "free colored" in Orange County in 1820 [NC:336], and a "Negro" head of a Guilford County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830. William's grandson Jeremiah made an application for Cherokee Indian benefits in 1908 in which he stated that his grandfather "Billy Shocraft" died about 1836 in Guilford County (when Jeremiah, born about 1821, was about fifteen or sixteen years old). His claim was rejected, but it identifies William's wife as Bicey Nickens and names their children: Silas, James, Sarah Milton, and Tabitha Robbins. Their children were

i. James, born about 1766, head of a Hertford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:101], an Orange County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:336] and a "Negro" head of a Guilford County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830. He was a "Mulatto" counted in New Garden Township, Wayne County, Indiana, in the 1850 census with Anna Shoecraft who was born about 1785. He married Mary Anna Milton, sister of Mills Milton, according to the testimony of his grandson Samuel Shoecraft in 1908.

ii. Silas E., born about 1783, head of an Orange County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:336] and a "Negro" head of a Guilford County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830. He was living in Green Township, Wayne County, Indiana, in 1850 with Polly Shoecraft who was also a "Mulatto" born in North Carolina about 1783.

iii. Sarah Milton, probably the wife of Miles Milton.

iv. Tabitha Robbins, the wife of Josiah Robbins who was head of an Orange County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:336]. She was head of a Guilford County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. Their grandson Philander Weaver applied for Cherokee benefits.

 

Endnotes:

1. Simon1 Shoecraft may have been identical to Simon Craft who was sued for a debt of 37 pounds in Lancaster County court on 10 October 1722 by Nicholas Holland, a shipwright in Liverpool. The case was dismissed because Simon had been an apprentice and servant to the plaintiff at the time of the signing and held under arrest in prison. William Stamps sued him for rent amounting to 730 pounds of tobacco on 11 May 1726 [Orders 1721-9, 67, 86, 207].

 

SHOEMAKER FAMILY

1.    Sarah Shoemaker, born say 1730, was living in Craven County, North Carolina, in May 1754 when the court issued a summons for her to show cause why her child John Bowers should not be bound out [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, IV:231]. She was the mother of

i. John Bowers, born before May 1754.

ii. ?Saul Bowers, born say 1760, head of a Craven County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:131].

 

2.    James Shoemaker, born say 1740, and his wife Mary were "Black" taxables in Fishing Creek District, Granville County, North Carolina, in 1762 [CR 044.701.19], and he was an insolvent taxpayer in Samuel Benton's 1764 list. He was among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster roll of Captain James Fason's Northampton County militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3] and was head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's Parish, South Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1790. He, Sampson, Solomon, Thomas, Sr., Thomas, Jr., and John Shoemaker were among the "free persons of Colour" of present-day Liberty and Marlborough counties, South Carolina, who petitioned the legislature to repeal the discriminatory tax against "free Negroes" on 20 April 1794 [South Carolina Department of Archives and History, General Assessment Petition, 1794, no. 216, frames 370-374, Free People of Color ST 1368, series no. 165015, item 216]. Perhaps his children were

i. Sampson, sued for a debt of 32 pounds in Marlboro County, South Carolina, on 5 March 1788 [Court Minutes 1785-1808, n.p.]. He recorded a plat for 100 acres in Craven on the southwest side of Catfish Swamp in Georgetown District on 16 November 1787 and 365 acres between Catfish and Gum Swamps in Marion District on 17 October 1803 [S.C. Archives Series S213190, 22:152; 36:525]. He was head of a Prince George Parish household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 1 in Liberty County in 1800 [SC:806]. John Shoemaker recorded a plat for 997 acres on Catfish Swamp adjoining Sampson's land in Marion District on 19 October 1819 [S.C. Archives series S213190, vol. 39:171].

ii. James Jr., head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's Parish household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in Liberty County in 1800 [SC:806].

