WALDEN FAMILY

The Waldens may have descended from the family of William Walden, a tithable in Surry County, Virginia in 1687 [DW 3:5]. The origin of the family is probably lost in the order books for Surry County which are missing for the years 1719 to 1741. One early ancestor of the family probably married a descendant of William Chivers (Chavis), a tithable in Surry County in 1679 [DW 2:422].

 

Members of the family living in Southside Virginia about 1750 were

i. Matthew1, born say 1718, a defendant in Surry County court in May 1750 [Orders 1749-51, 91] and a defendant in Brunswick County, Virginia court in April 1755. He sued William Randle in Brunswick County court in June 1758 for 2 pounds, 4 shillings. John Walden (his brother?) was his witness [Orders 1753-6, 396; 1757-9, 203]. He died before 26 April 1762 when the inventory of his Brunswick County estate totalled 22 pounds and included a horse, 3 head of cattle, 14 hogs, and carpenter's tools [WB 4:383].

1        ii. John Chavis1 Walden, born say 1720.

2        iii. William1, born say 1727.

3        iv. Elizabeth, born say 1728.

4        v. David, born say 1735.

 

1.    John Chavis1 Walden, born say 1720, was called John Charvis in July 1745 when John Meally sued him in Surry County, Virginia court. He was called John Chevas alias Walden when the case was dismissed because he had left the county [Orders 1744-8, 71, 130]. He was living in Southampton County, Virginia, on 9 November 1749 when the churchwardens bound out his unnamed son, "a mulatto of John Walden a poor child according to law" [Orders 1749-54, 22]. He was in Brunswick County, Virginia, in June 1758 when he gave testimony in the suit of (his brother?) Matthew Walden against William Randle [Orders 1757-59, 203]. The inventory of John Chavis Walden's estate, presented in Brunswick County on 25 September 1761, totalled 10 pounds and included a mare, a colt, hogs, and carpenter's tools [WB 4:265]. His children may have been

5        i. John Chavis2 Walden, born say 1742.

ii. Bartholomew Chavis Walden, born say 1748, called Batt C. Walden in 1782 when he was taxable on 60 acres in Dinwiddie County and called Batt Chavis when he sold this land in 1787 [Land Tax List 1782-1814, 1787 Alterations]. He was taxable in Dinwiddiie County on 3 horses and 2 cattle in 1783 and 1787 (called Batt Chavies). In 1788 he was called Batt Chavis when he was taxable on 2 horses in Wood Tucker's district, and on 23 May 1788 he was called Batt Walden when he and Isham Walden listed their taxable property in William Watts' district, but the entry was crossed out and the same property was listed in Watts' district for Batt Chavis (2 horses), Isham Chavis (a horse) and Robert Chavis three days later on 26 May. He was taxable as Batt Walden in 1791, Batt Chavis in 1793 and Bartholomew Walden from 1795 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, (1783, p.41), (1787 A, p.4; B, p.16) (1788 A, p.4, B, pp.5, 17); 1791-9, (1791 A, p.20), (1793 B, p.4), (1794 A, p.21), (1795 B, p.21), (1796 B, p.21), (1797 B, p.20), (1798 A, p.18), (1799 A, p.18)]. He was called Batt Waldane when he sued Micajah Harris for trespass, assault and battery in Dinwiddie County court in March 1790 [Orders 1789-91, 187].

6        iii. Isham, born say 1750.

iv. Robert1, born say 1760, a "yellow" complexioned soldier from Dinwiddie County who enlisted as a substitute in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 154], called Robert Chavis when he was listed as a tithable in Dinwiddie County with Batt and Isham Chavis in 1788, called Robert Walden in 1789 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90 (1788 B, p.5), (1789 A, p.21)].

v. Benjamin, married Lucy Blizzard in Southampton County on 28 August 1782, Mr. John Meglamor minister [Judgment Papers 1777-83, frame 788].

 

2.    William1 Walden, born say 1727, was called a "Mulatto" on 17 November 1747 when he was presented by the Surry County court for "Profane Swearing" [Orders 1744-53, 391]. He was sued for a 2 pound debt in the Surry County court on 17 September 1755 [Orders 1751-57, 287]. He was married before 21 November 1758 when he was presented by the court:

Against ... Wm Walden ... David Walden ... for each and every of them not listing their wife's according to law supposing the said persons to be Mulattoes ... [Orders 1757-64, 135].

He received a patent for 43 acres on the south side of Cypress Swamp in Surry County on 11 July 1761 and a patent for 27 acres on 7 August 1761 [Patents 33:1040; 34:924]. On 14 June 1762 he sold the 43 acres to David Debrix and the following day, 15 June 1762, his wife Sarah relinquished her dower rights to this land in the Surry County court. He was called William Walden, carpenter, on 21 December 1762 when he purchased 194 acres adjoining his land [DB 8:129, 151]. His 8 February 1775 will, proved 27 June 1775 in Surry County, left 221 acres of land to his wife Sarah, and at her death to his three sons: William, Michael, and Drury. It also named his son John and daughters Priscilla and Elender [WB 10:405-7].

Sarah Walden was taxable in Surry County from 1782 to 1787: taxable on a slave named Glasgow in 1782; taxable on slaves Sarah and Nanny in 1788; taxable on slave Aggy in 1791; taxable on a horse from 1792 to 1798 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 359, 380, 390, 482; 1791-1816, frames 69, 275, 308]. She was taxable on 147 acres from 1782 to 1787. She was deceased by 1814 when her estate was taxable [Land Tax List 1782-1820]. On 27 March 1783 the Surry court released her from paying taxes on "Betty, her Negro slave" [Orders 1775-85, 225]. She was probably the Sarah Walden whose estate was settled in Northampton County, North Carolina, in 1808. Drury1 Walden, executor, paid Harwood Walden for keeping Dorothy and John Walden, orphans of Sarah [CR 71.508.24]. William and Sarah Walden had

7        i. William2, born say 1755.

ii. Micajah1, born say 1757, married Martha Franklin. She was the heir of Charles and Ambrose Franklin who died in the service during the Revolutionary War [NCGSJ III]. Micajah's will was proved in December 1806 in Northampton County. He left 94 acres of land in Northampton County to his wife Martha and William3 Walden and left land in Surry County, Virginia, to his brother Drury [WB 2:575]. Martha's Northampton County will, proved in March 1808, mentioned her son Noah Franklin and cousins Martha and Margaret James [WB 2:597].

8        iii. John1, born say 1758.

9        iv. Dolly, born December 1761.

10      v. Drury1, born about 1762.

vi. Priscilla, born say 1764, perhaps the Siller Walden who married Matthew Stewart, 25 February 1799 Mecklenburg County bond, William Chandler security.

vii. Elender, born say 1767.

viii. Rebecca, born say 1769, "daughter of William Walden," married William Cypress, Surry County, Virginia bond of 30 December 1785.

 

3.    Elizabeth Walding, born say 1728, was living in Surry County on 16 April 1746 when she and James Evans were presented by the churchwardens for living in adultery. On 18 June 1746 the court ordered the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish to bind out her "base born child" Mary (no race indicated) as an apprentice to William Thompson [Orders 1744-49, 166, 175]. By 22 July 1747 the sheriff reported to the court that she was not to be found in the county [Orders 1744-49, 354]. She may have moved to Isle of Wight County where a month later on 13 August 1747 the court ordered the churchwardens of Nottoway Parish to bind out (her daughter?) Elizabeth Walden [Orders 1746-52, 37]. Elizabeth may have been the ancestor of

i. Mary, born say 1745.

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1747.

11      iii. Milly, born say 1758.

12      iv. Martha1, born say 1762.

v. Lewis, an illegitimate "Molatto" child living in Orange County, Virginia, on 26 January 1775 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Thomas's Parish to bind him out [Orders 1769-77, 348].

 

4.    David Walden, born say 1735, a "Mulatto," was married before 21 November 1758 when he was presented by the Surry County court for failing to pay tax on his wife [Orders 1757-64, 135]. His children may have been

i. Stephen1, born say 1758, head of a Surry County household of one person in 1782 [VA:43]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1782 to 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 354, 370, 398, 461]. He married Ann Bartel of Sussex County, 5 December 1784 Surry County bond, David Debrix surety. He was probably deceased by 1788 when Ann Walding was taxable on a horse in Surry County [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frame 482]. He may have been the Stephen Walden who died before 14 May 1791 when the Warren County court granted administration on his estate to John Harris in right of his unnamed wife. John (Chavis?) Walden was a buyer at the sale of the estate which totalled 38 pounds [WB 5:257; 6:82; Minutes 1787-93, 176]. John Harris was head of a Warren County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:77].

13      ii. Drury2, born about 1765.

14      iii. Sampson, born say 1766.

iv. Abel, born say 1770, a "poor infant" ordered bound apprentice in Surry County on 23 May 1775 [Orders 1775-85, 8].

 

5.    John Chavis2 Walden, born say 1742, was taxable on 125 acres in Dinwiddie County in 1782 [Land Tax List 1782-1814]. He purchased 70 acres in Warren County, North Carolina, on the east side of Causeway Branch adjoining Worrell on 23 April 1782 and purchased 125 acres on the west side of Smith's Creek in Warren County for 40 pounds on 27 February 1783. He sold (signing) the 125 acres for 50 pounds on 1 November 1785 [DB 8:13, 93, 347]. He was taxable on 460 acres and 1 poll in Warren County in 1784 and taxable on 75 acres and no polls in 1786 [Tax List 1781-1801, 81, 119]. He purchased three tracts of land in Mecklenburg County, Virginia: 400 acres joining the Warren County line on 26 December 1785 for 120 pounds; a 1-1/5 acre lot on the south bank of the Roanoke River on the west side of the road leading to Christopher Haskins' ferry, about 400 yards from the ferry on 9 July 1792 for 12 pounds; and 110 acres on the Warren County line and the head branches of Cotton Creek for 55 pounds on 8 January 1795 [DB 6:529; 8:149, 485]. He was taxable on 3 horses and 9 cattle in Mecklenburg County in 1787; taxable on himself and William Kersey in 1788; taxable on himself and slaves Pompey and Tiller in 1790; and on himself and John Walden, Jr., in another list for 1790; on himself, John Walden, and Robert Corn in 1791; on himself and son Jarrell in 1795 and 1796; and taxable on himself, son John and slaves Patty, Milly, Amy, Mary & Hannah in 1805 and 1806 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1805, frames 255, 333, 360, 416, 584, 604, 1095; 1806-28, frame 20]. He was called John C. Walden in August 1793 when the Warren County court ordered the Collector to pay him 67 pounds for building and keeping in repair the bridge across Palmer's Mill Pond, and on 27 August 1793 he was called John Walden of Mecklenburg County, Virginia, when he and John Birchett of Warren County posted a bond for 200 pounds to insure their keeping the bridge in repair for seven years [Warren County Minutes 1793-1800, 15; WB 6:252]. He (signing) and his wife Rebecca sold 400 acres where he was then living in Mecklenburg County on 3 February 1797, sold 60 acres at the head of Cotton Creek on 11 March 1797, and sold 50 acres on the county line to Susanna Mayo on 25 December 1797 with Moses Stewart and Charles Durham as witnesses [DB 9:218, 219, 431-2]. His sons Eaton and John were counted in the 1800 Warren County census [NC:837]. He owned land in Chatham County before May 1785 when he was among the freeholders ordered by the court to work on one of the county roads [Minutes 1781-85, 109b]. On 20 July 1800 he was called John C. Walden of Chatham County when he purchased 172 acres in Randolph County on Brush Creek, and on 27 February 1805 he bought another 170 acres on Flat Creek in Randolph County which he sold to his son William on 1 September 1810 [DB 8:174; 11:110; 12:97]. In the Tuesday, November 1819 session of the Chatham County court, a bond from him and John Farrar for building a bridge and keeping it in repair for seven years was returned, and the court ordered the County Treasurer to pay him 33 dollars for building the bridge across Hughs' Creek on the road leading from Ramsey's Mills on Deep River to Fayetteville. He was head of a Warren County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:837] (perhaps the same John Walden who was head of a Chatham County household of 12 "other free" in 1800), 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:747] and 6 "free colored" in Chatham County in 1820 [NC:202]. head of a Chatham County household of 12 "other free" in 1800. He transferred 100 acres to his son Bartley Walden by deed proved in Chatham County court on Tuesday, November 1819 and to (his son-in-law) Wiley Jean by deed proved in Chatham County court on Tuesday, February 1821. His 12 September 1829 Chatham County will, recorded November 1829, mentioned his wife Rebecca and thirteen children to whom he left 514 acres in Chatham and Randolph counties [WB B:170]. The will also mentioned a granddaughter Lucy Scott, probably the Lucy Walden who married Abraham Scott, 22 October 1822 Wake County bond. John Chavis Walden's children were

15      i. Eaton, born about 1767.

16      ii. John2, born about 1768.

iii. Mary/Polly, born say 1769, married Moses Stewart, 20 December 1788 Mecklenburg County bond with a note from the bride's father "John Cha. Walden." Her brother Eaton was security. Moses was head of a Randolph County, North Carolina household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:341].

iv. ?Robert2, born say 1775, (not mentioned in John Chavis Walden's will, perhaps he predeceased him), sued for a debt of 3 pounds due by account in Mecklenburg County on 8 June 1795 [Orders 1792-5, 465], taxable in Mecklenburg County adjacent to John, Jarrell, and Eaton Walden in 1796 and 1799 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1805, frame 593]. He was probably one of John Chavis Walden's tithables since the Mecklenburg County court ordered that he work on the road from Burton's road to Haskins Ferry on 8 April 1799 [Orders 1798-1801, 151]. He married Elizabeth Evans, 15 February 1813 Wake County bond, Andrew Peddy bondsman. Jesse Walden was charged with Robert's Wake County tax in 1820 [CR 99.252], and a Robert Walden was also counted in Chatham County, head of a household of 10 "free colored" in 1820, born before 1776, living next to Jarrel Walden [NC:211].

17      v. James1, born say 1773.

18      vi. Jarrel, born say 1774.

vii. Rhoda, born say 1777, married ____ Chavis.

19      viii. William4, born say 1784.

ix. Lucy, born say 1785, called the "consort of Willie Jean" in her father's will. Willie Jean was probably related to John Jean, born before 1776, a "Negro" head of a Guilford County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

x. Bartley, born before 1799, listed as an insolvent taxpayer in Chatham County in the Tuesday, August 1819 session. He received 100 acres from his father by deed proved in Chatham County in the Tuesday, February 1821 court session. He married Matilda McBain, 10 December 1829 Orange County, North Carolina bond, posting his own bond. He sold land by deed proved in the Tuesday, November 1835 session of the Chatham County court and moved to Owen County, Indiana, by 19 May 1836 when he married Lucy Walden [Book B:35]. He was head of a Washington Township, Owen County, Indiana household of 4 "free colored" in 1840 [OWEN:33].

xi. Stephen3, born say 1787, one of the freeholders of Chatham County ordered by the court to work on the road from Little Lick Creek to the Moore County line in the Tuesday, August 1823 session. The Thursday, May 1829 session of the Chatham County court ordered that he be paid $30 for building the bridge across Lick Creek near William Hinton's, and the Tuesday, November 1829 session ordered that he be paid $60 when he returned his bond for building the bridge. A deed of trust between him and Isham Rosser and Thompson Lawrence was proved in Chatham County in the Tuesday, May 1832 session, and he purchased land by deed proved in the Tuesday, May 1833 session. He was named as executor of the Chatham County will of Anthony Evans, but he was living in Indiana when the will was probated by John Dungill on Wednesday, August 1835 session.

xii. Elizabeth, married ____ Simpson.

xiii. Sarah, married ____ Stewart.

xiv. Anna, perhaps the Ann Walden who was head of a Chatham County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:209].

 

6.    Isham Chavis Walden, born say 1750, was taxable on a horse in Dinwiddie County from 1782 to 1799: called Isham Walding in 1782 and 1784, called Isham Chavis in 1787 and 1788, called Isham Walden from 1789 to 1800 and in 1801 when he was counted as a "free Negro" and called "free" Isham Chavis when he was taxable in 1804 [PPTL, 1782-90 (1782 A, p.18), (1784, p.25), (1787 B, p.2) (1788 B, p.5), (1789 A, p.21); 1791-9, (1791 A, pp. 4, 20), (1795 B, p.21), (1797 B, p.20), (1798 A, p.18), (1799 A, p.19); 1800-9, (1800 B, p.23), (1801 B, p.25), (1804 a, p.4)]. Isham Walden was taxable in Petersburg on 2 tithes and 2 horses in 1802 and 1803 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 59, 88]. He may have been the father of

i. Martha2/ Patty, mother of Anna Waldane who was bound out by the Dinwiddie County court in July 1789. Ann may have been identical to "free" Ann Chavis who was taxable on a slave in Dinwiddie County in 1804. Martha may have also been the mother of Stephen Waldane who was ordered bound out in Dinwiddie County in June 1789 [Orders 1789-91, 48, 55]. Stephen and Boswell Walden were "free Negro" taxables in Dinwiddie County in 1815 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-9; 1815-19, list A, p.16].

ii. William, born say 1780, over the age of sixteen when he was listed in Isham Walden's Dinwiddie County household in 1800 and 1801. He was taxable in Petersburg in 1803 [PPTL 1800-33, frame 94]. He may have been the "free" William Chavis who was called the "school master" when he was taxable in Dinwiddie County in 1804 [PPTL, 1800-19 (1800 A, p.21)].

iii. Harbert1, born say 1782, over the age of sixteen when he was listed in Isham Walden's Dinwiddie County household in 1800 and 1801 [PPTL 1800-19 (1800 A, p.21)], taxable in Petersburg in 1804 [PPTL 1800-33, frame 126].

