BAILEY FAMILY

1.    Ann Bailey, born say 1725, was called a "free Negro" on 18 July 1754 when she sued William Freeman in Norfolk County court for taking her daughter Sue outside the colony. She was called Ann Bailey, "a free Molatto," on 17 January 1755 when the court bound her daughter Sue to Lewis Stanford. She was the "free negro" mother of James Bailey who complained to the Norfolk County court on 17 December 1772 about the treatment he was receiving from his master John Lewelling [Orders 1753-5, 64a, 96, 110; 1771-3, 140]. She was the mother of

i. Sue, born say 1745, ordered bound apprentice to Lewis Stanford by the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish in Norfolk County on 17 January 1755.

2        ii. ?Amy, born say 1750.

iii. ?William, taxable in District 1 of Hertford County, North Carolina, on 76 acres, a slave 50-60 years old, 3 horses, and 9 cattle in 1779 [GA 30.1, p.5], head of a Hertford County household of 6 "other free" and one white woman in 1790 [NC:25] and 3 "other free," a white woman, and a slave in 1800, perhaps the William Bailey who was head of a Norfolk County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:889]. He may have been the father of Sue Bailey, married William Webb, 18 December 1792 Norfolk County bond, James Williams surety.

iv. Thomas, married Rebecca Harmon, 24 December 1771 Norfolk County bond, William Bayley surety.

v. James, born say 1760, complained to the court against his master John Lewelling. His case was dismissed on 23 January 1773 [Orders 1771-3, 147].

vi. ?Lemuel, (no race indicated) ordered bound to Francis Jordan by the Norfolk County court on 19 March 1774 [Orders 1773-5, 33], perhaps identical to Samuel Bailey, head of a Norfolk County household of 8 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:816].

vii. ?Priscilla, head of a Petersburg Town household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:124b].

 

2.    Amy Bailey, born say 1750, was a "free negro" living in Norfolk County on 17 August 1775 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Elizabeth River Parish to bind her daughter Frances to Thomas Marshall [Orders 1773-5, 78]. She was the mother of

i. Frances, born say 1775.

 

BAINE FAMILY

1.    Betty Baines, born say 1730, was a "free woman" living in Gloucester County and married to a fifty-two or fifty-three-year-old "mulatto man" (slave) named Gabriel on 20 January 1776 when his master John Hudson of Albemarle County placed an ad in the Virginia Gazette offering a reward for his return. Gabriel had formerly been the property of a Mrs. Thornton at the mouth of Queen's Creek in York County [Virginia Gazette (Pinkney)]. Betty may have been the mother of

i. Humphrey, born say 1756, a soldier from Henrico County who served in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 29]. He may have been the Humphrey Baines who was presented by the grand jury in York County on 21 December 1772 for not listing himself as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1772-4, 172].

ii. Nancy Baine, head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:361].

 

BAKER FAMILY

1.    John1 Baker, born say 1755, was called "a Mulatto by a White Woman" when the York County, Virginia court ordered the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish to bind him out as an apprentice on 21 February 1763. On 20 October 1766 he was a "Mulatto boy" who the court ordered bound to someone else because he was greatly misused by his master Cuthbert Hubberd [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 391, 470; Orders 1765-8, 147]. He may have been the brother of Barbara Baker, a seven-year-old "Mulata Girl born of a white woman" who petitioned the New Hanover County, North Carolina court on 2 September 1761 to be bound apprentice to James Gregg [Minutes 1738-69, 199]. He was taxable in New Kent County from 1787 to 1814: called a "molatto" from 1791 to 1796 and from 1805 to 1814; taxable on 2 tithes in 1799, 1801, 1812; listed in 1813 with his unnamed son who was called John, Jr., in 1814 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1800, frames 93, 109, 141, 159, 180, 202; 1791-1828, frames 264, 279, 293, 304, 317, 328, 341, 353, 367, 405, 417, 428, 441, 452, 462, 491, 503]. He was head of a New Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:745]. His children were

i. ?Henry, born say 1782, a "M"(ulatto) New Kent County taxable from 1807 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1791-1828, frames 429, 441, 452].

ii. John2, born say 1795, taxable in his father's New Kent County household in 1813 and 1814.

iii. ?Prisilla, head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:321].

 

Northumberland County:

1.    Alice Baker, born say 1665, the servant of John Taylor, was convicted by the Northumberland County court in April 1683 for having "a bastard Child by a Negro man" [Orders 1678-98, 175]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. William, born say 1743, a "runaway mulatto boy," the servant of John Billups, who was caught before 5 September 1758 when Thomas Sullinger was paid by the Caroline County court for returning him. He ran away again in 1761. He was called a "mulatto servant" on 13 May 1763 when the court charged him with stealing goods from John Baylor, Esq. There was insufficient evidence to try him before the Court of Oyer and Terminer, but the court convicted him of a misdemeanor and ordered that he receive thirty-nine lashes [Orders 1755-8, 388; 1759-63, 143, 419].

 

Other members of a Baker family were

i. John, "a free man of colour," married Lilly Walker, a "free woman of colour," 24 November 1803 Norfolk County bond, perhaps the John Baker who was head of a Goochland County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:683].

ii. Eliza, born before 1776, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:142].

 

BALKHAM FAMILY

1.    Thomas Baulkham, born about 1714, was a "Mulattoe" who petitioned the Orange County court for his freedom from his master Arjalon Price in September 1739. The case was dismissed in March 1740 when Thomas admitted that he was bound until the age of thirty-one but was only about twenty-six at that time [Orders 1739-41, 68, 87, 116, 137]. On 22 June 1758 the court ordered that he be paid as a witness for William Minor in the Orange County suit of Reuben Lantor. On 23 November 1758 he and Ann Rustin were indicted for fornication. He pled not guilty and the case was dismissed on 23 August 1759, probably because they married [Orders 1754-63, 404, 479, 491]. Ann was probably identical to Ann Rustin, born say 1715, who petitioned the Prince George's County, Maryland court together with her sister Alice on 24 August 1736 saying that they were the children of Elizabeth Riston by a white man and asked that the constable where they lived be ordered to remove them from the list of taxables. The court granted their request [Court Record 1736-8, 151]. Thomas was taxable on one tithe in Orange County in 1752 (called Thomas Backhum) and on two tithes from 1755 to 1769 (called Thomas Balcam/ Balkom/ Balkham). He was overseer for Elijah Morton in 1756 [Little, Orange County Tithables, 28, 36, 42, 64, 76, 82, 92, 96, 109].

 

BALL FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Ball, born say 1765, was a weaver counted in the list of "Free Molattoes" living on William Edward's land with her children George and Clarisa in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40]. She was the mother of

i. George.

ii. Clarisa, head of a Westmoreland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 and taxable on two "Mo." persons in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List].

 

Other members of the Ball family in Virginia were

i. Jane, a "Mulatto" child living in Loudoun County on 8 February 1779 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Cameron Parish to bind her to William Evans [Orders 1776-83, 150].

ii. Robert, head of a Loudoun County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:288].

iii. Sally, head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:341].

 

BALTRIP FAMILY

1.    Ann Baltrip, born say 1740, was living in Halifax County, Virginia, in June 1761 when the churchwardens of Antrim Parish were ordered to bind out her "Mulatto" child Frank to John Middleton [Pleas 3:254]. On 12 April 1765 she was sued for debt by the churchwardens of Cornwall Parish, Lunenburg County (for having an illegitimate child?) [Orders 1764-5, 53]. She was the servant of Edmond Denney of Rowan County, North Carolina, on 10 May 1770 when the court bound her children to her master, her "Melatto" daughter Hannah until the age of thirty-one and her white son John until the age of twenty-one [Minutes 1769-72, 30, 35 (abstract pp. 207, 212)]. She was the mother of

i. ?James, born about 1759 in Virginia, one of the Continental soldiers from Bute County who enlisted on 3 September 1778: 5 feet 4" high, 20 years old, dark hair, dark eyes (listed next to Edward Going in the same list as Charles Rowe) [NCAr:Troop Returns by NCGSJ XV:109].

2        ii. Hannah, born about March 1759.

iii. Frank, born say 1761, bound out in Halifax County, Virginia, on June 1761 [Pleas 3:254].

iv. John, born about March 1763, a white boy who was seven years and two months old on 10 May 1770 when he was bound out in Rowan County.

 

2.    Hannah Baltrip, born about March 1759, was nine years and two months old on 10 May 1770 when the Rowan County court bound her to Edmond Denney. She was taxable in the Surry County, North Carolina household of Edmund Denny in 1775 [Absher, Some Pioneers from Wilkes County, 188]. She was probably thirty-one years old on 26 October 1791 when the Wilkes County court ordered that she be set free "from this time hinceforth & forevermore" [Absher, Wilkes County Court Minutes, III:18]. On 27 January 1791 the Wilkes County court ordered that Edmond Denny have a hearing in court about her orphan children [Absher, Some Pioneers from Wilkes County, 83]. She was head of a Wilkes County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:29]. The children bound to Edmund Denny were

i. Sarah Baltrip, alias Roe, born about 1778, bound in Wilkes County to Charles Gordon on 28 October 1790 [Absher, Wilkes County Court Minutes, III:19] and to Edmund Denny at the age of fourteen years on 3 August 1792 [Absher, Wilkes County Will Books 1:33].

ii. Milly, born about 1781, a ten-year-old bound to Edmond Denny on 28 October 1791, to receive a horse at the age of eighteen years [Absher, Wilkes County Court Minutes, III:19].