iii. Solomon, born say 1765, head of a Georgetown District, Prince George's Parish household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [SC:56], 1 in Liberty County in 1800 [SC:806], 5 in Darlington District in 1810 [SC:669] and 10 "free colored" in 1830. His land on Black Creek near the Pee Dee River was mentioned in the 4 August 1817 Darlington deed of land to John and William Shoemaker and a 8 June 1822 plat for land in Darlington on Black Creek and the Pee Dee River [DB G:347-8; S.C. Archives Series S213192, vol. 47:40]. According to the Cherokee Claim of his grandson Samuel Evans, Solomon's wife was named Betty and they had a child named Elizabeth who was born on the Pee Dee River. His other grandparents were Henry and Molly Evans of North Carolina [Application to Eastern Cherokees of the United States, Court of Claims, 1806-1809 microfilm, nos. 28545 and 24480].

iv. John, born about 1766 in South Carolina, a "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 Jackson County, Alabama census, worth $3,000. His daughter Elizabeth was born in Tennessee about 1808 [AL:50a].

v. Thomas, born before 1776, head of a Bledsoe County, Tennessee household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

 

SILVA/ SILVER FAMILY

1.    Edward Silver, born say 1745, purchased land in Granville County, North Carolina, adjoining William Chavis, Jr., on 19 October 1767 (called Edward Silvey) and sold this land on 1 October 1768 (called Edward Silva) [DB L:306, 327]. Perhaps he was identical to or related to the Edward Silva who purchased land by deed proved in Amelia County, Virginia, in June 1749 [Orders 2:151]. He may have married or had children by Milly, the daughter of Richard and Susannah Chavis. Milly was taxable in her parents' household in 1767 in the list of Stephen Jett, adjoining the household of William Chavis, Jr. [CR 44.701.19]. Edward Silver was taxable on married-man poll tax in Granville County in 1780, and counted as white in Wake County in 1800, head of a household of two males over 16, 2 under 16, and 4 females [NC:104]. Milly Silver was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:342]. They may have been the parents of

2        i. Susannah1/ Sukey, born before 1776.

ii. Philip, born before 1776, married Babba Stewart, 24 February 1804 Wake County bond, head of a Robertson County, Tennessee household of 7 "free colored" in 1820.

 

2.    Sukey Silver, born before 1776, was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:164]. She was probably the mother of

i. Susan2, born about 1790, called "Sukey" when she was head of a Halifax County household of 1 "free colored" in 1830, a "Mulatto" living in household no. 1370, Halifax County in 1860.

ii. Henry, born about 1795, a "Mulattto" living in household no. 878 in 1860.

iii. Annis, married John Wilkins, 16 November 1825 Halifax County bond.

iv. Rose Silvey, born about 1817, ordered bound out by the Halifax County court on 16 August 1824.

 

SIMMONS FAMILY

Members of the Simmons family were

1        i. Margaret1, born say 1700.

ii. Anne Simmonds, born say 1712, a servant (no race indicated) of Thomas Stanton. She confessed to the churchwardens of St. George Parish, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, on 1 December 1730 that she had a "Mulatto bastard by a Negro man" [Orders 1730-32, 9].

 

1.    Margaret1 Simmons, born say 1700, was a "free Mulatto Woman" who came into King George County, Virginia court on 4 September 1730 and bound her daughters Rachel and Betty Simmons to serve William Strother, Gent., until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1721-34, pt.3, 526]. She was the mother of

i. Rachel, born in October 1717, twelve years old on 4 September 1730 when she was bound apprentice to William Strother.

ii. Betty, born in July 1720, ten years old on 4 September when she was bound apprentice to William Strother.

 

Their descendants may have been

2        i. William1, born say 1732.

ii. William2, head of an Essex County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:198].

iii. Margaret2 (Peggy), head of an Essex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:198].

iv. Samuel, born say 1753, head of a Craven County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1790 [NC:130]. His children were probably Backhouse Simmons, head of a Craven County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:77] and Larry Simmons, head of a Craven County household of 2 "free colored" and 7 slaves in 1820 [NC:77].