 

7.    William2 Walden (William1), born say 1755, married Priscilla Banks, daughter of John Banks, Surry County bond of 2 February 1778. He was also taxable in Surry County in 1782 on 74 acres, the land he was to inherit upon the death of his mother. He was taxable in Surry County from 1783 to 1796. His wife Priscilla was listed in his stead in 1797, taxable for Wright Walden who was probably their oldest son [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 367, 380, 390, 461, 482, 560, 607; 1791-1816, frames 19, 119, 171, 245, 275, 308, 349, 388, 428, 466, 504, 546, 578, 602, 618, 640, 659]. He died about 1797 when the Surry County Property Tax Alterations recorded the transfer of 74 acres from William Walden, deceased, to Sarah Walden. Priscilla was listed as living on her own land in an 1803 census of "Free Negroes" in Surry County with (her sister-in-law) Dolly Walden, (her son) John Walden, and "Children of P. Walden" living with her: Polly, Nancy, and Claiborn. She was last mentioned in the 1820 Surry County Tax list, taxable on a free tithe. William and Priscilla had

20      i. Wright, born about 1780.

21      ii. William3, born about 1782.

22      iii. John3, born about 1783.

23      iv. Jesse1, born say 1787.

v. Polly, born say 1790, married Major Debrix, 18 March 1814 Surry County bond, Nicholas Scott, surety. Her illegitimate child Elizabeth Walden, born before her marriage to Major, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 23 April 1827: daughter of Polly Debereaux who was formerly Polly Walden ... is upwards of 21 years old as appears from a certificate from Mary Deboreax, well made ... 5'6" high [Surry County Register, p.148].

vi. Nancy, born about 1791, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 3 June 1817: a Mulattoe Woman about 26 year old is 5'5-3/8" high ... long bushy hair, is the daughter of Priscilla Walden [Surry County Register, p.105].

vii. Claiborne (apparently an illegitimate son of Priscilla), born in April 1800, registered as a "free Negro" on 25 November 1822: Willis Claiborne Walden, son of Priscilla Walden of this County aged 21 years last April is 5'7-1/2" high, of yellow complexion [Surry County Register, p.126].

 

8.    John1 Walden (William1), born say 1758, may have been identical to John Waldon who was a taxable "Molato" in John Hutson's Bladen County household in 1770 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:34]. He was head of a household of 7 in Captain Winborne's District, Northampton County, North Carolina, for the 1786 state census and head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" and one slave in 1790 [NC:73]. On 19 February 1791 he purchased household items from Elisha Daughtry in Northampton County for a thousand weight of tobacco [DB 9:145]. Winnifred Walden (his wife) was granted administration on his Northampton County estate on 7 June 1796 [Minutes 1792-6, 240]. By 1802 she had married Moses Newsom who was named as the representative for the estate in the 6 February 1802 account of sales [CR 71.508.24]. Winnifred Newsom's 4 November 1807 Northampton County will, proved in December 1807, mentioned her son Harwood Walding, granddaughter Winna Walding, daughter Penny Newsom, and granddaughter Lucy Newsom [WB 2:353]. One of John and Winnie Walden's children was

i. Harwood, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1800, 8 "other free" and one white woman in 1810 [NC:751], 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:266], and 11 "free colored" in 1830. He was executor of the estate of Philip Byrd who mentioned Harriet Walden, perhaps Harwood's wife, in his will [WB 2:363].

 

9.   Dolly Walden, born in December 1761, registered as a "Free Negro" in Surry County on 22 May 1800: a Mulatto Woman a daughter of William Walden late of this county is of a bright Complexion...5'4" high aged about 38 last December [Surry County Register, p.117]. She was head of a Petersburg household of 3 "free colored" in 1830. Her child was

i. Matilda, born in November 1803, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 22 May 1820: a Mulatto Woman of rather a dark Complexion for a Mulatto a daughter of Dolly Walden...5'2-3/4" high, aged about 17 years last November [Register of Free Negroes, no. 118].

 

10.    Drury1 Walden (William1), born about 1762, was a Revolutionary War pensioner. He made a declaration in Northampton County court to obtain a pension on 4 September 1832. He stated that he was living in Bute County in 1779 when he was called into the service. Drury served three tours as a musician and private, the last one in 1781. He marched to Augusta on his first tour and on his second tour made gun carriages for the cannon and canteens for the soldiers, so he was probably a carpenter like his father. He married Elizabeth Harris in 1780 in Northampton County. William Hardee, Clergyman, testified that Drury "was for years a preacher of the Gospel of Jesus Christ." Charles R. Kee, executor of Drury's will, testified that:

... no man; no, not Jas K. Polk himself, is of better moral character [National Archives File R11014].

He was also in the Third Company detached from the Northampton County Regiment in the War of 1812 [N.C. Adjutant General, Muster Rolls of the War of 1812, 20]. He was taxable in Warren County in the same district as John Chavis Walden in 1786 [Tax List 1781-1801, 119]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 8 other free in 1790 [NC:73], 9 in 1800 [NC:483], 12 in 1810 [NC:752], 11 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:266], and 4 "free colored" in 1830. He purchased 173 acres in Northampton County on the south side of Occoneechee Swamp on 27 August 1794, sold 3 acres of this land on 1 September 1797 [DB 10:204, 316], and was taxable on 288 acres in all the extant Northampton County Tax lists from 1823 to 1834. On 2 March 1818 the court appointed him guardian to David Byrd on 250 pounds bond [Minutes 1817-21, 84]. His 9 October 1834 Northampton County will, proved December 1834, named his wife Elizabeth and his children [WB 4:117]. On 2 September 1844 his son Armstead made a declaration in Northampton County court to obtain a survivor's pension in which he provided the whereabouts of each member of the family. He stated that Drury died 22 December 1834, and his wife Elizabeth died in the fall of the year 1840. Their children were

i. Stephen2, born say 1782, purchased 77-1/4 acres of land in Northampton County from Drury Walden by a deed registered 9 February 1819. He was head of a Northampton County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830. He died in July 1842. Bryant (his son?) received Stephen's share of Drury's estate with instructions to support Stephen and his family.  Bryant was head of a household of 7 "free colored" in Ripley Township, Rush County, Indiana, in 1840: aged 24-36 with a woman aged 55-100.

ii. Matthew2, head of a Northampton County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:753] and 5 "free colored" in 1820, taxable on one poll in Northampton County in 1826. He was deceased when Drury made his 9 October 1834 will.

iii. Drury3, born about 1786, "went to Tennessee" according to Armstead's pension application. He was listed in the Northampton County muster of soldiers in the War of 1812 [N.C. Adjutant General, Muster Rolls of the War of 1812, 20]. He was counted in the 1820 census in Halifax, North Carolina, the 1840 Tennessee census, and the 1850 Nashville, Tennessee census: 74 years of age, with Priscilla, 75 years, both born in Virginia, owning $1,000 in real estate.

iv. John4, born say 1790, went to Ohio according to Armstead.

v. Micajah2, born about 1799, "went to Indiana" where he was head of a household in Jackson Township, Hamilton County, with wife Mary and children, owning $1,200 real estate [HAMI 141].

vi. Armstead, born 1795, remained in Northampton County, taxable on one poll in Northampton County in 1824, and head of a Northampton County household of 9 "free colored" in 1840.

vii. Polly, died 1835.

viii. Nancy, married Asey Byrd, 13 August 1821 Northampton County bond. She went to Ohio and died before 1834. In 1850 Asa Byrd was counted in the Jefferson Township, Logan County, Ohio census.

ix. Patsy, "went to the Red River."

 

11.    Milly Walden, born say 1758, married Jacob Hatter, 14 June 1806 Petersburg Hustings Court marriage. She was the mother of

i. ?Amy, born in November 1775, registered in Petersburg on 23 July 1798: a yellow brown Mulatto woman, twenty two years old in November last, five feet one and 1/2 inches high, Bushy Hair, born free & raised in the County of Dinwiddie [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 142]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:123b].

ii. Freeman Kelly, born about 1779, registered in Petersburg on 5 August 1800: Freeman Kelly, a brown Mulatto man, five feet ten and a half inches high, spare & strait made, twenty one years old April last, son of Milly Walden a free woman & born free in the County of Dinwiddie [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 152].

iii. ?Betsy, born about 1791, registered in Petersburg on 10 May 1809: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet three inches high, eighteen years old, long black hair, holes in her ears, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 469 ]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:118a].

iv. Boswell, born about 1794, registered in Petersburg on 5 July 1810: a brown Mulatto boy, sixteen years old, four feet eleven inches high, son of Milly Walden, now Milly Hatter, a free woman & born in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 632].

 

12.    Martha1 Walden, born say 1762, was the mother of James and Thomas Walden, orphans who were ordered bound to William Headen to be wagon makers by the Chatham County court in February 1792. The court rescinded the order during the same session and ordered them bound instead to Thomas Glover [Minutes 1790-4, 126, 134, 312]. Martha was probably the common-law wife of Thomas Glover who divided his land between her sons James and Thomas Walding and left his household goods, a cow and a mare to Martha and her daughters Elizabeth and Mary by his 18 October 1799 Chatham County will, proved in February 1800 [WB A:25]. Martha was the mother of

i. James2, born about 1783, nine years old in February 1792 when he was bound as an apprentice.

ii. Thomas, born say 1785, about seven when he was bound apprentice in February 1792.

iii. Mary, born about 1787, a thirteen-year-old "Girl of Colour" (no parent named), ordered bound to Mary Welch by the Chatham County court in May 1800 [Minutes 1794-1800, 269].

iv. Elizabeth.

 

13.    Drury2 Walden (David), born about 1765, was a "poor infant" ordered to be bound apprentice in Surry County on 26 March 1776 [Orders 1775-85, 21]. He married Hannah Scott, 29 July 1790 Surry County bond, Armstead Peters surety, 1 August marriage by Rev. Samuel Butler [Ministers' Returns, 29]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 5 January 1796: a bright mulattoe man aged about 30 years, pretty square made bushy hair, 5'7" high, born of free parents [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.13]. He purchased 35 acres in Surry County in 1794, and he was taxable on this land from 1796 through 1814 [Property Tax Lists and Alterations]. He was taxed on his personal property from 1787 to: listed with Armstead Peters in 1787; charged with his own tax in 1790; taxable on slave Clary in 1803; taxable on 3 free males from 1814 to 1816 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 479; 1791-1816, frames 19, 118, 275, 428, 546, 602, 659, 698, 795, 869]. He was listed in Surry County in 1803 with his wife and children Nora, Faithy, Edwin, and Jack in John Bartle's 1803 list of "Free Negroes" [p.205]. Drury was head of a Surry County household of 15 "other free" in 1810 [VA:619]. Hannah was head of a Surry County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830. Her 2 May 1842 Surry County will, proved 27 June the same year, named her son Drury executor and named her son Turner and his wife Nancy, formerly Nancy Debrix, and their children Elizabeth, John, Sam, and Martha Walden [WB 8:283]. Drury was the father of

i. Nora, born say 1792.

ii. Faithy, born say 1794, "daughter of Drew Walden," married Thomas Andrews, 20 February 1815 Surry County bond, 22 February marriage by Rev. James Warren, Methodist [Ministers' Returns, 97].

iii. Edwin, born say 1796.

iv. John6, born say 1798.

v. Turner, born say 1805, married Nancy Debrix.

vi. Drury4, born about 1812, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 24 February 1833: a Mulatto Man aged about 21 Years, is the son of Drury and Hannah Walden ... long bushy hair ... 5'6-1/2" high [Surry County Register, p.234].

 

14.    Sampson Walden (David), born say 1765, was taxable in Surry County from 1786 to 1810, listed with James Bruce in 1787 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 403, 409, 560; 1791-1816, frames 19, 119, 245, 308, 388, 466, 546, 602, 659, 677]. He married Scillar Porter, twenty-one-year-old daughter of Edward Porter, 6 April 1793 Surry County bond, Howell Debrix surety, 7 April marriage by Rev. Berriman [Ministers' Returns, 36]. He purchased 75 acres in Surry County in 1794, and he and his wife Priscilla (both signing) sold this land to Matthew Banks on 1 February 1796 [Property Tax Alterations; DB 1792-99, 296-7]. He purchased 45 acres in 1799, and he was taxable on this land until his death in 1810 when his wife Priscilla was taxed on it [Land Tax List 1782-1820]. His 6 March 1810 Surry County will, proved 24 April 1810, left all to his wife Priscilla [WB 2:343]. Priscilla was head of a Surry County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:619]. Her 9 September 1828 Surry County will, proved 24 October 1828, named their children [WB 6:196-7]:

i. Susannah, born say 1794, received her mother's plantation.

ii. John5, born say 1796.

iii. Silas.

iv. Allen Porter.

v. Elizabeth, married David Cypress, 28 July 1812 Surry County bond, David Sebrell surety, Sillar Walden witness, 6 August marriage by Rev. James Hill [Ministers' Returns, 89].

vi. Rebecca Elliott, formerly Rebecca Johns. She married Reuben Johns, 9 February 1818 Surry County bond, John Walden surety.

 

15.    Eaton Walden (John Chavis2, John Chavis1), born about 1767, was taxable in the Mecklenburg County household of his father in 1788. He was taxable in his own household in 1789, taxable on himself and 2 horses in 1795, and taxable on himself and a horse in 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1805, frame 255, 308, 584, 604]. He married Nanney Evans, daughter of Charles Evans, 20 December 1788 Mecklenburg County bond. He was taxable in adjoining Warren County, North Carolina, on 75 acres and a free poll in 1790 and taxable on a free poll in 1792, 1797, 1798, 1800 and 1801 [Tax List 1781-1801, 187, 243, 337, 362, 407, 419]. He was head of a Warren County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:78] and 6 in 1800 [NC:837]. He was bondsman for the 24 June 1793 Mecklenburg County marriage of Boling Chavous and Nancy Thomerson. He was taxable in Randolph County in 1815, and he was head of a Randolph County household of 8 "free Colored" in 1830 [NC:12]. By 1840 he had moved to Lafayette Township, Owen County, Indiana, where he was head of a household of 5 "free Colored" [OWEN:31]. On 7 April 1842 he was called "my father" (no name mentioned) in the Owen County will of his son Richard. In 1850 he was living with Morgan Walden in Washington Township, District 83, Owen County, counted as an eighty-three-year-old Black man born in Virginia. Eaton's children were

i. Richard, born say 1790, an insolvent taxpayer in 1822, listed in the Wednesday, August 1823 session of the Chatham County court. He was in Owen County, Indiana, by 31 August 1826 when he purchased Lot no. 119 in the town of Spencer [DB 2:14]. He purchased Lot no. 175 on 18 August 1827 and sold Lots no. 105 and 109 in November 1826 to Pardon Boen Roberts. He was head of an Owen County household of one "free colored" in 1830 and 14 in 1840, with a man and woman over fifty-five years of age [OWEN:18, 33]. He received a license to sell groceries and liquor in Owen County on 6 March 1833, in November 1834, January 1837, and March 1838 [County Commissioner's Record Book 2:29, 110, 259, 340]. He purchased 40 acres in Washington Township on 17 October 1836 and made a deed of gift of 1/4 acre of this land to (his brothers) Jesse and Morgan Walden as a "burying ground for myself and all my colored friends and relations forever" on 7 April 1842. His mother was already buried there [DB 5:97; 7:344]. By his 7 April 1842 Owen County will, proved five days later, he left land in Owen County to his brother Jesse and sisters Winney and Elizabeth Walden, and he mentioned but did not name his father [WB 1:57].

ii. Winney, mentioned in her brother Richard's will.

iii. Elizabeth, mentioned in her brother Richard's will.

iv. Jesse2, born about 1795, one of the freeholders of Chatham County who were ordered by the court to work on the road from Bell's Cross Roads to the County line near Goodwins by the Monday, February 1825 session. He married Martha Turner, 16 October 1828 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond. He obtained "free papers" in Randolph County on 1 October 1834 and recorded them in Owen County, Indiana, on 2 February 1835. They stated that he was a "young man of colour," a laborer, "moving to some of the western states" [DB 4:244]. He was head of an Owen County, Indiana, household of 5 "free colored" in 1840 [OWEN:37] and counted in the 1850 Owen County census: 55 years old, Black, born in Va., $250 estate, with Patsy, 35, Black, born in N.C., and nine children born in Indiana after 1834 [OWEN 089].

v. ?Morgan, married Clary Walden 20 October 1829 Randolph County bond. He was head of an Owen County, Indiana, household of 9 "free colored" and one 70-80 year old white woman in 1840 (his light-skinned mother?) [OWEN:32]. Eaton (his father?) was living in his Owen County household in 1850. He was counted in the census as having an estate worth $600 and being deaf and dumb. Also listed were Morgan's wife Polly, born in North Carolina, and his five children who were all born in Indiana [OWEN 090].

vi. ?Nancy, born about 1801, living nearby Eaton Walden in the 1850 Owen County census.