 

BANKS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth1 Banks, born say 1665, was the white servant of Major James Goodwin on 20 June 1683 when she was presented by the York County court for "fornication and Bastardy with a negroe slave." She was given thirty nine lashes, and the term of her indenture was extended [DOW 6:498]. She was the apparently the mother of

2        i. Mary1, born in 1683.

3        ii. Anne1, born say 1685.

 

2.    Mary1 Banks, born in 1683, was called the "Mallatto" servant of Martin Goodwin in York County court on 24 November 1702 when she agreed to serve him an additional year for having an illegitimate child and bound her "Mallato" daughter Hannah Banks to Peter Goodwin until the age of twenty-one years. Peter Goodwin was to provide her with three barrels of corn and clothing at the completion of her indenture according to law. On 23 February 1703/4 she indentured her three or four-month-old "Mollatto" daughter Elizabeth to Martin Goodwin and agreed to serve him an extra year for paying her fine [DOW 12:67, 181, 188]. She was the mother of

4        i. Hannah1, born say 1702.

5        ii. Elizabeth2, born about November 1703.

6        iii. ?William1, born say 1705.

7        iv. ?John1, born say 1708.

 

3.    Anne1 Banks, born say 1685, was presented by the York County court on 24 September 1706 for fornication [DOW 13:17]. She was living in Southampton County on 12 July 1759 when the court ruled that she be exempt in the future from paying taxes [Orders 1754-9, 516]. James Brooks called her his "housekeeper" when he left her 5 cattle, half his hogs, personal property and half his crop by his Southampton County will which was presented to the court in March 1759 [Southside Virginian, 1 (1982):29]. The court dismissed James Brooks, Jr.'s suit against her on 11 September 1761 when he failed to prosecute, and his suit against her abated on 13 August 1762 when the sheriff reported that she was no longer an inhabitant of the county. On 10 December 1762 Brooks was fined 5 shillings for assaulting her [Orders 1759-63, 151, 234, 272]. She may have been the mother of

8        i. Ann2, born say 1706.

 

4.    Hannah1 Banks, born say 1702, daughter of Mary Banks, was a "Mulatto" bound until the age of twenty-one years to Peter Goodwin on 24 November 1702 in York County [DOW 12:67]. She may have been the mother of

9        i. Mary3/ Moll, born say 1725.

 

5.    Elizabeth2 Banks, born about November 1703, was the "Mollatto" daughter of Mary Banks of York County. She was listed in the 20 December 1722 inventory of the York County estate of Mary Reade, a "mulatto Girle" valued at 7 pounds [OW 16, pt. 1, 209]. She may have been the mother of

10      i. Mary2/ Moll Banks, born say 1724.

11      ii. Elizabeth3 Banks, born say 1727.

 

6.    William1 Banks, born say 1705, was a "mulatto Boy" listed in the 20 December 1722 inventory of the York County estate of Mary Reade, valued at 8 pounds. Mary Read gave him to her son Samuel Read by her 7 December 1722 York County will: "one Mulatto Boy ______ks" [OW 16, pt. 1, 165, 209]. He was living in Southampton County on 12 September 1752 when he was sued for a 2 pound, 5 pence debt due by account. He and his wife Frances were exempted from paying levies in Southampton County on 14 July 1757. He, or perhaps a son by that name, was sued by James Brooks for a 5 pound, 5 shilling debt, but on 10 July 1761 the sheriff reported that he was no longer an inhabitant of the county [Orders 1749-54, 269; 1754-9, 372; 1759-63, 128]. William and Frances may have been the ancestors of

12      i. Edith, born about 1753.

13      ii. William2, born say 1755.

iii. ?Priscilla/ Caelea, a "poor child" living in Southampton County on 14 May 1761 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her out [Orders 1759-63, 102, 183], mother of Charlotte Banks, a poor child bound out in Southampton County on 15 July 1799 [Minutes 1799-1803, 25]. Prissy registered in Southampton County on 1 August 1810: age 50, Blk., 5 feet 3 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 804]. She was listed in Ned Whitfield's household on William Newton's land in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County in 1812 and 1814 [PPTL 1807-21, frame 305, 428].

14      iv. Silas, born say 1761.

 

7.    John1 Banks, born say 1708, was a "Mulatto Servant by Indenture" valued at 12 pounds in the 9 September 1725 inventory of the Surry County estate of Bartlett Morland. He was called a "Mallatto fellow" who lately belonging to Bartlett Morland, deceased, on 17 June 1727 when his value was assessed at 6 pounds. He was called a "Mulatto man" on 17 September 1729 when he was reappraised at 6 pounds by order of the court [DW 7:603, 741, 972]. He may have been identical to the John Banks who was presented by the York County court on 15 December 1735 for not listing his "Molatto" wife as a tithable. His wife may have been Sarah, the daughter of Mary Roberts, who was named in her mother's 19 September 1749 York County will [OW 18:245; W&I 20:163]. John purchased 100 acres on the east side of Cypress Swamp in Surry County on 21 September 1756 [DB 7:276]. On 21 November 1758 the Surry County court issued a presentment against him and (his son) John Banks, Jr., for "not listing their wife's according to law supposing the said persons to be Mulattoes" [Orders 1757-64, 135]. His 3 September 1780 Surry County will, proved 26 December the same year, left his plantation to his son Matthew Banks and mentioned other unnamed children. Matthew died before 22 February 1796 when his heirs (brother and sisters) sold their share of his land [Deeds 1792-99, 344-6]. John1 was the father of

15      i. John2, Jr., born say 1735.

ii. Matthew, born say 1748, named in his father's will. He was head of a Surry County household of 1 free person in 1784 [VA:78], and in 1787 he was taxable on the 100 acres he inherited from his father. He sold this land to William Kea in 1795 and purchased 75 acres in Surry County on 1 February 1795 from Sampson Walden [Property Tax Alterations, 1796; Deeds 1792-99, 296-7]. He was taxable on his personal property from 1783 to 1794 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 369, 399, 490, 565; 1791-1816, frames 75, 176]. He died before 22 February 1796 when his heirs (brother and sisters: John Banks, Judy Charity, Susanna Howell, and Hannah Roberts) sold this 75 acres to Howell Deberix [Deeds, 1792-99, 344-6].

iii. Judy1, born say 1750, married Henry Charity, head of a Surry County household of 9 persons in 1782 [VA:43].

iv. Susanna, born say 1752, married _____ Howell.

v. Hannah3, born say 1755, married Joseph Roberts.

 

8.    Ann2 Banks, born say 1706, was presented by the York County court on 20 December 1731 for having a bastard child on information of the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish. She apprenticed her "Mulatto" daughter Hannah to Patrick Matthews in York County on 18 November 1745. Eliza Banks was witness to the indenture [OW 17:248, 273, 308, 338; W&I 18:5; 19:397; Deeds 1741-54, 152]. She was the mother of

16      i. Hannah2, born say 1731.

17      ii. ?Elizabeth4/ Betty, born about 1744.

 

9.    Mary3/ Moll Banks, born say 1725, was a "Mulatto Woman" presented by the York County court on 20 November 1749 for not listing herself as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1746-52, 256, 277, 284]. She was probably identical to "M_____s" (damaged order book page), a "free Mulatto" whose son Jimmy was ordered bound to Patrick Matthews by the York County court on 19 August 1751. She was the mother of

i. Peter, born say 1741, Moll's "Mulatto" son living in Crab Neck on 16 July 1753 when he bound himself as an apprentice planter to Thomas Wooten, Jr., in York County on 16 July 1753 [Deeds, Bonds 1741-54, 551-2]. He was presented by the court on 16 November 1772 and 15 November 1773 for not listing himself as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1772-4, 151, 437].

18      ii. James, born about 1749.

19      iii. ?William3, born about 1767.

 

10.    Mary2/ Moll Banks, born say 1724, was the mother of Jane Banks, an orphan (no parent or race mentioned) who was bound apprentice to Walter Leak in Goochland County in September 1744 and called a child of Mary Banks when she was bound to Judith Leak in September 1760 [Orders 1741-44, 132; 1757-61, 365]. She was taxable in the St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County household of Walter Leake in 1746 and 1748 [List of Tithables, 1730-1755, frames 77, 161-2]. She was living in Goochland County in May 1757 when her children were bound apprentices [Orders 1750-57, 646; 1757-61, 180]. She was the mother of

i. ?Gideon1, born say 1742, an "orphan boy" (no parent or race mentioned) bound to William Leak in Goochland County in October 1742 [Orders 1741-44, 132].

20      ii. Jane1, born about 1744.

21      iii. Louisa, born say 1746.

22      iv. John3, born 25 February 1749.

v. Judith2, born say 1751, an orphan ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish in Goochland County in May 1757 (no parent named) and called child of Mary when she was bound to Judith Leak in February 1759 [Orders 1750-7, 646; 1757-61, 180].

23      vi. Jacob1, born in August 1754.

vii. Agnes, born say 1756, an orphan ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish in Goochland County in May 1757 (no parent named) [Orders 1750-57, 646] and called child of Mary when she was bound to Judith Leak in February 1759 [Orders 1757-61, 180]. She was probably the same as Agnes, daughter of "Mary Begs a Negroe w Wal: Leek," who was born January 1756 and baptized 13 June 1756 by Rev. William Douglas [Jones, Douglas Register, 348].

viii. ?Mary4, born say 1758, married James Johnson (in Goochland County), "both of this parish & Mulattoes," on 7 November 1776 [Jones, Douglas Register, 347]. He may have been the James Johnson who was head of a Buckingham County household of 17 "other free" in 1810 [VA:799].

