STEWART FAMILY

The Stewart family probably originated near present-day Dinwiddie County since there were at least a dozen members of the family in that general area by 1730. No evidence has yet been located to indicate whether or not they were all related. There were several Stewart to Stewart marriages. William ("Sonkey") Stewart married Nancy, the daughter of Dr. Thomas Stewart of Dinwiddie County, about 1770, Doctor Stewart's brother James married Priscilla Stewart in Mecklenburg County in 1791, and a Thomas Stewart married the daughter of Peter Stewart before 1801 when he named her in his Chesterfield County will.

Dinwiddie was formed in 1752 from Prince George County which was formed in 1702 from Charles City County. All three are burned-record counties. However, the register of Bristol Parish from 1720-1789 contains records for Dinwiddie and Prince George counties, and the Prince George County court order books for the years 1710-1714 and 1737-1740 as well as wills and inventories for the years 1713-1728 have survived. These contain a number of references to mixed-race members of the Stewart family, but they also contain over thirty references to free, mixed-race people whose full names are not provided. One mixed-race child was called "a Moll. Boy named Wm" in 1725 when William Eaton petitioned the churchwardens of Bristol Parish to bind the child to him. He may have been identical to the "Mulatto Boy" William Stewart who was bound to Eaton by the churchwardens of Bristol Parish in 1739 [Chamberlayne, Bristol Parish Register, 24; Prince George County Orders 1737-40, 241].

Members of the Stewart family were

1        i. Elizabeth, born say 1695.

2        ii. John1, born say 1715.

3        iii. Rebecca1, born say 1717.

4        iv. Ann, born say 1722.

5        v. Elizabeth2, born say 1724.

6        vi. Thomas1, born say 1727.

7        vii. Peter1, born say 1729.

8        viii. James1, born say 1734.

 

1.    Elizabeth1 Stewart, born say 1695, was the mother of "Mulatto" children: Ned, Matthew, Mary, and Martha whose births, indentures, and baptisms were registered in Bristol Parish (Henrico, Prince George, and Dinwiddie Counties). Her "Moll." son Ned was born in the household of Mrs. Frances Wynn sometime before 28 June 1725 when Mrs. Wynn petitioned the Bristol Parish Vestry to have the boy bound to her. She may have also been the mother of William, a "Moll. boy," who was bound to William Eaton in Bristol Parish in 1725 [Chamberlayne, Bristol Parish Register, 24, 27, 362, 366, 368]. Her children were

i. ?Joshua1, born say 1719, a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County in 1747 [Tax List 1747-1821, 4].

9        ii. Edward1/ Ned, born 19 August 1721.

10      iii. ?William1, born say 1723.

11      iv. Matthew1, born 6 January 1726.

12      v. Mary, born 19 September 1732.

13      vi. Martha, born 3 October 1741.

 

2.    John1 Stewart, born say 1715, owed a debt of about 6 pounds currency to William McLain in December 1747 when the Lunenburg County court ordered the sheriff to sell items held by his security, Redman Fallen [Orders 1746-8, 353]. He was a "mulatto" taxable in Lunenburg County in the list of William Caldwell in 1749 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 94]. He had married Martha Harris sometime before 13 October 1763 when the Lunenburg County court bound Patty Steward's son Isham Harris to Amos Tims, Jr. John died before 14 February 1765 when the Lunenburg County court ordered the churchwardens of St. James Parish to bind his orphan daughter Eleanor Steward to William Taylor [Orders 1763-4, 257; 1764-5, 2, 203]. Mecklenburg County was formed from St. James Parish later that year, and in September 1772 the Mecklenburg County court bound Eleanor to Molly Taylor [Orders 1771-73, 318]. On 27 April 1777 Martha's son Moses purchased 100 acres from Henry Jackson in Mecklenburg County on the south side of Allen's Creek adjoining Stephen Mallett, with Stephen and Zachariah Mallett as witnesses [DB 5:56]. She apparently purchased this land in his name since he was only eleven years old at the time. Her 17 January 1779 Mecklenburg County, Virginia will, witnessed by Zachariah Mallett, was proved 9 October 1780 on motion of her executor, Henry Jackson. By her will she left her land to her son Moses and left livestock and money to her children Isham, Nelly, Edy, Fanny, Moses, Sinai, and Disea [WB 1:341]. She was counted as head of a Mecklenburg County household of 7 persons in 1782, but this was probably the listing for her estate [VA:32]. Her estate included 54 acres of land which was sold for taxes in 1793 [DB 8:407-8]. John was the father of

14      i. ?Thomas2, born about 1742.

15      ii. Nelly1, born say 1760.

iii. Edy, born say 1762, ordered bound by the churchwardens of Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, to John Blaxton on 11 October 1764 (no parent named) and called "Daughter of Martha Stewart" on 8 March 1770 when the court ordered her bound by the churchwardens of Cumberland Parish to Sarah Blaxton [Orders 1763-64, 171; 1769-77, 27]. She married William Harris before 11 September 1780 when the Mecklenburg County court ordered Zachariah Mallett to deliver up the will of Patty Stewart, deceased, on the motion of William Harris and his wife Eady. She was called "Edith Stewart now Harris" on 9 August 1784 when the court ordered her son Jerry Stewart bound out [Orders 1779-84, 76; 1784-7, 103].

iv. Fanny2, born say 1764.

 

Martha was the mother of

i. Isham Harris, born say 1756, called "Isham Harris, Son of Patty Stewart" on 13 October 1763 when he was ordered bound to Amos Tims, Jr., by the Lunenburg County court. On 13 April 1769 the court ordered Isham bound instead to John Evans (alias Eppes) [Orders 1763-64, 257; 1766-69, folio 202]. He was taxable in John Evans' Lunenburg County household in 1772 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 304]. He applied for a pension for services in the Revolution at the age of eighty-four years on 8 August 1843 in Rutherford County, North Carolina, stating that he was born in Charlotte County, Virginia, in 1759 and that he was drafted in Lunenburg County.

16      ii. Moses1, born 18 November 1766.

iii. Sinai, orphan of Martha Stewart, ordered bound apprentice in Mecklenburg County on 9 October 1780 [Orders 1779-84, 81], married Samuel Chandler, 23 December 1793 Mecklenburg County bond, William Chandler bondsman.

iv. Disea/ Dicey, born 27 January 1770 according to her mother's will, married Isaac Evans, 24 December 1792 Mecklenburg County bond.

 

3.    Rebecca1 Stewart, born say 1717, sued Charles Hix in Brunswick County, Virginia court in September 1738 for her freedom and a certificate for the same, but the court dismissed the case in February 1738/9 when she failed to appear. Hix was ordered to pay Douglas Irby as an evidence for one day and for coming and going fifty miles [Orders 1732-41, 203, 223]. She was living in Surry County, Virginia, on 17 July 1750 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish to bind out her children: Moggy, Tom, Jack, Nan, Peter, and James [Orders 1749-51, 110]. Joseph Walker sued her in Brunswick County court on 22 June 1756. The jury found her not guilty on 23 February 1757 and ordered Walker to pay costs. She sued Daniel Clarke and Sylvanus Stanton for trespass, but both suits were dismissed by agreement of the parties on 28 February 1759. And her suit against William Evans was dismissed on 28 May 1760 by agreement of the parties [Orders 1756-7, 65, 128, 201-2; 1757-9, 300; 1760-84, 65]. She purchased 50 acres in Brunswick County on the south side of the Meherrin River and the north side of the Great Road from John Parham for 25 pounds on 26 September 1763, and she purchased 70 acres on Fox Branch from Kirby Moody on 16 April 1764 and sold this 70 acres to Moody on 6 June 1766. She purchased 200 acres near the Rocky Run in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, on 23 September 1776. Her land adjoined Drury Going and the Pompey family according to Going's deed of sale for land on the south side of the Meherrin River in Brunswick County on 10 October 1787 [DB 4:215; 7:384; 8:311; 12:84-5; 14:366]. She was called the executrix of Peter Moggy on 23 January 1783 when the Greensville County court dismissed a suit against her for debt brought by Batt Peterson, assignee of Ephraim Peebles, because she was not residing in the county [Orders 1781-9, 56]. She was called administratrix of the estate of Peter Moggy, deceased, on 27 March 1787 when Peterson sued her in Brunswick County court [Orders 1784-8, 463]. She was probably the unnamed mother of Thomas Stewart who provided for her maintenance by his 24 February 1791 Greensville County will [WB 1:181-3]. Rebecca was the mother of

i. Moggy, born say 1740.

17      ii. Thomas3, born say 1743.

18      iii. John2/ Jack, born say 1745.

iv. Ann1, born say 1746, perhaps the Nanny Pompey who, with husband Littleberry Pompey and (brother?) James Stewart, sold 135 acres adjoining Steward's Branch in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, on 26 January 1778 [DB 13:45].

19      v. Peter2, born say 1748.

20      vi. James2, born say 1750.

21      vii. ?Barnett1, born say 1760.

22      viii. ?William4, born say 1761.

 

4.    Ann Steward, born say 1720, was the mother of Fanny Stewart (no race indicated) whose 1 August 1740 birth was registered in Bristol Parish [Chamberlayne, Bristol Parish Register, 367]. She may have been the same Ann Stewart whose children Billy, Matthew, Peyton, Abram, Woody, and Lucretia Stewart (no race indicated) were bound out to the Rev. Arch. McRoberts by the Chesterfield County court on 7 May 1763 [Orders 1759-63, 410]. Peyton (Patron), Abram and Woody Stuard were taxable in Manchester Parish, Chesterfield County, in 1777 [Tax List 1747-1821, frame 131]. Ann was the mother of

i. Fanny, born 1 August 1740.

ii. William, born say 1749.

iii. Matthew, born say 1751.

iv. Peyton1, born say 1753.

v. Woody, born say 1757, taxable in Chesterfield County from 1793 to 1796 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 188, 220, 286].

23      vi. Lucretia, born say 1759.

vii. Abram, born about 1761, bound apprentice in Chesterfield County on 7 May 1763. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County on a tithe and a horse from 1788 to 1810, taxable on a slave in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 72, 109, 147, 220, 286, 545, 622, 717, 753, 802]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 March 1809: forty eight years old, black complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 113]. He was taxable on 10 acres in Chesterfield County from 1811 to 1816 [Land Tax List 1791-1822, B lists].

 

5.    Elizabeth2 Stewart, born say 1724, was the "free mulatta" mother of Thomas Stuart who was baptized in Bruton Parish, James City County, on 3 April 1748 [Bruton Parish Register, 8]. She was the ancestor of

i. Thomas4, born say 1748, baptized on 3 April 1748.

ii. ?Sarah, born about 1750, registered in Petersburg on 15 August 1800: a light Colourd Malatto woman, five feet four inches high, fifty years old, born free & raised in Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 175].

iii. ?Tomison, born about 1769, registered in Petersburg on 21 December 1809: a dark brown woman of Colour, five feet two inches high, forty years old, born free & raised in Wmsburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 516].

iv. ?John7, born say 1775, taxable in Charles City County from 1805 to 1814: listed with 2 tithables in 1807 and 1809, listed as a "Mulattoe" in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1788-1814]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958].

v. ?William, born say 1780, head of a Charles City County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:958], taxable in Charles City County from 1805 to 1813, listed as a "Mulattoe" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1788-1814]. He was the father of Sarah who registered in Charles City County on 19 January 1832: Sarah Evans, wife of Thomas Evans, who was Sarah Stewart, daughter of Wm Stewart, a light mulato, twenty four years of age [Minutes 1830-9, 89]. On 19 March 1835 the overseers of the poor bound to him William Stewart (born April 1827), orphan of Sally Stewart [Minutes 1830-9, 227].

24      vi. ?Henry, born say 1785.

 

7.    Thomas1 Stewart, born say 1727, was a medical doctor in Dinwiddie County before 13 November 1778 when the following notice appeared in the Virginia Gazette:

I Nathaniel Hobbs, of Dinwiddie County, do hereby certify, that in the month of May last my negro boy Tom received a kick from a stallion in the forehead, which deprived him of his senses from Sunday until Tuesday evening in which time he lost a quantity of blood, and many ounces of matter, supposed to be part of his brain, but by the assistance of Dr. Thomas Stewart, of Dinwiddie, and his specifick balsam, he is now perfectly well, and as sound and sensible as ever [Virginia Gazette (Dixon and Hunter), page 3, column 1 viewed on the Colonial Williamsburg web site: http://research.history.org].