 

16.    John2 Walden (John Chavis2, John Chavis1), born about 1768, was taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1789 (adjacent to his brother Eaton), taxable in his father's household in 1790 and 1791, and taxable on himself, slave Tom, and 6 horses in 1796 and 1797 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1805, frame 308, 360, 625]. He was head of a Warren County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [NC:837] and 4 "other free" and one slave in 1810 [NC:747]. He purchased 252 acres in Mecklenburg County for 230 pounds on 18 February 1800 and he and his wife Sarah sold this land to Ray Moss by deed proved in Mecklenburg County court on 12 October 1801 [DB 10:389; Orders 1801-3, 86]. He married Betsy Stewart, 6 April 1804 Mecklenburg County bond, Kinchin Chavis security. He was taxable on 75 acres and 1 free poll in Nutbush District of Warren County in 1808 and 1815 [C.R. 100.702.1; Tax List Papers, Vols. TC 8, 1795-1815]. He was counted in the list of "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" for Mecklenburg County with two persons in his household in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List] and was head of a Mecklenburg County household of 10 "free colored" in 1820. One of his children may have been

i. Milly, married Banister Chavis, 29 December 1819 Mecklenburg County bond. Banister Chavis was living in the household next to John Walden in the 1820 Mecklenburg County census.

 

17.    James1 Walden (John Chavis2, John Chavis1), born say 1773, was head of a Chatham County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:195]. He married Beedy Stewart according to the 1824 Wake County will of her father Thomas Stewart. He was one of the freeholders in Chatham County who were ordered to work on the road from Lick Creek to the Moore County line by the May 1816 and August 1822 session of the Chatham County court [Orders 1811-18, 266]. He may have been the father of

i. Edward/ Edmund, born about 1797, listed as an insolvent taxpayer for 1823 in the Wednesday, August 1824 session of the Chatham County court. Farrar and Sanders had a suit against him in the Tuesday, May 1827 session of the court, but it was ruled a non-suit. He and (his brother?) William Walden were ordered to work on the road from Gums Spring Meeting House to the Deep River Bridge at Haywood by the Wednesday, February 1832 session, and he was ordered to work on the road from Boylan's Mill to Stinking Creek by the Monday, November 1832 session. He was listed as a fifty-three-year-old farmer with $300 estate living with Lucy, forty-eight years old, and their children in the 1850 Chatham County census [NC:457].

ii. William5, born say 1800, listed as an insolvent taxpayer for 1823 in the Wednesday, August 1824 session of the Chatham County court. The Wednesday, August 1826 session of the court ordered seven persons paid for being witnesses in a State case against him in the Superior court.

 

18.    Jarrel Walden (John Chavis2, John Chavis1), born say 1774, was taxable in his father's Mecklenburg County household in 1795 and 1796 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1805, frames 584, 604]. He married Mourning Jackson, 16 September 1801 Mecklenburg County marriage bond. He purchased 150 acres in Chatham County on Shaddox Creek on 9 March 1810. He was living in Wake County on 14 November 1812 when he sold 75 acres of this land and was living in Chatham County on 12 February 1816 when he sold the remaining 75 acres [DB U:181, 123; W:169]. He was head of a Chatham County household of 11 "free Colored" in 1820 [NC:211]. He received land in Chatham County from his father by deed proved in the Tuesday, February 1828 session, and he sold land by deed proved in the Monday, November 1829 session. On 1 September 1828 he paid $250 for 162 acres on the south side of Deep River in Randolph County [DB 20:102], and he headed a Randolph County household of 13 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:5]. By 1840 he was in Lafayette Township, Owen County, Indiana, head of a household of 16 "free colored" [OWEN:19]. His 17 February 1843 Owen County will, recorded 5 March 1844, mentioned a lot in the town of Vandaley and named his wife Rebecca and children [WB 1:77]:

i. Harbard2, born about 1803 in Virginia, married Jane Scott, 27 February 1824 Wake County bond. The Thursday, August 1826 session of the Chatham County court listed him as an insolvent taxpayer for the year 1825. He obtained free papers in Wake County on 23 March 1841 and recorded them in Owen County, Indiana, on 14 February 1846: a free man of color, thirty five years of age, five foot eleven inches high, light complected prety strait hair, Yellow eyes ... with a five and seven children ... his father and mother was respectable coloured people Also his wife's father and mother who is and have been Citizens of this neighborhood [DB 8:518 by Peterson, Owen County Records, 30]. He was counted near Eaton Walden in the 1850 Owen County census without a wife but with his children. He had a personal estate worth $800 [OWEN 090].

ii. Sally.

iii. Clara.

iv. Lucy.

v. Amos.

vi. Beverly.

vii. Leanah.

viii. Larken H.

ix. Betsey, married Farrow Powell, 2 April 1829 Randolph County bond. He was head of an Owen County household of 7 "free colored" in 1840, living near the Walden family [OWEN:35]. He married, second, Rebecca Bass, on 17 September 1844 in Owen County, Indiana [DB B:239]. He entered the NE:SW part of Section 28 in Marion Township of Owen County on 1 June 1849 [Land Entry Book 1].

 

19.    William4 Walden (John Chavis2, John Chavis1), born say 1784, bought land from his father John Chavis2 Walden in Randolph County on 1 September 1810 [DB 12:97] and was taxable in Randolph County in 1815. He married (second?) Elizabeth Lytle, 6 February 1819 Randolph County bond. Elizabeth died on 12 March 1830 [NCAAHGS vol. V, no.1, 1-8]. He was head of a Randolph County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:43] and 7 in 1840 [NC:56]. In February 1842 the Randolph County court accepted a petition signed by William, his four sons Anderson, John C., William D., and Stanford B., and numerous neighbors stating that, "as Mulattoes or free persons of Colour ... of good moral character," they be allowed to carry firearms. He died before 3 May 1842 when his Randolph County estate papers were filed and his wife Levina received her widow's portion [CR 081.508.141]. His children were

i. Anderson, born about 1800, married Sally Walden, 30 September 1830 Randolph County bond. He was head of a Randolph County household of 6 "free colored" in 1840 [NC:56], counted in the household next to William Walden in the 1850 Randolph County census [NC:88].

ii. John C., married Martha Evans, 4 January 1836 Wake County bond, counted in the 1850 Randolph County census in the household next to William [NC:80].

iii. William D.

iv. Stanford B.

 

20.    Wright Walden (William2, William1), born about 1780, was a taxable 16-21 year old in Surry County in 1797 [Personal Property Tax List 1791-1816]. He married Sally Byrd, daughter of Joseph, on 30 March 1804, Surry County bond. He was head of a Surry County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:619]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 22 February 1834: bright mulatto man aged about 50 years was born of free parents ... is a little grey ... is 5'9" high [Surry County Register, p.250]. He was counted in the 1850 Surry County census: 72 years old with Sally, 65 years old, and $400 estate. They had

i. Reuben, born about 1807, registered in Surry County on 22 February 1834: bright mulatto man, son of Wright Walden and Sally his wife ... about 27 years of age ... 5'5-3/4" high [Surry County Register, p.251].

ii. Eliza Ann, born about 1809, registered on 22 May 1831: daughter of Wright Walden and Sally his wife ... bright complexion about 22 years of age ... 5'1-1/2" high [Register, 173].

 

21.    William3 Walden (William2, William1), born about 1782, was taxable in Surry County in 1800. He probably moved to Northampton County, North Carolina, about 1803 since he was not taxed in Surry County after 1802. His uncle Micajah left him 94 acres of land in Northampton County in 1806. Micajah referred to him as "Neffu William Walden son of William Walden" [WB 2:575]. He may have been the William Walden who married Katy Rowell 1 April 1815, Northampton County bond with Matthew Walden bondsman. He was security for the apprentice indenture of John and Fanny Dungill, "children of color," who were bound to Beverly Brown in Northampton County, North Carolina, on 7 June 1813 [Minutes 1813-21], and he was witness to the 13 October 1824 Greensville County, Virginia will of Patsey Stewart [WB 3:378]. He was counted in the 1850 Northampton County census: a 78 year old "Mulatto" in the same household with Squire Walden, 38 years old, and in 1860: 90 years old, still living with Squire. He was also listed in the Northampton County Tax List in district 9 from 1824-38. In a deed registered on 29 March 1843 he purchased an additional 70 acres adjoining his land from John B. Odom [DB p.329]. However, he lost all his land when he defaulted on a debt for $224.07 to Odom in March 1853 [DB pp. 374-5]. William3's name does not appear in the 1870 census so he probably died between 1860 and 1870 at the age of 80-90 years. His son was

24      i. Squire, born about 1815.

 

22.    John3 Walden (William2, William1), born about 1783, married Eady Cannada, 9 August 1809 Surry County bond. He was taxable in Surry County from 1803 to 1809, his tax charged to (his mother) Priscilla Walden from 1803 to 1805. He probably died before 1813 Eady Walden was listed as a "free Negro & Mulatto above the age of 16" [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 546, 578, 659, 762]. They were the parents of

i. John7, born about 1809, registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 28 November 1831: a bright mulatto man aged about 22 years ... son of Edy Walden ... is 5'-1/2" high [Surry County Register, p.215].

 

23.    Jesse1 Walden (William2, William1), born say 1787, married Milley Stewart, 6 April 1805 Mecklenburg County, Virginia bond, Frederick Ivy security. He was taxable in Mecklenburg County in 1806 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1805, frame 21] and taxable in Surry County from 1809 to 1816: called a "M"(ullato) in 1810; listed with 3 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16" in 1813, 2 of whom were free males [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1816, frames 659, 678, 716, 761]. He was head of a Surry County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:619]. He may have been the Jesse Walden whose will was proved 20 November 1838 in Putnam County, Indiana [WB PA:574]. He left 80 acres of land valued at $750 to his wife Elizabeth and their children: William M., Rachel Ann, Elizabeth Jane, John S, Palmilea E., and an infant.

 

24.    Squire Walden (William3, William2, William1), born about 1815, married Tempy James, 28 March 1832, Halifax County, North Carolina bond. Squire was named as surety for the bond which William3 Walden defaulted on in 1853 [DB p. 27]. Squire was taxable in Northampton County in 1836, his free poll charged to William3 Walden. In 1849 Squire was charged with his own free poll. He and his wife Tempy were listed with their children in the Northampton County census for 1850, 1860 and 1870 [NC:649]. He was listed as a ditcher who could read and write. He probably worked on his father's farm. Tempy, "Mulatto," eighty-four years old, born August 1816, was living with their youngest son Benjamin in dwelling no.176 in Rich Square, Northampton County in 1900. Squire's youngest child Molly Walden Markham, as an elderly woman, told a tale to the WPA Writer's Project how her mother Tempy was a white woman and her father Squire Walden was a slave on her grandfather's plantation. Tempy fell in love with Squire, her father found out about it, and sold Squire to another slave owner in another state. Tempy bought Squire's freedom and then drank the blood from a cut in his finger so she could honestly tell the Justice of the Peace that she had Negro blood in her [WPA Project vol. XI, part 2, 106-8]. Tempy was actually the daughter of Benjamin James, a light-skinned free African American who lived in Halifax County, North Carolina. Molly Markham said that she was the youngest of fifteen children, but only twelve were listed in Squire's household in the 1850-1870 census. Squire and Tempy's children were

i. ?John Felson, born about 1832, not listed in Squire's household, married first, Rebecca Haithcock, 20 April 1853 Northampton County license, and second Henrietta Clark, 5 September 1856 Northampton County bond.

ii. ?Bryant, born about 1834, not listed in Squire's household.

iii. Samuel, born about 1836.

iv. William6, born about 1837, married Elizabeth F. Jones, 1856 Northampton County bond.

v. Amanda, born about 1838, married James Artis 28 December 1859, Northampton County bond.

vi. Martha, born about 1839.

vii. James, born about 1841.

viii. Hester, born about 1842.

ix. Peyton, born about 1845.

x. Whitand, born about 1849, living in Halifax County in 1870.

xi. Patsy, born about 1851.

xii. Betsy, born about 1853.

xiii. Benjamin, born about 1855, died 6 February 1930 in Rich Square.

xiv. Mary/Molly Walden Markham, born 20 August 1857, died 19 February 1941. She met the Reverend Edian Markham while he was on a missionary tour of Rich Square and married him in her parents' home. Reverend Markham founded the St. Joseph African Methodist Episcopal Church [NCAAHGS IV, no.4, 36]. Their son William Benjamin Markum published a booklet about his father and the founding of the church in which he wrote that tradition said his great grandfather Billy Walden rode horseback at 100 and one years old and only gave it up because he thought it unseemly. The booklet contains a photo of Molly and her three children: William Benjamin, Maggie, and Robert [Markum, The Life of a Great Man, 26-7]. They were counted in the 1900 North Carolina census [23/26/11/23]. See the following URL for a photo of Edian and Molly and more details of St. Joseph's Church: http://www.hayti.org/Support-Hayti/Support-Hayti.htm

 

Endnotes:

1.     William Walden's name was written as "William Woleing" in his Surry County, Virginia will. However, the 27 June 1775 court order to appraise the estate called him William Walden [Orders 1775-85, 9].

 

WALKER FAMILY

1.    Sarah Walker, born say 1703, was the mother of "a Mulatto Boy named Daniel, Son of Sarah Walker a Mulatto Woman, aged six years last February," who was brought before the King George County, Virginia court on 7 September 1733 by Mary Brocke who asked the court to bind him to her. The court ordered the churchwardens of Hanover Parish to bind Daniel as an apprentice until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1721-34, pt.3, 649]. Sarah was the ancestor of

2        i. ?Moses, born about 1724.

ii Daniel, born in February 1727, "Free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 3 in 1800 [MD:385].

iii. ?Samuel, born about 1752, an eight-year-old "Mulatto Bastard Child" bound out in Frederick County, Virginia, on 3 September 1760 [Orders 1760-2, 159].

iv. ?Thomas, head of a Westmoreland County, Virginia household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:789].

v. ?George, taxable in Prince William County from 1795 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 277, 371, 462, 670, 740], head of a Prince William County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:506].

vi. ?David, taxable in Prince William County from 1792 to 1807, described as "y" (yellow) in 1807 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1810, frames 205, 411, 513, 601, 671].

 

2.    Moses Walker, born about 1724, was a sixteen-year-old "mulatto" boy who was listed in the Stafford County estate of Edward Derrick on 13 May 1740 [WB Liber M, 1729-48, 295]. He and his wife were taxable "Mulatoes" in Bladen County in 1768, taxable "free Negroes" in 1770 and 1771, "Mixt Blood" taxables in 1774, and taxable in 1775. His wife was probably Mary Walker, a "free Negro" head of a household of one Black from 12-50 and one over 50 or under 12 years of age in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:7, 26, 67, 124; II:39, 175]. Mary was head of a Fayetteville, Cumberland County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:42] and 3 in 1800. Moses and Mary may have been the parents of

3        i. Elizabeth, born say 1765.

 

3.    Elizabeth Walker, born say 1765, was head of a Fayetteville Town, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" in 1790 [NC:42]. She may have been the mother of

4        i. David, born 28 September 1785.

ii. James, born say 1788, a "free Black boy," who was mentioned in the 29 December 1798 Bladen County will of Joseph Cain [Campbell, Abstracts of Wills, Bladen County, 20]

 

4.    David Walker, born 28 September 1785 in Wilmington, North Carolina, was the son of a free African American woman and a slave father. He travelled widely throughout the United States and settled in Boston where he owned a used clothing shop near the wharves. He was one of the most militant of the abolitionists, encouraging slaves to fight for their freedom whatever the cost in blood. He was also a militant leader of the Massachusetts General Colored Association, which was fighting for better education and employment for those who were already free as well as the freedom of slaves. This association was one of the forerunners of the Boston anti-slavery movement [Horton, Black Bostonians, 81, 93]. In 1829 he wrote and published at his own expense, "An Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World." Walker distributed his pamphlet by placing it in the pockets of the clothes he sold to sailors. One of his pamphlets was found by the mayor of Richmond in 1830 in the house of a free African American [Richmond Enquirer, January 28, 1830]. Governor Floyd of Virginia was referring to this incident when he appealed for the passage of additional restrictions against "free Negroes" since they were allowed to go at liberty and "distribute incendiary pamphlets and papers" [House Journal, 1831-32, 10, cited by Russell, Free Negro in Virginia]. Warned that his life was in danger, he refused to flee to Canada. A price was placed on his head, and in 1830 he was found dead in the doorway of his shop [New Encyclopedia Britannica, Micropedia, X:521]. His only son was

i. Edwin G. Walker, elected to the Massachusetts legislature in 1866.