 

11.    Elizabeth3 Banks, born say 1727, may have been identical to "Mulatto Betty" who was living in Warwick County on 6 July 1749 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her son Malicai to Thomas Hobday to be a planter [Minutes 1748-62, 43 (p.30 of transcript)]. She may have been the ancestor of

24      i. Malachi1, born say 1749.

25      ii. Elizabeth5, born say 1762.

iii. Mary7/ Molly, born about 1769, registered in York County on 18 December 1809: a Mulatto woman about 40 years of age, 5 feet & an half Inch high, her face a little pitted with the small pox, has very large nostrils, pouting thick lips and is a low well set woman - was born of free parents in the Cy of Warwick but has been residing in this Cy for the last 10 Years. She was head of a Yorktown, York County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:870].

iv. William4, born about 1773, a 16-21 year-old taxable in Warwick County in 1789 and a "Mulatto" taxable there in 1798 [1789 PPTL, p.1; 1798, p.1]. He was taxable in York County from 1793 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 191, 200, 209, 219, 227, 254, 263, 304, 373]. He was head of a York County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 (called William Banks, Jr.) [VA:157]. He registered in York County on 17 March 1823: (called Little Billy Banks) a very black man nearly 50 years of age, 5 feet 3-1/4 inches high, short hair which is little grey, round face, black Eyes...Born free [Guardians' Accounts, 1780-1823, following the index, No. 206].

v. Thomas1, born say 1772, 16-21 year-old a taxable in Warwick County in 1789 and a "Mulatto" taxable there in 1798 [1789 Personal Property Tax List, p.1; 1798, p.1]. He was taxable in York County from 1801 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 263, 275, 304, 315, 325] and head of a York County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:871] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:155].

vi. Joshua, born about 1777, taxable in York County from 1801 to 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 263, 275, 284, 304], head of a Warwick County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:681]. He registered in York County on 19 March 1827: a mulatto man about 50 years of age, 5 feet 5-1/4 inches high, has a long forehead, much pitted with the small pox, has large whiskers & a pleasant countenance...born free [Guardians' Accounts, 1823-46, end of book, Register of Free Negroes, No. 231].

vii. William5, born say 1782, a "Mulatto" over the age of sixteen in 1798 when he was listed in Warwick County, called William Banks, Jr. [Personal Property Tax List, p.1].

 

12.    Edith Banks, born about 1753, was living in Southampton County on 9 May 1783 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Luke's Parish to bind out her children Jacob and Rebecca Banks [Orders 1778-84, 314]. She registered in Southampton County on 8 April 1808: age 55, yellow (Colour), 5 feet 3-1/2 inches high, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 424]. She was a "free Negro" spinner living on Stith Nicholson's land in Southampton County in 1812 and 1813 [Personal Property Tax List 1807-21, frames 297, 313]. She was the mother of

i. Jacob3, born about 1775, registered in Southampton County on 21 February 1798: age 23, Blackman, 6 feet 5/8 inches, free born. He registered again on 12 March 1817 at the age of 45 [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 121, 1048]. He was taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, in John Applewhite's household from 1791 to 1794, a "f.n." with no fixed residence in 1817 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frames 811, 868; 1792-1806, frame 45, 72; 1807-21, frame 573].

ii. Rebecca, born say 1780, married Richard Artis, 30 December 1801 Southampton County bond, Evans Pope surety.

iii. ?William, taxable in Nottoway Parish, Southampton County, in 1801 (no race indicated) [Personal Property Tax List 1792-1806, frame 473].

 

13.    William2 Banks, born say 1755, was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 3 "Black" persons 12-50 years old and 4 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Captain Dupree's district for the 1786 state census. He was permitted to take the oath of insolvent debtor in the 23 August 1798 session of the Halifax County, North Carolina court. Perhaps his widow was Oney Banks, head of a Northampton County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:218]. He may have been the father of

i. Brittain, born say 1785, ordered bound to Philip Brittle to be a planter by the 3 December 1792 Northampton County court [Minutes 1792-96, 40]. Brittain was head of a Hertford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:101].

ii. Temperance, born say 1786, head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:9] and 4 "free colored" in Northampton County in 1820 [NC:214].

iii. Elizabeth9, bound an apprentice farmer to Jesse Smith, Sr., by the 5 December 1814 Northampton County court [Minutes 1813-21], perhaps the Betsy Banks who married Randall Tann, 5 July 1816 Northampton County bond, John Priden bondsman.

iv. Nancy1, head of a Northampton County household of one "free colored" in 1820 [NC:220].

 

14.    Silas Banks, born say 1761, was taxable in the Southampton County household of William Drewry in 1788 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-92, frame 658] and head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74], 7 in 1800 [NC:429], and 4 "free colored" in Halifax County in 1820 [NC:142]. He was probably outside the county of Northampton in 1810 when (his wife) Omey Banks was head of a household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:715]. He (called Cyrus Banks) and his wife Naomi were named in the 20 September 1832 Champaign County, Ohio petition of Henry Newsome for partition of 200 acres in Rush County, Ohio [Champaign County Court of Common Pleas, Thursday, September 1832]. Naomi was apparently identical to Ona Banks who was living with (her son?) Everitt Banks in the Northampton County household of (her son-in-law) Thomas Smith in 1850. Silas and Naomi were the parents of

i. ?William8, born about 1791, a poor child bound out in Southampton County on 19 May 1800 [Minutes 1799-1803, 87]. He registered in Southampton County on 20 December 1817: age 26, 5 feet 9 inches, rather bright (Colour), free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1132]. He married Maria Pompey, 9 August 1825 Northampton County bond, Silas Banks bondsman.

ii. Everitt, born about 1802, married Rebecca Artis, 2 March 1824 Northampton County bond, Everitt Stancell bondsman. He was named as executor of the 25 May 1840 Northampton County will of his uncle Moses Newsom [WB 5:48]. He and Ona Banks (born about 1765) were living in the household of (his brother-in-law?) Thomas Smith in 1850. He married second, Cherry Tann, 6 December 1852 Northampton bond, January 1853 marriage by Green Stancell.

iii. Nancy4, born about 1808, married Thomas Smith, 9 September 1822 Northampton county bond, Everitt Banks bondsman. In 1850 Thomas was head of a Northampton County household with Nancy Smith and (Nancy's brother and mother?) Everitt and Ona Banks.

 

15.    John2 Banks, Jr., born say 1735, was married before 21 November 1758 when he was presented by the Surry County court for not paying tax on his wife. In 1782 he was head of a Surry County household of 7 persons [VA:43]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1782 to 1800: taxable on 3 horses and 19 cattle in 1782; taxable on Benjamin Banks in 1787; taxable on Nathan Banks in 1788; taxable on Nathan Banks from 1788 to 1790; taxable on a slave named Tab in 1789; taxable on Jacob Tann's tithe in 1797 and 1798 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 364, 383, 403, 411, 488, 519, 564; 1791-1816, 26, 127, 205, 284, 319, 400]. His estate was settled in Surry County in 1802 [WB 1:580-581]. His children were

i. ?Jeremiah, born say 1760, head of a Surry County household of no whites in the 1784 list of William Boyce [VA:78]. He was taxable in Surry County from 1783 to 1813: taxable on slaves Joe and Tab, 2 horses and 8 cattle in 1787; taxable on slaves Jo and Aggy in 1788; taxable on slaves Lydia, Harry, Aggy, Fanny in 1789; taxable on slaves on slaves Lydia, Harry and Dadan in 1791; taxable on William Clark's tithe and slaves Harry, Liddia, Moses, and Jem in 1800; taxable on 4 free males and 2 slaves in 1809; a "free Negro & Mulatto" taxable on 2 slaves in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 372, 403, 411, 488, 519; 1791-1816, 26, 127, 205, 284, 362, 400, 475, 516, 556, 610, 648, 685, 726]. He married Hannah Copeland Price, 15 March 1788 Surry County bond, Edmund Bennett surety. He was head of a Surry County household of 5 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:598].

ii. Priscilla, born say 1762, "daughter of John Banks," married William Walden, 2 February 1778 Surry County bond.

26        iii. Benjamin, born about 1765.

iv. Faithy, born say 1768, "daughter of John Banks," married James Wilson, 31 May 1786 Surry County bond, Joseph Roberts surety, 1 June 1786 Isle of Wight marriage.

v. ?John4, born say 1769, taxable in Surry County from 1788 to 1790, called John Banks, Jr. [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 488, 519, 564]. He married Mildred Valentine, 29 May 1789 Surry County bond, Sampson Walden surety, 31 May marriage in Southampton County [Minister's Returns, 642].

vi. Nathan, born about 1771, taxable in Surry County from 1788 to 1795: listed in his father's household from 1788 to 1790 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 488, 564; 1791-1816, frames 26, 205]. He registered in Surry County on 3 September 1795: son of John Banks, a mulattoe man aged 24 years pretty stout made about 5' 10 or 11" high, born of free parents [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no. 6]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1799 to 1810 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 459, 508, 540, 557, 617, 634, 692, 733, 751, 809, 828].

27      vii. ?Anthony, born about 1776.

viii. ?William, a "free Negro" taxable in Isle of Wight County in 1804 and 1805 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 634, 693].

ix. ?Clara, married Davis Jones, 5 June 1795 Isle of Wight County bond, Francis Young surety, 6 June marriage.