 

2.    William1 Simmons, born say 1732, died before September 1766 when his children Phereby and James (no race indicated) were bound out by the Bertie County, North Carolina court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, III:748]. William's children were

3        i. ?Sarah1, born say 1755.

4        ii. Phereby1, born about 1757.

iii. James1, born about 1759, the seven-year-old orphan of William Simmons, ordered bound as an apprentice cooper to Thomas Collins by the September 1766 Bertie County court. In 1775 he was an under-sixteen-year-old taxable "molatto," called Jem Simmons, in John Hyman's household in David Standly's Bertie County list [CR 10.702.1, box 3].

 

3.    Sarah1 Simmons, born say 1755, was living in Bertie County in November 1787 when her daughter Hannah was bound apprentice. Sarah was the mother of

5        i. ?Phereby2, born say 1772.

ii. ?Charity, born say 1781, no age, race, or parent named when she was bound to Elizabeth Rascoe in Bertie County on 8 August 1785 [NCGSJ XIV:161].

iii. Hannah1, born say 1783, "Daughter of Sarah Simmons" (no age or race mentioned), ordered bound apprentice to William Bentley in Bertie County by the November 1787 court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:676].

iv. Amy, born say 1786, "daughter of Sarah Simmons," ordered bound to Mary Seals by the November 1788 Bertie County court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:719].

v. ?Polly, born about 1788, about eleven years old when she was bound to David Ryan in Bertie County [NCGSJ XV:170]. Perhaps she was the Mary Simons who was a 26-45 year-old head of a Washington County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:410].

vi. ?Andrew, born about 1796, six years old (no race mentioned) when he was bound to William Swain to be a shoemaker in Bertie County on 9 August 1802 [NCGSJ XVI:39]. He was called "an orphan of color, 14 years old last November" when he was bound to Daniel Young to be a block maker on 14 May 1810 [NCGSJ XVII:41].

vii. ?James2, born about 1804, a five-year-old "orphan of color" bound to John Bond to be a shoemaker on 16 August 1809. On 18 November the same year he was bound instead to Peter Kirkham to be a carpenter [NCGSJ XVII:41].

 

4.    Phereby1 Simmons, born about 1757, was the nine-year-old orphan of William Simmons (no race mentioned), bound apprentice on 30 September 1766 in Bertie County, North Carolina [NCGSJ XIV:31]. She may have been the mother of

i. Sarah3, born about 1777, a twelve and one-half year-old child (no parent or race mentioned) bound apprentice to Zedekiah Stone in Bertie County on 17 August 1789 [NCGSJ XIV:163].

ii. Henry, born in February 1778, "14 years old next February," ordered bound to William Armstead as an apprentice blacksmith and corker by the May 1791 Bertie County court [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, VI:868].

iii. Charles2, born about 1781, a four-year-old child (no parent or race mentioned) bound an apprentice shoemaker to Luke Warburton in Bertie County in May 1785 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:631].

iv. Levi, born say 1790, head of a Hertford County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:190].

 

5.    Phereby2 Simmons, born say 1772, was not mentioned in Bertie County records. However, in a 1 June 1853 Wayne County deposition, Winney Huff deposed that she had been acquainted with Phereby for seventy to seventy-five years and that Phereby's mother was a "Colored Woman" who lived in Bertie County when Phereby was bound apprentice to William Burnham. Phereby moved with Burnham to Duplin County where her children were apprenticed to him. One daughter named Hannah was apprenticed to Burnham's daughter, Elizabeth (married Simpson), when he moved to Georgia [2 June 1853 Wayne County Deposition of Winney Huff]. Other Wayne County residents, Charity Bryant and Mary Wiggs, deposed that they were acquainted with Phereby for sixty to sixty-five years and that she had been William Burnham's apprentice [3 July & 1 June 1853 Wayne County Depositions]. Phereby was probably the "other free" person counted in William Burnham's Duplin County household in 1790 [NC:191]. According to the 2 June 1853 deposition of Winney Huff and Charity Bryant, Phereby was the mother of

i. Hannah2, born about 1794, a "free born negro" about one year old when she was bound to Betsy Burnham in Wayne County on 21 January 1795.