 

WALLACE FAMILY

Members of the Wallace family were

1        i. Martha, born say 1720.

ii. James1, born say 1730, a "dark Mulatto, who "called himself a Portugueze and went by the name of James Wallace alias Wadling," said to be "lurking" about Chesterfield County with his convict "doxy" and to be pretending to be a bricklayer according to an ad placed in the Virginia Gazette of 17 October 1755 by John Brunshill, Sr., of Caroline County who stated that James was suspected of stealing his horse and was headed to Gloucester County to seek work [Virginia Gazette (Hunter)].

 

1.    Martha Wallace, born say 1720, was living in Charles City County, Virginia, in November 1745 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind out her children Philip and Lucy (no race indicated) and ordered that she be discharged from the service of Thomas Ballard [Orders 1737-51, 388]. She was the mother of

2        i. ?Elizabeth1, born say 1738.

ii. Philip1, born say 1740, taxable in New Kent County from 1782 to 1803. He may have been the father of Benjamin Wallis, a "Mulatto" taxable in Gerard Ellyson's household in 1788 and a "Negroe" taxable in his own household in 1792 [PPTL 1782-1800, frames 8, 17, 44, 86, 101, 112, 154, 197, 221; 1791-1828, frames 362, 374, 387].

iii. Lucy, born say 1742, probably the Lucy Wallace who was called the indentured servant of James Major in June 1761 when the Charles City County court ruled that she had served her time and set her at liberty [Orders 1758-62, 290].

3        iv. ?James2, born say 1755.

v. ?Joseph, a man of color who served in the Revolution from Bedford County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 154].

 

2.    Elizabeth1 Wallace, born say 1738, was a "Free Negro" whose daughter Elizabeth was baptized in Bruton Parish, James City County, on 4 January 1762 [Bruton Parish Register, 20]. She was probably the unnamed "free Negro" living in York County on 19 March 1759 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Bruton Parish to bind her children Mary and James Wallace to Fleming Bates [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 16]. She was a "free" head of a Williamsburg City household of 4 "Blacks" in 1782 [VA:45]. She was the mother of

i. Mary, born say 1756.

4        ii. James3, born about 1757.

iii. ?John, born say 1760, taxable in James City County from 1785 to 1813: a Mulatto" taxable on a horse and 5 cattle in the upper precinct of Bruton Parish in 1785, taxable on 2 tithes in 1806 and 1809, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1805 and 1806, a "cold man" listed with a tithable and 2 "free persons of colour" (probably himself and his wife) in 1813 [PPTL 1782-99; 1800-15].

5        iv. Elizabeth2, baptized 4 January 1762.

6        v. ?Lylla, born say 1764.

vi. ?Rebecca1, born say 1765, "Free Mulatto" mother of Rebecca Wallace who was baptized 13 March 1783 in Bruton Parish [Bruton Parish Register, 35].

vii. ?William, taxable in James City County in 1786, 1794, from 1800 to 1803 and listed as a "Mulatto" taxable in 1805 [PPTL 1782-99; 1800-15].

7        viii. ?Edward1, born say 1771.

 

3.    James2 Wallace, born say 1755, was taxable in Charles City County from 1792 to 1805 [PPTL, 1788-1814], taxable on 30 acres in 1800 [Land Tax List, 1782-1830], head of a Charles City County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:957] and 13 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:7]. He leased 30 acres from Nicholas Holt of Charles City County for seven years on 21 August 1799 and leased 10 acres on Oldman's Run on the path from the courthouse to Samuel Hargrave's for twenty-one years on 21 January 1802 [DB 4:484, 587]. On 24 December 1811 the Charles City County estate of William H. Lightfoot, deceased, paid him $43 for clover seed [WB 2:214]. He purchased 31-1/2 acres in Charles City County adjoining Edward Wallace and the "roling road" for $126 on 16 January 1812, and he and his wife Martha (making their mark) made a deed of trust to sell this land for a debt of $76 he owed Samuel Ladd [DB 5:410, 432]. He and his wife transferred 30 acres to (his son?) Peter Wallis by deed acknowledged in court on 20 April 1837 [Minutes 1830-9, 317]. He registered as a free Negro in Charles City County about 1806 (no details provided) and "removed to Ohio" sometime after 1835 [Register of Free Negroes, 1835-64, no.1]. He was the father of

i. ?Edward2, born say 1780, called Edward Wallis, Jr., when he was taxable in Charles City County from 1801 to 1805 [PPTL, 1788-1814].

ii. ?Philip2, born say 1784, taxable in Charles City County in 1805 [PPTL, 1788-1814], registered as a free Negro in Charles City County about 1806 (no details provided) [Register of Free Negroes, 1835-64, no. 26] and was head of a Charles City County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:959]. He married Elvy Morris, daughter of James Morris, 24 March 1815 Charles City County bond [Wm & Mary Quarterly Historical Papers Vol. 8, No.3, p.195].

iii. ?Peter, born about 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 17 March 1831: certificate of Emancipation from the clerk of Henrico, Peter Gwin, alias Peter Wallis, a man of dark brown Complexion and 23 years was born free [Minutes 1830-9, 43].

iv. James6, Jr., born about 1809, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 21 September 1826: (by testimony of Nelson New) son of James Wallace, a black boy, aged seventeen years, 5 feet 7 inches, born free in this county [Minutes 1823-9, 189].

 

4.    James3 Wallace, born about 1757 in New Kent County, made a declaration in James City County on 13 August 1832 to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution. "Being a Coloured man," he acted as a cook for Colonel Porterfield and guarded prisoners. He enlisted in James City County and returned there after the war [M804-2479, frame 0558; The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 154]. He was taxable in James City County from 1786 to 1813: listed as a "Mulatto" in 1805 and 1806, taxable on 2 tithables in 1806, 3 in 1809, 2 in 1810, taxable on 2 tithables and a "free person of colour" (probably his wife) in 1813 [PPTL 1782-99; 1800-15]. He may have been the father of

i. Joseph D., taxable in James City County from 1806 to 1814: taxable on a tithe and a "free person of colour" (probably his wife) in 1813 [PPTL 1800-15].

ii. Nathaniel1, taxable in James City County from 1806 to 1810, a "cold man" taxable on a tithe and a "free person of colour" (probably his wife) in 1813 [PPTL 1800-15].

iii. James5, Jr., a "cold man" taxable in James City County in 1813 [PPTL 1800-15]. perhaps the James Wallace who was head of a Warwick County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

iv. Jasper, taxable on a tithe in James City County in 1813 [PPTL 1800-15].

 

5.    Elizabeth2 Wallace, baptized 4 January 1762 in Bruton Parish, was a "mulato" head of a James City County household of 2 "free persons of colour above the age of 16" in 1813. She bound her daughter Rebecca Wallace to Toby and Rebecca Jackson of Richmond City on 27 July 1789 [Hustings Court Deeds 1:305-6 cited by Gill, Apprentices of Virginia, 258]. (Toby Jackson was emancipated by Henrico County deed proved on 3 July 1786 by his wife Rebecca Jackson, a "Mulatto woman" emancipated by Thomas Johnson by deed proved on 4 November 1782 [Orders 1781-4, 114; 1784-7, 509; 1789-91, 493]. Toby and Rebecca were married in Henrico County on 24 August 1787). Elizabeth was the mother of

i. Rebecca, born in 1776, bound apprentice to Toby and Rebecca Jackson of Richmond City.

ii. Henry, obtained a certificate of freedom in James City County and registered it in York County on 15 July 1833: son of Betty Wallace (remainder of certificate not copied by the York County clerk) [Free Negroes Register 1831-1850, no. 349].

 

6.    Lylla Wallace, born say 1764, was the "Free Mulatto" mother of Matthew Wallace who was baptized in Bruton Parish on 2 March 1783 [Bruton Parish Register, 35]. She was the mother of

i. Matthew, baptized 2 March 1783, head of a Norfolk County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:926].

ii. ?Mahlon, born 1776-1794, head of a Guilford County, North Carolina household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. ?Polly, born about 1798, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a Mulatto about 24 years of age...has short hair...Born free [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 170].

 

7.    Edward1 Wallace, born say 1771, was taxable in Charles City County from 1792 to 1801 [PPTL, 1788-1814]. He was a resident of Henrico County on 16 January 1812 when he purchased 31-1/2 acres adjoining the land of James Wallace in Charles City County [DB 5:408]. He was head of a Charles City County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:7]. His widow Rhoda Wallis obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 18 June 1835: widow of Ned Wallis, a black woman, thirty eight years of age [Minutes 1830-9, 237]. He was the father of

i. Nathaniel2, born about 1816, registered in Charles City County on 20 April 1837: son of late Ned Wallis, a black man, twenty one years of age [Minutes 1830-9, 316].

ii. Alexander, born 14 July 1818, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles City County on 16 June 1836: son of late Ned Wallis, aged seventeen years 14 July last, black lad [Minutes 1830-9, 280].

 

A member of the Wallace family may have had a child by a slave:

i. James3, born about 1760, registered in York County on 18 June 1810: James als. James Wallace, a bright Mulo. about 49 or 50 years of age, 5 feet 9-1/2 Inches high...long hair which seems inclined to curl - Liberated by deed from Sam. L. Goodson & Wm. G. Goodson by deed recorded in York Ct. [Register of Free Negroes 1798-1831, no. 43]. He was head of a Williamsburg, York County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:886].

 

WARBURTON FAMILY

1.    "John Wabbleton, a Molatto fellow," born say 1750, and his wife Beck were taxables in Sarah Smithwick's household in the Bertie tax list of Joseph Jordan in 1772 [CR 10.702.1, box 3]. He and Beck were taxables in Luke Smithwick's household in the 1775 list of David Standly, and he was called John "Wharburton" in 1790, head of a Bertie County household of 4 "other free" [NC:15]. He may have been related to Richard Wattleton, "free negro" head of a Norfolk County household in Elizabeth River Parish in 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 83].

 

WARRICK/ WARWICK FAMILY

1.    Hannah Warwick, born say 1647, was convicted of an unspecified offence, but the General Court of Virginia ruled on 23 April 1669 that the case against her was "extenuated because she was overseen by a negro overseer" [VMHB VIII:243 (General Court Judgments and Orders 1664-1670)]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. John, born say 1668.

 

2.    John Warrick, born say 1668, was called "Jack Orrick a Mollato" in May 1686 when Mary Arsbrook, a servant of Francis Mason, confessed in Surry County court that Jack was the father of her bastard child [Haun, Surry County Court Records, IV:567]. On 7 September 1687 Mary's daughter, Mary Arsbrooke, was bound as an apprentice to Thomas Drew [DW&c 4:39]. He was called "Jno. Warwick" when he was taxable in Mason's household in 1690 and called "Orick" when he was taxable in Mason's household in 1695 [DW 5:22b, 59, 61b, 108a, 190b, 208b, 257b; Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, v.23, no.3, p.61; v. 24, no.1, p.71]. He purchased 80 acres at Upper Chipoakes adjoining the county line on 6 September 1698. He and his wife Mary sold this land on 2 February 1723 and sold another 95 acres in the same area adjoining Charles City County on 14 May 1723 [DW&c 5:161; 7:470, 472]. He was the father of

i. Mary Arsbrooke, born about 1686.

3        ii. ?Job, born say 1705.

 

3.    Job Warrick, born say 1705, sued Solomon Borakin in Brunswick County, Virginia court on 24 May 1757 [Orders 1757-9, 20]. He sold 10 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, on the state line with Brunswick County, Virginia, to (his son?) Jacob Warrick on 23 April 1772. He was deceased by 10 January 1776 when a deed of sale from his son Jacob mentioned land belonging to the heirs of Job Warrick [Northampton DB 5:205; 6:86]. He may have been the father of

4        i. Jacob, born about 1721.

ii. Moses, born say 1740, listed among the "Black" members of the undated colonial muster of Captain James Fason's Company of Northampton County militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He may have been the Moses Warwick who was counted as white in Robeson County in 1790, head of a household of 3 males and one female [NC:49].

iii. Henry, head of a household of one "Black" person 12-50 years old and 2 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Elisha Webb's District of Northampton County for the 1786 state census.

 

4.    Jacob Warwick/ Warrick, born about 1721 in Surry County, Virginia, was listed among the soldiers in King George's War who failed to report to their camp at Williamsburg in July 1746: a whitish mulatto, age 25, 5'10" [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:92]. He was called Jacob Warrick, Junr., in July 1746 when he sued John Mons in Surry County court [Orders 1744-9, 195]. He was a resident of Isle of Wight County when he purchased 100 acres in Northampton County, North Carolina, joining the county line and Thomas Jordan on 21 February 1746/7 [DB 1:288]. On 24 September 1754 the Brunswick County, Virginia court ordered Jacob and Job Warwick to clear the road from Longs Road to the country line across Fountain Creek on the southside [Orders 1753-6, 286]. He was sued for debt in Sussex County in September 1754 [Orders 1754-56, 68]. The sheriff sold 50 acres of his Northampton County land on 26 November 1755 and sold another 100 acres of his land on 10 May 1757. Jacob purchased 10 acres at "Country Line" adjoining Arthur Hart from Job Warrick on 23 April 1772 [DB 2:262, 404; 5:205]. He, Job, and Moses Warrick were "Black" members of the undated colonial muster of Captain James Fason's Company of Northampton County Militia [Mil. T.R. 1-3]. He was called Jacob Warrick of Brunswick County, Virginia, blacksmith, on 20 January 1776 when he sold 100 acres "lying in Brunswick and Northampton Counties ... by Fountain Creek ... by the land belonging to the heirs of Job Warrick ... being all the land he now owns." Perhaps it was this land belonging to the heirs of Job Warrick, "90 acres bounded by the land Jacob Warwick formerly possessed," which he sold two years later on 23 April 1778 [Northampton County DB 6:86, 230]. He may have been the Jacob Warrick who was counted as white in Wayne County in 1790, head of a household of 2 males and one female [NC:149]. His children may have been

i. James, born before 1776, perhaps the James Warwik who was in the Third Company detached from the Northampton County Regiment in the War of 1812 [N.C. Adjutant General, Muster Rolls of the War of 1812, 20]. He was head of an Anson County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:13].

ii. Riley, head of an Anson County household of 6 "free colored" and 2 white women in 1820 [NC:13].

 

Endnotes:

1.     Only John Newsom had "Black" written next to his name in Fason's Muster, but all those persons listed below him were counted as "other free" in the census.

 

WALTERS/ WATERS FAMILY

1.    Joseph Walters, born say 1670, complained to the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia that the child born to his wife while she was the slave of Isaac Collyer was held by Collyer as his slave. The case was referred to the York County court which decided that the child was born while Joseph's wife was still a slave. He and his wife Mary, "free Negroes," were arrested for assault and battery in York County on 24 August 1693. His wife Mary was convicted of assaulting Elizabeth Samson, and there was also a "general complaint against her ... of threats ... of dangerous consequence," so the court ordered her transportation out of the colony. Joseph was probably identical to Joseph Waters, a "free Negroe," who the grand jury of York County presented on 25 February 1694/5 for "keeping company with an English woman & constantly lying with her." The court also presented the unnamed English woman for having a "Molotto Child" [DOW 9:173, 240, 255, 270; 10:106].

 

WATKINS FAMILY

1.    Catherine1 Watkins, born say 1720, was listed in the inventory of the Northumberland County, Virginia estate of John Coppedge between 1743 and 1749, valued at 4 pounds currency. Also listed were (her?) "Molatto" children Robert, Jeane and Michael Watkins, valued at 15 pounds, 13 pounds and 11 pounds respectively [RB 1743-9, 131]. She may have been the mother of

i. Robert1, born say 1737, perhaps the Robert Watkins whose petition against Seymour Powell was dismissed by the Brunswick County, Virginia court on 27 June 1758 after hearing both sides [Orders 1757-9, 202].

2       ii. Jean/ Jane1, born say 1739.

3        iii. Michael, born say 1741.

 

2.    Jean/ Jane1 Watkins, born say 1739, was a "Molatto" listed in the Northumberland County estate of John Coppedge, valued at 13 pounds [RB 1743-9, 131]. She may have been the mother of

4    i. Moses, born say 1760.

 

3.    Michael Watkins, born say 1741, was living in Lancaster County, Virginia, on 21 October 1765 when the court ordered his daughter Kate Watkins bound to Robert Watkins [Orders 1764-7, 168]. He was in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 25 January 1779 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out his "poor Children" William and Robert Watkins. His wife was apparently Ann Watkins who was living in Brunswick County on 22 April 1771 when the court ordered her children William, Robert, and Mary Watkins, "(Mulattoes) poor Children," bound out by the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish [Orders 1768-72, 346; 1774-82, 242]. He was taxable in St. Andrew's Parish, Greensville County, Virginia, from 1787 to 1820: taxable on a horse and 4 cattle in 1787, taxable on a free male tithable 16-21 years of age in 1790, 1795 and 1796; taxable on James Watkins' tithe in 1804 and 1805, listed in 1813 with Ann Watkins ("Mulattos") [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 57, 124, 149, 157, 195, 207, 236, 271, 299, 317, 334, 350, 369, 384, 399, 413, 430, 444, 460, 503, 599]. He was head of a Greensville County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:266]. Michael and Ann were the parents of

5        i. Catherine2, born say 1763.

ii. William, born say 1768.