 

16.    Hannah2 Banks, born say 1731, daughter of Ann Banks, bound herself as an apprentice to Patrick Matthews in York County on 18 November 1745 until the age of twenty-one years [Deeds, Bonds 1741-54, 152]. She was presented by the York County court on 17 November 1766 for not listing herself as a tithable [Orders 1765-68, 161, 206]. She may have been the mother of

i. Judith3, born about 1767, registered in York County on 11 February 1803: a free negro, 36 years of age, five feet 3/4 Inches High of a yellowish complexion, flat nose, wide mouth & black eyes with a dimple in her right cheek when she smiles [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no. 21]. She may have been the Judy Banks who was taxable on a slave in York County in 1804 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 295].

 

17.    Elizabeth4/ Betty Banks, born about 1744, registered in Petersburg on 13 October 1794: a dark brown Mulatto woman, five feet one inches high, supposed about fifty years old, born free & raised in the County of Richmond [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 93]. She was the mother of

i. Sally, born about 1771, registered in Petersburg on 13 October 1794: a light Mulatto woman, five feet six inches high, twenty three years old, daughter of Betty & born free [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 94].

 

18.    James Banks, born about 1749, was the son of M_____s (damaged order book page), a free Mulatto" living in York County on 19 August 1751 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish to bind out her son Jimmy. James was called a "poor orphan" on 21 February 1763 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Yorkhampton Parish to bind him to James Anderson and called a "Mulatto" in the indenture bond which bound him as an apprentice blacksmith for seven years [Judgments & Orders 1749-53, 451; Deeds 1755-63, 497]. He was taxable in York County from 1784 to 1812 and head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 91, 139, 148, 171, 180, 227, 362, 373, 385]. He may have been the father of

i. Critty, born about 1781, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a very light Mulatto about 41 years of age, 5 feet 4 Inches high.

 

19.    William3 Banks, born about 1766, married Patty Maclin, 8 September 1787 York County marriage by Rev. John Davenport [VMHB XXV:300]. He was taxable in York County from 1788 to 1812, called William Banks "of Poquoson" from 1805 to 1811 and in 1812 when he was taxable on a slave [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 139, 148, 181, 190, 209, 263, 275, 284, 304, 315, 325, 351, 362, 373]. He was head of a York County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:870] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:155]. He registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a Mulatto about 55 years of age, 5 feet 8-1/2 inches high [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no.149]. He was a "free man of colour" who died about 1843-1847 according to a chancery suit over division of his land among his ten children, all of whom were of full age in 1853: William, Fanny (wife of John Morris), Milly (married Henry Wallace), Christian, Godfrey, Sally (married John Wallace), Mary, James, Thomas and Betsy [LVA chancery case 1853-012]. His children were

i. William7, born say 1788.

ii. Fanny, (described as a "lunatic" in 1853) married John Morris, plaintiff in the chancery suit.

iii. Milly, born before 1798, head of a York County household of 1 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 385], called Milly Hunley of Bruton Parish on 2 December 1846 when she married Henry Wallace by York County bond.

iv. Christian.

v. Godfrey.

vi. Sally, married John Wallace, 18 December 1848 York County bond.

vii. Mary.

viii. James.

ix. Thomas3.

x. Betsy.

 

20.    Jane1 Banks, born about 1744, was bound to William Leak in Goochland County in September 1744 (no parent or race mentioned) and was called a child of Mary when she was bound to Judith Leak in September 1760. She sued Judith Leak in Goochland County court in June 1762 for her freedom dues [Orders 1741-4, 490; 1756-61, 365; 1761-65, 63, 208]. She died before 22 October 1770 when the Cumberland County court ordered the churchwardens of Southam Parish to bind her "mulattoe" daughter Mary Banks to Edmund Clements. On 25 April 1774 Mary was called the orphan of Jane Banks (no race indicated) when the court ordered her bound to Joseph Leek [Orders 1770-2, 107; 1774-8, 156]. She was the mother of

i. Mary5, born say 1765, bound out in Cumberland County in 1770.

 

21.    Louisa Banks, born say 1746, was bound to Walter Leak in Goochland County in November 1749. She was called a child of Mary Banks when she was bound to Judith Leak in September 1760 [Orders 1744-9, 561; 1757-61, 365]. She was taxable in Shadrack Mims' Goochland County household in 1769 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frame 119]. She was the mother of

i. Mary6, born say 1766, "infant of Louisa Banks" (no age or race mentioned) bound to Shadrack Mimms in April 1767 [Orders 1765-70, 15]. She married Henry Isaacs, 4 November 1787 Goochland County bond, Josiah Leake surety. Henry was taxable in Goochland County from 1789 to 1799 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 221, 239, 282, 298, 343, 483, 529]. He was called a "free Mulattoe" when his suit against Edward Houchins in Goochland County court for battery was continued for the award on 21 November 1792 [Orders 1791-4, 207]. His wife Molly was called Molly Isaacs in October 1804 when her children Peyton and Austin Isaacs (nine and eleven years old) were bound to William Clarke [Goochland County Miscellaneous Court Papers 1728-1840, LVA cited by Butler, Evolution of a Rural Free Black Community, 224]. Molly was head of a Goochland County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:699].

ii. Gideon2, child of Louisa, a "free Negro," bound to Shadrack Mimms in Goochland in November 1768 [Orders 1765-70, 277].

iii. Kitty, daughter of Louisa Banks ordered by the Goochland County court to be bound to Joseph Payne, Gent., on 20 October 1788 [Orders 1788-91, 63].

 

22.    John3 Banks, born 25 February 1749, was an orphan ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish in Goochland County in May 1757 and was called the child of Mary when he was bound to Judith Leak in February 1759 [Orders 1750-7, 646; 1757-61, 180]. He was taxable in Goochland County in 1774 [List of Tithables 1767-1780, frame 319], taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1787 to 1813: charged with James Banks' tithe from 1795 to 1798, a "Mulatto" planter near James Wares' land in 1804, living near James Holman from 1805 to 1813, charged with John Banks, Jr.'s tithe in 1811, listed with his wife Sally, John, Judy and Nancy Banks in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 149, 217, 278, 338, 387, 419, 478, 523, 614, 736, 820; 1810-32, frames 3, 156]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:684]. He registered as a free Negro in Goochland County on 3 September 1823: a man of colour, was 74 years of age the 25th day of last February, about six feet high [Register of Free Negroes, p.152]. He enlisted in Goochland County about 1779, served for two years, and was discharged at the barracks in Albemarle County. On 22 May 1822 when he applied for a pension, his family consisted of his wife Sally, his thirteen-year-old niece Mary Banks and his twelve-year-old nephew John Brown. He died before 19 August 1845 when his wife applied for and was granted a widow's pension. She stated that she was born about 1756 and that they were married about the spring of 1772 by Parson McLaerin in the Episcopal Church of Cumberland County, Virginia. On 6 February 1846 Walter D. Leake of Henrico County testified that Sally had a daughter living who was at least seventy years old [National Archives Pension File W.5763; Dorman, Virginia Revolutionary Pension Applications, IV:51]. He was the father of

i. Sally, born 2 July 1779, "son of John Banks," married Thomas Lynch, 29 July 1801 Goochland County bond, Edward Fuzmore surety, 29 July marriage [Minister's Returns, 78].

ii. Judith4, born about 1794, twenty-one-year-old daughter of John Banks, married Elijah Day, 28 December 1815 Goochland County bond, Jacob Martin surety [Ministers' Returns, 127].

iii. Jane3, born say 1785, "daughter of John Banks," married Dick Adams, 5 December 1803 Goochland County bond, Josiah Leaks surety, 5 December marriage [Ministers' Returns, 85]. Richard Adams was head of a Goochland County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:682].

 

23.    Jacob1 Banks, born in August 1754 according to his pension application, was an orphan ordered bound out by the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish in Goochland County in May 1757 (no parent named) and called child of Mary Banks when he was bound to Judith Leak in February 1759. In December 1772 he sued Elisha Leak whom he was bound to as an apprentice, and the court bound him instead to Peter Pollock to learn the trade of carpenter [Orders 1750-57, 646; 1757-61, 180; 1771-78, 263]. He married Susannah Jones (Johns), "Mulattoes both," on 29 August 1775 in Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 347]. Susanna Jones was taxable in William Swift's Goochland County household in 1766. Jacob was taxable in Goochland County in 1774 and 1778 [List of Tithables 1756-1766, frame 350; 1767-1780, frames 319, 412], taxable in the upper district of Goochland County from 1782 to 1813: taxable on a horse and 2 cattle in 1782, charged with John Lynch's tithe in 1789, listed as a "Mulatto" carpenter on Thomas E. Randolph's land in 1804, charged with Martin and Elisha Banks' tithes in 1806, a "Mulatto" farmer living on Jesse Sanders' land when he was charged with Elisha Banks' tithe in 1809, charged with John Banks' tithe from 1810 to 1813, listed with wife Sucky in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1809, frames 15, 42, 72, 131, 175, 217, 278, 356, 419, 478, 614, 685, 777, 863; 1810-32, frames 4, 69, 155]. He was head of a Goochland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:684]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Goochland County on 21 September 1818: a free man of color aged 64 years about five feet Six inches high [Register of Free Negroes, p.106, no.221]. He was living in Goochland County on 17 September 1832 when he made a declaration to obtain a pension for his Revolutionary War services. He was a "free man of Color" who served eighteen months as a wagoner. He died 5 January 1835 [Dorman, Virginia Revolutionary Pension Applications, IV:51]. Jacob's children were

i. Elizabeth6, born say 1776, "daughter of Jacob Banks," married Drury Farrar, 2 December 1792 Goochland County bond, 3 December marriage by Rev. Lewis Chaudoin.