He was taxable in Dinwiddie County on a free tithable, 17 slaves and 874 acres in 1782 [PPTL, 1782-90; Land Tax List 1782-1814]. The land tax records of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, list a grant of 362 acres to Thomas Stewart [Land Tax List, 1782-1814, 1782 Land Office Grants]. This was apparently the land office grant he received on 15 May 1784 as assignee of Jacob Chavous for 362 acres on Sandy Creek [Grants L:614]. He was called Thomas Stewart of Dinwiddie County when he was taxable on 720 acres in Mecklenburg County from 1782 to 1793 [Land Tax List 1782-1811A, A lists]. He was called Doctor Thomas Stewart in the Dinwiddie County tax records in 1787 and thereafter. He was called Dr. Thomas Stewart when he was taxable in Dinwiddie County on 874 acres on Walker's Road from 1787 to 1789 and on 845 acres from 1790 to 1807 [Land Tax List 1782-1814, B lists]. James Crook owed him 109 pounds on 27 March 1788 when Crook mortgaged three slaves in Brunswick County to secure the debt [DB 14:439]. The February 1789 session of the Dinwiddie County court granted him permission to keep an ordinary in his house. Between March 1789 and March 1790 he sued four persons for debt in Dinwiddie County court [Orders 1789-91, 4, 8, 177, 180]. While resident in Dinwiddie County he was taxable in Mecklenburg County on slaves Berry, Patty and Lewis in 1787, taxable on Frederick Gowen and slaves Berry, Judy, Patty and Lewis in 1788, taxable on his son Charles and four slaves in 1790, taxable on his sons Charles and Joseph and four slaves in 1791, taxable on son Joseph and five slaves in 1793, but not taxable thereafter in Mecklenburg County [PPTL 1782-1805, frames 177, 223, 276, 329, 383, 451, 470]. He was called Thomas Stewart of Dinwiddie County on 5 December 1792 when he made a deed of gift (signing) to his son James Stewart for 150 acres in Mecklenburg County adjoining the land of his brother James Stewart [DB 8:306]. His grandson John Day described him as:

a coloured man of Dinwiddie County, Virginia whose name was Thomas Stewart, a medical doctor [Rev. John Day to Rev. J.B. Taylor by Sneed & Westfall, History of Thomas Day, 6].

He was called Thomas Stewart, Sr., of Dinwiddie County on 10 November 1799 when he sold 102 acres on Butcher's Creek in Mecklenburg County to (his son-in-law) Humphrey Wilson for 30 pounds, and the same day Thomas and his wife Mildred Stewart of Dinwiddie County sold 162 acres adjoining Wilson's line on Sandy Creek to (their son-in-law) William Stewart for 60 pounds [DB 10:267, 268]. Thomas married, second, Winnifred Atkins, 5 February 1795 Sussex County bond. He died about 1810 when his estate was taxable on 13 slaves. His widow Winnie was taxable on 5 slaves in Dinwiddie County in 1811 [PPTL, 1810-14]. The Mecklenburg County chancery suit of his granddaughter Hannah Stewart described him as a "black man but a great doctor" and stated that he was married twice and that his second wife died about 1812 [Chancery Causes, 1872-008, LVA]. His will survived because it was included in a 24 April 1832 to 4 September 1832 Dinwiddie County chancery court suit which also named his children and their heirs. He actually made two wills. In the first, dated 22 September 1804, he left a dollar to his daughter Molly, 25 pounds to his daughter Sally, a dollar to the children of his deceased daughter Tabitha, 50 pounds to his son William, the land and plantation whereon he was then living and "Negroes" Peter, Miles, Jerry, little Dinah, little Frank and four horses to his son Armstead; "negroes" Bob and Len, a filly and a horse to son Joseph; "negroe" boy Nelson to his grandson Richard, son of Joseph. He willed that the old place where he formerly lived should be sold with one moiety of the profits given to his son John. His executors should send unnamed boys, each of whom he had emancipated in a preceding clause of the will, to school for two years and then bound to some good trade. The children of his son John should be schooled for three years at the expense of the estate and the surplus of the estate after payment of debts should go to his son Armstead and his wife. The will was presented in court on 17 September 1810, but was not admitted into record for reasons appearing to the court. The second will was dated 18 May 1808 and proved in January 1810. He divided the land where he was living among his sons Charles, Joseph and Armstead; lent half his land, four slaves, his "mantion house" and stage wagon to his wife Winnie during her natural life; divided another eighteen slaves among his children Charles, Joseph, Armstead, Mary Stewart, Nancy Stewart (of Mecklenburg), grandson Henry Armstead Stewart, grandson John Day, grandchildren Eliza and Richard Deen (Aberdeen) (children of his daughter Sophy), and Tempy Boyd wife of Capt. Boyd of Portsmouth. He noted that his sons Charles and Joseph had moved to the "Western Country" and might never return, in which case their share was to go to his grandson Henry Armstead Stewart when he reached the age of twenty-one. The July 1810 court were of opinion that it ought not be admitted to record because he was not of sound mind and for other reasons it was not his true last will [Wills 1801-69 (loose papers); Chancery Orders 1832-52, 1, 12, 13]. He was the father of

i. Nancy, born say 1755, married William ("Sonkey") Stewart.

25      ii. James3, born say 1757.

iii. Charles1, born say 1763, taxable on 233 acres on Cox's Road in Dinwiddie County which was transferred to him by William Sallard between October 1783 and November 1784. He was taxable on this land until 1806, taxable on 185-1/2 acres from 1807 to 1814, and taxable from 1811 to 1814 on 80 acres which he inherited from his father Doctor Thomas Stewart [Land Tax List 1782-1814, B lists]. He was tithable in Dinwiddie County in the same district as Dr. Thomas Stewart from 1784 to 1820: in his own household from 1784 to 1788, listed in Dr. Thomas Stewart's household in 1789 and 1793, taxable on 2 slaves in 1801, and taxable on about 3 slaves until 1820 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90; 1791-9; 1800-9; 1810-14; 1814-19, B lists]. He was living on his father's Mecklenburg County land in 1790 and 1791 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 329, 383].

iv. Mourning, born about 1766, married John Day [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 1]. She was counted as an eighty-four-year-old woman in the 1850 census for Caswell County.

v. William, father of William, Herbert and Lucy Stewart. Lucy was married to Stephen Hall by 1832 [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 12]. Herbert and Polly Stewart were bound by the Mecklenburg County court to Thomas Spence and his wife on 11 September 1809 [Orders 1809-11, 53]. Herbert, born 1794-1806, was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:144b].

vi. John5, born about 1772, taxable in his father's Dinwiddie County household from 1788 to 1792 and in 1798 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90; 1791-9, B list]. His son John S. Stewart was named in the September 1832 Dinwiddie County chancery suit brought by the heirs of Dr. Thomas Stewart [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 13].

vii. Mary, born say 1774, married Edmund Gowan (Gowen). Edmund was taxable in his father-in-law's Dinwiddie County household in 1788. He purchased 200 acres in Mecklenburg County on Sandy Creek adjoining William Stewart's line from his father-in-law on 5 November 1799 [DB 10:176]. Edmund and Mary's heirs Henry, Lemon and Thomas Gowan were plaintiffs in a 4 September 1832 Dinwiddie County chancery suit [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 12].

viii. Joseph1, born about 1775, a sixteen-year-old taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 383]. He was taxable in the Dinwiddie County household of his father from 1796 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-9; 1800-9].

ix. Thomas6, born say 1776, taxable in the Dinwiddie County household of his brother Charles in 1797 [PPTL, 1791-9, B list], probably the Thomas Stewart who was a "Molatto" taxable in the lower district of Sussex County in 1806 [PPTL, 1782-1812, frame 687] and a cabinetmaker living with John Day in the "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" for Sussex County in 1806 [List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1801-1812, frame 32, LVA microfilm no. 221].

x. Tabitha, born say 1777, married ___ Eppes [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 13], the Joel Epps who purchased 200 acres on Sandy Creek in Mecklenburg County from his father-in-law on 5 November 1799 [DB 10:177].

xi. Sally, born say 1779, married Humphrey Wilson [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 1]. Humphrey purchased land in Mecklenburg County from his father-in-law by deed recorded in 1800 [DB 10:268].

xii. Elizabeth2, married Moses Brown [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 1], head of a Southampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1810.

xiii. Soffee, married Henry Aberdeen [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 13], head of a Norfolk County household of 4 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [VA:826]. Henry may have been identical to "Aberdeen a free negroe" whose suit for trespass, assault and battery against John Britain was dismissed by the City of Norfolk Hustings Court on 20 June 1785 because the defendant was not an inhabitant [Orders 1783-5, 185b]. Henry was administrator of his father-in-law's Dinwiddie County estate [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 1]. He purchased a lot at Dinwiddie and Glasgow Streets and a half lot in Westminster Square in Portsmouth, Norfolk County, from Willis Culpeper on 1 October 1790 [DB 32:140]. He was taxable in Norfolk County from 1794 to 1817: taxable on 2 slaves over 16 and 2 horses but not charged with his own tithe in 1794; called a seaman from 1798 to 1803 when he was taxable on 2 slaves over 16; a mariner living in Portsmouth when he was in a list of "free Negroes and Mulattoes" with males Richard and Henry, and females Tempy, Corn, Sophia and Elizabeth Aberdeen in his household in 1801 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 94, 167, 241; 1813-24, frames 11, 56, 94, 121, 238, 350, 460]. On 14 April 1797 he was living in the town of Portsmouth when he emancipated his slaves Rose and her child Lydia in Norfolk County court for 50 pounds paid by Lydia [DB 37:46]. They registered in Norfolk County on 16 July 1816: Rose Anderson (50 years old) and Lydia Anderson (19 years old): of dark complexion, liberated by Henry Aberdeen. His children Henry Armistead Aberdeen (20 years old, a dark complected man) and Sophia Jennet Aberdeen (17 years old, a mulatto woman) registered on 15 January 1821 [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 120-1]. On 19 November 1800 the Norfolk County court awarded him $168 in his suit against Syme & Marshall [Orders 1799-1801, 49a, 183a]. On 20 June 1807 he and his wife sued George Whitfield, and on 22 September the court ordered Whitfield to post bond of $300 for a breach of the peace against Henry and ordered Henry to post the same bond for a breach of the peace against Whitfield. The court issued the same order against both parties again on 21 September 1808, this time requiring a bond of $1,000 with two securities of $500 each. On 24 August 1809 he sued Whitfield for assault, but the jury could not reach a verdict [Orders 1806-8, 174a, 250; Orders 1808-10, 111-2, 325]. On 9 April 1798 he (making his mark) and his wife Sophia (signing Sopphe Deen) of the town of Portsmouth sold for 46 pounds half a lot near the corner of Middle Street and Queen Street in Linen Square which he had purchased from Cornelius Edwards [DB 37:157]. And he recorded a deed of trust for slaves Betsey, Mary, Thomas, Sophia and Jane on 19 April 1825. He was deceased and his daughter Sophia had married Joseph E. Cocke before 15 September 1828 when a suit was filed in chancery against his estate [Minutes 18:363; 19:75; 21:19]. His heirs Henry, Soffee and Richard Aberdeen were named in the September 1832 Dinwiddie County chancery suit brought by the heirs of Dr. Thomas Stewart [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 13].

xiv. Armstead, born say 1783, over sixteen years old when he was listed in John Day's Dinwiddie County household in 1800 (with his brother Henry Stewart). He was taxable in the household of his father in 1807 and taxable in his own household with a slave in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-99; 1800-9; 1810-14]. He was head of a Dinwiddie County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:161]. He was called Armstead Stewart of Dinwiddie County when he married Flora Crook, 10 October 1806 Brunswick County bond, Robert Crook security. Robert Crook was a "free negro" head of a Brunswick County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:708]. Armstead was taxable in Dinwiddie County on 3 slaves in 1811, 2 in 1812 and his estate was taxable on 2 slaves and 3 horses in 1813. (His widow) Flora Stewart was taxable on 2 slaves from 1815 to 1819 [Personal Property Tax List 1810-14; 1815-19]. His heirs Theophilus H., Edward R., Henry A., Julian, and Robert (still an infant) were named in a chancery suit in Dinwiddie County on 4 September 1832 [Chancery Orders 1832-52, 13].

 

7.    Peter1 Stewart, born say 1729, purchased 100 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, joining Robert Duke, the road, and Seymore Somersall for 5 shillings from Humphrey Revell and his wife Margaret on 19 February 1751. This was probably a deed of gift from his wife's parents. He and his wife Celia sold this land back to Humphrey Revell three and one-half years later on 26 August 1755 for one pound, ten shillings. On 20 November 1760 he purchased 335 acres near Wiccacon Swamp and Bridger's line and sold it on 15 March 1765 without a dower release [DB 2:161, 229; 3:368]. He voted for Joseph Sikes in the Northampton County election of 1762 [SS 837 by NCGSJ XII:170]. On 5 September 1775 he purchased 165 acres from Charles Gregory, and he and his wife Jean sold this land to Francis Stewart of Greensville County, Virginia, on 26 March 1795 with the proviso that he live on it rent free [DB 6:127; 10:162; 11:149]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 2 "other free" and 5 slaves in 1790 [NC:73] and 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:477]. His 30 December 1794 Northampton County will was proved in December 1805. He left his land to his wife, to be divided among his unnamed children at her death. He mentioned Jane Evans and his grandchild James Stewart [WB 2:309]. Perhaps he was the father of

26      i. Francis2, born say 1760.

ii. Christopher, born say 1775, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76]. According to his grandson Samuel T. Stewart's application for Cherokee compensation in 1908, his wife's name was Clara and they were the parents of John Stewart who was born in Henry County, Virginia, about 1784 and married Virginia Fendley, daughter of Thomas Fendley (Findley) and Priscilla Rickman [Jordan, Cherokee by Blood, Cherokee Roll of 1909, application no. 19117]. Christopher's widow Clara Stewart was head of a Stokes County, North Carolina household of a "free colored" woman aged 26-45 and 2 females under age 14 in 1820 [NC:371] and a "free colored" woman aged 36-55 in 1830 [NC:237]. Their son John was a "M" taxable in Patrick County, Virginia, in 1819 and 1820 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1823, frames 700, 717] and head of a Patrick County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

 