6        iii. Robert2, born about 1770.

7        iv. Mary, born say 1771.

v. ?John1, born before 1776, taxable in Greensville County from 1797 to 1820, listed with (his wife) Sally, "Mulattos," in 1813 [PPTL 1809-50, frames 225, 236, 250, 290, 307, 317, 341, 375, 450, 466, 538, 610]. He was head of a Greensville County household of 12 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:266].

vi. ?Daniel1, born before 1776, taxable in Greensville County in 1795, 1799 and 1800 [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 195, 249, 257], head of a household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:266].

8        vii. ?David, born say 1780.

viii. ?James, born say 1782, married to Sally on 8 May 1809 when they sold 30 acres on the south side of Fountain Creek and both sides of Jordan's Road in Greensville County. This was their allotment of the estate of Lucretia Byrd, widow of Thomas Stewart [DB 4:117]. He was taxable in Michael Watkins' household in 1804 and 1805, in his own household from 1807 to 1811, probably deceased by 1812 since Sally Watkins was taxable on a horse in 1812 and listed by herself as a "Mulatto" in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 369, 399, 384, 403, 417, 430, 444].

ix. ?Frederick, born in 1785, registered in Greensville County on 10 November 1806: aged 21 years the 24 December 1806 is free born, of a yellowish complexion...about 5 feet 8-1/2 Inches high [Register of Free Negroes, no.6]. He was head of a Rutherford County, Tennessee household of 6 "free colored" in 1820.

 

4.    Moses Watkins, born say 1760, was a "Mulatto" taxable in Culpeper County from 1789 to 1794 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 307, 338, 416, 437, 498] and a "free negro" taxable in Fauquier County in 1798 [PPTL 1797-1807, frame 100]. On 13 July 1789 he rented for 5 pounds currency annually 100 acres on the west side of the Hatyman River from William Allason by Culpeper County deed during the natural life of himself, his wife Judie and his son Robert who was then under eight years of age. He also agreed that within two years he would build a twenty foot square house, sixteen foot square kitchen, twenty by sixteen foot stable, thirty by twenty foot barn, and plant fifty apple and fifty pear trees [DB P:243]. His father-in-law James Nickens made the same agreement with Allason about two weeks later [DB P:249]. He and his wife Judy were the parents of

i. Robert3, born about 1781.

 

5.    Catherine2 Watkins, born say 1763, was bound to (her uncle?) Robert Watkins in Lancaster County in 1765. She was living in Greensville County, Virginia, on 26 June 1783 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out her illegitimate children Moses and Cherry Watkins [Orders 1781-9, 73]. She was the mother of

i. Moses2, born 1776-94, head of a Warren County, North Carolina household of 1 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [NC:756], and 3 "free colored" in 1820. His estate was ordered settled in Warren County in November 1828 [Gammon, Record of Estates Warren County, vol. II, no. 566].

ii. Cherry.

 

6.    Robert2 Watkins, born about 1770, was taxable in Greensville County from 1792 to 1815: in the same household with John Deen in 1792 when they were taxable on a slave, taxable on 2 horses in 1793, his tax charged to George Harwell in 1799, taxable on a slave and 2 horses in 1812, listed in 1813 with Nancy ("Mulattos") [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 149, 157, 207, 244, 264, 278, 299, 317, 334, 350, 384, 417, 436, 450, 489]. He married Nancy Jones, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Jones, 10 February 1796 Greensville County bond, Abraham Artis surety [Marriage Bonds, 34]. Robert and his wife Nancy and Mark Gowen and his wife Sally sold 9 acres in Greensville County on 23 September 1799. This was part of the land their wives inherited from their father Thomas Jones [DB 2:577]. Robert registered as a "free Negro" in Greensville County on 1 September 1824: a free Man of Colour of a Yellow Complexion supposed to be 54 years old, 5'9-1/4 inches high (in shoes)...a farmer [Register of Free Negroes, no.113]. He was head of a Greensville County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:266]. He may have been the father of

i. Daniel2, born about 1798, registered on 29 April 1817: free born of a black complexion, nineteen years of age the 28th May next, five feet 9-3/4 inches high (in Shoes)...a planter [Register of Free Negroes, no.66], married Fanny Dungill, 10 February 1824 Greensville County bond, David Wadkins surety, 12 February marriage by Rev. Nathaniel Chambliss [Ministers' Returns, 93].

ii. Sterling, born about 1807, registered in Greensville County on 1 April 1825: free born of a yellowish Complexion about Eighteen years old, 5 feet 10-1/2 inches high in shoes...a planter [Register of Free Negroes, no.141].

 

7.    Mary Watkins, born say 1771, "Mulato" daughter of Ann Watkins, was bound apprentice in Brunswick County on 22 April 1771 [Orders 1768-72, 346]. She was a "free Mulatto Woman" living in Greensville County between 1822 and 1826 when her children registered as "Free Negroes and Mulattos." Her children were

i. John2, born about 1802, registered in Greensville County on 17 July 1822: (son of Mary Watkins a free Mulatto Woman) free born of a black complexion, about 20 years of age, five feet 7 inches high (barefoot)...a sawyer [Register of Free Negroes, no.100].

ii. Jesse, born about 1804, registered in Greensville County on 3 January 1826: son of Mary Watkins, free born 22 years of a yellow Complexion, 5'8-1/8 inches high (in shoes)...a ditcher [Register of Free Negroes, no.151]. He was head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820.

 

8.    David Watkins, born say 1780, was taxable in Greensville County from 1798 to 1820: taxable on a horse in 1805, his tax charged to John Blanks in 1806 and 1807, taxable on a slave in 1809, 5 slaves in 1811 and 4 slaves and 3 horses in 1812, listed in 1813 with (wife) Jemima ("Mulattos") [PPTL 1782-1850, frames 235, 249, 257, 299, 317, 334, 347, 367, 367, 384, 413, 430, 444, 459, 478, 503, 551, 575, 599]. He married Mima, "a mulatto woman freed by Mr. John Wickham," 25 December 1805 Greensville County bond, James Watkins surety. He was head of a Greensville County household of 12 "free colored" and 7 slaves in 1820 [VA:266] and 21 "free colored" and 12 slaves in 1830 [VA:41]. He was the father of

i. Mary Ann, born say 1804, "daughter of David Watkins," married Thomas King, "people of color," 29 January 1822 Greensville County bond.

 

Other members of the family in North Carolina and Virginia were

i. Clarkey, born before 1776, head of a Caswell County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:93].

ii. Sarah, born before 1776, head of a Guilford County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Robert4, born about 1786, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County, Virginia, on 8 January 1811: twenty five years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 152].

iv. Isaac, born 1776-94, head of a Caswell County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:512] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:93], married Jenny Jones, 23 February 1816 Caswell County bond.

v. Jane2, born say 1780, living in Caswell County on 22 February 1805 when the court ordered her unnamed children bound apprentices. Her children were probably Betsy, "child of colour," and Lewis Watkins, a five-year-old, both bound to Christopher Dameron on 30 July 1806 [CR 20.101.1]. Jane was a "Negro" head of a Guilford County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Nathan, born 1776-94, head of a Gates County household of one "free colored" in 1820 [NC:145].

vii. Joseph, born say 1765, married Sally Porter, daughter of Edward Porter who consents and is surety, 28 October 1788 Surry County, Virginia bond, Elizabeth Porter witness.

 

WEAVER FAMILY

Three members of the Weaver family, probably brothers, were called "East Indians" in Lancaster County between 1707 and 1711. They were

1        i. Richard1, born say 1675.

ii. John1, born say 1684.

2        iii. William1, born say 1686.

 

1.    Richard1 Weaver, born say 1675, was called an East Indian by the Lancaster County court on 11 April 1711 when it granted him judgment against the estate of Andrew Jackson for 400 pounds of tobacco due by bill [Orders 1702-13, 262]. He and Elizabeth Weaver were witnesses to the 21 September 1735 Lancaster County will of Edward Nicken and proved the will in court on 12 November 1735 [WB 12:355; Orders 1729-43, 131]. Thomas Edwards sued him for 319 pounds of tobacco on 10 April 1733. On 11 November 1737 the Lancaster County court presented him and his wife Betty of Wiccocomoco Parish for being absent from Church for one month, but the case was dismissed the following month. He was called "an ancient poor man of Wiccocomoco Parish" on 12 September 1739 when the Lancaster County court excused him from paying taxes in the future. James Scrosby sued him for 500 pounds of tobacco on 10 September 1742 [Orders 1729-43, 106, 185, 187-8, 251, 358]. His son Isaac Weaver was a tithable in his household in 1745 [Lancaster County Tithables 1745-95, 2]. He left a Northumberland County will dated 28 August 1756, proved 14 Mary 1759, leaving his estate to his wife Elizabeth during her lifetime and then to sons Joseph and Benjamin Weaver. The inventory of his estate, appraised at 17 pounds currency, included a bible and a prayer book [RB 1758-62, 74, 89]. Richard was the father of

3        i. Ann1, born say 1720.

4        ii. Isaac1, born say 1722.

5        iii. Aaron1, born say 1725.

iv. Joseph1, born say 1730, received a certificate from the Lancaster County court on 16 August 1756 for taking up Dinah, "a Runaway Negro woman Slave" belonging to the estate of William Harvey, deceased, of Northumberland County [Orders 1752-6, 264]. He won a suit in Lancaster County court on 19 August 1773 against Charles Barratt for 2 pounds, 8 shillings [Orders 1770-8, 343]. He was head of a Northumberland County household of 6 "Black" persons in 1782 [VA:37], taxable in Northumberland County from 1782 to 1790: listed with 2 tithes, 18 cattle, and a horse in 1782, charged with Benjamin Weaver's tithe in 1783, 1786 and 1787; listed as Benjamin's tithe in 1789; charged with 2 tithes in 1791 [PPTL, 1782-1812, frames 235, 249, 293, 315, 337, 374]. On 14 June 1790 the Northumberland County court exempted him and Joseph Weaver, "free negroes," from paying personal taxes [Orders 1790-5, 2].

v. Benjamin1, born say 1732, was living in Northumberland County when John Clayton wrote a promissory note to pay him 19 pounds, 11 shilings by 19 August 1772. Benjamin sued Clayton for debt in Lancaster County court on 17 March 1785 [Lancaster Judgments 1702-1785, frames 593, 761-2; Orders 1783-5, 93a]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1787 to 1795: his tax charged to Joseph Weaver in 1787, taxable on himself and Joseph Weaver in 1788, taxable on his own tithe and a free male aged 16-21 in 1790, taxable on Richard Weaver in 1791 and 1792 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 337, 360, 376, 389, 403, 420, 434]. On 14 June 1790 the Northumberland County court exempted him and Joseph Weaver, "free negroes," from paying personal taxes [Orders 1790-5, 2]. He purchased 100 acres in Lancaster County on 3 May 1796 and another 10 acres on 19 November 1803 [DB 23:89; 25:20]. He was head of a Lancaster County household of 6 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:364]. His 13 July 1812 Lancaster County will, proved 17 November the same year, named his niece Elizabeth, left a bible to his niece Jenny Weaver, and left his land to Jenny's male issue [WB 28:137].

vi. ?Moses1, sued Richard Weaver in Lancaster County court for debt due by account on 11 March 1748 and sued Aaron Weaver on 17 January 1754, but the cases were dismissed on areement of the parties [Orders 1743-52, 181a; 1752-6, 210, 212]. He was paid 3 shillings for sureproofing the tobacco house of the orphans of John Hutchings in Lancaster County in 1762 [Deeds & Wills 1758-63, 234].

 

2.    William1 Weaver, born say 1686, and Jack Weaver, "East Indy Indians," sued Thomas Pinkard for their freedom in Lancaster County court on 13 August 1707. The court allowed them five days time to produce evidence relating to their freedom but ordered them not to depart the county to some remote county without giving security to return to their master within the time allowed. Neither party appeared for the trial on 10 March 1707/8 [Orders 1702-13, 183, 176, 185]. William may have been the father of

6        i. ?William2, born say 1710.

ii. ?Elizabeth, born say 1714, living in Bertie County, North Carolina, on 12 August 1735 when the court nullified the indenture of "Elizh. Weaver Setting forth that being a Free woman she is detained by Edmd. Wiggons as a servant by indenture illegally obtained...from the Petnrs. mother." And on 13 August 1740 the court read the petition of Charles Horne "Shewing that he has bound to him by ye Cts. of ye N W Par & two Majestrates O. & Elizabeth Weavers a Mallatto Boy wch Allex. Cotton refuses to Deliver ye sd. Boy" [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, I:152, 293].

7        iii. ?James1, born say 1718.

 

3.    Ann1 Weaver, born say 1720, a "Mulatto" was married to Allen Kelly on 24 May 1755 when they bound themselves and her "Mulatto" son Elijah Weaver to serve Benjamin Waddy of Lancaster County for three years to pay a debt they owed John Heath. Waddy sold Elijah's indenture to William Pullen who sued Waddy, testifying on 17 December 1762 that Elijah, the son of "Nanny Weaver a free mullattoe," had served only two years because he reached the age of twenty-one after the second year [LVA, chancery suit 1765-001, digitized]. She was the wife of Thomas Nicken on 30 November 1777 when her brother Isaac Weaver called Nicken his brother-in-law in his Lancaster County will [WB 20:120] and on 22 April 1778 when her husband Thomas Nicken left his estate to her and her grandchild Ann Weaver Kelly [RB 10:375]. She was the mother of

8        i. Elijah1, born about 1736.

 

4.   Isaac1 Weaver, born say 1722, was taxable in the Lancaster County household of his father Richard Weaver in 1745 and taxable in John Longworth's household in 1775 and 1777 [Tithables 1745-95, 2, 14, 22, 35]. He was sued by Thomas Edwards, Gent., for 2 pounds, 9 shillings due by account on 13 June 1746 [Orders 1743-52, 102]. The churchwardens were ordered to bind out his children in Lancaster County on 17 April 1764. He brought a successful suit in Lancaster County against William Steptoe for 429 pounds of tobacco on 21 May 1764. His suit against Joseph McAdams was dismissed on 19 November 1764, and on 15 July 1765 David Galloway won a suit against him for 13 pounds, 13 shillings. This was for merchandise that Isaac purchased from Galloway between 9 August 1762 and 26 February 1764 that included a linen handkerchief, brown sugar, 3 pints of rum, a drinking glass, 2 men's felt hats, 2-5/8 yard fine linen, a quart of rum, molasses, another pint of rum, men's shoes, a thimble, a narrow ax, and a quart of rum. It also included 10 pounds, 13 shillings which Galloway paid to settle Isaac's account with Hugh Ker on 8 September 1762 and a deduction of 2 shillings which was paid for Isaac by John Nicken. Isaac was living in Northumberland County on 14 August 1762 when he signed (making his mark) a promissory note to Ker for the 10 pounds, 13 shillings. The suit was settled when Elmour Doggett agreed to pay Galloway from Isaac's crop when finished after deducting one broad and narrow hoe as well as his levy and poll tax [Lancaster County Orders 1764-67, 27, 32, 39, 78, 144; Judgments 1765-7, frames 178-182]. His children were probably the "Mulatto" boys and girls who William Heydon of Wiccocomico Parish named in his 17 June 1765 Lancaster County will, "To my Son in Law Ambrose Jones...my Mulatto boy John Weaver...To my Son John Heydon...my Mulatto Girl Betty Weaver...To my Granddaughter Tabitha Oldham my Mulattoes Tom and Darcus Weaver...To my Grandson William Oldham...my Mulatto Boy William Weaver." They were listed in the 17 June 1765 inventory of his estate: Darcus Weaver (25 pounds currency), John Weaver (20 pounds), William Weaver (18 pounds), Thomas Weaver (15 pounds) and Betty Weaver (10 pounds) [DW 1764-70, 34, 38, 78, 81]. Isaac's 30 November 1777 Lancaster County will, proved 19 March 1778, named his brother Aaron Weaver and his brother-in-law Thomas Nicken [WB 20:120]. His children may have been

i. Dorcas, born say 1755, mother of Wilson Weaver who was bound to Thomas Lovelace in Halifax County, Virginia, on 19 September 1776. On 27 February 1792 the Halifax County court ordered the overseers of the poor of the upper Southern District to bind out her son William Weaver to William Smith [Pleas 1774-9, 172; 1790-2, 341]. Her son Wilson Weaver registered in Halifax County on 30 August 1802: aged about twenty five years, five feet seven inches and three quarters high, yellow colour... born free...registered as a free Negro [Register of Free Negroes 1802-31, no. 21]. He may have been the son of a member of the Wilson family of Halifax County. He was a "Moloto" taxable in Pittsylvania County in 1803, living at John Fitzjahrelds's in 1804 [PPTL 1792-1812, frames 412, 484].

ii. John3, born about 1760, petitioned the Lancaster County court on 19 October 1786 for his freedom from Susannah Leland who was holding him in servitude until the age of thirty-one. The court ruled that he was free since he had served for twenty-one years [Orders 1786-9, 32]. He married Dorcas Bell, 10 June 1789 Lancaster County bond. He received a certificate of freedom from the Lancaster County court on 19 April 1796 stating that he had been a servant until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1792-9, 268]. He was taxable in Lancaster County from 1788 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1839, frames 54, 86, 291, 322, 385]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 19 September 1808: Age 48, Color yellow, Height 5'3-1/4. His wife Dorcas, born about 1754, registered on 18 July 1803: wf/o John, Age 49, Color dark, Height 4'11, Served till 31 years of age [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1]. He left a 6 November 1809 Lancaster County will, proved 20 February 1815 which named his wife Darkey Weaver and grandsons John, James, and Samuel Bell. Betsy Bell was one of the witnesses to the will [WB 28:162]. He was a Revolutionary war veteran who died before 19 May 1834 when his only heir Betty Weaver was named in Lancaster County court [Orders 1834-41, 7]. Dorcas left a 23 July 1820 Lancaster County will, proved 21 August the same year, naming her son Spencer Bell and grandchildren John Weaver Bell, James Bell, and Nancy Bell [WB 28:208].

iii. William3, born say 1760, perhaps the William Weaver who the Lancaster County court ordered on 20 June 1771 to remain with his mother Sinah Hamlin (Hamilton?) until further order [Orders 1770-8, 109], taxable in Mary Haydon's Wicomico Parish, Lancaster County household in 1781 [Tithables 1745-95, 38].

iv. Thomas1, born say 1762, married Eliza Lawes/Laws, 7 July 1794 Lancaster County bond. He was granted a certificate of freedom by the Lancaster County court on 21 July 1795 [Orders 1792-9, 225]. He was taxable in Lancaster County in 1795 [Tithables 1745-95, 58] and a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:998]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1805 to 1809, a "Blk" taxable in 1809. Perhaps his widow was the Betty Weaver who was listed as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County in 1813 with a male over sixteen years of age and 2 slaves over sixteen [A list of Free Negroes and Mulattoes in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 588, 597, 616, 645; 1813-49, p.13].

v. Elizabeth, born say 1763, taxable in Northumberland County on 4 cattle in 1787, taxable on 2 horses in 1797 and 1798 [PPTL 1782-1812, frame 315, 466, 488].