 

SIMMS FAMILY

1.   Margaret Syms, born say 1681, the servant of Robert Dudley, Gent., was presented by the Middlesex County court on 7 July 1701 for having a "mulatto bastard Childe." She confessed to the fact when she appeared in court on 6 April 1702. She may have been the mother of "William, a Mullato boy," who was bound to Major Robert Dudley by the Middlesex County court on 4 March 1699/1700 [Orders 1694-1705, 323, 424, 461]. She may have been identical to a "Mallato woman" who had 2 years to serve and was valued at 2 pounds in the inventory of the Middlesex County estate of Major Robert Dudley on 3 November 1701 [WB A:103]. And she may have been the ancestor of

i. Lewis, born about 1745, a "black man" listed in the militia returns for Granville County, North Carolina, in 1778 [N.C. Archives Troop Returns 4-40; The North Carolinian, 1960, p.727].

ii. Humpy, "free Negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 4 "other free" and 5 slaves in 1810 [VA:301].

iii. Lee, "free Negro" head of a Fairfax County household of 2 "other free" and a white woman in 1810 [VA:299].

iv. Elisha, married Rebecca Scott, 11 March 1790 Goochland County bond. He was head of a Goochland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:715].

 

SIMON FAMILY

1.    Thomas Simon, born say 1730, was among fourteen free African Americans presented by the Surry County, Virginia court on 21 November 1758:

Against ... Wm Walden ... Thomas Simon... for each and every of them not listing their wife's according to law supposing the said persons to be Mulattoes ... [Orders 1757-64, 135].

On 19 February 1760 he purchased 50 acres in Southwark Parish on Horsemeadow Branch in Surry County. He probably died before 4 June 1787 when (his wife & daughter?) Nanny and Sarah Simon sold his 50 acres in Southwark Parish adjoining William Walden [DB 7:495; 12:268]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1782 to 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames; 351, 367, 459]. He may have been the father of

i. Sarah, born say 1762, sold her father's Surry County land on 4 June 1787.

 

SIMPSON FAMILY

1.    Ann Simpson, born say 1709, was presented by the King George County, Virginia court on 3 November 1727 for having a "Mulatto Child." She was the servant of John Farguson on 8 March 1728/9 when she was again presented for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1721-34, 384, 391, 443; 447]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Archable, born before 1755, a "Free Mulattor" taxable in John Smith's household in the 1766 Bertie County, North Carolina tax list of John Crickett [CR 10.702.1, box 3].

2        ii. Sarah, born say 1760.

iii. Reddin, born say 1760, "free colored" head of a Tyrrell County, North Carolina household of one male and 3 females in 1790 [NC:34].

iv. Jacob, born say 1765, "free colored" head of a Tyrrell County household of one male over 16, one under 16 and one female in 1790 [NC:34].

v. Molly, a "Mullato" child bound to James Patterson in Augusta County, Virginia, on 18 March 1772 [Orders 1769-73, 331].

vi. Charon, head of a Tyrrell County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:785].

vii. Milly, head of a Martin County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:452].

viii. Isaac, head of a Hyde County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:119] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:240].

 

2.    Sarah Simpson, born say 1760, was head of a Washington County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" at Stewart's Mill in 1800 [NC:710]. She may have been the mother of

i. Jemima, bound an apprentice in Tyrrell County on 26 April 1792 [CR 96.102.1, box 1].