8.    James1 Stewart, born say 1734, may have been the James Stewart of Brunswick County who leased land on Flat Rock Creek in Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg County, from Agnes Freeman (widow of Arthur Freeman) for twelve years on 10 December 1754 for the yearly rent of 20 pounds currency. The lease included the use of a grist mill and a slave named Tony [DB 4:131]. He was taxable on 100 acres, 3 horses, and about 10 cattle in Dinwiddie County from 1782 to 1788 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90; Land Tax List 1782-1814, B lists]. He was called James Stewart, Sr., of Dinwiddie County when he purchased 225 acres in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, at the head of Little Creek adjoining Stith and Munford from William and Mary Stewart for 100 pounds on 11 February 1788 [DB 7:253]. That same day he was security for the 11 February 1788 Mecklenburg County, Virginia, marriage bond of (his nephew) James Stewart, Jr. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County on his own tithe, a slave named Isham, and two horses in 1790 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1805, frame 356]. He married Priscilla Stewart, 14 November 1791 Mecklenburg County bond, John (Chavis) Walden security. He was called brother of Doctor Thomas Stewart of Dinwiddie County on 5 December 1792 when Thomas made a Mecklenburg County deed of gift to his son James [DB 8:306]. He was an exempt taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1795, taxable in 1796 on a slave named Judy, adjacent to James Stewart, Jr. [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 558, 622]. He was called a blacksmith on 10 June 1799 William Stewart, shoemaker, sued him for a 3 pound debt due by account [Orders 1798-1801, 192]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County on 242 acres in 1804 [DB 16:272]. He head of a Mecklenburg County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:148b]. He sold 45 acres in Mecklenburg County on Mill Creek adjoining William Stewart to Elizabeth Brandun on 10 September 1811 [DB 14:461]. On 26 July 1816 James Drew paid the taxes which were due for the years 1804 and 1805 on 170 acres of James Stewart, Sr.'s land [DB 16:277]. His 22 March 1804 Mecklenburg County will, proved 20 May 1816 by William Stewart, left 125 acres to his "housekeeper Priscilla Stewart" and her eight children Polly, James, Amey, Peter, Joseph, Patty, Anny and William [WB 8:237]. He was the father of

i. Thomas, born say 1773, over the age of sixteen in 1791 when he was taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 383].

ii. John, born say 1775, over the age of sixteen in 1791 when he was taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 383].

iii. Polly, married James Drew, 1817 Mecklenburg County bond.

iv. James6, born say 1785.

v. Amey, married Robin (Robert) Evans, 13 February 1809 Mecklenburg County bond, James Chavous security.

vi. Peter6, born in 1789, not yet twenty-one years old in 1804 when James Stewart made his will. He and his brother Joseph were to live with Elison Crew and receive tuition until the age of twenty-one. He received a certificate in Mecklenburg County on 20 May 1812 signed by Christopher Blackburn, Alexander S. Field, J.B. Jones, and Jo. B. Clausel: a free man born and raised in the County of Mecklenburg and State of Virginia ... five feet ten Inches and three quarters, a bright mulatto born some time in the year one thousand Seven hundred and eighty nine ... resided in the County and State above mentioned, since his birth to the present period and has generally supported a good Character [Free Person of Color, no.3, p.2].

vii. Joseph2, born say 1790, head of a Mecklenburg County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820. On 21 November 1828 he sold 125 acres adjoining the lands of William Stewart, deceased, to Henry Avery [DB 23:512].

viii. Patty, born say 1792.

ix. Anney3, born say 1794.

x. William8, born say 1796.

 

9.    Edward1/ Ned Stewart, born 19 August 1721, son of Elizabeth Stuard, was baptized in Bristol Parish on 29 October 1721. On 28 June 1725 Mrs. Frances Wynn petitioned the Bristol Parish Vestry to have a "Moll. boy named Ned son of Eliz. Stuard born in ye house of Mrs. Wynne" bound to her as an apprentice. And on 6 March 1725/6 Captain Buller Herbert petitioned the Vestry to have "A Mollatto boy named Ned son of Elizabeth Stuard born in his house" bound to him [Chamberlayne, Bristol Parish Register, 24, 27, 362]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County in 1747 [Tax List 1747-1821], was taxable in Chesterfield County on a tithe, 2 horses, and 3 cattle in 1786, on 2 tithes in 1794, taxable on a slave over the age of 16 and a horse in 1795 but not taxable himself, called Edward Stewart, Sr., in 1796 when he was taxable on 2 tithes and was last taxable in 1801 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 19, 88, 92, 125, 165, 205, 237, 305, 343, 377, 453]. Edward may have been the father of

27      i. John3, born say 1757.

ii. James3, born say 1760, taxable in Powhatan County in 1787, a "Mulo" taxable on a horse in 1788 and 1789 but not listed again in Powhatan County [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 10, 24, 38]. He may have been the James Stewart who was a "freed Negroe" taxable in the lower district of adjoining Goochland County in 1793 and 1794, called an "Indian" in 1795 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1809, frames 332, 380, 411].

28      iii. Edward2, born about 1762.

iv. William, a "Mo" taxable on a horse in Powhatan County in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frame 38].

v. Daniel, born say 1770, taxable in Chesterfield County on one tithe and a horse from 1791 to 1797, two tithes from 1798 to 1801, one tithe and a horse in from 1802 to 1805, and a "Mulatto" taxable in 1806 and 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 91, 125, 165, 206, 272, 305, 343, 377, 453, 488, 529, 604, 642, 689].

vi. Nathaniel1, born about 1774, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809: thirty five years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 94]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1797 to 1811, a "Mulatto" laborer living with his wife and six children on the land of Samuel Davis in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 305, 453, 530, 604, 642, 689, 738, 824].

vii. Pleasant, born about 1778, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 October 1810: thirty two years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 142]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1801 to 1811, a farmer living on John W. Gilly's land in 1809, living with his wife and child in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 453, 529, 604, 689, 738, 824] and a "Free Negrow of Colour" living on William Roulett's land in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

viii. Joshua2, born about 1779, registered in Petersburg on 22 May 1802: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet eight and a half inches high, twenty three years old, short knotty hair, has holes in his ears, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield & now a resident of the sd. County. Renewed in 1809 - a shoemaker. His wife Darkey registered on 21 December 1809: a light brown Mulatto woman, wife of Joshua Steward, five feet three 3/4 inches high, twenty seven years old, born free & raised in Lancaster County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, nos. 223, 502]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County in 1801 [1801 Personal Property Tax List A, p.13] and head of a Petersburg Town household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:122a].

ix. William5, born about 1779, registered in Petersburg on 8 September 1804: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet seven and a half inches high, twenty five years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 284].

x. William6/ Billy, born about 1779, registered in Petersburg on 21 December 1809: a yellow brown Mulatto man, five feet six inches high, thirty years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 519]. He was a "Free Negrow of Colour" living on William Roulett's land in Chesterfield County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

xi. Lucy, born about 1784, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809: twenty five years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 89].

xii. Jesse, born about 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 October 1810: twenty one years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 144].

xiii. John10, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 February 1814: twenty three years old, bright yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 196]. He was head of a Chesterfield County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:70/1062].

 

10.    William1 Stewart, born say 1723, was called the "Moll. boy named William who formerly lived with William Standback" by William Eaton in 1725 when he petitioned the churchwardens of Bristol Parish to have William bound to him [Chamberlayne, Bristol Parish Register, 24]. On 13 March 1738/9 the churchwardens of Bristol Parish in Prince George County ordered William Stewart, a "Mulatto Boy" (no parent or age indicated), bound an apprentice to William Eaton [Orders 1737-40, 241]. He was a taxable head of household in Lunenburg County, Virginia, with Ephraim Drew in 1772 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 299, 351]. He purchased 200 acres on the head branches of Little Creek in Mecklenburg County from Jacob Chaves on 8 March 1779 [DB 5:399]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 6 free persons and 2 slaves in 1782 [VA:33] and was taxable in Mecklenburg County on slaves Edward and Charles, 6 cattle and 4 horses in 1782; taxable on Anselm Cunningham's tithe and a slave named Ned in 1784, called "William Stewart B. Smith" (blacksmith) in 1785 when he was taxable on slaves Bob and Charles. He was taxable on slave Ned from 1786 to 1788 but not taxable thereafter in Mecklenburg County [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 12, 27, 85, 126, 223]. William (signing) and his wife Mary sold their 200 acres on Little Creek to James Steward, Sr., of Dinwiddie County, on 11 February 1788 [DB 7:253]. Mary may have been identical to "Mary Haris now Stuart" whose son Isham Harris was ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. James Parish in Mecklenburg County court on 8 November 1766 [Orders 1765-8, 231]. Isham was head of a Wake County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:769]. William was head of a Wake County household of 11 "other free" in 1790 [NC:105] and 11 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [NC:798]. He had undertaken to pay Thomas Evans' costs on 13 February 1786 when Jacob Chavis sued Evans in Mecklenburg County court, but William left the county without paying Chavis. On 13 September 1790 Chavis obtained an attachment against William's estate and recovered part of the debt from a number of persons including Henry Chavis, Henry Chavis, Jr., and James Stewart who testified that they owed William money [Orders 1784-87, 461; 1787-92, 536, 540]. William was residing in North Carolina on 11 July 1806 when Jacob Chavis of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, gave John Chavis power of attorney to recover a debt from him [Mecklenburg DB 13:1, 2]. He tried to prove the nuncupative will of John Jackson Chaves in Wake County court in May 1808, but John Jackson's aunt Lucy Cole of Mecklenburg County contested the will, claiming she was his only heir. She won her case based on testimony from Frederick Ivey, Peter Chavis and afidavits by three of her white neighbors [Haun, Wake County Court Minutes VII:67-8, 151]. Perhaps William was the father of

29      i. William2, born say 1745.

30      ii. John4, born say 1761.

iii. Benjamin, born say 1769, a "Mulatto" taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1790 (adjacent to Moses Stewart) [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 357].

iv. Prissey, born say 1777, married Frederick Ivy, 14 December 1795 Mecklenburg County bond, William Willis security.

v. John Ginnet, born say 1778, married Polley Manning, 9 December 1794 Mecklenburg County bond, Earbe Chavous security, with a note from Polly's mother Susanna Chavous. He may have been the John Stewart who obtained a certificate in Mecklenburg County from W. Birdett on 22 November 1809: John Stewart, is a free man, and an Inhabitant of the County of Mecklenburg, he came down with my waggon, and not going home as he expected by the return of the waggon, has made application to me for this Certificate being fearful of molestation [Free Person of Color, no.1, p.1].

 

11.    Matt/ Matthew1 Steward, born 6 January 1726, "Son of Eliza Stuard" (no race indicated), was living in Bristol Parish on 22 December 1750 when the birth of his son Charles Toney by Mary Toney was recorded [Chamberlayne, Register of Bristol Parish, 364, 369]. He may have been the Matthew Stewart who was a taxable head of a Lunenburg County household with Titus Stewart in 1772 and taxable with Titus and Francis Stewart in 1773 and 1774 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 302, 313, 343]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County on his own tithe and a horse in 1782 and 1783 [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 11, 27]. He sued Abram Morris in Mecklenburg County court on 9 December 1783 for a debt of 7 pounds and he and Titus Stewart were sued by Benjamin Clark on 14 July 1788 [Orders 1779-84, 483; 1787-92, 258]. He may have been the father of

31      i. Titus, born say 1753.

ii. Francis1, born say 1756, taxable in Lunenburg County with Matthew and Titus Stewart in 1773 and 1774 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 313, 343]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of two persons in 1782 [VA:33] and taxable there from 1783 to 1785 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 77, 90, 101]. He was taxable on 157 acres in the lower district of Mecklenburg County in 1787 and 1788 but taxable on no land in 1789 [Land Tax List 1782-1811A, B list].

32        iii. Charles1, born say 1757.

 

12.    Mary Stewart, born 19 September 1732, was the "Mullatto girl of Elizabeth Stuart" who was baptized in Bristol Parish, Virginia, on 4 February 1733 [Chamberlayne, Bristol Parish Register, 366]. She died before December 1778 court in Northampton County, North Carolina, when her 13 September 1778 will was proved. Arthur Williams and William Stuart were named executors. She left ten shillings to her daughter Rebecca, made a bequest of six pounds to Sarah Mitchell, and divided the remainder of her estate among her children when they came of age: Deme, Tempta, James, Thomas, and Bitha [WB 1:309]. Her children were

i. Rebecca2, born say 1756.

33      ii. Deme (Dempsey), born say 1758.

iii. Tempta.

iv. James4, born say 1761.

v. Thomas5, born say 1770, bound by the Greensville County court as an apprentice to Thomas Stewart on 26 October 1786 [Orders 1781-9, 294]. He was taxable in Greensville County in 1795 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frame 192].

vi. Bitha, perhaps the Tabitha Stewart who was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 7 "free colored" in 1820.

 

13.    Martha Stewart, born 30 October 1741, the daughter of Elizabeth Stewart (no race indicated), was baptized in Bristol Parish, Virginia, on 4 July 1742 [Chamberlayne, Bristol Parish Register, 368]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Jane, born about 1757, registered in Petersburg on 24 January 1803: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, forty six years old, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 246].

ii. Arey, born about 1765, registered in Petersburg on 19 August 1794: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet high, twenty nine years old, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 63].

iii. Nancy, born about 1765, registered in Petersburg on 12 September 1805: a dark brown, rather black free Negro woman, five feet four inches high, forty years old, short black hair, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 362].

iv. Frank, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a dark Mulatto man, five feet eight & a half inches high, twenty three years old, born free & raised in the town of Brandford, Prince George County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 29].

v. David, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 24 August 1796: a black Mulatto man, five feet ten inches high, large lips & bushy head of hair, twenty five, born free in County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 113].

vi. Betsy, born about 1786, registered in Petersburg on 9 July 1805: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet inches high, nineteen years old, holes in her ears, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 314].