 

5.    Aaron1 Weaver, born say 1725, was sued by Moses Weaver in Lancaster County court on 17 January 1754, but the case was dismissed on areement of the parties [Orders 1752-6, 210, 212]. He purchased household items at the sale of the Northumberland County estate of David Lattimore on 10 January 1769 [RB 1770-2, 105, 107]. He was named in the 30 November 1777 Lancaster will of his brother Isaac Weaver [WB 20:120]. He was taxable in Lancaster County in 1775 in the list of John Longworth on himself and slave Phebe, on himself in 1776, one of Betty Brady's tithables in 1777, a tithable head of a household with slave Sarah in 1779, and tithable on himself and slave Lucy in 1781 [Tithables 1745-95, 14, 18, 22, 35, 42]. He was head of a Northumberland County household of 9 "Black" persons (called "Free Aaron Weaver") in 1782 [VA:37] and was taxable in Northumberland County in 1782 and 1783 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 232, 249]. He was taxable in Lancaster County from 1783 to 1785 [PPTL, 1782-1839, frames 18, 32]. On 16 February 1786 the Lancaster County court excused him from paying taxes because he was aged and infirm. He was taxable on 50 acres in Lancaster County from 1782 to 1799. His estate was taxable on this land from 1791 to 1801 [Land Tax List 1782-1850]. He made a deed of gift to Betty Brady and Joseph Weaver and Betty Brady made a deed of gift to Easter Longworth which was proved in Lancaster County court on 18 January 1791. On the same day Easter Longworth was presented by the grandjury for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1786-9, 2a; 1789-92, 254, 258]. Aaron may have been the father of

i. Richard2, born about 1752, an indentured servant who ran away from Robert Dudley of King and Queen County who offered a reward for his return in the 21 March 1771 Virginia Gazette, describing him as: a young Negro fellow...about 19 years of age, of a yellow complexion, and very spare, had on when he went off a grey serge coat and waistcoat, lined with red, and a pair of leather breeches [Virginia Gazette, Rine edition, p. 4, col. 3]. He was taxable in Lancaster County in 1787, perhaps identical to Richard B. Weaver who was taxable there from 1797 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1839, frames 46, 157, 178, 191, 206, 219, 232, 385]. On 18 March 1788 he and Peter Haw admitted to the Lancaster County court that they owed Meredith Nelms a balance of 3 pounds, 12 shillings of a debt of 7 pounds. He was called a "free Negroe" on 21 July 1794 when the Lancaster County court granted him a certificate stating that he was born free. [Orders 1786-9, 133a; 1792-9, 182]. He was listed as one of Nathan Pullen's tithes in Northumberland County in 1790 [PPTL 1782-1812, frame 359]. On 13 October 1794 he was administrator of the Northumberland County estate of Rebecca Weaver [Orders 1790-95, 471], and on 18 March 1795 he was awarded 4 pounds, 10 shillings in his suit against the estate of Francis Rock [Orders 1792-9, 154, 213].

ii. Lucy2, a witness to the 22 February 1775 Northumberland County will of Judith Hughlett [RB 1772-6, 566]. She was called Lucy Weaver, Senr., on 12 July 1796 when she and Lucy Weaver were sued in Northumberland County court by Daniel Muse. She acknowledged a debt to him of 32 pounds currency which was to be discharged by paying 16 pounds with interest from 27 September 1790 [Orders 1796-7, 55]. She was taxable in Northumberland County on a free male, 3 cattle and a horse in 1782; taxable on a slave in 1790 and 1794 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 238, 368, 427], "a free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:999].

9        iii. Aaron2, born say 1758.

iv. Ann2, born say 1778, married Henry Johnson, 13 February 1795 Lancaster County bond.

v. Nanny, head of a Lancaster County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:363].

vi. Anthony, born about 1780, married Susan Causey, 30 May 1807 Northumberland County bond, James Toulson security. Anthony was "a free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:998]. He registered in Northumberland County on 13 May 1811: Mulatto, about 31 years, 6 feet 1-3/4 Inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 52]. He was a "Blk" taxable in Northumberland County from 1807 to 1812, called Anthony, Sr., in 1810 when he was taxable on a slave [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 616, 645, 661, 676].

vii. Henry, married Jenny Weaver, 28 November 1811 Lancaster County bond. He was a "Blk" taxable in Northumberland County from 1806 to 1811 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 597, 616, 645, 661, 676] and listed with Jenny Weaver in the list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Lancaster County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1839, frames 382, 385, 398].

viii. Joseph2, married Nancy Causey, 6 May 1810 Northumberland County bond, Amos Nicken security. He was a "Blk" taxable in Northumberland County from 1809 to 1812 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 645, 661, 676].

ix. S., head of a Lancaster County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:364], perhaps identical to Sally Weaver who registered in Northumberland County on 6 July 1810: black woman, about 36, 5 feet 5-1/2 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 45].

x. Moses2, born about 1785, registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 17 February 1807: Age 22, Color mulatto...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 3]. He was taxable on 173 acres in Lancaster County on the Northumberland County line from 1827 to 1830 [Land Tax List 1782-1850]. He married Janette Smith, "daughter of Sally Mactear," 31 December 1816 Lancaster County bond. Sally McTyre registered on 15 May 1829: Age 42, Color bright...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 9]. Sally was head of a Lancaster County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:354]. He married Jane Lowe alias Mercer after 16 November 1830 when her freedom was approved by the Lancaster County court. Gawin Corbin emancipated her mother Anna Lowe alias Mercer and Anna's children and grandchildren by his Lancaster County will, recorded 19 May 1823. Gawin stated that he was the father of her two youngest children Jane and Robert Lowe and left land in trust for Anna's use. On 2 January 1843 Anna's older children Dianna Lowe (mother of Joseph and Frederick) and Eliza Lowe sued Moses as administrator of Robert Lowe's estate, but the record showed that most of Corbin's land had been sold to pay his debts [LVA, chancery suit 1830-005, 1845-006, digitized].

 

6.    William2 Weaver, born say 1710, was taxable in Norfolk County, Virginia, in Thomas Archer's household in 1732 and 1733, charged with his own tax in 1734, and taxable on his own tithe and James Weaver's in 1735 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1730-50, 59, 78, 122, 167]. In February 1741 he paid 70 pounds for 300 acres adjoining Alexander Cotton and Jonathan Clift in the part of Bertie County, North Carolina, which became Hertford County after 1759 with Thomas Archer as witness [DB F:319]. He and his wife Elizabeth Weaver were taxable in Bertie County as "free Mulattos" from 1751 to 1758: charged with James Weaver's tithe in 1757 [CCR 190; CR 10.702.1, Box 1]. He purchased 100 acres on Potecasi Creek joining John Carter's Mill on 27 August 1753 [DB H:4]. Most early Hertford County records were destroyed in courthouse fires, but William was taxable there on 2 persons in 1770 and his taxable property was recorded in a 1779 Hertford tax list for District 3 filed with the state government: 300 acres, 2 horses, 16 cattle, and 143 pounds money. James and Carter Nickens and Abel and Baker Archer were taxed in the same district [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 66; GA 30.1]. William's children may have been

10      i. Amey, born say 1730.

ii. Charles1, born before 1748, taxed in 1759 in the household of Peter Jones in John Brickell's Bertie County tax list and taxable on 2 persons in Hertford County from 1768 to 1770 [Fouts, Tax Receipt Book, 13]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:350], 6 in 1810 [NC:106], and 13 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:182].

11      iii. Jesse1, born before 1759.

12      iv. Edward (Ned), born say 1760.

v. James3, born say 1762, purchased 160 acres on the south side of Conway Creek in Halifax County, North Carolina, on 13 October 1784 and sold this land on 3 May 1792 [DB 15:467; 17:746]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:63], 5 in 1800 [NC:350], 9 in 1810 [NC:54], and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:170]. He was charged with bastardy by Martha Lynch in Halifax County court on 24 May 1798. Their son was probably two-month-old Charles Lynch who was ordered bound to James Weaver on the same day to learn the trade of cooper [Minutes 1796-8].

 

7.    James1 Weaver, born say 1718, was taxable in Norfolk County from 1734 to 1736: listed with James Howard in 1734, listed with William Weaver in 1735, and charged with his own tax in the district from Ferry Point to Great Bridge in 1736 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1730-50, 130, 167, 181]. He was listed as William Weaver's tithe in the Bertie County list of John Brickell in 1757 and listed as a "negro" tithable with Peter and Elizabeth Jones, "Blacks," in 1758. Perhaps his widow was Sarah Weaver who was taxed on 300 acres and 5 cattle in District 4 of Hertford County in 1779 [GA 30.1]. Their children may have been

13      i. James2, born say 1749.

ii. Charles2, head of a Hertford County household of 1 "other free" in Captain Langston's District in 1800.

iii. Mary, head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in Captain Lewis' District in 1800.

 

8.    Elijah1 Weaver, born about 1736, was a "Mulatto" bound out by his "Mulatto" mother Ann Kelly on 24 May 1755 to serve Benjamin Waddy of Lancaster County for three years. Waddy sold the indenture to William Pullen on 12 December 1755, but Elijah turned twenty-one two years later and refused to serve the remaining year of the indenture [LVA, chancery suit 1765-001, digitized]. John Heath, factor for Anthony McKitrick & Company, sued him on 17 February 1764 for 6 pounds, 9 shillings which was for merchandise Elijah had purchased between January 29, 1760 and March 1762: including oznabrug, shalloon and linen cloth, thread, buttons, worsted stockings, and a fur hat. The case which was dismissed in Lancaster County on 7 March 1764, probably upon payment of the debt [Judgments, 1763-4, frames 431-4; Orders 1764-67, 15]. He purchased household items at the sale of the Northumberland County estate of David Lattimore on 10 January 1769 [RB 1770-2, 106, 108]. He was administrator of the estate of John Kelly in Northumberland County in 1778 [Orders 1773-83, 362, 371, 374]. He complained to the 22 March 1782 Lancaster County court that Jesse Waddy carried away his son Spencer. The case was dismissed and he was required to pay costs [Orders 1778-83, 93, 94]. He was taxable in Lancaster County in 1781 [Tithables 1745-95, 41] and taxable there from 1783 to 1791 [PPTL 1782-1839, frames 18, 23, 64, 86]. Thomas Mott sued him for 900 pounds of tobacco on 24 October 1784 [Court Papers, 1770-1780, frame 276]. On 21 June 1790 the Lancaster County court exempted him from paying taxes in the future [Orders 1789-92, 150]. He was taxable on 159 acres in Lancaster County from 1787 to 1791 [PPTL 1782-1850]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 18 July 1803: Age 66, Color dark...born free. His wife Dorcas Weaver registered the same day: wf/o Elijah, Age 62, Color mulatto...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1]. He was a Revolutionary War veteran who died intestate in Lancaster County before 15 September 1834 when his heirs Spencer Weaver, Elijah Weaver, Mary Pinn, Agatha Bell, Betsy Weaver, and Polly the wife of Armstead Nicken were named in court [Orders 1834-41, p.37]. His children may have been

i. Spencer, born about 1773, taxable in Lancaster County from 1794 to 1810 [PPTL 1782-1839, frames 124, 206, 277, 338]. He was granted a certificate of freedom by the Lancaster County court on 21 July 1795 [Orders 1792-9, 223]. On 10 November 1801 he and his "Brother" William or Billy Weaver purchased a vessel from a Mr. Arbothnott and signed a promissory note for $110 to a Mr. Thomas Brown payable at the Office of Discount & Deposit at Norfolk. He was sued in Lancaster County court for payment in 1809 [LVA, chancery suit 1811-025, digitized]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 16 January 1804: Age 31, Color mulatto [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 2].

ii. William/ Billy, purchased a vessel from a Mr. Arbothnott and signed a promissory note on 10 November 1801 for $110 to a Mr. Thomas Brown payable at the Office of Discount & Deposit at Norfolk. His brother Spencer stated that Billy sailed to Charlotte in 1802 as a mariner for about $30 wages to pay the note. Billy was not an inhabitant of Lancaster County in 1809 when Spencer and he were sued for payment of the note, and he was never listed in the Lancaster County tax lists [LVA, chancery suit 1811-025, digitized].

iii. Elijah2, married Elizabeth Frary, 8 April 1796 Westmoreland County bond, Tracy Richard Clayton security.

iv. Mary Pinn, perhaps the Mary Weaver who was bound apprentice in Northumberland County court on 9 June 1772 by the churchwardens of Wicomico Parish [Orders 1770-73, 378]. Mary Kelly Weaver married Aaron Pinn, 3 March 1794 Lancaster County bond.

v. Agatha, born about 1785, registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 18 July 1803: Age 18, Color bright mulatto...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1]. She married Coleman Bell, 26 December 1806 Lancaster County marriage.

vi. Betsy.

vii. Polly, married Armstead Nicken, 21 January 1819 Lancaster County bond.

 

9.    Aaron2 Weaver, born say 1758, was head of a Lancaster County household of 3 free persons and a slave in 1783 [VA:55]. He was a Lancaster County seaman in the Revolutionary War who made application for a pension while resident in Princess Anne County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 45]. He was "F.B." taxable on a horse in the Eastern Branch Precinct of Princess Anne County from 1784 to 1815, exempt from personal tax starting in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-89, frames 600, 682, 719; 1790-1822, frames 21, 40, 47, 69, 104, 112, 141, 179, 186, 206, 244, 252, 290, 299, 335, 347, 397, 419, 431, 479, 534]. He was a "F.B." head of a Princess Anne County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:479]. He was the father of

i. Betsy, "daughter of Aaron Weaver," married Demce Anderson, Jr., 4 January 1796 Princess Anne County bond, Thomas Weaver surety.

ii. ?Thomas2, born say 1772, taxable in Princess Anne County from 1793 to 1795 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 69, 104, 112].

 

10.    Amey Weaver, born say 1730, "a Free Mullattoe," was taxable in the Bertie County household of Margaret Bynus (also a taxable) in William Wynn's list for 1757. Her children bound apprentices in Bertie County were

14      i. Lucy1, born about 1746.

ii. Peter, born about 1750, bound to John Campbell to be a seaman on 28 January 1757 [NCGSJ XIII:168].

iii. John2, born about 1753, a six-year-old son of "Free Mullattoe" Amey Weaver bound to William Witherington to learn the trade of shoe making in July 1759 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:491]. He was taxable in Portsmouth and Elizabeth River Parishes in Norfolk County, Virginia, in 1788 and 1789 and from 1796 to 1806: called a "Mulatto" in 1798, 1800 and 1804; a labourer in Western Branch Precinct in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1801 [PPTL, 1782-1791, frames 633, 652; 1791-1812, frames 180, 235, 261, 306, 364, 384, 569, 584]. He purchased 11 acres in Norfolk County at the head of the Western Branch of the Elizabeth River adjoining John Cooper, James Manning and Thomas Taylor on 1 February 1798 and purchased another 8 acres from John Cooper adjoining this land near Hall's Mill and Mary Ann Hall for $110 on 15 March 1803 with Thomas Newton (signing) and Wright Bowers as witnesses [DB 37:136-7; 41:49]. He and his wife Mary sold 11 acres of this land to Adam Perkins for 40 pounds on 9 December 1805, and they sold 8 acres adjoining their land to richard David for $200 on 17 March 1806 [DB 43:4, 72-3]. He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:750], 5 "free colored" in Hertford County in 1820 [NC:206] and 3 "free colored" in Hertford County in 1830. On 28 November 1823 he testified in Hertford County court for Evans Archer saying that he was in the same regiment with him during the Revolution, stationed in South Carolina. He made a declaration in Hertford County court for his own pension on 13 October 1828, stating that he was born about 1752. James Smith testified for him [M805-845, frame 272].

iv. Bridgett, born about 1756, three-year-old daughter of "Free Mullattoe" Amey Weaver, bound to William Witherington to learn household business [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:491]. She was head of a Hertford County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:206].

v. ?James4, born say 1770, head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in Captain Lewis' District in 1800.