 

SISCO FAMILY

1.    John1 Francisco, born say 1630, was the slave of Stephen Charlton for whom Charlton claimed a headright in Northampton County, Virginia, in August 1647 [DW 1645-51, 97 by Deal, Race and Class]. In July 1648 Charlton made a deed of manumission to free him ten years later in November 1658: and then the said Negro is to bee a free man [DW 1645-51, 150-2]. He was called "Black Jack" in Charlton's October 1654 will by which he received his freedom. Charlton also agreed to free John's wife Christian, a "Negro woman," three years after his death or within six months if she paid 2,500 pounds of tobacco [DW 1654-55, fol.57]. John and Christian were tithable in their own household in Northampton County from 1665 to 1671. Grace Susanna (Sebastian Cane's wife?) was in their household in 1667. In 1668 the court agreed to have the "Negro" child of Thomas Driggers, then living with him, bound to him until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1657-64, 198; 1664-74, fol.14, p.42, 53, fol.54, fol.115]. He was called "John Francisco Negroe" on 7 July 1685 when the Accomack County court ordered him to pay his debt of 5,090 pounds of tobacco to Colonel William Kendall [W&cO 1682-97, 66a]. He was taxable in Accomack County from 1674 to 1695, called a "negro" in 1676 and 1686. In 1684 one of his three tithables was identified as his unnamed wife [Orders 1676-78, 33, 57; 1678-82, 18, 99; W&cO 1682-97, 191, 258; Nottingham, Accomack Tithables, 12, 16, 18, 19, 22, 23, 25, 27, 28, 31, 33, 35, 37, 40, 42, 44, 47, 50, 52, 54, 60]. John was probably the ancestor of

2        i. Daniel1, born say 1680.

3        ii. Elizabeth, born say 1695.

iii. Thomas1 Frisco, born say 1700, a Northampton County taxable with Ann Frisco in 1724 and called Thom Frica when he was tithable without Ann in the household of Nathaniel Andress in 1725 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 64, 89].

 

2.    Daniel1 Francisco, born say 1680, was sued for debt in Northampton County, Virginia, on 28 November 1706. The case was dismissed because neither part appeared [Orders, Wills, Etc., 1698-1710, 308]. He was the father of an illegitimate child which Mary Winslow had in Somerset County in March 1707. Daniel was probably living in the same community as William Driggers because Mary Winslow had a child by William Driggers in Somerset County in 1708. Daniel admitted to being the father of her child when he appeared in court seven years later in March 1713/4 [Judicial Records 1707-11, 95-6, 103; 1713-5, 5, 26]. He was living in Accomack County on 6 July 1715 when the court ordered that he, John Smith, John Martiall, and Richard Rowle/ Rowlin be summoned to the next court for disobeying Constable Hill Drummond while he was trying to break up a fight. The other parties were fined when they appeared at the next court on 4 October, but there was no further mention of Daniel [Orders 1714-17, 10a, 11]. He died before 22 September 1732 when the inventory of his Kent County, Delaware estate was taken. He may have married the daughter of Thomas Consellor who mentioned his daughter Elizabeth Francisco in his 26 September 1739 Kent County will. "Elisabeth Siscom" was head of a household in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County in 1738, taxable on (her son?) Thomas. They may have been the parents of

4        i. Daniel2, born say 1700.

5        ii. Thomas2, born say 1721.

6        iii. John2, born say 1723.

 

3.    Elizabeth Francisco, born say 1695, a "negro," bound out her daughter Rachel to Robert Nottingham in Northampton County on 17 March 1717/18 and bound her daughter Sabra, a "Negro child," to Abraham Bowker on 18 August 1719. On 10 October 1720 Bowker sued her for 20 bushels of Indian corn, and on 13 September 1722 Bowker and his wife were examined when she was acquitted of murdering her child [Orders 1716-18, 84; 1719-22, 31, 95, 183]. In November 1722 Bowker sued her to recover his costs for looking after her during her childbirth. She may have left the county since Ralph Pigot forfeited the bail he posted for her appearance in court to answer Bowker [Orders 1719-22, 95; Milhalyka, Loose Papers 1628-1731, 37, 42]. Her children were

7        i. Rachel1, born say 1715.

ii. Sabra, born say 1717.