 

14.   Thomas2 Stewart, born about 1742 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, enlisted in Captain Dawson's Company in Lunenburg County under General Gibson and was at Valley Forge and Guilford Courthouse. He may have been the Thomas Stewart who had an illegitimate child named Tempy by Keziah Matthews in Mecklenburg County before 14 June 1784. On 9 July 1787 Harrod Rudd and Frederick Ivey were his securities for payment of 8 pounds per year for support of the child for the next five years [Orders 1784-87, 51; 1787-92, 63; 1792-5, 107]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1790 (with the initials "B.S." after his name) [PPTL, 1782-1805, frame 330]. He and his wife Sarah were married by James Yancey of Granville County, North Carolina, in the fall of the year 1791 [M805-772, frame 69]. He was called "Thomas Stewart a Dark Man" by the 17 September 1792 Person County court when the court exempted him from payment of poll tax [Minutes 1792-6]. He was head of a Person County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:598] and 11 in 1810 [NC:632]. His 30 January 1818 Person County will, proved in May 1818, named his wife Sarah and children: Nathaniel, Mavel Sheppard, Nancy, Joseph, John, David, and Thomas [WB 8:77]. He died on 15 February 1818 leaving seven children. His wife Sarah Stewart, formerly Sarah Drummond, born about 1769, was living in Person County on 4 March 1843 when she received a pension for his services [M805-772, frame 69]. Their children were

i. Nathaniel2, head of a Person County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:498].

ii. Mavel, married Byrd Shepherd, 20 April 1815 Person County bond. He may have been related to Shepherd Stewart who was detained as a slave by Robert Tucker in Halifax County, Virginia, on 24 August 1790 [Pleas 1790-2, 33].

iii. Nancy Stewart.

iv. Joseph3, born say 1792.

v. John11, born say 1795.

vi. David.

vii. Thomas9, perhaps the Thomas Stewart, born about 1804, who obtained "free papers" in Halifax County, Virginia, on 29 November 1831, and registered them in Ross County, Ohio: a man of color, aged about 27 years, 5 ft 9 1/4 in., was born free [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 34].

 

15.    Nelly1 Stewart, born say 1760, was called "Eleanor Steward orphan of John Stewart, deceased," on 14 February 1765 when the Lunenburg County court ordered the churchwardens of Cumberland Parish to bind her to William Taylor [Orders 1764-5, 205]. She was living in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, in September 1772 when the court ordered her bound to Molly Taylor, and on 8 July 1782 she was called Milley Steward when the court ordered her children Elizabeth and Bartley Steward bound to Robert Taylor. She was called Nelly Stewart on 12 June 1786 and 8 February 1790 when the court ordered her bastard children Betsy and Bartlett Stewart bound out by the overseers of the poor [Orders 1771-3, 318; 1779-84, 176; 1787-92, 470, 511, 524]. Nelly was head of a Warren County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:756]. Her children were

i. ?Matthew, born say 1776, son of Thomas Evans, bound out by the Mecklenburg County court to Charles Evans on 10 March 1789 [Orders 1787-92, 363]. He was probably identical to twelve-year-old Matthew Stewart, "orphan of Matthew Stewart," who was bound out by the Warren County court to John Moseley on 27 February 1788 [Minutes 1787-93, 39; WB 5:6]. He married Siller Walden, 25 February 1799 Mecklenburg County bond, William Chandler security.

ii. Betsy, born say 1780, bastard of Nelly Stewart bound out on 8 July 1782 and bound to Martha Coleman in Mecklenburg County on 12 June 1786 [Orders 1779-84, 176; 1787-92, 524]. She was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820.

iii. Bartlett, born say 1782, bound out to Robert Taylor in Mecklenburg County on 8 July 1782, bound out again on 8 February 1790, and bound to John White on 9 October 1797 [Orders 1779-84, 176; 1787-92, 470; 1795-8]. He married Elizabeth Drew, 21 October 1807 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, George Guy security. He was taxable on 100 acres and 1 poll in Nutbush District of Warren County in 1815 [Tax List Papers, Vols TC 8, 1795-1815].

iv. Mahalah, "bastard of Nelley Stewart," ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor on 12 July 1790 [Orders 1787-92, 511].

 

16.    Moses1 Stewart, born 18 November 1766 according to his mother's will, purchased 100 acres in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on the south side of Allen's Creek adjoining Stephen Mallett from Henry Jackson on 27 April 1777, Stephen and Zachariah Mallett witnesses [DB 5:56]. Since he was only ten years old at the time, his mother probably purchased the land in his name. He was taxable on a 16-21 year old tithe, 3 horses, and 8 cattle in Mecklenburg County from 1787 to 1798 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 202, 304, 486, 698]. He married Polly Walden, 20 December 1788 Mecklenburg County bond, and moved to Randolph County, North Carolina, near his wife's family. He was head of a Randolph County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:341] and 11 in 1810 [NC:65]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Randolph County on 20 November 1829 for himself and his son Shadrack Stuart, "a man of colour," which stated that Moses had been known as free in Randolph County for over thirty years and wished to move to Indiana or Illinois. He was described as a "large mulatto man" when he recorded the certificate in Madison County, Illinois, on 17 October 1838, and testified that his family consisted of his seventy-year-old "mulatto" wife Mary, thirty-seven-year-old daughter Winnie (wife of Turner Stewart), and thirty-nine-year-old daughter Queentina (wife of George Barton) [Madison County Emancipation Register 1830-60, 17, 29-30]. His grandson Dalton Stewart applied for Cherokee benefits (rejected) in 1908 and named Moses Stewart's children: Griffin, Shadrick, George, Allen, Machack, Walden, Quiny, Darcus, Winnie, Clara, and Mary [Jordan, Cherokee by Blood, III:42-3]. Moses was the father of

i. Griffin2.

ii. Shadrack.

iii. George.

iv. Allen.

v. Meshack.

vi. Walden, born 24 January 1795 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, according to his son Dalton. He was head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1830.

vii. Queentina, born about 1799, married George Barton in Madison County, Illinois, on 9 March 1831 [Marriage Register 6:21, license #21; Emancipation Register 1830-60, 39].

viii. Darcus.

ix. Winnie, born about 1801, called Winny Chavers when she married Turner Stewart on 1 October 1834 in Madison County, Illinois [Madison County marriage license no. 117; Emancipation Register 1830-60, 19, 21, 23].

x. Clara.

xi. Mary.

 

17.    Thomas3 Stewart, born say 1743, son of Rebecca Stewart, was ordered bound by the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish in Surry County, Virginia, on 17 July 1750 [Orders 1749-51, 110]. He sued Chisland and Henry Morris in Brunswick County, Virginia court for trespass, assault and battery on 25 July 1769, and he sued Joseph Wright for debt on 24 November 1783 [Orders 1768-72, 125; 1760-84, 289]. He purchased 114 acres on the southside of Meherrin Branch in Brunswick County for 75 pounds in January 1778 [DB 13:28]. He won a case against Robert Hicks for a debt of 100 pounds in Brunswick County court on 26 April 1785 and sued several other persons for debt on 23 March 1786, 26 March 1787, and on 28 July 1788 [Orders 1784-8, 130, 265, 344, 436, 448; 1788-92, 41]. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1782 to 1790: taxable on 6 horses and 12 catlle in 1782, 6 slaves in 1786, 5 in 1787, 3 slaves and 5 horses in 1790 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 3, 21, 28, 46, 68, 87]. On 29 May 1782 the Greensville County court credited him for 325 pounds of beef and 4 bushels of oats which was impressed during the war, and on 26 October 1786 the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind Henry and Thomas Stewart to him [Orders 1781-9, 29, 294]. His 14 October 1790 Greensville County will was proved 24 February 1791. He left his land and his two slaves Solomon and Anaky to his wife Crecy and allowed 5 pounds a year for the maintenance of his unnamed mother. He directed that his slaves be treated well and freed after six years and that his children receive schooling. He named his children: Rebecca, Henry, Sally, Peyton, and Nancy. His sons Henry (who was under twenty-one years of age) and Peyton were to divide his land between them after his wife's death. He left 10 pounds to Aaron Newsom. He left a fairly large estate of 437 pounds, excluding his land. His estate record indicates that he died from drowning and that a total of 88 pounds cash was found in his house and pockets. Dempsey and Francis Stewart were renting part of his land in 1792 [WB 1:181-3, 262]. On 22 September 1791 his wife Lucretia Stewart renounced all benefit from the will and petitioned the Greensville County court to lay out and assign her dower land. On 23 October 1794 the court appointed Peyton Harwell guardian to Sally, Henry, Peyton and Nancy Stewart, orphans of Thomas Stewart, and on 28 November 1795 Lucretia returned an account of their estates. She sued William Vincent for trespass on 24 March 1796 and was awarded 10 pounds. On 27 November 1798 one of Vincent's slaves named Phebe was accused of stealing Lucretia's shoats, but the case was dismissed when Phebe's counsel argued "the want of due form and regularity in the warrant" [Orders 1790-9, 97, 241, 299, 316, 411, 455, 520, 539, 549, 582]. Lucretia was taxable in Greensville County from 1791 to 1802: taxable on William Stewart's tithe and 3 slaves in 1791, taxable on 2 slaves from 1794 to 1797, taxable on a slave and 2 horses from 1798 to 1802 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 129, 141, 164, 181]. She sold 100 acres in Greensville County to (their daughter?) Rebecca Stewart on 23 May 1799. She married Asa Byrd before 10 October 1806 when she and her children Henry and Peyton Stewart sold 114 acres in Greensville County which they had received by their father's will [DB 2:552; 3:520]. Lucretia died shortly before 16 January 1808 when Asa Byrd was examined in court but found not guilty of having murdered her [Orders 1799-1806, 204]. On 13 March 1809 the court divided 244 acres of Lucretia's land among her heirs: 50 acres to Viney G. Stewart, 57 acres to Rebecca Dimmery, 22 acres to Nancy Banks, 55 acres to Henry Stewart, 30 acres to Peyton Stewart and 30 acres to Sally Watkins. On 11 September 1809 Lucretia's last will was presented in court but set aside since it was revoked by her intermarriage with Asa Byrd [Orders 1806-10, 279, 340, 398; DB 4:117]. Thomas's emancipated slave Solomon Scott registered in Greensville County on 12 March 1807: Set free by the last Will of Thomas Stewart, Decd., Dark complexion, aged thirty two years [Register of Free Negroes, no. 18]. Thomas and Lucretia's children were

i. Rebecca4, born say 1778, orphan of Thomas Stewart, chose Francis Stewart as her guardian in Greensville County court on 28 February 1792 [Orders 1790-9, 178]. She purchased 100 acres in Greensville County from (her mother) Lucretia Stewart on 23 May 1799 [DB 2:552]. She mortgaged 100 acres in Brunswick County (bounded on the west by Barney Stewart, on the south by Nanny Pompey and on the north by Daniel Hammmons) to William Stewart on 12 April 1800 for 30 pounds to secure a debt of 20 pounds she owed him [DB 18:36]. She married John Demery, 10 February 1806 Greensville County bond, Frederick Shelton surety. She and her husband were living in Northampton County, North Carolina, on 8 November 1806 when they sold 91 acres in Greensville County to (her brother) Henry Stewart with Benjamin Gowing as witness [DB 3:523].

ii. Viney G., received 50 acres by the distribution of her mother Lucretia Byrd's estate on 13 March 1809 [Orders 1799-1806, 340]. Asa Byrd made a deed of gift to her which was proved in Greensville County court on 9 May 1808 [Orders 1806-10, 231].

iii. Henry1, born about 1781, taxable in Greensville County from 1802 to 1820: listed as a "Mulatto" with his unnamed wife in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 289, 325, 449, 465, 488, 609]. He registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County on 7 October 1805: born free of a darkish complexion ... aged about 24 years. 5 feet 7-3/4 Inc. high [Free Negro Register, no.3]. His wife was Celia Stewart who registered in Greensville County on 26 August 1824: a free Woman of Colour & the wife of Henry Stewart, of a black Complexion supposed to be about 33 years old, 5'4 inches high ... by occupation a Spinstress [Free Negro Register, no. 109]. He and his wife Celia, Peyton Stewart and their mother Lucretia Byrd sold 114 acres in Greensville County which their father Thomas Stewart left them by his will. On 20 December 1804 he purchased from Nancy Jones all her rights to the Greensville County estate of Jesse Jones, with Rebecca Stewart as witness [DB 3:412]. On 14 January 1805 he provided security for the payment of 10 pounds per year for seven years to maintain Lindsey Stewart, an illegitimate child Joseph Holley (Hawley) begot by Jane Stewart. In exchange, Holley bound himself to serve Henry for seven years. On 10 February 1806 Henry complained to the court that Joseph had left his service and was living with his father Jacob Holley. The court ordered Joseph to return to Henry's service, serve four months for absenting himself, and then serve until the illegitimate child was bound out by the overseers of the poor [Orders 1799-1806, 540, 541; DB 3:402]. He purchased 53 acres in Greensville County from David Haithcock for 53 pounds on 16 January 1807 [DB 3:412, 520; 4:49]. On 12 January 1807 he sued Peyton Stewart on an attachment and the court granted him a commission to take the deposition of Rebecca Stewart who was about to move out of the state. Asa and Lurcetia Byrd were Peyton's witnesses in the suit [Orders 1806-10, 71-2]. He was head of a Greensville County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:265].