ii. ?William5, born say 1780, taxable in Goochland County in 1798 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1809, frames 478], married Nancy Martin, 16 February 1808 Goochland County bond, John Martin surety.

iii. Polly, born say 1781, daughter of Jacob Banks, married John Tiler (Tyler), 23 December 1797 Goochland County bond, Francis Tiler surety.

iv. Martin, born about 1787, married Betsy Ann Howell, daughter of Charles Howell, 11 March 1812 Goochland County bond, William Howell surety. He registered in Goochland County on 22 August 1810: a free man of color, about twenty three years of age, five feet seven inches & an half high [Register of Free Negroes, p.39, no.79].

v. Elisha, born about 1788, registered in Goochland County on 22 August 1810: five feet seven inches an half high, about twenty two years of age, yellow complexion, hair inclining to bushy [Register of Free Negroes, p.39, no.80]. He married Nancy Lynch, daughter of Polly Lynch, "people of color," 10 March 1813 Goochland County bond, 11 March marriage, Robert Lynch surety. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in 1813 with his wife Nancy, farming land owned by Rice Innes.

vi. Nancy2, born say 1790, "daughter of Jacob Banks," married William Cooper, 29 August 1809 Goochland County bond, 1 September marriage, Jacob Martin surety.

vii. John, born say 1792, taxable in Jacob's household from 1810 to 1813.

 

24.    Malachi1 Banks, born say 1749, was taxable in York County on 19 May 1783 when the court presented Elizabeth Pescud for not listing him as a tithable [Orders 1774-84, 324, 334]. And he was taxable on his own tithe from 1784 to 1814 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 83, 97, 170, 181, 190, 227, 275, 325, 337, 362, 373, 385, 403]. On 21 January 1793 the York County court discharged him from his recognizance on the complaint of Elizabeth Cuttillo and Mary Hopson for a breach of the peace [Orders 1788-95, 507]. He may have been the father of

i. Godfrey, taxable in York County in 1791 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frame 170], head of a York County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:871].

ii. Lucy, head of a York County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:871].

iii. Malachi2, born about 1792, registered in York County on 19 February 1810: a slim fellow of yellow complexion 5 feet 6 Inches high abt 18 years of age, short thick hair, large flat nose ... Born of a free Woman in the parish of York Hampton. On 15 July 1833 he and his wife Judith registered their daughter Lucy: a small Girl about 10 years of age, a little cross Eyed ... a wide gap between her Teeth (she and her Brother, now at the Breast, are children of Malachi & Judith Banks, free persons of colour [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, nos. 39, 147, 42; 1831-50, no. 298].

 

25.    Elizabeth5 Banks, born say 1762, was called a "Free Mulatto" on 2 March 1783 when her son John was baptized in Bruton Parish, York and James City counties [Bruton Parish Register, 35]. She was taxable in York County on a horse in 1800, on one free tithable and a slave in 1801, 2 tithables from 1802 to 1804, 2 horses in 1805, 2 tithables and 2 horses in 1806 and taxable on one horse in 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 254, 263, 275, 285, 295, 304, 315, 325], head of a York County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:887] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:157]. She was the mother of

i. John, baptized in Bruton Parish on 2 March 1783. He was taxable in York County in 1805, 1807, taxable on 2 tithes in 1809, taxable on a slave in 1810, taxable on one tithe and a horse in 1811 and 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 304, 325, 337, 351, 362, 373] and head of a York County household of 6 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:887].

 

26.    Benjamin Banks, born about 1765, was taxable in Surry County from 1787 to 1816: taxable in John Banks' household in 1787; taxable on 2 tithes in 1805; 3 in 1807; 4 "free Negroes & Mulattoes above the age of 16," 3 of whom were male tithables in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 411, 519; 1791-1816, 26, 177, 252, 319, 400, 475, 556, 589, 628, 666, 704, 726, 848]. He was twenty-three years old when he married Mary Valentine, 12 December 1788 Surry County bond, John Banks surety. He registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 5 September 1798: ...son of John Banks ...a Mulatto man bright complexion aged about 30 years, has bushy hair, about five feet eight inches high, pretty well made, by profession a planter [Back of Guardian Accounts Book 1783-1804, no.32]. He married, second, Lucy Bruce, daughter of Elizabeth Bruce, 22 January 1803 Surry County bond, 19 February marriage, James Roberts surety. Benjamin was head of a Surry County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:601] and 12 "free colored" in 1830. The inventory of his Surry County estate was taken in 1832 [WB 6:303-4]. His wife Lucy was called "widow and relict of Benjamin Banks" in her 25 September 1841 Surry County will, proved 24 February 1845, which named her children Parthenia and Dawson and many of her grandchildren. Benjamin's children were

i. William6, born about 1787, registered in Surry County on 2 June 1809: a Mulatto Man aged about 22 years a son of Benjamin Banks of Surry County, thick lips has a large Nose, yellow complexion, his hair grows low in his forehead ... and is 5'6" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 38].

ii. Sampson, born about 1789, registered in Surry County on 28 March 1831: a mulatto man, son of Benjamin Banks ... has curley hair, a pleasant countenance, of a bright complexion, stout made, is about 42 years of age and is 5'8-1/2" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 91].

iii. Parthenia, married Elias Francis.

iv. Ruffin, born in January 1794, registered in Surry County on 29 August 1815: a Mulatto Man, is the son of Benjamin Banks of this County, is aged 21 years last January is 5'10" high, light complexion, his hair grows on his forehead [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 53].

v. Willis, born in January 1797, registered in Surry County on 8 February 1820: a Mulatto Man and a Son of Benjamin Banks, who is of a bright complexion, has a large Mouth, thick lips, round distended Nostrils, his hair grows low on his Fore-head...5'7-1/2" high, straight & stout made, aged 23 years last January [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 71].

vi. Elizabeth7/ Betsy, born about 1799, registered in Surry County on 23 April 1823: daughter of Benjamin Banks & Nancy Banks of Surry County who was born free, aged 24 years some time in the present year, is 4'4-1/4" high, full lips, her hair grows low on the forehead and temples, has round but not large Nostrils, her hair tolerable straight for a Mulatto, her complexion light. She was the mother of Benjamin's grandson John Banks who registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 23 May 1834: The bearer John Banks son of Betsy Banks was born Nov 14th 1816 in the above named county within two miles of my House and lived with his Grandfather Benjamin Banks at the above named place until the year 1832. The above named John Banks was free born and his connections for three generations past. James Wilson [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 116].

vii. Fielding, born about 1799, registered in Surry County on 22 September 1826 and 28 November 1831: a Mulatto Man & son of Benjamin Banks and Nancy his Wife, free Mulattoes, as certified to the clerk of the Surry County Court by James Wilson, a highly respectable resident of Surry County--the said Fielden Banks is quite Mulatto, 5'4-1/4" high...full rounded upper lip, round distended Nostrils, tho' not remarkably large...bushy hair...aged about 32 Years (in 1831) [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 82, 104].

viii Dawson, born about September 1803, registered in Surry County on 26 December 1825: a son of Benjamin Banks, a free Mulato Man of Surry County ... aged 22 years, some time in Sept. 1825 is 5'9-3/4" high, of a bright complexion, pretty stout & straight made [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 81]. He was a "free Negro" fisherman on Dawson Davis' land in 1841.

 

27.    Anthony Banks, born about 1776, was a "FN" taxable in Sussex County from 1804 to 1809 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1812, frames 610, 646, 675, 699, 747]. He was taxable in Greensville County from 1810 to 1814: listed with Nancy in 1813, "Mulattos," called Anthony Miles Banks in 1814 when he was taxable on 2 free tithes and 2 horses [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1850, frames 400, 413, 430, 445, 460]. He and his wife Nancy were the heirs of Thomas and Lucretia Stewart. On 12 December 1807 he and Nancy, Henry Stewart, and Peyton Stewart sold 114 acres in Greensville County on the south side of Fountain Creek and both sides of Jordan's Road which they received by Thomas Stewart's will, and on 8 May 1809 Anthony and Nancy purchased 30 acres adjoining this land in Greensville County from James and Sarah Watkins. This was James and Sarah's allotment from the estate of Lucretia Byrd, widow of Thomas Stewart [DB 3:520; 4:117]. On 12 February 1810 the Greensville County court granted him a license to keep an ordinary at his house [Orders 1806-10, 429]. He received a certificate of freedom in Sussex County on 1 September 1814. He was described as a free born, brown skin man, 5'9-1/2" tall, aged 26 [Register of Free Negroes, no.244]. His wife Nancy Banks registered as a "Free Negro" in Greensville County, Virginia, on 14 September 1814: wife of Anthony Banks, born free, of a black Complexion, aged twenty six years ... five feet 4-1/2 Inches high in shoes [Register of Free Negroes, no.46]. Anthony and Nancy were living in Perry Township, Logan County, Ohio, in 1850 [Census p.206]. Two of their children were

i. Ewing S., born about 1807, forty-five years old when he registered in Logan County, Ohio, on 11 June 1852: 5'10" tall, dark brown complexion ... son of Anthony & Nancy Banks.

ii. Eaton Wilkison, born about 1813, twenty-one years old when he registered in Logan County on 24 June 1834: 5'10" tall, dark brown complexion ... son of Anthony & Nancy Banks [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, and Poor Persons, 13, 10].