 

4.    Daniel2 Francisco, born say 1700, was sued by Evan Jones in Kent County, Delaware court in November 1724 and by Nicholas Greenway in May 1725 [General Court Records 1722-5, 68, fol. 75]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County from 1727 to 1748. Since he is not mentioned in the tax lists after 1748, he may have been the brother of John Francisco who petitioned the Kent County Orphans court on 26 February 1756 stating that his brother had died "some years ago," as had his brother's wife Catherine leaving an infant [Estate Accounts, by Heite]. And he may have been the father of

8        i. Ephraim Sisco, born say 1745.

 

5.    Thomas2 Francisco, born say 1721, was taxable in the Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of (his mother?) Elisabeth Siscom in 1738 and taxable in his own household from 1740 to 1745. He died before 16 July 1748 when his widow Patience Sisco was granted administration on his Kent County estate [WB I-1, fol. 231]. The 29 November 1750 account of his estate mentions Daniel Durham and Elizabeth Francisco [Estate Accounts, by Heite]. Thomas and Patience may have been the parents of

9        i. Benjamin, born say 1735.

 

6.    John2 Francisco, born say 1723, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1743 to 1758 [1743 to 1767 Levy Assessments, frame nos. 16, 24, 43, 51, 107, 136, 143, 187, 226]. On 26 February 1756 he petitioned the Kent County Orphans court stating that his brother (Daniel?) had died "some years ago," as had his brother's wife Catherine leaving an infant in the care of John Swaney who was unable to care for it. The court placed the child in his care [Estate Accounts, by Heite]. He died before 18 December 1798 when administration of his Kent County estate was granted to (his wife?) Elizabeth Francisco [WB N-1, fol. 221]. The inventory of his estate totalled over 942 pounds. On 10 November 1800 the estate was divided among Charles, Lydia, and Esther Francisco [Estate Accounts, by Heite]. His children were most likely

i. John3, Jr., born say 1738, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1758.

10      ii. Charles, born say 1745.

11      iii. Lydia, born say 1747.

iv. James2, born say 1749, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1770.

v. William, born say 1750, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1770 and 1771.

vi. Esther, born say 1752, left an 11 February 1815 Kent County will in which she left 4-1/4 acres and her personal estate to Gelica Lockerman and Susan Derham, wife of George Derham (Durham) [WB P-1:69].

 

7.    Rachel1 Sisco, born say 1715, was bound apprentice by her mother Elizabeth Francisco in Northampton County, Virginia, on 17 March 1717/18. She was presented on 15 May 1734 and 9 November 1736 for bastard bearing [Orders 1732-42, 113, 117, 246, 255]. She was tithable in Ann Batson's Northampton County household in 1738 and 1739 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 282, 309]. She was apparently identical to "Negro Siss" who was living at Ann Batson's on 13 November 1739 when she was presented for bastard bearing [Orders 1732-42, 372, 378]. Her children were

12      i. Phillis1, born in March 1736/7.

ii. Bridget, born in September 1739, daughter of Rachel Sisco, bound apprentice to Major Brickhouse on 11 May 1742 [Orders 1732-42, 484].

iii. ?James1, born say 1745, a "free Negro," petitioned the Northampton County court for his freedom from William Roan on 12 November 1766. The court ruled on 11 February 1767 that his indenture was illegal and ordered him discharged from further service [Minutes 1765-71, 76, 79, 98].

 

8.    Ephraim Sisco, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County from 1765 to 1772 and head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:36]. He was the father of

i. John5, born say 1768, called "son of Ephr." in 1788 and 1789 when he was taxable in Little Creek Hundred. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33].

ii. ?Amelia2 Cisco, born say 1770, married Jeremiah Shad, July 1790. Jeremiah was head of a New Castle County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:161].