iv. Sally, born say 1782, married James Watkins by 8 May 1809 when they sold 30 acres on the south side of Fountain Creek and both sides of Jordan's Road in Greensville County. This was their allotment of the estate of Lucretia Byrd, widow of Thomas Stewart [DB 4:117]

v. Peyton3, born about 1784, registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County on 25 January 1805: born free of a darkish complexion, aged Twenty one or upwards, is about five feet nine Inches high... [Free Negro Register, no.2]. He married ____, 12 May 1806 Greensville County bond. Asa Byrd gave his consent for the bride and was security. Peyton and his wife Vicey, his brother Henry Stewart, and his mother sold 114 acres in Greensville County on 10 October 1806 which was land they received by their father's will. On 18 September 1806 he sold Asa Byrd a crop of corn and peas, a bed, furniture, and two hogs in Greensville County for 16 pounds. He was taxable in Greensville County in 1804 and 1805 [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 317, 333]. On 13 October 1806 his mother Lucretia Byrd (formerly Stewart) came into court and made oath that her son Peyton Stewart was 21 years of age on the day of October 1806 to the best of her knowledge [Orders 1806-10, 44]. He was living in Sumner County, Tennessee on 12 December 1807 when he sold 30 acres on Jordan's Road in Greensville County to Anthony Banks. This was land he received at the death of his mother Lucretia [DB 3:511, 520; 4:282]. He was head of a Sumner County, Tennessee household of 10 "free colored" in 1820.

vi. Nancy, born say 1789, chose John Robinson as her guardian in Greensville County court on 13 February 1804 [Orders 1799-1806, 366]. She married Anthony Banks "of Sussex County" before 8 May 1809 when they were identified as heirs of Lucretia Byrd in a deed by which 244 acres of her land was divided among her heirs. Anthony and Nancy purchased 30 acres on the south side of Fountain Creek which was James and Sally Watkins' part of the estate [DB 4:117].

 

18.    John2/ Jack Stewart, born say 1745, may have been identical to Jack Stewart, a "mulatto," who was listed among seven deserters, drafted out of Prince George County, for whom a reward was offered in the 28 November 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Purdie edition, p. 3, col. 3]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County on a tithe and three horses from 1788 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 73, 91, 148, 166, 206, 253, 286, 360, 508, 545, 585, 622, 717]. He was a "Mulattoe" taxable on 79-1/4 acres in 1809, 61-1/4 acres in 1811, and 52 acres in 1815. He transferred 9 acres to Ezekiel Stewart in 1814 [Land Tax List 1791-1822, B lists]. He was probably the father of

i. Ezekiel, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 August 1814: twenty nine years old, light brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 223]. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:123a] and taxable in Chesterfield County from 1814 to 1816 on 9 acres which had been transferred to him by John Stewart in 1814 and taxable on 57 acres from 1820 to 1822 [Land Tax List 1791-1822, B lists].

 

19.    Peter2 Stewart, born say 1748, son of Rebecca Stewart of Brunswick County, may have been the Peter Stewart (born about 1751) who obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 October 1807: fifty five years old, bright mulatto complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 39]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County on one tithe and a horse from 1791 to 1802, and two tithes and two to three horses from 1803 to 1810, and living on Roger Atkinson's land from 1809 to 1811 when he had eight persons in his family [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 91, 125, 165, 205, 262, 305, 343, 529, 566, 605, 689, 782, 824]. He died in 1827 and left a will which divided his property among his children Peter, Archibald, John, Jane (wife of William Harris), Berry and Joseph and his grandchildren Nancy, Polly (wife of Silas Hill) and James Stewart. In 1831 his estate was distributed to the legatees after they brought a Chesterfield County suit in chancery against the administrator of the estate, sheriff William Fendley [LVA chancery suit 1831-035]. His children were

i. Peter, born say 1775. He may have been the Peter Stewart who was head of a Dinwiddie County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:161].

ii. Archibald1, born say 1776, head of a Dinwiddie County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Peggy, not named in her father's will but named in the 21 September 1801 Chesterfield County will of Thomas Stewart by which he left all his estate to his wife Peggy and appointed her and her father Peter Stewart his executors [WB 5:491-2].

iv. John7, born about 1779, registered in Petersburg on 21 December 1809: a light Coloured free Mulatto man, with grey eyes, five feet six inches high, thirty years old, a Blacksmith, born free in Chesterfield County & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 504]. He was head of a Petersburg Town household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:122a].

v. Jane, wife of William Harris. William registered in Petersburg on 24 June 1805: a brown Mulatto man, five feet five inches high, twenty two years old, born free in Chesterfield County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 293].

vi. Berry, born about 1781, taxable in Chesterfield County from 1802 to 1805 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 492, 530, 566, 605]. He died unmarried before 1831 when his father's estate was distributed among the heirs. Administration on his estate was granted to James Britton by order of the Hustings Court of Petersburg.

vii. Joseph, born about 1786, a laborer taxable in Chesterfield County in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frame 824]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 8 October 1810: twenty four years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 143]. He died intestate before 1831 leaving a widow Dolly Stewart and infant children Lizzy and Anderson.

 

20.  James2 Stewart, born say 1750, was living in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 11 January 1774 when he and Littleberry Pompey of Sussex County purchased 270 acres in Meherrin Parish, to be equally divided between them as if two separate deeds had been made. He purchased 50 acres on the north side of the Maherrin River in Brunswick County adjoining Richard Branscomb and Thomas Evans on 23 November 1778 [DB 11:251-3; 13:280]. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, from 1782 to 1796 [PPTL 1782-98, frames 19, 206, 271, 325, 401, 497, 543]. On 26 January 1778 he and Littleberry Pompey and wife Nanny Pompey (James's sister?) sold 135 acres in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, adjoining Steward's Branch. And on 15 August 1792 James and his wife Sarah sold for 50 pounds 137 acres on Buckwater Creek in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, adjoining Dempsey Stewart's land [DB 13:45; 15:498]. He may have been the James Stewart who married Sally Evans, 2 May 1791 Warren County, North Carolina bond, Eaton Walden bondsman. James and his wife Sarah sued (his brother) William Stewart and his wife Keziah in Brunswick County on 23 November 1795, but the case was dismissed at the defendant's costs [Orders 1795-8, 1, 211]. He was head of a Wake County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:798]. By his Wake County will, proved in November 1824, he left his land to his children: Evans, Beedy (married James Walden), Mackey (married Joel Stuart), Tazewell, Dickson, Elijah, and Elisha [WB 19:130]. His children were

i. Evans, married Milly Stuart, 15 November 1817 Wake County bond, Joel Stuart bondsman.

ii. Beedy, married James Walden.

iii. Mackey, married Joel Stuart, 2 January 1821 Wake County bond.

iv. Tazewell.

v. Dickson.

vi. Elijah.

vii. Elisha.

 

21.    Barnett1 Stewart, born say 1760, was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia, from 1782 to 1792: taxable on 2 horses and 2 cattle from 1782 to 1796, taxable on a free tithe and a slave in 1799, taxable on 2 free tithes and a slave in 1801, 2 free tithes from 1803 to 1805, 1 in 1806 [PPTL 1782-1798, frames 19, 206, 271, 364, 437, 592; 1799-1815, frames 43, 92, 259, 349, 394, 439]. On 23 September 1784 a Greensville County jury awarded him 5 pounds in his suit for trespass against Hayley Dupree. John Chapman and John Robinson were his witnesses [Orders 1781-9, 36, 138, 163]. He owned land on the south bank of the Meherrin River near Buckwater Run in Brunswick County before 4 January 1787 [DB 14:321]. He may have been the brother of Thomas Stewart of Greensville County since he gave his consent for the 12 May 1806 Greensville County marriage bond of Thomas' son Peyton Stewart. He and his wife Lucy sold 200 acres on the Meherrin River in Brunswick County to Benjamin Wyche for $800 on 5 August 1806. (Lucy signed her name to the deed) [DB 19:484]. Francis Sterling was awarded a judgment against him for $25 in Greensville County court on 12 November 1805. He filed a motion for an injunction against Sterling for which Francis Stewart was required to post security on 8 February 1808 since Barnett was not an inhabitant of the state. The case was decided in Barnett's favor on 17 November 1809 [Orders 1799-1806, 520, 532, 1806-10, 201, 207, 311-2]. Perhaps he was identical to Barnabus Stewart, head of a Chatham County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:200]. Barnett was head of a Sumner County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820. He left a 1 March 1832 Sumner County, Tennessee will, proved March 1840, which named his wife Lucy and children: Sally, Mumfre, Naney, Virey, Peterson, Barnet, Woody, Patsy, and Dollison. He directed that his land be sold after his wife's death and that his son Peterson receive one hundred dollars [WO:315]. His children were

i. Sally.

ii. Mumfort, born about 1783, registered as a "Free Negro" in Brunswick County on 3 October 1805: a black man about 22 years of age about 5 feet 11 1/2 Inches high rather slender made...free born and has been raised in the County [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 4]. He was taxable on a horse in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, in 1806 [PPTL 1799-1815, frame 394] and head of a Sumner County, Tennessee household of 10 "free colored" in 1820.

iii. Naney.

iv. Virey.

v. Peterson.

vi. Barney/ Barnett2, born say 1785, registered as a "Free Negro" in Brunswick County on 2 October 1806: a tall black man ... has a very droning speech when he talks, he is free born as I have always understood and verily believe as he has lived in the county for a number of years [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 6]. He was probably the Barnes Stewart who was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:260].

vii. Woody.

viii. Patsy.

ix. Dollison.

 

22.    William4 Stewart, born say 1761, purchased 100 acres in Brunswick County, Virginia, adjoining James Steward, William Fergason, Branscom and Thomas Evans on 23 September 1778 [DB 13:281]. He was taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, from 1782 to 1815: taxable on a slave and 3 horses in 1797 and 1798, taxable on 2 persons from 1806 to 1809, taxable on 3 "persons of colour" in 1810 and 1811, listed as a "Free Negro" from 1813 to 1815 [PPTL 1782-98, frames 20, 54, 166, 206, 237, 271, 325, 364, 401, 437, 448, 543, 592, 642; 1799-1815, frames 43, 92, 139, 197, 259, 295, 349, 394, 439, 478, 520, 559, 637, 675, 733]. He married Kissey Corn, undated Mecklenburg County bond, Robert Corn security. (His brother) James Stewart and wife Sarah sued William and his wife Keziah in Brunswick County on 12 November 1795, but the case was dismissed at the defendant's costs [Orders 1795-8, 1, 211]. Rebecca Stewart mortgaged 100 acres to him in Brunswick County adjoining Barney Stewart, Nanny Pompey and Daniel Hammons for 30 pounds on 12 April 1800. He and his wife Keziah sold 100 acres adjoining Barney Stewart, Nanny Pompey and Richard Harrison for $300 on 6 September 1805 [DB 18:36; 19:322]. He was head of a Free Town, Brunswick County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:770], 9 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:670] and 9 in 1830 [VA:249]. He died before 15 February 1839 when his Brunswick County estate was appraised [WB 14:384]. His children can be identified from the deeds by which they sold the land they received from his estate. They were

i. John9, born about 1787, head of a Brunswick County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:670], 11 in 1830 [VA:249], and 12 in 1840. He registered as a "Free Negro" in Brunswick County on 23 November 1813: a black of a yellow complexion five feet nine or ten inches high about Twenty five or six years old...has a stoppage in his Speech when spoken to, his hair rather inclined to be Straight was freeborn in this county [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 18]. Dempsey Stewart left him land by his 11 December 1848 Brunswick County will [WB 15:231]. John's Brunswick County estate was appraised on 5 January 1860 and included 144 acres he had from Dempsey, land he inherited from his father, as well as land he had purchased in 1835 [WB 18:96-7].

ii. William7, born about 1793, head of a Brunswick County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820, called Wm B. [VA:670], registered on 28 August 1823: a free man of black complexion six feet & an half Inch high about thirty Years of age ... born free as appears from the evidence of Phil Claiborne and by Occupation a carpenter [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 67]. He was living in Greene County, Ohio, on 2 January 1840 when he sold his interest in his father's Brunswick County estate [DB 32:72].

iii. Rebecca5, born about 1794, registered on 23 September 1839: a free person of color yellow complexion about forty five years of age five feet six Inches high...born free as appears from the evidence of George Stone [Wynne, Register, 152]. On 4 March 1840 she sold 37 acres of land in Brunswick County which she had received from her father's estate [DB 32:75].

iv. Julius, born about 1798, head of a Brunswick County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:670], registered in May 1837: a free man of Color Dark complexion five feet eleven Inches and three quarters high, thirty nine years of age... born free as appears from the Evidence of R H H Wallton [Wynne, Register, 139].

v. Jincey, born about 1802, registered on 24 February 1840: a free woman of color Dark complexion about 38 years of age five feet three Inches high ... born free as appears from the evidence of F. W. Green [Wynne, Register, 154]. On 29 November 1841 she sold 40 acres of her father's Brunswick County land to her brother Julius Stewart [DB 32:297].

vi. Littleton, born about 1804, head of a Brunswick County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:249] and 6 in 1840, registered on 24 February 1840: a free person of color Dark complexion about thirty six years of age six feet two Inches high ... born free as appears from the evidence of F. W. Green [Wynne, Register, 154]. On 2 February 1839 he executed a Brunswick County deed of trust for the land he inherited from his father [DB 31:509].

vii. Wyatt, born about 1807, registered on 22 September 1828: a free man of colour, dark complexion, five feet nine & a half inches high twenty one years Old ... was born free as appears by the evidence of John Wyche & R.H.H. Wallton & by occupation a ditcher [Wynne, Register, 100]. He was living in Ohio when he sold his part of his father's land to his brother Julius [DB 33:53].

viii. Thomas10, born about 1809, registered on 23 May 1836: a free man of Colour dark complexion twenty seven years old six feet high ... born free ... from the evidence of R H H Wallton [Wynne, Register, 135]. He was living in Ohio in 1842 when he sold his part of his father's land by Brunswick County deed [DB 32:335].