 

11.    Jesse1 Weaver, born before 1759, was taxable on 1 poll in District 3 of Hertford County in 1779 [GA 30.1] and taxable on 230 acres and 1 poll in Hertford County in 1784 [L.P. 64.1]. He was head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:26], 5 in Captain Lewis' District in 1800, 3 in 1810 [NC:102], 13 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:182], and 6 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:404]. His 14 January 1834 Hertford County will was proved in February 1834. He mentioned but did not name his wife and named his sons William and Jesse who were "keeping the Mill" and daughters Fanny Cotton, Phebe Cotton, Nany, and Martha Weaver [WB A:65]. His children were

i. William4, born before 1776, head of a Hertford County household of 17 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:186] and 9 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:407]. William, Elias, Lawrence, Jesse, Charles, Thomas and John Weaver as well as Micajah, Wiley, and Richard Cotton were among the "Sundry persons of Colour of Hertford County" who petitioned the General Assembly in 1822 to repeal the act which declared slaves to be competent witnesses against free persons of Colour [NCGSJ XI:252].

ii. Jesse3, born 1776-94, head of a Hertford County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:206] and 3 "free colored" in 1830.

iii. Fanny Cotton.

iv. Phebe Cotton.

v. Nan.

vi. Martha.

 

12.    Edward (Ned) Weaver, born say 1760, was head of a Hertford County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 [NC:25] and 7 in Captain Moore's District in 1800. His 8 April 1816 Hertford County will was proved in May 1816. He left land in the middle of little wood yard at James Smith's line to his wife and then to his granddaughter Polly Weaver with the balance of his land to be rented out to pay his wife $25 annually. He named his granddaughter Anga Weaver, grandson Allen Newton, granddaughter Hester Newton, son John Weaver and grandson Benjamin Weaver. Margaret Hall was a witness to the will [WB A:188]. His children were

i. John4, head of a Hertford County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:403].

 

13.    James2 Weaver, born say 1749, was taxable in Norfolk County, Virginia, in 1765 in St. Brides Parish [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1751-65, 211]. He was head of a Princess Anne County household of 6 whites in 1783 and 1785 [VA:60, 103], taxable on a horse in Blackwater Precinct of Princes Anne County from 1782 to 1787 [PPTL, 1782-9, frames 558, 568, 613, 632, 654, 696] and head of a Gates County, North Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [NC:23] and 4 in 1800 [NC:280]. The Gates County court ordered Benjamin Weaver, "Molatto" son of Lucy Weaver, bound to him as an apprentice shoemaker in August 1793 [Fouts, Minutes of County Court 1787-93, 133]. His children Carter and Joel Weaver were called orphans of James Weaver when they were bound out in Gates County in 1802 [Black Craftsmen in North Carolina, NCGSJ XI:95]. James was the father of

i. ?Lucy, born say 1774, mother of Benjamin Weaver who was bound to James Weaver by the Gates County court as an apprentice shoemaker in August 1793.

15      ii. ?Jane, born say 1775.

iii. ?Willoughby, born say 1780, a labourer heading a household in Western Branch District of Norfolk County in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1801 and included in Josiah Flood's household in the same list [PPTL, 1791-1812, frame 383]. Perhaps his widow was Mrs. Mary Ann Weaver who married John Robbins, "free persons of colour," 1816 Norfolk County bond, Robert Barrett security.

16      iv. ?Jesse2, born say 1782.

v. Carter, born about 1790, bound to Richard Rawls of Gates County to be a house carpenter, a "F Blk" taxable in Princess Anne County from 1813 to 1822 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 492, 511, 554, 667, 686, 705].

vi. Joel, born about 1792, bound to Richard Rawls of Gates County to be a house carpenter, a "F Blk" taxable in Princess Anne County from 1813 to 1821 [PPTL, 1790-1822, frames 492, 511, 554, 667, 686].

 

14.    Lucy1 Weaver, born about 1746, the eleven-year-old daughter of "Amiah Wever a free Mullattoe," was bound to John Campbell by the Bertie County court on 28 January 1757 [NCGSJ XIII:168]. She was called "Negroe Lucy Weaver" on 29 January 1767 when the Chowan County court bound her four-month-old "Free Negroe" son Lewis to Richard Brownrigg, Esq., until the age of twenty-one [Minutes 1766-72, 318]. In August 1793 the Gates County court ordered her fourteen-year-old "Molatto" son Benjamin Weaver bound as an apprentice shoemaker to James Weaver [Fouts, Minutes of County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1787-93, 133]. She was the mother of

i. Lewis, born about October 1768, four months old on 29 January 1767 when he was bound to Richard Brownrigg. He was head of a Hertford County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:102] and 1 "free colored" in 1830 [NC:398].

ii. Benjamin2, born about 1779, bound apprentice in 1793.

 

15.    Jane Weaver, born say 1775, was charged in Norfolk County court with "preparing a potion of medicine supposed to be poison" but released on 17 August 1801, "it appearing the said Jean Weaver is a free person." She was charged with stealing several articles of wearing apparel from the house of ___ Nash but found not guilty on 19 November 1805 [Orders 1801-3, 42a; 1804-5, 217a]. Milley Clayton asked to Norfolk County court to issue a peace warrant against her, but the court dismissed the case on 15 June 1806 [Orders 1806, 79b]. She was in a list of "Free Negroes & Mulattoes" in St. Brides Parish, taxable on a slave and a horse from 1801 to 1803 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 400, 416, 456]. She was the mother of

i. ?Jemima, born about 1794, no race or parent indicated, bound to Ann Hansford to be a seamstress in Portsmouth Parish on 16 December 1805 [Orders 1804-5, 248a], registered in Norfolk County on 19 December 1815: 5 feet 2 ins., 21 years of age of a Yellowish complexion, born free in the county of Norfolk, registered again on 13 November 1821: light complected woman, probably the Miny Weaver who registered on 19 September 1831: 37, 5 ft 3-3/4, a mulatto, Born free, and probably the mother of Mary Weaver who registered on the same day: 13, 5 ft 1/2 inch, Dark complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 105, 239, 714-5].

ii. ?Charlotte, born about 1798, a ten-year-old "girl of color" bound to Mrs. Mason Laws in Portsmouth Parish until the age of eighteen on 21 September 1808 [Orders 1808-10, 113].

iii. ?John, born about 1803, registered in Norfolk County on 17 July 1826: 23, 5 ft 9, light black, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 346].

iv. Milha, "daughter of Jane Weaver," bound to Martha Smith in Portsmouth Parish on 18 January 1808 [Orders 1806-8, n.p., 6th page of January court].

v. ?Anderson, born about 1802, a "free boy of color" bound to Thomas Owens to be a ship carpenter in Portsmouth Parish on 21 September 1808, called a seven-year-old "Mulatto boy" on 20 November 1809 when the order was repeated [Orders 1806-8, 245; 1808-10, 361]. He registered in Norfolk County on 12 November 1822: 21 years, 5 ft 6-1/2, of light complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 272].

vi. ?Abby, born about 1803, registered in Norfolk County on 9 October 1822: 19 years, 4 feet 10-3/4 in, a light complexioned woman, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 271].

 

16.    Jesse2 Weaver, born say 1782, was a "M"(ulatto) taxable in Portsmouth and Elizabeth River Parish District of Norfolk County from 1803 to 1817 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 471, 585, 653, 698, 750; 1813-24, frames 115, 257] and head of a Norfolk County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:819]. He married Eliza Archer in Norfolk County on 14 September 1805 [Ministers' Returns, 1787-1840, 34]. He acquired land from Thomas Archer by deed proved in Norfolk County in 1817. He called Elizabeth Weaver the daughter of Thomas Archer in the Norfolk County deed by which he gave her all his personal estate [DB 47:168; 48:85]. Elizabeth registered in Norfolk County on 21 May 1832: age 48, 5 ft 7-1/4, a mulatto, Born free and registered two years later on 19 August 1833 after the "not Negro" law was passed: age 49, 5 ft 8, Indian complexion, Indian descent [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 870]. He, making his mark, left a 11 March 1832 Norfolk County will, proved 16 September 1846 by which he left all his real and personal estate to his wife Elizabeth to be equally divided among his unnamed children at her death or marriage. They were probably the parents of two members of the Weaver family who registered on 21 May 1832, the same day as Elizabeth:

i. Ann Joseph, born about 1807, age 25, 5 ft 7-3/4, a mulatto, Born free, apparently the Nancy Weaver who registered on 19 August 1833: Indian complexion, Indian descent [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 871, 910].

ii. Sarah Ann, born about 1809, 23, 5 ft 5, a mulatto, Born free, registered as Sally Weaver on 19 August 1833: Indian complexion, Indian descent [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 872].

 

Other members of the family in Princess Anne County were

i. Betsy, born about 1785, registered in Princess Anne County on 3 October 1831: 5'3/4", age 46, a Bright mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 277].

ii. Lucretia, born about 1791, registered in Princess Anne County on 7 October 1833: 5'1-1/2", age 42, a bright Mulatto woman, born free in Princess Anne County [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-62, no. 318].

 

Other members of the family in Virginia were

i. Mary, granted a certificate of freedom by the Lancaster County court on 20 June 1796 [Orders 1792-9, 280].

ii. William L., born about 1795, registered in Petersburg on 9 November 1818: a free man of colour, five feet six inches high, twenty three years old, born free in Lancaster County, a barber [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 936].

 

Those counted as "other free" in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1800 were

i. Penny, head of a household of 7 "other free" [NC:605].

ii. Zadock, head of a household of 6 "other free" [NC:605].

 

Those counted as "other free" in South Carolina were

i. Bett, (free) head of a household of 4 "other free" and a slave in St. Philip's & Michael's Parish in 1790.

ii. John, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [SC:804].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Alexander Cotton owned land in Hertford County adjoining (Elizabeth Weaver's brother?) William Weaver.

 

WEBB FAMILY

1.    Daniel1 Webb, born say 1646, was a tithable slave in the Northampton County, Virginia household of Captain John Custis from 1664 to 1677, called Daniel Negro from 1664 to 1671 and called Daniel Webb when he was listed with Isbell Webb } Negroes in 1677 [Orders 1657-64, fol.198; 1664-74, p.15, fol.42, p.55, fol.114; OW&c 1674-79, 191]. He was witness to the 6 February 1677 Northampton County will of "King Tony Negro" [Orders, Wills 1674-9, 247]. Daniel was probably the father of several children born to Ann Williams, a white indentured servant. Two of their children, Jane and Ann, were listed in 1693 in the Northampton County will of Henry Warren, a neighbor of Captain Custis [OW 1689-98, 261-2; OW&c 1674-79, 191]. Warren's widow Susanna married Hamond Firkette, and Ann's "Maletto" daughter Anne Williams was bound apprentice to him on 30 November 1699. The indenture required Firkette to pay Henry Warren's daughter Esther 1,000 pounds of tobacco at the expiration of the indenture when Anne reached the age of eighteen years [OW&c 1698-1710, 30]. Daniel was the father of

2        i. ?Daniel2, born about 1666.

3        ii. Jane, born about 1682.

iii. Ann1, born in September or October 1686, named in Henry Warren's Northampton County will, a thirteen-year-old "Maletto childe" called Anne Williams when she was bound to Hamond Firkette of Northampton County on 30 November 1699 [OW&c 1698-1710, 30].

 

2.    Daniel2 Webb, born about 1666, was a "molatto" son of an English woman and had attained the age of twenty-one on 5 October 1687 when the Northumberland County, Virginia court released him from his service to the orphans of Major John Mottram. He may have had a child by Mary Day, an indentured white servant, who had a "molatto child" Samuel Webb alias Day who was apprenticed in Northumberland County on 23 November 1694. On 16 July 1701 another English woman named Margaret Lawson confessed in court that "a Negro called Daniell Webb" was the father of her illegitimate child. The court ordered the churchwardens to dispose of her according to law at the expiration of her service to Sarah Dawson [Orders 1678-98, 405, 412, 681; 1699-1713, part 1, 167, 272]. Daniel was the father of

i. ?Samuel1 Webb, alias Day, born say 1694, son of Mary Day, apprenticed in Northumberland County on 23 November 1694. See the Day history.

ii. Robert1 Lawson, born say 1701. See the Lawson history.

 

3.    Jane Webb, born about 1682, was called a "muletto Girle named Jane" in the Northampton County will of Henry Warren in 1693. She agreed to indenture herself for seven years to Thomas Savage in exchange for permission to marry his slave Left. On 17 April 1711 the court bound her children Diana, Daniel and Frances to her master, and on 20 June 1716 the court bound to Savage her two "Malatto" children Ann and Elizabeth, "Born of ye body of Jane Webb ye wife of a Negro man belonging to Captain Thomas Savage" [Orders 1711-6, 225]. On 16 August 1722 Jane was called "Jane Webb, formerly Jane Williams, the daughter of a white woman," when she petitioned the court to release her children Diana (then eighteen), Daniel and Frances from their indenture to Savage, asking the court not to adjudge her children in servitude since they were born in lawful wedlock. Savage delayed the case until 10 January 1722/3 when the court ruled that her petition was frivolous [Orders 1719-22, 185, 191; 1722-9, 11, 46; Deal, Race and Class, 466-71; Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:41-2]. She sued Benjamin Barth for 3-1/2 yards of Virginia linen in November 1723 [Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:60]. Jane was head of her own Northampton County household in 1724, called Jane Webb in one list and "Jane Left mulatto" in the list of tobacco planters. In February 1724/5 the court dismissed her petition for release of her daughter Diana from servitude, but it released her two months later when Diana produced evidence from the parish register that she was twenty-one. In February 1725/6 Savage petitioned the court to have her children Lisha and Abimeleck bound to him because their mother "has no visible means of support" [Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:125]. She brought a suit in chancery against Savage maintaining that as part of her original indenture he had agreed to free her husband Left and had agreed not to make any claim on her children born after her servitude was completed. And she said that Savage had taken the written indenture and would not allow her to see it [Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:147]. On 12 July 1726 two of Savage's neighbors, Colonel George Harmonson and Mrs. Margaret Forse, testified that they had seen an indenture by which Jane agreed to serve Savage seven years and that any children born in the lifetime of her husband Left should serve Savage in exchange for his permission to allow her to marry his slave Left. Savage failed to produce the indenture in court, but testified that he had never agreed to free her husband Left. When asked for what term the children were to serve him by the indenture, he answered that he could not say. His witnesses Colonel Harmonson and Philip Jacob testified that they had heard Jane declare, "if all Negros had as good a heart as she had they would all be Free," for which she received ten lashes. The case was discontinued on 14 December 1726 while the court considered whether to allow the evidence of "Free Negros." Jane failed to make her court appearance shortly after the court decided not to allow her evidence, and the case was dismissed on 11 July 1727 [Orders 1722-32, 247, 248, 258, 260, 265, 278, 287, 297]. She was called Jane Webb, alias Left, in September 1727 when she petitioned to have her name added to the list of tithables. Jane was head of a household with son Daniel and daughter Dinah in 1728, and Jane was in the household of her daughter Dinah Manly in 1730 and 1731. Dinah left the county before 1735, and Jane was tithable as Jeane Webb in Thomas Savage's household in 1737 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 53, 67, 102, 149, 167, 206, 214, 221, 265, 284]. On 14 June 1732 she informed the court that Sophia Savage had not listed her overseer as a tithable and that Major James Forse had not listed her daughter Elizabeth as a tithable, but the court dismissed her evidence as insufficient and did not pay her the usual informer's fee [Orders 1732-42, 6]. On 12 August 1740 the court excused her from paying taxes because of her old age [Orders 1732-42, 409]. She, called Jane Left, died before November 1764 when the vestry of Hungar's Parish paid Abemileck Webb for burying her [Hungar's Parish Record 1758-82, 19]. Jane and Left's children were

i. Dinah, born 14 February 1703/4, eighteen years old in 1722 when her mother petitioned the court for her release from indenture. When she was twenty-one years old, Dinah petitioned the court herself with a note from the parish certifying her birth date, and the court released her on 14 April 1725 [Orders 1722-9, 17, 46, 179; Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:100]. She married Gabriel Manly and was called Dinah Manly on 1 September 1727 when she petitioned to have her name added to the list of tithables [Orders 1722-9, 206].