 

Other York County descendants were

i. Thomas2, born about 1788, registered in York County on 18 November 1822: a Mulatto fellow about 34 years of age 5 feet 6-1/4 inches high, has a very rough face [Free Negro Register 1798-1831, no.132]. He was taxable in York County from 1812 to 1814, head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" in 1813 (probably himself and his wife) [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 373, 385, 403].

ii. Elizabeth8/ Betsy, born about 1788, registered in York County on 16 December 1822: a dark Mulatto 34 years of age 5 feet 8-/12 inches high [Register, no.183]. She was head of a York County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:871].

iii. Hannah4, born about 1804, registered in York County on 19 September 1831, a woman about 27 years old, 5 feet 5-3/4 inches high, quite black ... broad face, high cheek bones [Register, no.352].

iv. Lavinia, born about 1806, registered in York County on 16 January 1832: a woman of tawny complexion, about 26 years of age, 5 feet 5 and a half high, high cheek bones, sunken or hollow eyes, flat nose [Register, no.327].

v. William9, born about 1807, registered in York County on 19 September 1831: alias Stump, a dark fellow 5 feet 4-3/4 inches high twenty four years old, has ... a stump toe. Born free [Register, no.291].

vi. William10, born about 1808, registered in York County on 19 September 1831: a bright mulatto about 23 years of age 5 feet 7-3/4 inches high ... short hair, little or no beard and a high nose [Register, no.299].

vii. Martha, born about 1810, registered in York County on 17 October 1831: a woman of Tawney complexion about 20 or 21 years of age 5 feet 3-1/2 Inches high ... high forehead & large eye brows. Born free [Register, no.308].

viii. Matilda, born about 1815, registered in York County on 15 July 1833: light complexion, about 18 years of age, 5 feet 5-1/4 Inches high, light yellow Eyes - high cheek bones ... Has the scar of vaccination for Kine or smallpox on her left arm [Register, no.351].

 

Other descendants in North Carolina were

i. Jane2, born say 1765, head of an Edenton Town, Chowan County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:19], 3 in 1800 (Jenny Banks) [NC:116], and 4 in 1810 [NC:533].

ii. Jacob2, born before 1776, head of a Craven County, North Carolina household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:77]. He married Phebe Moore, 13 August 1821 Craven County bond.

iii. Lettice, born 1776-94, head of a Chowan County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:129].

iv. Sarah, born 1794-1806, head of an Edenton household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:130].

v. Washington, born 1794-1806, head of an Edenton household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:130].

vi. Nancy3, born 1794-1806, head of a Chowan County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:129].

vii. Mary8, born 1794-1806, head of an Edenton household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:130].

 

BANNISTER FAMILY

1.    Isabella1 Bannister, born say 1730, a "Mulatto woman," was the mother of James, Oliver, Frank, and Cate who were named in Caleb Sesson's 21 June 1771 Orange County, Virginia will, proved 22 August 1771. Sesson asked that his sons and executors William, Caleb, and George Sesson have the children legally bound to them and that they be divided equally according to valuation [WB 2:436-7]. They were valued in the 13 November 1771 inventory of his estate:

James a Negro man 30 pounds, Oliver a Lad 30 pounds, Frank a Negro boy 25 pounds, Cate a Negro boy 15 pounds [WB 2:442].

Isabella may have been related to Sarah Banister, head of a Queen Anne's County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1790. And they may have been related to Mary Bannister who was sued for debt by the churchwardens of Caroline County, Virginia, in 1740 (for having a bastard child?) [Orders 1740-43]. Isabella's children were

i. James, born say 1752.

2        ii. Oliver1, born say 1755.

3        iii. Francis1, born say 1758.

iv. Catherine, born say 1761.

v. ?Arthur, born say 1770, died before 27 January 1794 when (his brother?) Oliver Banister was granted administration on his estate on 1,000 pounds security in Orange County, Virginia [Minute Book 1789-97, 205].

4        vi. ?Nancy, born say 1771.

5        vii. ?Henry, born before 1776.

6        viii. ?Esther, born say 1776.

 

2.    Oliver1 Bannister, born say 1755, was called a "Mullatto Claim'd by Wm Sesson" on 28 March 1782 when he petitioned the Orange County court for his freedom (from his indenture?) [Minutes 1774-89, 171]. On 27 January 1794 he was granted administration on the Orange County estate of (his brother?) Arther Bannister [Minutes 1789-97, 205]. He was a "Free Negro" head of a Culpeper County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:7]. He may have been the father of

i. Oliver2, born say 1790, a "Mulatto" bound as an apprentice tailor to James M. Early in Botetourt County on 14 June 1796 [Orders 1793-7, 370]. He was head of a Rockbridge County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:284].

ii. Elijah, born 1776-94, head of a Botetourt County household of 1 "free colored" and a white woman in 1820.

iii. Winn, born 1776-94, head of a Mecklenburg County, Virginia household of 6 "free colored" in 1820.

iv. Thomas, born say 1780, a "free Negro & mulatto" taxable living with his wife and five children in Chesterfield County in 1811 [PPTL, 1786-1811, frame 824].

 

3.    Francis1 Bannister, born say 1758, was counted in the "List of Free Negroes & Mulattoes" for Botetourt County in 1802. He was listed as a cooper living on James Lackey's land in John Holloway's District with his wife Lucy and children and in George Rowland's District for 1803 [A List of Free Negroes & Mulattors within the District of James Tunor Commissioner of Botetourt for the Year 1802, no.51; 1803, no.1]. He was head of a Botetourt County household of 11 "free colored" in 1820. His children were

i. ?Eleanor, born say 1783, married Samuel Day, 26 December 1801 Botetourt County bond, Francis Bannister surety.

ii. Becky, born say 1786.

iii. Nancy, born say 1787.

iv. Isbell3, born say 1789.

v. Rachel, born about 1791, eleven years old in the 1802 Botetourt list.

vi. James2, born about 1792, ten years old in 1802.

vii. Jenkins, born about 1793, nine years old in 1802. He registered as a "free Negro" in Botetourt County in July 1819: Jenkin Bannister son of Francis, 25 years old, yellow colour 5'7" Born Free [Free Negroes &c Registered in the Clerks office of Botetourt County, no.23].

viii. Alexander, born about 1796, six years old in 1802, head of a Botetourt County household of a "free colored" man in 1820.

ix. Francis3, born about 1798, four years old in 1802.

x. William, born about 1800, two and one-half years old in 1802.

xi. John, born about 1803, counted in the 1803 Botetourt list.

 

4.    Nancy Banister, born say 1771, was the mother of

i. Francis2, born about 1791, registered in Rockbridge County on 2 November 1818: a man of colour born free in said county near the Natural Bridge, 5 feet 6 inches high, about 27 years of age, dark brown complexion, nearly black, stout made, son of Nancy Banister a free negro of said county [Free Negro Register 1803-28, no. 17].

ii. Isabell2, born about 1794, registered in Rockbridge County on 2 November 1818: a woman of colour born free in this county near the Natural Bridge, about 5 feet 4-1/2 inches high, 24 years old, dark brown complexion, slender person, the daughter of Nancy Banister a free negro of said county [Free Negro Register 1803-28, no. 16].

 

5.    Henry Bannister, born before 1776, was head of a Botetourt County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820. He may have been the father of

i. Simon, born about 1810, twenty-one years old when he registered as a "free Negro" in Botetourt County in November 1831: Bright Black, 5'6" or 7" high [Register, no.73].

ii. Eliza, born about 1818, eighteen years old when she registered in March 1836: Bright Mulatto, 5'2" high [Register, no.89].

 

6.    Esther Bannister, born say 1776, was the mother of

i. Christopher, born about 1796, twenty-four years old on 13 June 1820 when he registered in Botetourt County: Chs Banister, son of Esther Banister, Dark Yellow, 5'8", born free by information from Chs Beale Esqr [Register, no. 33a]. He married Maria Madden sometime after 11 June 1823 when he acknowledged paternity of her daughter Sally [Madden, We Were Always Free, 49, 53, 54, 206].

 

BARBER FAMILY

1.    Jane Barbers, born say 1727, was living in Chesterfield County, Virginia, on 5 July 1754 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Dale Parish to bind out her "Mulatto" child Nanny. Her daughter was called Ann Barber in April 1755 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind her out to a trade [Orders 1749-54, 510; 1754-9, 61]. She was the mother of

2        i. ?William1, born 17 May 1745.

3        ii. ?Thomas, born about 1748.

4        iii. Nanny/ Nancy, born before 5 July 1754.