 

23.    Lucretia Stewart, born say 1759, was bound to the Rev. Arch. McRoberts by the Chesterfield County court on 7 May 1763 [Orders 1759-63, 410]. On 6 December 1790 the Petersburg Hustings Court bound out her "Mulatto Boy son of Lucretia Stewart" to Doctor Robert Mackie [Orders 1784-91, 343]. She was the mother of

i. Peyton2, born about 1779, registered in Petersburg on 14 August 1800: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet seven inches high, thin made, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 163].

 

24.    Henry Stewart, born say 1785, was taxable in Charles City County from 1805 to 1813, listed as a "Mulattoe" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1788-1814]. He died before 16 April 1835 when the Charles County court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind out his orphans Peter and William Steward to Micajah Brown until the age of twenty-one [Minutes 1830-7, 231]. His widow Maria Stewart registered with four of their children in Henrico County on 5 February 1838: wife of Henry Stuart, about 51 years of age, a bright mulatto woman, 5 feet 3 inches, Born free as appears by a certificate from the clerk of Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.28, no.871]. They were the parents of

i. Thomas, born 22 October 1816, registered in Charles City County on 18 June 1835: son of Henry Steward, brown complexion, age 18 the 22 October 1834 [Minutes 1830-7, 237]. He registered in Henrico County on 5 February 1838: age about 22 years, son of Henry Steward, a man of brown complexion, 5 feet 8-1/4 inches, born free as appears by a certificate from the clerk of Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.28, no.870].

ii. Isaiah, born 30 December 1814, registered in Charles City County on 18 June 1835: son of Henry Steward, brown complexion, age 20 the 30 December 1834 [Minutes 1830-7, 237].

iii. John, born 12 October 1818, registered in Charles City County on 18 June 1835: son of Henry Steward, brown complexion, age 16 the 12 October 1834 [Minutes 1830-7, 237].

iv. Peter, born 12 December 1820, registered in Charles City County on 18 June 1835: son of Henry Steward, bright mulatto, age 14 the 12 December 1834 [Minutes 1830-7, 237]. He registered in Henrico County on 5 February 1838: age 17 years the 12 December 1837, a mulatto man, 5 feet 4 inches, born free as appears by a certificate from the clerk of Charles City County [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.28, no. 869].

v. Lockey, born 22 March 1822, registered in Charles City County on 18 June 1835: daughter of Henry Steward, bright mulatto girl, age 13 the 22 March 1835 [Minutes 1830-7, 237]. She registered in Henrico County on 5 February 1838: about 14 years of age, a girl of light complexion, 5 feet 1/2 inch, born free as appears by the evidence of James Binford [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.28, no. 871].

vi. William, born 29 September 1824, registered in Charles City County on 18 June 1835: son of Henry Steward, bright complexion, age 10 the 19 September 1834 [Minutes 1830-7, 237]. He registered in Henrico County on 5 February 1838: about 13 years of age, a boy of very light complexion, 4 feet 8 inches, born free as appears by the evidence of James Binford [Register of Free Negroes and Mulattoes, 1831-1844, p.28, no.873].

 

25.    James3 Stewart, born say 1757, was taxable in Dinwiddie County on a horse and 3 cattle in 1782, taxable on a horse in 1787, and taxable on a horse in 1788 when he was listed the same day as (his father) Dr. Thomas Stewart [PPTL, 1782-90 (1787B, p.13)]. He married Ryte Chavous, 11 February 1788 Mecklenburg County bond, James Stewart, Sr., security. He received a deed of gift of 150 acres in Mecklenburg County from his father Thomas Stewart on 5 December 1792. On 14 April 1793 the Mecklenburg County court granted him a license to keep an ordinary at his house [Orders 1792-5, 430]. He, called James Stewart, Junr., and his wife Ritter Stewart (both signing) sold 50 acres of land adjoining Durham, Munford, and Doctor Thomas Stewart to William Stewart on 12 September 1796, and they sold the remaining 100 acres where they were then living on 10 November 1796 to Benjamin Edmundson for 5 shillings [DB 8:306; 9:153, 164]. He was a "mulatto" insolvent taxpayer in Mecklenburg County in 1789, taxable on himself and a horse [Virginia Genealogist 22:49]. He was "B. Smith" (blacksmith) taxable on a slave named Winny in 1795, called James Stewart, Jun., in 1796 when he was taxable on his son Thomas and an ordinary license. He was living in the lower district of Mecklenburg County when he was taxable on his own tithe and an ordinary license in 1798 and taxable on slave Peter in 1799 but was not taxable thereafter in Mecklenburg County [PPTL, 1782-1805, frames 558, 622, 698, 779]. He was taxable in Lunenburg County from 1802 to 1805, taxable on a slave in 1804 [PPTL 1782-1806]. He was a blacksmith living on Beaver Pond, counted in a "List of all free Negroes & Mulattoes in the lower District of Lunenburg County" in March 1802 and April 1803 with his wife Ritter and children: Drury, Nelly, Aggy, Henry, Jordan, and Rebecca and Allen Norton [Lunenburg County Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803, p.1]. He may have been the James Stewart who was a "Free Black" head of a Bedford County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:482] and a "f. negroe" taxable in Bedford County from 1809 to 1814: listed with 3 tithes in 1811, listed next to (his sons?) Henry and Drury in 1813 [PPTL 1806-16, frames 181, 240, 260, 311, 374, 435]. According to the Mecklenburg County, Virginia chancery suit of Hannah Stewart (daughter of Nancy Stewart and William Sonkey Stewart), James was Doctor Thomas Stewart's oldest son, and he died in Tennessee about 1820. He was head of a Smith County, Tennessee household of 4 "free colored" in 1820, living near Thomas, Drury, and Henry Stewart [TN:87]. James was the father of

i. Thomas7, born say 1779, married Sary Cattiler (Cuttillo), 15 July 1800 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Richerson Farrar bondsman. He was a farmer on Bears Element Creek in Lunenburg County living with his wife Salley and child Haily in March 1802 but not listed there in 1803 [Lunenburg County Free Negro & Slave Records, 1802-1803, LVA]. He was head of a Smith County, Tennessee household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [TN:87]. He was the oldest son of James Stewart according to the Mecklenburg County chancery suit of Hannah Stewart. He died in Lunenburg County about 1830 leaving six children: Hailey, Anderson, Branch, James, and Delila, wife of William Chapman. Hailey died about 1831 [Chancery Causes, 1872-008, LVA].

ii. Drury, born say 1781, taxable in Lunenburg County in 1804 and 1806 [PPTL 1782-1806], a "f. negroe" taxable in the northern district of Bedford County from 1810 to 1816 [PPTL 1798-1812, frames 240, 289, 332, 373, 435, 469, 588, 702]. He was head of a Smith County, Tennessee household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [TN:87] and 8 in 1830 [TN:42].

iii. Nelly2.

iv. Aggy.

v. Henry3, born 1794-1806, a "f.N." taxable in the northern district of Bedford County, Virginia, from 1812 to 1816 [PPTL 1806-16, frames 332, 373, 403, 469, 588, 702], head of a Smith County, Tennessee household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [TN:87].

vi. Jordan2, born 1794-1806, head of a Smith County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830 [TN:109].

vii. Rebecca, probably born 1802-1803, not listed in her parents' household in 1802.

 

26.    Francis2 Stewart, born say 1760, was taxable in Greensville County in 1782, 1785 and from 1787 to 1815: taxable on a horse in 1782, taxable on 3 horses and 3 in cattle 1787, taxable on a free tithable aged 16-21 in 1796, taxable on a slave in 1799, taxed on an ordinary license in 1800, taxable on (his son) Peter Stewart's tithe in 1801, taxable on his son Francis's tithe in 1812, a "Mulatto" listed with his unnamed wife and daughter in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 4, 28, 46, 69, 87, 112, 129, 141, 164, 181, 192, 206, 222, 235, 248, 262, 277, 289, 306, 325, 339, 356, 375, 389, 404, 417, 435, 449, 465, 488]. On 26 March 1790 Kitt, "a free man," sued him for debt in Greensville County court [Orders 1790-9, 12, 79]. He purchased 100 acres in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 22 November 1790 for 15 pounds, and he and his wife Patience, "of Greensville County," sold this land about fifteen months later on 11 February 1792 for 22 pounds [DB 15:5, 179]. He rented land in Greensville County from Thomas Stewart in 1792 [WB 1:262] and was called Francis Stewart of Greensville County when he purchased 165 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, from Peter Stewart on 26 March 1795 [DB 10:162]. The Greensville County court presented him on 24 March 1796 for retailing liquor without a license, and on 27 June 1799 the court granted him a license to keep an ordinary at his house. The court presented him for the same charge on 8 June 1801 and renewed his license for a year on 10 May 1802 [Orders 1790-9, 410, 594, 621; 1799-1806, 132, 220]. He was executor of Peter Stewart's 30 December 1794 Northampton County will, proved in December 1805 [WB 2:309]. On 17 November 1808 he provided security for the Greensville County suit of Barnett Stewart since Barnett was not an inhabitant of the state, and he was assignee of Barnett Stewart in a Greensville County suit against John Wyche on 12 June 1809 [Orders 1806-10, 207, 367]. His 27 January 1816 Greensville County will was proved on 8 December 1817. He left his Greensville County land to his wife Patience, left his land in Northampton County, North Carolina, to his son Peter, a horse and cattle to his son Nevison, land to son Francis after his wife's death, land to daughters Patsey and Rebecca Stewart after his wife's death, and a cow, calf, and furniture to his daughters Seley Stewart and Jane Hathcock. His wife Patience and son Nevison were executors [WB 3:41]. Patience made a deed to Allen Deberry which was proved in Northampton County court by her son Peter on 5 June 1820 [Minutes 1817-21, 271]. Patience Stewart, born about 1764, was head of a Greensville County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:265]. She registered in Greensville County on 26 August 1824: a free Woman of Colour of a black Complexion supposed to be Sixty years old, 5' 3-3/4 inches high in shoes ... by occupation a Spinstress [Free Negro Register, no.108]. She was probably living with her son Peter in the 1830 census for Northampton County. Francis was the father of

i. Neverson, born about 1789, married Anna Jones, 18 May 1809 Greensville County bond, Asa Byrd security, registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County on 8 November 1813: born free of a black Complexion, aged twenty four years last May, about six feet high [Free Negro Register, no.33]. He was taxable in Greensville County in 1812 and a "Mulatto" taxable with his unnamed wife in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 435, 449]. He was head of a Caswell County, North Carolina household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:87] and listed a second time as Everson Stewart [NC:92].

ii. Peter5, born say 1780, a plaintiff in a suit for trespass in Northampton County against Hezekiel and Wheeler, judged in his favor for $30 on 2 March 1819. He and Stephen Walden were assessed damages of $13 in another suit on the same day [Minutes 1817-21, 167]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:746] and 13 "free colored" in 1830, with a woman born before 1776 (his mother Patience?).

iii. Seley.

iv. Patsey, born say 1784, left a 13 October 1824 Greensville County will, proved 6 December the same year. She devised her land to her daughters Tabitha and Eliza Stewart. William and John Walden (of Northampton County, North Carolina) were witnesses to the will [WB 3:378].

v. Jane Hathcock.

vi. Francis3, born about 1794, registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County on 14 December 1819: free born, black Complexion, twenty five years old, about five feet 8 inches high (in shoes) by profession a planter [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-32, no.73], head of a Greensville County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:265]. His wife Dolly registered on 3 January 1826: of a dark yellow Complexion free born Thirty years old five feet three & three quarter inches high (in shoes), and they registered their children the same day: Mariah (about 14 years old), Warren (about 8 or 9), Dick (7 or 8), Betsy (6), Mary Jane (4) [Register of Free Negroes, 1805-32, nos. 152, 154].