 

9.    Benjamin Sisco, born say 1735, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1754 to 1756, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1761 to 1764 and taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1768. He may have been the father of

i. Amelia1, born say 1755, married Hanser, perhaps Nehemiah2 Hanser who was taxable in Dover Hundred from 1785 to 1788. Amelia died before 9 December 1814 when administration on her Kent County estate was granted to John Francisco [WB P-1:61].

ii. George, born say 1765, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1785 to 1789, a taxable "Mulattoe" in 1797 and 1798. By his 10 November 1814 Kent County will, proved two weeks later on 26 November, he divided his estate between his sister Emela (Amelia) Hanser and his brother William Sisco. Abraham Allee was surety in the sum of one thousand dollars [WB P-1:59].

 

10.    Charles Sisco, born say 1745, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1765 to 1785. He was granted administration on the estate of (his father?) John Francisco on 24 October 1791 [WB N-1, fol. 5]. His 20 January 1798 Little Creek Neck, Kent County will, proved 9 February 1798, named his sister Lydia Francisco and niece nephew Elizabeth (daughter of Lydia) [WB N-1, fol. 195-6]. Charles was the father of

i. John4, born say 1767, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1785 and called "son of Chrls." in the list for 1787, perhaps the John Francisco who died before 24 October 1791 when Charles Francisco was granted administration on his Kent County estate [WB N-1, fol. 5].

 

11.    Lydia Francisco, born say 1747, was named in her brother Charles' 20 January 1798 Kent County will. Her 7 November 1798 Little Creek Neck, Kent County will, proved 18 December 1798, named her daughter Elizabeth [WB N-1, fol. 221-2]. She was the mother of

i. Elizabeth, born say 1770.

 

12.    Phillis1 Sisco, born in March 1736/7, daughter of Rachel Sisco, was bound apprentice to John Roberts in Northampton County on 11 May 1742. She was presented on 11 September 1753, 11 June 1755, and 14 June 1763 for bastard bearing [Orders 1732-42, 484; Orders 1751-3, 325; Orders 1753-8, 218-9; Minutes 1761-5, 71, 82]. She may have been the mother of

13      i. Phillis2, born in December 1758.

ii. Rachel2, born about 1760, nine years old on 8 July 1769 when she was bound apprentice to Elizabeth Scott [Minutes 1765-71, 306]. Rachel, Betty, Cellar, Sarah, and Moses Scisco registered as "free Negroes" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 364].

 

13.    Phillis2 Sisco, born in December 1758, was a five-year-old "Negro" bound apprentice to Baily Scott in Northampton County on 10 April 1764 and bound to David and Leah Stott on 12 May 1772. She was presented on 13 May 1777 for bastard bearing [Minutes 1761-65, 111; 1771-7, 52, 370; 1777-83, 4]. She was the mother of

i. Isaiah, born about 1776, son of Phillis Sisco, nine years old when he was bound apprentice by the Northampton County court on 1 May 1785 [Orders 1783-87, 284].

ii. ?James3, born in July 1767, bound apprentice to Robert Henderson in Northampton County on 14 April 1772 [Minutes 1771-77, 44].

iii. ?Daniel3, born on 19 August 1771, bound apprentice to William Roberts, Jr., in Northampton County on 10 June 1777 and bound to Abel Garrison on 8 February 1780 [Minutes 1771-77, 372; 1777-83, 220]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354]. He married Betsy West, 9 December 1794 Northampton County bond, William Roberts, Jr., security. He was head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:14].

 

SKIPPER FAMILY

The Skipper/Scipper family may have descended from Francis Skiper, a white man, whose "Negro" wife Ann was tithable in Norfolk County, Virginia, in 1671 [Orders 1666-75, 73, 73a, 84a, 89, 92 by Morgan, American Slavery-American Freedom, 335]. She was still living there in 1691 [Deeds 1686-95, 130].