 

2.    William1 Barber, born on 17 May 1745 in Dinwiddie County, was living in Surry County, North Carolina, on 2 January 1833 when he made a declaration in court to obtain a Revolutionary War pension. He stated that he was living in Halifax County, Virginia, when called into the service and moved to Surry County about 1805. His widow was Amey or Noama Barber [M805-48]. He was taxable in the southern district of Halifax County, Virginia, from 1782 to 1803: called a "Mulatto" starting in 1792, listed with 2 tithables in 1795 and 1796; 3 in 1798, 3 in 1800 when he was called "Senr." [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1799, frames 5, 127, 185, 259, 412, 434, 533, 598, 671, 808; 1800-12, 49, 175, 304]. He was head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [NC:697] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:670]. He was probably the father of

i. William2, Jr., born about 1773 in Virginia, a "Mulatto" taxable in Halifax County from 1801 to 1803 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1800-12, frames 120, 175, 304], head of a Surry County, North Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:697], listed in 1850 as a Mulatto farmer with a white wife Mary.

ii. Matthew, born say 1775, a "FN" taxable in Halifax County in 1803 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1800-12, frame 304].

iii. Sally, married Richard Lawrence, 23 September 1817 Surry County, North Carolina bond.

 

3.    Thomas Barber, born about 1748, a "Mullatto" servant, complained to the Chesterfield County court against his master the Rev. Mr. William Leigh. Leigh agreed to discharge him from further servitude on 5 November 1779. His suit for assault and battery against John Coates and Robert Burton was dismissed on agreement of the parties in June 1784 [Orders 1774-84, 264, 552]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1791 to 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 80, 293, 227, 366]. He registered in Petersburg on 18 August 1794: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet 5 & a half inches high & thin made, about forty six years old, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 23]. His widow Juday registered in Petersburg on 24 January 1803: (widow of Thos. Barber a free man) a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet four inches high, forty years old, born free, freckles in her face [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 249]. She was head of a Petersburg Town household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:122a]. They were the parents of

i. John2, born 27 July 1780, registered in Petersburg on 18 June 1807: a brown Mulatto man, five feet seven and a half inches high, nineteen years old 27 July next, son of Judah Barber, a free woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 409].

ii. ?William3, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 13 August 1806: Billy Barber, a light brown free negro man, five feet seven inches high, twenty one years old, a shoemaker by trade, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 394]. He was taxable in Chesterfield County from 1802 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 480, 518, 556, 689].

iii. Matthew, born September 1790, registered in Petersburg on 29 January 1811: a yellow brown Mulatto man, five feet six 3/4 inches high, twenty one years old Sept. next, son of Judah Barber a free Mulatto woman [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 654].

 

4.    Nancy Barber, born about 1752, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 September 1807: fifty five years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 46]. She was called Nanny Barber when she was taxable on one to two horses in Chesterfield County from 1793 to 1804, taxable on one tithe from 1796 to 1801, a "Mulatto living on her own land in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List 1786-1811, 156, 227, 262, 293, 329, 368, 443, 480, 518, 556, 738]. She may have been the mother of

i. John1, born about 1770, taxable in Chesterfield County from 1791 to 1811 when he was living on James Scott's land [Personal Property Tax List, 1786-1811, frames 80, 227, 441, 556, 782]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 9 January 1809: thirty nine years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 98]. His wife Priscilla registered in Petersburg on 3 January 1809: yellow brown free negro woman, five feet two inches high, thirty six years old, wife of John Barber, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 445].

ii. Aggy, born about 1773, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 June 1808: thirty five years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 72, 455]. She was a "Mulatto" living in Chesterfield County with her five children in 1811 [Personal Property Tax List 1786-1811, frame 824].

iii. Suckey, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 September 1807: twenty eight years old, brown complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 47]. She was a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse and living on William Varner's land in Chesterfield County in 1809 [Personal Property Tax List, frame 738]. She was called Sucky Harris on 3 July 1812 when she registered in Petersburg: (formerly Barber) a yellow brown Mulatto woman, five feet three 3/4 inches high, thirty three years old, born free and raised in the County of Chesterfield [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 708].

iv. Jinsey, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 13 June 1808: twenty six years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 73].

v. Phebe W., born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Chesterfield County on 14 September 1807: twenty years old, yellow complexion, born free [Register of Free Negroes 1804-53, no. 48, 151].

 

Other members of the family were:

i. John, head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:563].

ii. Elizabeth, born before 1776, head of a Hyde County, North Carolina household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:248].

iii. Jenny, born before 1776, head of a Hyde County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:248].

iv. Sarah, married Peter Godett, 26 April 1797 Craven County, North Carolina bond, William Tignor bondsman. Peter was head of a Craven County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:130].

v. Harry, head of a Stafford County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:126].

vi. Aaron, an Indian wheelwright living on Connelly Mullins' land in Goochland County from 1809 to 1811 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1782-1809, frame 862; 1810-32, frames 4, 69], counted in a list of "free Negroes & Mulattoes" in Fluvanna County in 1813 and 1814 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1809-50, frames 503, 526].

vii. Samuel, head of a Norfolk County household of one "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:887].

viii. Marina Mackey/ Barber, born say 1820, a "free woman of Colour," presented by the Spring 1843 session of the Hyde County court for unlawfully marrying a slave named Riley who was owned by R.U.S. Moore. Marina was probably related to Robert Mackey, head of a Hyde County household of 2 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [NC:372].

 

BARTLETT/ BARTLEY FAMILY

Mixed-race members of the Bartley/ Bartlett family born before 1750 were

1        i. Solomon1, born about 1727.

2        ii. Joseph, born say 1735.

3        iii. Miriam Bartlett, born say 1738.

4        iv. David1, born say 1740.

 

1.    Solomon1 Bartlett/ Bartley, born about 1727, was living in Southampton County (called Solomon Bartlett) on 13 April 1758 when John Powell sued him for trespass, assault and battery. The case was dismissed on agreement of the parties [Orders 1754-9, 431]. He was exempted from paying taxes by the Bertie County court in 1777 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, IV:246]. He and his wife Amy were "free Mulattows" taxed in the 1770 Bertie list of James Moore and in James Churchwell's 1772 tax list [CR 010.702.1]. He probably died before August 1781 when the Bertie court ordered his children bound out as apprentices. They were called children of Amey Bartlet in November 1782. In August 1783 the court ordered that John Johnston have administration of his estate on 400 pounds security [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:393, 435, 468, 465, 496]. His children were

i. ?Hall, head of a Bertie County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:11]. Rebecca Bartley (his widow?) was head of Bertie County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:34].

ii. Henry2, born about 1769, fourteen years old in 1783 when the Bertie court ordered him bound as an apprentice shoemaker. He was head of a Bertie County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:34]. He married Edith Butler, 1 June 1804 Bertie County bond.

iii. Benjamin2, born about 1771, ten years old in August 1781 when the Bertie court ordered him bound as an apprentice cooper [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, V:398].

iv. Solomon2, born about 1772, eleven years old in 1783 when the Bertie court ordered him bound as an apprentice shoemaker. He was head of an Edgecombe County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [NC:186], 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:740], and 6 "free colored" and a slave in 1820 [NC:119].

 

2.    Joseph Bartley, born say 1735, was called Joseph Barkley, a "Mulatto," on 21 November 1758 when the Surry County, Virginia court presented him for not listing his wife as a tithable [Orders 1757-64, 135]. And he was called Joseph Barkley the following year on 19 November 1759 when the York County court presented him for not listing himself as a tithable. The case was dismissed when he paid his tax. He was called Joseph Bartlett on 20 August 1764 when he sued Christiana Kemp for debt in York County court in a case that was dismissed on agreement of the parties. On 17 December 1764 he was called Joseph Bartley when the court ordered him to pay the parish of Bruton 500 pounds of tobacco for not listing his wife as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 281, 308, 320, 90]. He and his wife Elizabeth, "Boath free mulattoes," registered the birth of their son James in Bruton Parish, James City County in 1768 [Bruton Parish Register, 33]. And he and his wife Elizabeth sued William Wilson in court for trespass, assault and battery on 18 June 1770. He was called Joseph Barclay on 15 July 1771 when the grand jury presented him for failing to list himself as a tithable [Orders 1768-70, 508; 1770-2, 25, 336]. He may have been identical to Josias Bartley who was taxable in York County from 1792 to 1795, taxable on two slaves and a horse in 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 180, 191, 199, 209]. He was a "M"(ulatto) tavern keeper with Mary Bartlet on Tanner's Creek in Norfolk County from 1800 to 1802 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 351, 371, 383, 427]. Joseph and Elizabeth were the parents of

5        i. James, born 8 July 1768.

ii. ?Matthew, born 25 January 1783, son of Elizabeth Bartlett, a Free mulatto" [Bruton Parish Register, 35].

iii. ?Benjamin5, born about 1786, registered in Norfolk County on 17 November 1811: 5 feet 9 In. 25 years of age of a Yellowish Complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, no. 65].