 

27.    John3 Stewart, born say 1758, was head of a Powhatan County household with no whites and a slave in 1783 [VA:59]. He was a "Mulo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1787 to 1810: taxable on 2 slaves in 1787, 3 in 1788, 5 in 1798; taxable on Thomas Stewart's tithe from 1796 to 1800; taxable on James Stewart's tithe from 1799 to 1802; taxable on 4 slaves, 4 horses and a stud horse in 1802 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 10, 24, 38, 51, 68, 83, 97, 110, 124, 138, 151, 172, 193, 213, 245, 266, 283, 305, 351, 370, 386]. He married (second?) Frances Dungey, 20 April 1797 Powhatan County bond, Wade Woodson, Sr., surety [Powhatan County Marriage Register, 34]. He was a "Free Black" head of a Powhatan County household of 26 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [VA:2]. He made a 25 March 1817 White County, Tennessee will by which he left his plantation, his two "servants" Dafney and Randal, and his farm animals, wagon and household effects to his wife Frances Stewart during her lifetime and named his children Thomas, James, Elisha, John, Elizabeth Coker, William, Richard, Littleberry, Rebecca and Mariah Stewart. He also named his wife's daughter Susanna Dungy. He appointed Joseph Upchurch, Thomas Stewart and Elisha Stewart executors [WB A:78-9]. He was the father of

i. James6, born say 1777, a "Mulo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1799 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 193, 266, 283, 305, 369, 386, 406]. He married Frances Dungey (twenty-one years of age), 8 January 1801 Powhatan County marriage, John Moss surety [Powhatan County Marriage Register, 44].

ii. Thomas8, born say 1780, a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County from 1796 to 1815: charged with his own tax from 1802; taxable on 2 slaves in 1811, 3 in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 138, 1551, 193, 213, 245, 266, 351, 369, 386, 406, 428, 446, 466, 493]. He married Page (Peg) Crowder, 3 January 1804 Powhatan County marriage, John Moss surety, Elisha Steward and Samuel Branch witnesses [Marriage Register, p.51]. He died before 20 July 1818 when his White County, Tennessee inventory was taken. The administrators were (his brother) Elisha Stewart and (widow) Margaret Stewart [WB A:95-6].

iii. Elisha, born say 1783, a "Mo" taxable in Powhatan County on 3 horses in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 351, 369, 386]. He died before 25 March 1822 when his White County inventory was recorded [WB A:162].

iv. John8, born say 1786, a "Mo" taxable on a horse in Powhatan County from 1809 [Personal Property Tax List, 1787-1825, frames 370, 386].

v. Elizabeth, born say 1792, married Peter Coker.

vi. William, born say 1795.

vii. Richard3, born 10 January 1800, married Barbara Creacy, who was born 7 May 1799 in Powhatan County. They moved to White County, Tennessee, in 1810 and travelled by wagon train to Cass County, Michigan, with William Chavous and his family. Richard died in Cass County on 6 May 1885 with an estate valued at $12,000 [Cass County Probate Court Liber 33:196; 37:107 cited in personal communication by his descendant E.P. Stewart].

viii. Littleberry.

ix. Rebecca.

x. Mariah, born about 1807-1810.

 

28.    Edward2 Stewart, born about 1762, was a "yellow" complexioned man born in Chesterfield County who was living in Dinwiddie County when he was listed as a substitute in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 154]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable on one tithe and two to three horses in Chesterfield County from 1791 to 1811, called "Edward Stewart, Jr." from 1796 to 1801, a farmer taxable on two tithes and four horses in 1809 when he was living at Booker's shop, and living on Jones's land with three in his family in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 92, 205, 272, 343, 488, 529, 604, 642, 689, 738, 824]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 11 June 1810: forty eight years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 131]. His wife Sally Stewart (born about 1764) registered in Petersburg on 9 June 1810: a brown Mulatto woman, wife of Edward Stewart, five feet three inches high, forty six years old, emancipated by Edward Stewart in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 589]. They may have been the parents of

i. Henry, born about 1781, registered in Petersburg on 8 July 1802: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet eight inches high, twenty one years old, short knotty hair, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 239].

 

29.    William2 ("Sonkey") Stewart, born say 1745, was married to Nancy Stewart ("of Mecklenburg"), daughter of Dr. Thomas Stewart, on 18 May 1808 when Doctor Stewart left her a slave woman named Daus [Dinwiddie County Chancery Orders 1832-52, 13]. William was taxable in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, on a slave named Dorman in 1782, taxable on 12 head of cattle and 2 horses in 1783 (called William Stewart, Jr., adjacent to William Stewart), called a shoemaker in 1785 when he was taxable on slaves Daws and Len, taxable on slaves Daws, Len and Jenny in 1786 and 1787, taxable on slave Daws in 1789, and taxable with his son Jordan and slave Daws in 1790 and 1791. His son Jordan Stewart and Robert Cole were taxable in his household in 1792. He was taxable on slaves Daws, Fan and Len in 1795 and 1796 but taxable on only his own tithe from 1797 until 1802 when he was taxable on his son William [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 13, 27, 101, 125, 178, 276, 329, 383, 451, 558, 622, 645, 743, 880, 902]. He purchased 50 acres in Mecklenburg County adjoining the land of Doctor Thomas Stewart from James Stewart, Jr., and wife Ritter on 12 September 1796. And he purchased 162 acres on Sandy Creek adjoining Wilson's line from Thomas and Mildred Stewart of Dinwiddie County for 60 pounds on 10 November 1799 [DB 9:153; 10:267]. He was called a shoemaker on 10 June 1799 when he sued James Stewart, blacksmith, for a 3 pound debt due by account [Orders 1798-1801, 192]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County on 242 acres in 1804 [DB 16:272] and head of a Mecklenburg County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:148b]. He sold 60 acres adjoining Frederick Ivey's land on 21 August 1815 [DB 16:212]. He died intestate in Mecklenburg County before 7 December 1820 when the coroner viewed his body. His estate included a slave named Nelson who was valued at $500. The administrator of his estate sold 144 acres of his land and sold 41 acres to (his son-in-law) Thomas Spence. His estate was settled in 1821, and a Mecklenburg County chancery suit gives many details of his descendants [WB 9:163; 10:243; DB 19:33; Chancery suit 1872-008, LVA]. William and Nancy's children were

i. Jordan1, born about 1765 in Dinwiddie County, taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household in 1790 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 329], head of a Chatham County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:193]. He was in Wake County in 1849 when he applied for a pension for his services in the Revolution.

ii. Griffin1, never married and died intestate.

iii. Peter4, lived in Richmond, never married and died in Nashville, Tennessee.

iv. Rebecca3, born say 1775, married Anthony Chavous, 10 September 1792 Mecklenburg County bond.

v. William, born about 1785, over the age of sixteen when he was taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household in 1802 and 1803, called son of William when he was taxable in his own household in 1804 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 902, 982, 1007].

vi. Charles2, born about 1787, over the age of sixteen when he was taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frame 17]. He married Sabra Elam, 14 March 1808 Mecklenburg County bond, Frederick Ivey security. He received a certificate in Mecklenburg County on 16 September 1814: born free, & raised in the County of Mecklenburg ... of a yellow Complection and good Stature, he is five feet nine inches high, about Twenty Seven years old [Free Person of Color, no.8, p.5]. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820. His bond was mentioned in the account of his father's estate [WB 10:243]. He and Sabra had four children: Margaret, William, Joel, and Thomas Stuart [Mecklenburg County chancery suit, 1872-008, LVA].

vii. Nancy, born about 1788, married Thomas Spence, called Thomas Spain when they married, 14 September 1801 Mecklenburg County bond, Frederick Ivy security. Thomas Spence, born before 1776, was head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 5 "free colored" in 1820. His Mecklenburg County registration states that he was born free in Amelia County. His wife Nancy Spence registered as a free Person of Color in Mecklenburg County on 20 October 1828: yellow complexion, about forty five years of age ... born of a free woman in the county of Dinwiddie [Free Person of Color no.54, p.41]. Thomas may have been a descendant of John Spence, a "Mulatto man" who was freed by the 20 July 1720 Northumberland County of Elizabeth Banks [RB 1718-26, 128, 148 by W. Preston Haynie, Bulletin of the Northumberland County Historical Society XXXIII:61].

viii. Hannah, born about 1790, a sixty-year-old "Black" woman counted in the 1850 Mecklenburg County census [VA:138]. She was still living on her parents land in February 1858.

ix. Dicey, married Mat Stuart.

x. Elizabeth3, lived on her parents land and died in December 1853. She never married but left five children: Susan, Viney, Cresa, Sally Mayo, and Franky Stuart. James and Priscilla Stewart charged Susanna with stealing 16 yards of cloth from their home in Mecklenburg County on 1 August 1811. Susanna's sister Cresy testified that Susanna "striped" herself, went down James and Priscilla's chimney, rolled away a mortar in the fire place, and cut out the cloth [Orders 1811-13, 14].

 

30.    John4 Stewart, born say 1761, purchased 303 acres in Mecklenburg County in 1786 and was a "Mulatto" taxable on 303 acres in the lower district of Mecklenburg County in 1787 and 1788, taxable on 199 acres in 1790, but not taxable on any land in 1791 [Land Tax List 1782-1811A, B lists]. He was taxable on personal property in 1787, 1789, 1794, and 1797-1802 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 202, 304, 507, 698, 778, 807, 929]. On 27 January 1797 he purchased 100 acres in Mecklenburg County on Allen's Creek adjoining Mallett from Henry Jackson [DB 9:299] and was taxable on 100 acres in the lower district of Mecklenburg County until 1810 [Land Tax List 1782-1811A, B lists]. His wife Ann was apparently a white woman. On 10 January 1809 Ann Stewart was called "widow of John Stewart formerly Ann Jackson" in a Mecklenburg County chancery suit by which she and Patsy Jackson, Peter Jones and Sally his wife (formerly Sally Jackson), and Augustine Smith sued Isaac Jackson, Jeremiah Claunch and Prudence his wife (formerly Prudence Jackson), William Jones and his wife Charity (formerly Charity Jackson), to sell 296 acres which had belonged to Henry Jackson, deceased. The land was sold to Roderick Coleman who distributed 17 pounds, 14 shillings to each litigant on 11 July 1809 [Orders 1809-11, 5]. On the same date Ann Stewart bought 23 acres adjoining her land and Mrs. Boyd's from Roderick Coleman for 17 pounds, 5 shillings [DB 14:109-10]. She was called Nancy Stewart when she was taxable on 23 acres from 1809 to 1816 [Land Tax List 1811B-1824A]. And she was called Nancy Stewart when she was taxable on a horse in 1810 and taxable on 2 "Mulattoes over the age of 16" and a horse in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1806-28, frames 173, 362]. She died before January court 1817 when the court ordered the commissioners to sell land which was late the property of John Stewart. His son Archibald was the buyer of the land on 13 March 1817. Later that year on 18 August Archibald sold to Roderick Coleman the timber on 23 acres which had belonged to Nancy Stewart, deceased widow of John Stewart [DB 9:299; 14:109; 17:87, 201]. A May 1817 chancery suit divided John's estate among his heirs who were probably his children [LVA chancery case 1824-039]:

i. Elizabeth/ Betsy, married John Walden, 21 April 1804 Mecklenburg County bond, Kinchin Chavis security.

ii. Henrietta, married John Harris, 27 December 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Jere Harris security.

iii. Archibald2/ Archer, born say 1785, married Jincy Chavos, 14 August 1809 Mecklenburg County bond, Edward Brandon security, and second, Elizabeth Brandon, 19 December 1818, Mecklenburg County bond, 22 December marriage, Ned Brandon surety. He was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 with one woman in his household who was over 45 years of age. He died before 23 January 1826 when his estate was appraised at $96 [WB 11:151].

iv. Abel.

v. Henry2/ Harry, born say 1798, a "Mulatto" Mecklenburg County taxable in 1814, 1818 and 1820 [Personal Property Tax List 1806-28, frames 405, 659, 709], head of a Mecklenburg County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820. His estate consisted of a gun, skillet and saddle when it was appraised at Archer Stewart's house on 1 February 1825 [WB 10:396].

vi. John.

vii. Sally.

viii. Franky.

ix. Jane, born about 1798, married Luke Burkes.

 

31.    Titus Stewart, born say 1753, taxable in Lunenburg County in Matthew Stewart's household from 1772 to 1774 and taxable in his own household from 1782 to 1784 [Bell, Sunlight on the Southside, 302, 313, 343; Personal Property Tax List 1782-1806]. He and Matthew Stewart were sued for debt in Mecklenburg County court on 13 December 1784 [Orders 1784-7, 188, 204]. Daniel Durham sued him and his securities Frederick Ivey and Thomas Spence for a bond of 18 pounds on 9 June 1806, and he made a deed of trust with Birchett & Company which was acknowledged in court on 14 July 1806 [Orders 1805-6, 209, 225]. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County in Ephraim Drew's household in 1785 and taxable in his own household from 1786 to 1815. He was a "free Negro" taxable with his unnamed wife in 1813. He was not listed in 1816 and was deceased by 1817 when his estate was taxable on a horse [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frames 99, 125, 224, 329, 558, 721, 902; 1806-28, frames 17, 95, 118, 197, 221, 314, 425, 582]. He was the father of

i. Matthew, born say 1784, over the age of sixteen when he was taxable in his father's household in 1802 and taxable in his own household from 1803 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 902; 1805-28]. He married Eliza Stewart, 8 February 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Miles Dunston surety. And married second, Kesiah Drew, 20 June 1804 Warren County bond, Standfield Drew security. Kesiah was named in the 8 May 1827 Warren County, North Carolina will of her father John Drew.

ii. John, born about 1791, over the age of sixteen when he was taxable in his father's household in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1806-28, frame 95].