1.    George1 Skiper, born say 1685, was sued in Bertie County court by George Allen who accused him of having detained his servant, Mary Bailey, between 17 December 1719 and 13 August 1722 [Saunders, Colonial Records of North Carolina, V]. Mary Bailey may have been related to Wat Bailey, one of the "Chief men of the Nottoway Indians" who sold their land in Southampton County on 2 February 1749/50 [DB 1:98]. George was called George Skeper, Sen., when he purchased 120 acres in Bertie County in Urahaw Woods on the northeast side of Quarter Swamp (present-day Northampton County) from James Skeper on 6 August 1725. He and his wife Mary sold this land on 11 January 1728. On 14 March 1729 he sold 615 acres in this same area on the south side of Potecasie Creek which he had patented on 1 January 1725 [DB B:184; C:118, 230]. He received a patent for 200 acres on the north side of the Neuse River on 21 March 1742/3 which was probably the land he sold by deed proved in Johnston County between 1 November 1746 and April 1750 [DB 1:20]. He may have been the father of

2        i. George2, born say 1720.

 

2.    George2 Skiper, born say 1720, was one of the "Chief men of the Nottoway Indian Nation" who sold their land in Southampton County, Virginia, on 2 February 1749 [DB 1:98, 131, 144]. He may have been the George Skipper who the previous day, 1 February 1749/50, purchased 200 acres in Anson County, North Carolina, on the north side of the Pee Dee River [DB A:92]. He sold 50 acres of this land and eight horses to (his son?) Barnabas Skipper on 15 February 1765 [DB 3:188, 192]. He was called George Skipper, Sr., in the 1763 list of taxables for Anson County where he was taxable on five tithes [Holcolm, Anson County, North Carolina, 122]. His sons were most likely

i. Barnabas, born say 1744, taxable on one tithe in Anson County in 1763.

ii. Benjamin, born say 1745, taxable on one tithe in Anson County in 1763.

 

Some of their likely descendants were

i. Moses Skipper/ Scipper, a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County in 1768 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:9] and taxable in Brunswick County on one "white poll" in 1772 [GA 11.1], head of a Brunswick County household of 4 males and 2 females in 1790 [NC:189] and 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:14].

ii. Isom, a "Mulato" taxable in Bladen County in 1768 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:4].

iii. Clemonds, taxed in Brunswick County on one "white poll" in 1772 [GA 11.1].

iv. Urias Scipper, head of a Brunswick County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:14].

v. Isaac Scipper, head of a Brunswick County household of 3 white males in 1790 (abstracted as "Supper" [NC:189] and 8 "other free" in 1800 [NC:14]. He entered 125 acres on Rattlesnake Branch on 7 December 1704 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Brunswick County, 91].

vi. Jesse Scipper, head of a Brunswick County household of 2 males and one female in 1790 (abstracted as "Supper") [NC:189] and 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:14].

vii. John Scipper, head of a Brunswick County household of 1 male and 3 females in 1790 [NC:189] and 5 white females in 1800 [NC:14]. He entered 50 acres in Brunswick County on 13 December 1800 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Brunswick County, 67].

viii. Abram Scipper, head of a Brunswick County household of 3 males and 3 females in 1790 [NC:189] and 4 white females in 1800 [NC:14]. He entered 100 acres bordering his land and John Hogg's on Town Creek on 24 September 1807 [Pruitt, Land Entries: Brunswick County, 106].

ix. John Skipper, Jr., head of a Brunswick County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:228].

x. Nancy Skipper, married John Tann, 3 October 1756 Chowan County bond, Joseph Price bondsman.

 

Endnotes:

1.    Only the index entry has survived for George Skipper's Johnston County deed.

2.    There were no persons counted as "other free" in the 1790 census for Brunswick County. The Skipper family, John Hays, and James Potter were counted as white in 1790 [NC:189] and "other free" in 1800 [NC:14].

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