4        ii. Daniel3, born 25 August 1706.

iii. Frances, born 14 January 1708/9 [Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:100].

iv. Ann2, born about 1711, "a malatto...Born of ye body of Jane Webb ye wife of a Negro man," was bound to Thomas Savage on 20 June 1716. She had four more years to serve when she was listed in the inventory of estate of Thomas Savage who died in 1728 [Orders 1711-16, 255; DW 1725-33, 229-30]. On 9 May 1732 she was presented for bastard bearing and the same day petitioned the court against Sophia Savage who was detaining her children Daniel and Abraham in servitude on the pretense that Ann owed her three years of service for having three bastard children during her servitude. The court ordered that she be set free and ordered Mrs. Savage to deliver her clothes and bedding to her [Orders 1729-32, 143-5; 1732-42, 7, 8, 14]. On 12 February 1733/4 she was called "Nanny Week, late Nanny Webb," when the court bound out her three-year-old "free Negroe" son Daniel to William Scott with her consent [Orders 1732-42, 92]. She and her descendants were called Weeks thereafter. See the Weeks history.

5        v. Elizabeth1, born about 1713.

vi. Lisha/ Elishe1, born about 1716, bound to Thomas Savage on 17 July 1726 [Orders 1722-9, 247]. She had nine more years to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the estate of Thomas Savage who died in 1728 [DW 1725-33, 229-30]. She was presented by the grand jury on 12 March 1733/4 for having a bastard child which she charged to William Beckett [Orders 1732-42, 97, 103, 107].

6        vii. Abimileck, born about 1720.

 

4.    Daniel3 Webb, born 25 August 1706 in Northampton County, was "the son of Left and Jane" according to the petition of his sister Dinah Webb in April 1725 [OW 1698-1710, 397; Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:100]. He was probably identical to Daniel, a "negro" tithable in the household of Thomas Savage from 1723 to 1726, tithable in the household of his mother "Jane Web malato" in 1728, in Daniel Jacob's household in 1729, in the household of his sister Dinah Manly in 1730, and with his wife Frances Jacob in Daniel Jacob's household in 1731. Frances was Daniel Jacob's daughter who was listed in his household as Frances Jacob from 1724 to 1729 and called Frances Web in 1731 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 47, 92, 116, 149, 190, 214, 229]. He was called a "Negroe" on 14 August 1733 when he admitted in Northampton County court that he owed Peter Mifflin a debt of 18 bushels of corn due by obligation [Orders 1732-42, 67]. And he was called "free Negro" on 1 October 1764 in a New Hanover County, North Carolina deed, proved on 2 September 1766, by which he purchased 100 acres on the east side of the mouth of Nichols Creek and the sound from Joshua Pavey (Peavey), "a Mullato" [DB E:274; Minutes 1738-69, 274]. Daniel's 18 July 1769 New Hanover County will was proved on 5 October the same year with his sons Isaac and Samuel Webb qualifying as executors. He left 64 pounds and his land to his children William, Solomon, Jacob, Samuel, and Isaac and his grandchildren John and Elizabeth Webb [Original, NC Archives; Minutes 1738-69, 418, 420]. His children were

7        i. ____, born say 1730.

8        ii. William, born say 1738.

iii. Solomon, received only "one shilling and no more" by his father's will.

iv. Jacob, received only "one shilling and no more" by his father's will. He may have been the Jacob Webb who was taxable in Alex McDowgal's household in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1763.

v. Samuel2, born say 1742, one of the executors of his father's will.

vi. Isaac1, born in August 1743, an eighteen-year-old "Negro" bound by the Northampton County, Virginia court to John Ellegood on 12 May 1762 [Minutes 1761-5, 28]. He was one of the executors of his father's 18 July 1769 Hanover County, North Carolina will.

 

5.    Elizabeth1 Webb, born about 1713, "a malatto...Born of ye body of Jane Webb ye wife of a Negro man belonging to Captain Thomas Savage," was bound to Savage in Northampton County, Virginia, on 20 June 1716 [Orders 1711-16, 255]. She was about nineteen on 14 June 1732 when her mother Jane Webb informed the court that Major James Forse had failed to list her as a tithable. On 11 December 1733 she was presented for having a bastard child, and on 9 January 1733/4 agreed to serve Major James Forse and his wife Margaret for three years for the trouble of his house and fine for having the child. She was called "Betty Webb Mulatto" on 9 May 1738 when she was again presented for having a bastard child [Orders 1732-42, 6, 87, 89, 312, 321; Mihalyka, Loose Papers II:5]. She was a taxable "negro" in John Ellgood's household from 1737 to 1739 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 255, 276, 292]. She may have been identical to Elizabeth Laylor, otherwise Webb, who was presented for bastardy on 11 May 1756, perhaps the wife of "William Ailor (Negro)" who was sued by Arthur Robins on 12 February 1754 [Orders 1753-8, 67, 315]. Elizabeth Webb was the mother of

9        i. Katherine, born on 26 January 1732/3.

 

6.    Abimileck Webb, born about 1720, was bound to Thomas Savage in Northampton County on 17 July 1726 [Orders 1722-9, 247]. He was a "mulatto boy" with thirteen more years to serve when he was listed in the estate inventory of Thomas Savage who died in 1728 [DW 1725-33, 229-30]. He was probably the "Ebemilech" listed among Norly Ellgood's tithables from 1737 to 1740. He was called Bemalidg Web when he was tithable in George Winget's household in 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 264, 284, 358]. On 11 September 1750 he was accused of "combining with sundry Negros in a conspiracy against the white People of this county." His companion, Barbary White, a white hired laborer, deposed that he had told her that:

they (Negroes) would be free...with their one indeavour [an]d godalmightys assistance or blessing, for what would it be for the Negroes to go through this County in one nights time.

He received thirty-nine lashes and was ordered to give security of 100 pounds for his good behavior for a year [L.P. #36 (1750), cited by Deal, Race and Class, 470; Orders 1748-51, 271-2]. He was tithable in Thomas Speakman's household in 1765 and head of his own household with (his wife?) Susanna Webb in 1769 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 374, 388]. Perhaps she was the Susannah Webb who was taxable on 2 horses and 4 cattle in Northumberland County in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 1276]. They may have been the parents of

i. Charles, born about 1760, a "Mulattoe" delinquent tithable in Northampton County in 1786 [Virginia Genealogist 20:269]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1786 to 1792 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 54, 119, 149]. He married Sinah Sample ("Free Negroes"), 7 June 1791 Northampton County bond, William Satchell security. On 9 July 1793 the Northampton County court bound Aaron Webb, son of Leah Webb, to him as an apprentice. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 14 May 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 296, 349]. He was a "fn" taxable in Accomack County from 1800 to 1813, listed with wife Sinah and son Henry at Sleek Neck in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1814, frames 437, 601, 835], head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:165] and 9 in 1810 [VA:69]. He registered in Accomack County about 1832: born about 1760, a Black, 5'8-3/4", born free in Accomack County. His wife Sinah Webb registered about the same time: born about 1762, a light black, 5'3-3/4" high, born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, nos. 623, 626].

ii. Leah, mother of Aaron Webb (born Christmas 1785) who was bound as an apprentice to (his uncle?) Charles Webb on 9 July 1793 [Orders 1789-95, 296]. Aaron married Catherine Drighouse, 31 December 1811 Northampton County bond, James Carter security. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1809 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 459, 553]. Perhaps his widow was the Catherine Webb who was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:214A].

 

7.    ____ Webb, born say 1730, child of Daniel Webb, was the parent of Daniel's grandchildren John and Elizabeth Webb who he gave a total of 34 pounds by his 18 July 1769 New Hanover County will [Original, NC Archives]. Children:

i. John, born say 1750, received twenty pounds by his grandfather's will. He was taxable in Bladen County on one male and two female "Mixt Bloods" in 1774, taxable on one "Black" male and two "Black" females in 1776, taxable on 100 acres, four horses and three cattle in 1779, taxable on 150 acres and one black poll in Captain Dupree's District of Bladen County in 1784, taxable on four "Blacks" from 12-50 years old and five under 12 or over 60 in 1786 and taxable on 200 acres in 1789 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, I:124; II:48, 97, 141, 169, 204; Bladen Co. Historical Society, 1784 Tax List, 13]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 8 "other free" in 1800. His farm animals and household goods were sold for a debt in Bladen County on 28 February 1797 [DB 12:51]. In 1810 he was in South Carolina, head of a Richland District household of 6 "other free" [SC:176].

ii. Elizabeth2, head of a Bladen County household of 6 "other free" in 1800.

 

8.    William Webb, born say 1738, was taxable on a horse in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1779, taxable on 150 acres and one black poll in Captain Dupree's District of Bladen County in 1784 and taxable on one "Black" male from 12 to 50 years old in 1786 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, II:141, 173, 202; Bladen Co. Historical Society, 1784 Tax List, 13]. He purchased 50 acres in Bladen County on 3 October 1786 between Fryar and Slapass and another 50 acres on 30 October 1786 [DB 1:302; 25:243]. He was head of a Bladen County household of 7 "other free" in 1800, 2 in 1810 [NC:204], and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:150]. His children may have been

i. Daniel4, born say 1770, head of Brunswick County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:230] and 8 "free colored" in Cumberland County in 1820 [NC:152]. He may have been the father of William2 Webb, born after 1776, head of a Cumberland County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:153].

ii. Pegg, a "Malatto," bound to William Rutlege by the 10 July 1790 New Hanover County court [Minutes 1779-92, 388].

iii. Benjamin, married Chloe Webb, "Blacks," on 13 June 1806 in St. Philip's Parish, Charleston, South Carolina.

iv. Matthew, petitioned the South Carolina State Legislature on 1 January 1791 to repeal the discriminatory laws against free African Americans [Berlin, Slaves Without Masters, 65-66].

 

9.    Katherine Webb, born on 26 January 1732/3, one-year-old daughter of Elizabeth Webb, was bound apprentice to Major James Forse and his wife Margaret in Northampton County, Virginia, on 26 January 1733/4 [Minutes 1732-42, 89]. She was presented for bastard bearing on 8 May 1750, 10 July 1753, and on 8 June 1756. She petitioned the court on 13 August 1755 saying she had been bound to John Ellegood and completed her servitude while serving his son by the same name. However, he sold her to George Scott for a further five years. The court ordered that she be discharged and paid her freedom dues [Orders 1748-51, 207, 228, 241; Orders 1751-3, 293, 316; 1753-8, 243, 248, 330]. She was awarded 2 pounds by the court on 11 July 1786 in her suit against Charles Floyd for debt. Her suit for trespass against Peter Warren was dismissed by the court on 13 March 1793. She and Grace Webb registered as "free Negroes" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794 [Orders 1783-7, 501; 1789-95, 276, 364]. She was the mother of

i. ?Elishe2, born about 1748, bound to Stratton Caple on 11 June 1755 [Orders 1753-8, 219].

ii. ?Bridget, born in August 1750, bound to Stratton Caple on 11 June 1755 [Orders 1753-8, 219].

iii. Isaac2, born in September 1752, the three-year-old son of Catherine Webb (no race mentioned), bound apprentice to George Scott on 9 September 1755. He was eleven years old when he was bound to John Wilkins, Sr., Gent., on 10 January 1764 [Orders 1754-61, 251; Minutes 1761-5, 95]. He was living with his wife Margaret on 20 March 1778 when he was charged with felony in Northampton County court and sent for further trial. He was awarded 12 pounds on 9 June 1784 in his suit against Kendall Goodwin for trespass [Minutes 1777-83, 43; Orders 1783-7, 126]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1783 to 1789: taxable on a free male tithable in 1789 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 16, 29, 54, 105]. He and (his wife) Peggy Webb registered as "free Negroes" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95]. He was head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:83] and 3 in 1810 [VA:69].

iv. ?Susanna, born in August 1756, bound apprentice to James Ellot in Northampton County on 8 October 1765 [Minutes 1765-71, 19].

v. ?Grace, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 13 June 1794. She died before 16 September 1795 when the court ordered the Overseers of the Poor of the second district to bind her sons John and James Webb to (their uncle?) Isaac Webb [Orders 1789-95, 296, 507].

 

Other members of the Webb family in Northampton County, Virginia, were

i. Aaron, born say 1760, a "Negro" bound to John Stripe, Jr., by the Northampton County court on 10 May 1763 [Minutes 1761-5, 65]. He was taxable in Northumberland County in 1787.

ii. Armstead, born 1 March 1762, a ten-year-old "negro" bound apprentice in Northampton County on 11 August 1772 [Minutes 1771-77, 77]. He was taxable in York County from 1791 to 1812, head of a household of 4 "free Negroes and mulattoes above 16," two of whom were tithable in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 175, 185, 196, 214, 248, 259, 280, 320, 357, 397, 413] and head of a York County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:886].

iii. Mark, born 11 June 1769, bound to William Roberts, Sr., by the Northampton County court on 14 April 1779 [Minutes 1777-83, 148]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1790 to 1792 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 119, 142, 149] and taxable in Western Branch Precinct of Norfolk County from 1796 to 1814: called a "M"(ulatto) in 1801 when he and William Webb were labourers [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 181, 382, 384, 491, 585, 698, 750; 1813-24, frames 16].

iv. Levin, born in February 1771, a three-year-old "negro" bound apprentice to Mark Beckett in Northampton County on 10 May 1774 [Minutes 1771-77, 251]. He was taxable in Northampton from 1794 to 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 184, 295] and head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:215].

v. Southy, born say 1774, an orphan who complained to the Northampton County court against Thomas Speakman on 13 November 1781. He was bound to Major Brickhouse on 12 June 1782 [Minutes 1777-83, 331, 364]. He married Ann Miles, 26 October 1795 Northampton County bond, John Carpenter security. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1795 to 1812 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 201, 294, 520].

vi. William, a "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County in 1796 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 219].

 

Spotsylvania County, Virginia

1.    Frances Webb, born say 1705, was called "Francis Tibbo a Mullato" in Spotsylvania County court on 3 October 1733 when her master, James Roy, petitioned to have her son George bound to him. The court ruled that the case was "not properly coming before this Court." On 1 July 1735 she petitioned the court for her freedom from Roy, stating that she had been bound until the age of thirty-one and that her time had expired. She was called "Frances Webb alias Tibbo" in December 1735 when the court ruled that she should be free on 22 April 1736 according to a letter from Mrs. Frances Smith, widow of William Bird, Gent., who sold her to David Darnell. On 2 March 1735/6 James Roy petitioned the court for an additional year of service from her for having a bastard child, but the court ruled that the law did not apply to her because she was a "Mullatto." She was probably the mother of the "Mulatto girl," about eleven or twelve years old and bound until the age of thirty-one, who was listed in the estate of David Darnell on 2 February 1742/3 [Orders 1735-8, 401, 412, 423; 1740-2, 204]. She was living in adjoining King George County on 5 September 1740 when the court ordered that she serve Peter Lee twelve months for having a bastard child and that the child be bound to Lee by the churchwardens of Brunswick Parish until the age of eighteen. A suit brought by the churchwardens of Brunswick Parish was dismissed on 5 June 1741 and another dismissed on 6 August 1742 because it had not been executed [King George Orders 1735-51, 240, 254, 296]. On 5 December 1758 the Spotsylvania County court bound her illegitimate "Mullatto" sons John and Richard Tibbo, who were born after her servitude, to John Carter, Gent., until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1755-65, 127]. She was the mother of

i. Catherine Webb alias Tibbo, born about 1729, probably the "Mulatto girl," about eleven or twelve years old and bound until the age of thirty-one, who was listed in the Spotsylvania County estate of David Darnell on 2 February 1742/3. She sued her master Thomas Roy for her freedom in Spotsylvania County court on 7 December 1756, but the court ruled that she serve him another three years from 3 March 1757. It also ruled that he provide her with warm clothing [Orders 1755-65, 59, 64].

ii. George, born before 3 October 1733, perhaps the George Web who was head of a New Kent County household of one "other free" and two slaves in 1810 [VA:772].

iii. John, born say 1748.

iv. Richard Webb, born about 1750, a 25-30 year old "mulatto" servant who ran away from Hunter's Forge near Falmouth according to the 13 November 1778 edition of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 360].

 

Other members of the family in Virginia were

i. Betsy, head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:317].

ii. William, head of a Norfolk County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:815]. He married Sally Bailey, 18 December 1792 Norfolk County bond, James Williams surety.

iii. General, head of an Essex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:208].

 

WEBSTER FAMILY

Members of the Webster family were

i. Thomas, born say 1745, presented by the Charles County, Maryland court in August 1772 for failing to list as a tithable his wife who was a slave hired to him. He was fined 500 pounds for the offense in November 1772 [Court Records 1772-3, 2, 171]. He was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Daniel, born about 1752, head of a Prince William County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:501], a sixty-year-old "free Negro" living in Prince William County in 1812 when he petitioned the legislature to allow him to free his wife Lucy and children who were his slaves and remain in the state [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 251]. He and his wife Lucy were residing at Accoquan Mills in Prince William County on 28 September 1821 when their son William Armstead Webster registered in the Court of the District of Columbia in Alexandria: free born, twenty-three years of age, a bright mulatto [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, no. 89, p.65].

iii. John, head of a Talbot County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:549].

iv. Joseph, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:391].

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