 

32.    Charles1 Stewart, born say 1757, was taxable in Henry County from 1782 to 1784: taxable on his own tithe, 2 horses and 7 cattle in 1782 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 16, 56, 118] and taxable on a horse in Patrick County in 1807 [PPTL 1791-23, frame 499]. Most of what we know about this branch of the Stewart family history comes from the rejected claims of his grandchildren Samuel Stewart and Catherine Guilford, for Cherokee compensation in 1908. Their applications stated that Charles Stewart married Clara Husten of Patick County, Virginia, (formed from Henry County in 1790) and Stokes County, North Carolina. They had children John, Green, Salem, George, Betsy, and Frankey [http://www.footnote.com which has now transferred the files to http://www.ancestry.com]. On March 6, 1804 the Stokes County court ordered Clara to show cause why her children Green and Frankey should not be bound out as apprentices [http://www.usgwarchives.org/nc/stokes/court/stewart26nwl.txt]. Clara was head of a Stokes County, North Carolina household of a "free colored" woman aged 26-45 and 2 females under age 14 in 1820 [NC:371] and a "free colored" woman aged 36-55 in 1830 [NC:237]. Charles and Clara were the parents of

i. John, born about 1784 in Henry County, married Virginia Fendley, daughter of Thomas Fendley and Priscilla Rickman [Jordan, Cherokee by Blood, Cherokee Roll of 1909, application no. 19117]. John was a "M"(ulatto) taxable in Patrick County, Virginia, in 1819 and 1820 [PPTL, 1791-1823, frames 700, 717] and head of a Patrick County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. George.

iii. Green.

iv. Madison.

v. Betsy.

vi. Frankey.

vii. Claire.

viii. Jincey.

 

33.    Dempsey Stewart, born about 1764, enlisted in the 1st North Carolina Regiment for eighteen months while residing in Northampton County, North Carolina. He married Lucy Berry, 4 February 1786 Greensville County, Virginia bond, Cannon Cumbo bondsman, Thomas and Barney Steward witnesses. They were married 10 February 1786 [Greensville County Marriage Bonds & Ministers Returns, 6]. He was taxable on a tithe and 2 horses in St. Andrew's Parish, Greensville County, from 1787 to 1792 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 55, 74, 94, 102, 123, 149] and taxable in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, from 1793 to 1815: listed as a "Free Person of Colour" in 1810 and 1811, a "Free Negro" from 1813 to 1815 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1798, frames 401, 497, 543; 1799-1815, frames 197, 259, 295, 349, 394, 478, 520, 559, 637, 675, 733]. He rented land in Greensville County on the south side of Fountain Creek from Thomas Stewart from 1790 to 1792 [WB 1:181-3, 262]. He purchased property by deed proved in Brunswick County court on 26 March 1792, and he and his wife Lucy sold 40 acres in Brunswick County on the south side of the Meherrin River for 30 pounds on 2 October 1795 [Orders 1788-92, 636; DB 16:178]. He registered in Petersburg on 9 November 1805: a brown Free Negro man, five feet ten inches high, thin made, about forty one years old, Born free p. register from the Clk of Brunswick County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 368]. He purchased 60 acres on Buck Water Creek in Brunswick County by deed proved in 1806 and another 84 acres in 1827 [DB 16:178; 19:486; 27:224]. He was head of a Free Town, Brunswick County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:770], 2 "free colored" over forty-five years old in 1820 [VA:670], and 5 in 1830 [VA:249]. He was about fifty-seven years old on 27 January 1823 when he made a declaration in Brunswick County court, stating that he had entered the service in 1782, that his property included 60 acres of land, and that his family consisted of his wife who was about fifty-six [M804-2290, frame 0162]. His 11 December 1848 Brunswick County will, proved January 1849, left five dollars each to his daughters who were living in Indiana: Lucy Cary and Holly Anderson, and left the balance of his estate (including his land) to John Stewart, no relationship stated, who was to support his wife Lucy [WB 15:231]. She was head of a household in Freetown, Brunswick County, in 1850 (born about 1767) with (her son?) Murfree. She was a resident of Petersburg on 17 March 1853 when she applied for a widow's pension based on Dempsey's service for eighteen months in the 1st Regiment of North Carolina. Murphy Stewart testified that he was present when Dempsey died in January 1849 and that Lucy had lived with him since her husband's death [M804-2290, frame 0162]. Dempsey and Lucy's children were

i. ?Murfree B.T., born about 1806, registered on 7 September 1832: a free man of yellow complexion about twenty six years of age, six feet one inch and a half high ... was born free as appears by the evidence of John Wyche [Wynne, Register, 122].

ii. Lucy, in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" over the age of sixteen Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1799-1815, frame 637], married ___ Cary.

iii. Holly, in a list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" over the age of sixteen in Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1799-1815, frame 637], married ___ Anderson.

 

Other members of the Stewart family were

i. Thomas, born say 1750, a "mulatto" runaway jailed in Rowan County, North Carolina, on 8 February 1772 when the court ordered the sheriff to hire him out [Minutes 1769-72, original p.56, abstract p.233].

ii. Samuel, born about 1758, taxable in Surry County from 1783 to 1816: called a "FN" in 1809, listed with 2 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 368, 398; 1791-1816, 17, 169, 271, 384, 462, 574, 616, 657, 757, 866]. He first married Celia Bell, 27 January 1791 Surry County bond; and second, Lucy Scott, 11 October 1808 Surry County bond, David Charity surety. He was head of a Surry County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830. He enlisted in the Revolution in Brunswick County, Virginia, in 1777 and was granted a pension while resident in Surry County, Virginia, in 1832. His widow Lucy received a grant for 160 acres in 1855 [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 44].

iii. William3, "a Colored man ... free born" about 1759 in Brunswick County, Virginia, according to his Revolutionary War pension file. He enlisted in 1777 under Major Hardy Murphy in Northampton County, North Carolina, and marched to West Point and Valley Forge. After the war he returned to Northampton County. He married Mary Artis, 3 January 1792 Greensville County, Virginia bond, 5 January marriage, John Jeter, Sr., surety [Ministers' Returns, 25]. He was taxable in Greensville County in Lucretia Stewart's household in 1791 and taxable on a horse in his own household from 1793 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 129, 164, 181, 193, 206, 220, 248]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:479], perhaps the William Stuart who was witness to Mary Stuart's September 1778 Northampton County will [WB 1:309]. He moved with his family to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he had been living from 1814 until 19 May 1835 when he made his pension application. Nancy Scott, a "Colored woman," who came to Pennsylvania with the Stewart family, testified on his behalf [M805-773, frame 400].

iv. Reps, born say 1763, taxable in Brunswick County on his own tithe and a horse in 1784 [PPTL 1799-1815, frame 93], taxable in Meherrin Parish, Greensville County, from 1787 to 1792 [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 46, 68, 87, 112, 129, 141] and taxable in Warren County, North Carolina, in 1793 and 1795 [Tax List 1781-1801, 249, 294]. He was surety for the 23 June 1791 Greensville County marriage of Nathan Jeffries to Clary Norton and bondsman for the 21 February 1800 Orange County, North Carolina marriage of William Jeffries and Penelope Evans. He married Anny Mason, 22 September 1806 Orange County bond, Charles Whitmore bondsman. He was head of an Orange County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:530].

v. William, born say 1770, a "free man" living with his wife Betsy in Henrico County on 25 January 1797 when Sam "a Negro man slave the property of Samuel Pleasants" was acquitted of entering their house and robbing them of a red cloak and sundry other articles of clothing valued at ten dollars [Orders 1796-8, 227].

vi.Thomas, called "Thomas Stuart a Free Mulatto late of the County of Amelia" on 15 November 1785 when the Petersburg Hustings Court charged him with stealing cloth from David Ross & Company [Orders 1784-91, 83]. He was taxable on a tithe and a horse in Chesterfield County from 1791 to 1797, 2 tithes and a horse in 1798 and 1799, and 1 tithe in 1801 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frames 91, 125, 166, 205, 237, 305, 377, 453]. He left a 21 September 1801 Chesterfield County will by which he gave all his estate to his wife Peggy and appointed her and her father Peter Stewart his executors [WB 5:491-2].

34      vii. Molly, born about 1772.

viii. Nancy, born about 1773, registered in Petersburg on 8 December 1795: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, twenty two years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 106].

ix. George, born say 1774, married Jean Chandler, 27 December 1797 Mecklenburg County bond, Moses Stewart security, with a note from Zacharias Mallett that he had "sold George (commonly of late called George Stewart) to Moses Stewart and therefore have no further claim or title on him whatsoever." George was head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:194].

x. Betsy, head of a Petersburg Town household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:125a].

xi. Ann2, born about 1775, registered in Petersburg on 27 September 1800: a very light Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, light grey eyes, twenty five years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 209]. She was head of a Dinwiddie County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:161].

xii. Richard/Dick, born about 1776, registered in Petersburg on 27 January 1797: a dark brown Mulatto man, five feet eleven inches high, short hair, twenty one years old the beginning of the present month, born free & brought up in the business of a Blacksmith in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 120].

xiii. Pheaby, head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" and 7 slaves in 1810 [VA:120a]. A Phobe Stewart was the mother of illegitimate children Nancy and Polly who were bound to Thomas Cartelon and his wife in Mecklenburg County on 12 February 1787 [Orders 1784-7, 652].

xiv. Nancy, born say 1781, married Miles Dunstan, 18 February 1802 Mecklenburg County bond, Thomas Spence security.

xv. Jarrald, born about 1782, registered in Petersburg on 8 August 1808: a brown free Negro man five feet six and a half inches high, twenty six years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 430]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Chesterfield County from 1802 to 1806 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 492, 605, 642].

xvi. Jane, born say 1784, had a child by Joseph Holley (Hawley) in Greensville County before 14 January 1805 he was charged with bastardy. Henry and Peyton Stewart were security for his maintenance of the child [Orders 1799-1806, 439]. In return, Holley bound himself to serve Henry for the period of seven years [DB 3:402]. On 13 January 1806 the court ordered her son Lindsey bound to Francis Stewart but rescinded the order the following month on 10 February for reasons appearing to the court [Orders 1799-1806, 532, 533].

xvii. Nancy, born about 1784, registered in Petersburg on 21 December 1809: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, twenty five years old, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County. 22 March 1820: now wife of Geo. Valentine [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 529].

xviii. Henry, born about 1787, registered in Petersburg on 25 February 1809: a light yellow brown free Negro man, five feet five inches high, twenty one years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 458].

xix. Moses2, born say 1789, head of a Randolph County, North Carolina household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [NC:64].

xx. Richard/ Dick, born about 1790, registered in Petersburg on 9 May 1809: a light Mulatto man, five feet eight and a half inches high, nineteen years old, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 466].

xxi. Edward3, born say 1792, head of a Randolph County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:64].

xxii. Peter7, born about 1792, registered in Petersburg on 1 May 1816: a brown man of colour, five feet nine and a half inches high, twenty four, born free & raised in Mecklenburg County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 806].

xxiii. Robert, born say 1793, married Polly Jones, 8 December 1814 Greensville County bond, Nevison Stewart surety.

 

34.    Molly Stewart, born about 1772, charged Aaron Newsom in Greensville County court with breach of the peace, but the case was dismissed on 10 May 1802 [Orders 1799-1806, 217]. She was listed as a "Mulatto" in Greensville County in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frame 449]. She was head of a Greensville County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:265]. She registered as a "Free Negro" in Brunswick County on 26 February 1827: Molly Stewart a free woman of color about 5 feet 2 1/2 Inches high about 55 years of age ... of a yellow complexion was born of free parents as appears from the evidence of Phil Claiborne [Wynne, Register of Free Negroes, 87]. She was the mother of

i. Siddy, born about 1805, registered on 26 February 1827: a free woman of yellow complexion about 21 or 23 years of age five feet high ... is the daughter of Molly Stewart a free woman as appears from the evidence of Phil Claiborne [Wynne, Register, 86].

 

1.    Mixed-race persons referenced in early Prince George County records without full names. The year 1721: Three Mallattos not slaves. 1722: One Mallatto Woman and four children valued at 20 pounds. 1725: Three Mallatto Children...Dureing their time. 1727: One Mallatto girl named Sue to serve till 22 years. Mallatto Girl if a slave 13 pounds if Born free then valued to 8 pounds [Prince George County Deeds, Etc. 1713-1728, 15, 428-9, 498-9, 669, 802, 972-4, 1049]. 1722: Bind out three Moll. Children their Mother a Mollatto the names of the Children Peter, Dick, & Nan, To serve James Williams. 1724: Hen. Royall petitioneth that two Moll. Children born in his house Wm. & hannah may be bound to him...granted. 1725: Godfry Radgsdale doth petition that a Moll. girll born in his house may be bound to him. Wm. Eaton prays a Moll. Boy name Wm. be bound unto ye sd Eaton. 1727: Bind to Godfrey Ragsdail two Mullatto Children Dol and bidde. 1728: Peter a mulatt Boy Bound to Edward Colwell. 1729: Two Mulotto Children peter & tom be Bound to Henry Royall. Betty and Jno. Mullattoes bound to Saml Harwell, Jr. 1730: A Mulatto Child Ned bound to Godfrey Rags Dail. 1731: Two Melettos Tom & Will bound to Capt Peter Wynn. Maletto Child Tom be bound to Eliza Ragsdale. 1732: Two Mellattos Patt aged three year Griffen aged Nine Months be bound to Philip Morgan [Chamberlayne, Bristol Parish Register, 11, 18-9, 24, 45, 47, 50, 58-9, 63]. 1739: Robin and Dick two Mulato Boys Sons of Amy a Mulato Woman be bound by the Churchwardens of Bristol Parish to William Coleman until the age of twenty one [Prince George County Orders 1737-40, 378].

2.    Henry Jackson of Mecklenburg County have been identical to or related to the Henry Jackson whose daughter Hannah was mentioned in the 15 January 1744 Brunswick County, Virginia will of Ralph Jackson. Ralph Jackson's 3 June 1745 inventory included "2 Mullatto Apprentice Boys" [WB 2:100-2].

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