 

3.    Miriam Bartlett, born say 1738, was living in Southampton County, Virginia, on 8 February 1759 when her "mulatto" son Henry Bartlett was bound apprentice [Orders 1754-59, 487]. She may have been the Mary Bartley who lived on land in Surry County, Virginia, on each side of Tarapin Swamp which was described on 16 November 1770 by Joseph Hargrave as "the land whereon Mary Bartley formerly lived" [DB 10:119; Hopkins, Surry County Deeds and Estate Accounts, 1756-1787, 52]. One of her descendants may have lived with the Nottoway Indians for a while since Solomon Bartlett (born about 1800) and Fanny Bartlett (born about 1798) were listed in an 1808 Nottoway Indian census [LVA, Box 154a, Executive Papers June 21-July 22 1808, pp.4-5]. Solomon registered in Southampton County on 29 November 1821: 5 feet 9 1/4 inches high Brown complection, one of the Nottoway Tribe of Indians [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 1298]. Miriam was the mother of

i. ?Benjamin1, born about 1755, a "poor child" bound apprentice in Southampton County on 14 November 1771. He may have been related to a member of the Byrd family because his apprenticeship to Nathan Bryant was vacated and he was bound instead to John Byrd "for reasons appearing to the court" on 14 May 1772 [Orders 1768-72, 470, 532]. And he may have been the Benjamin Bartlett who married Alee Evans in Prince Edward County on 22 August 1782 and was surety for the 22 March 1785 Prince Edward County marriage of John Jackson and Nancy Gowing. He was taxable on a horse and 3 cattle in the lower district of Prince Edward County in 1787 [PPTL 1782-1809, frame 185]. In June 1789 he was paid 25 pounds of tobacco by the Prince Edward County court for guarding a prisoner, and on 17 August 1789 he confessed judgment to the executors of Archibald Cary for 28 pounds, 12 shillings of which he still owed 14 pounds, 6 shillings [Orders 1788-91, 141, 151, 164]. He registered as a free Negro in Southampton County on 12 June 1794: Age 39, Colour Black, born of free parents in Southampton [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 27]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Prince Edward County in 1802, 1803 and 1811 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 598, 619; 1809-31, frame 47] and he was a "fn" taxable in Charlotte County in 1806, 1807, 1809 (adjoining Samuel Bartlett), 1812, taxable on horse in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1813, frames 688, 722, 755, 851, 893], a "F.N." head of a Charlotte County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:68].

ii. Henry1, born say 1758, apparently identical to Henry Barclay who complained to the Southampton County court against his master Simon Vick on 13 February 1777 [Minutes 1775-8, n.p.].

6        iii. ?Patty1, born say 1760.

 

4.    David1 Bartley, born say 1740, was paid as a witness for Daniel Armfield in his York County suit against Peter Gillett on 16 March 1761. He was sued for a 6 pound debt in York County court on 19 July 1762 [Judgments & Orders 1759-63, 222, 398]. He and his wife Lucretia, "free mulattoes," registered the birth of their son Godfrey Macklin in Bruton Parish, James City County. David may have been deceased by 1782 when a Lucretia McLin (born about 1742) was counted in the 1782 census for Richmond, Virginia [VA:111]. David and Lucretia were the parents of

i. Godfrey Macklin, born 29 November 1764 [Bruton Parish Register, 27].

 

5.    James Bartley, born 8 July 1768, was baptized 14 August 1768 in Bruton Parish [Bruton Parish Register, 33]. He (called James Bartlett) was charged with murdering John Gillett and sent by the York County court for further trial in Williamsburg on 21 December 1796. Reuben Gillett was a witness against him [Orders 1795-1803, 141]. James was taxable in York County from 1789 to 1813 (called James Bartlett in 1792, 1793, 1806, 1809, and 1810). He was taxable on 3 slaves in 1806 and head of a household of 2 "free Negroes & mulattoes over 16" and a slave in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 148, 180, 191, 199, 264, 284, 304, 314, 351, 363, 385]. He was head of a York County household of 3 "other free," a slave and a white woman 16-26 years old in 1810 [VA:871]. He registered as a "free Negro" in York County on 18 November 1822: a light Mulatto about 61 years of age 5 feet 9-3/4 Inches high, has long grey hair. And his wife Nancy registered the same day: a bright Mulatto about 52 years of age 5 feet 2-3/4 Inches high, has short wooly hair which is grey, flat nose...broad mouth [York County Register, nos. 143, 144]. He may have been the father of

i. William Bartlett, born say 1791, taxable in York County in 1812 and 1814, called William Bartly in 1815 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frames 374, 402, 419].

 

6.   Patty1 Bartlett, born say 1760, was taxable on a horse in Prince Edward County from 1806 to 1819: listed with (her children?) Redy and Polly Bartlett in 1814 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 699, 726; 1809-31, frames 2, 25, 95, 122, 199, 215, 272, 292] and head of a Prince Edward County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:556]. She may have been the mother of

i. David2, born say 1788, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Prince Edward County from 1805 to 1820 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 653, 699, 726; 1809-31, frames 2, 25, 70, 95, 123, 138, 272, 352].

ii. Samuel, born say 1789, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Prince Edward County in 1805, 1806, 1812, 1819 and 1820 [PPTL 1782-1809, frames 653, 699; 1809-31, frames 70, 292, 329] and a "fn" taxable in Charlotte County in 1809 [PPTL 1782-1813, frame 755].

iii. Burwell, born say 1792, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Prince Edward County in 1809 [PPTL 1809-31, frame 2].

iv. Patty2, ordered bound out by the overseers of the poor in Prince Edward County on 21 December 1795 [Orders 1793-7, 236], probably identical to Patience Bartlet who was listed as a "free Negro" with Betsy Bartlet in 1814 [PPTL 1809-31, frame 122].

v. Henry3, born say 1797, a "free Negro" taxable in the lower district of Prince Edward County in 1814, 1815, 1818 and 1819 [PPTL 1809-31, frames 123, 138, 272, 292].

 

Others members of the Bartlett family in Virginia were

i. Cary, head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:333].

ii. Benjamin3 Bartley, born about 1783, registered in Southampton County on 25 August 1806: Blk., 5 feet 5 1/2 inches high, Free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, no. 394]. He was a "M"(ulatto) taxable in St. Luke's Parish, Southampton County, from 1806 to 1810 but not taxable there in 1811 [PPTL 1792-1806, frame 838; 1807-21, frames 47, 69, 166].

iii. Edward, a "mulatto" taxable in Gloucester County in 1812 [PPTL, 1800-20].

iv. Lucy and Sarah Bartlett, emancipated by letter from Elizabeth Harrison proved in York County court on 16 April 1787 [Orders 1784-7, 440], possibly descendants of a member of the Bartlett family who had children by a slave.

 

BASS FAMILY

The Bass family descended from John1 Bass of Norfolk County, Virginia, who married Keziah Elizabeth Tucker, an Indian. Most of their children married whites and became part of the white community. However, many descendants of their son William1 Bass married African Americans and became part of that community. William1 Bass's son, William2 Bass, remained in Norfolk County and married an African American. Two other sons, Edward1 and John2 Bass, moved to North Carolina and probably married African Americans as did most of their descendants.

 

1.    John1 Bass, an early settler of Norfolk County, Virginia, was born on 7 September 1616. On 14 August 1638 he married Keziah Elizabeth Tucker, daughter of

Robin the Elder of ye Nansimuns kingdom, a Baptized Xtian

His children were

i. Nathaniel1, born 29 May 1640, d. 1652.

ii. Keziah1, born 4 September 1643.

iii. Elizabeth1, born 12 July 1645.

iv. Jordan, born 27 June 1648, d. 1651.

v. Samuel1, born 23 March 1653.

2        vi. William1, born 29 March 1654, d. 13 August 1741.

vii. Richard1, born 2 August 1658, died in Norfolk County in 1722.

viii. John, born 14 March 1661, died the same day.

 

2.    William1 Bass, born 29 March 1654, married Catherine Lanier who died 17 February 1691/2. He was called William Bass, Sr., on 13 October 1715 when he admitted in Norfolk County court that he owed John Hodgson 50 pounds of tobacco [Orders 1710-17, 169]. On 17 March 1726/7 he claimed to have cleared lands near the Dismal Swamp which "hath been used by his and Their forebears since & before English governance in Virginia." He received a certificate from the Norfolk County Clerk confirming his rightful possession of the land and further stating that

William Bass, Senr. & ... his sons Wm. Bass, Thomas Bass and Joseph Bass, & spinster daughter Mary Bass are persons of English and Nansemun Indian descent with no Admixture of negor, Ethipopic blood

He was called William Bass, Senr., and was living in Western Branch District of Norfolk County on 6 January 1729 when he purchased 103 acres in Norfolk County at the mouth of Deep Branch for 25 pounds [DB G:fol.35 (p.183)]. He was taxable with his son Thomas in the Western Branch District of Norfolk County in 1730, 1731 (called William Bass, Sr.), 1732 (with William Horse/Horsey in his household), and 1733-36 living near Richard and Eliza Price and William Price whose wife was taxable in 1736 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1730-50, 20, 38, 73, 94, 138, 183]. He was probably in debt when he made his 1 October 1740 will since he left his land to his daughter Mary, "if she can Save it." The will, proved 17 September 1742 in Norfolk County, mentioned his children William, Edward, Joseph, Thomas, and Mary (executrix), and grandson William Bass [WB H:8]. The record of his death on 13 August 1741 is in the Bass family papers which also record that his son John and his daughter Keziah, Jr., predeceased him [Bell, Bass Families of the South, 12]. His children were

3        i. Edward1, born 19 October 1672.

4        ii. John2, born 4 December 1673.

iii. Keziah2, born 30 October 1675, died 1704.

5        iv. William2, born 28 October 1676.

v. Joseph1, born 21 December 1679.

vi. Mary1, born 15 June 1681, sued ___ Mux in Norfolk County Orphans Court on 15 May 1700. The Norfolk County court bound two-year-old Sarah Crawley and nine-year-old Elizabeth Johnson to her as apprentices on 22 May 1714. Sarah was probably the daughter of Jane Crawley who sued John Nichols in court on the same day. On 20 June 1718 the court bound the children to Mr. Thomas Scott [DB 6:189; Orders 1710-7, 84; DB 10, 12a].

vii. Thomas1, born 13 November 1687, married Martha Willis 22 June 1724, married second, Tamer Spivey 2 May 1729. He was taxable in the household of his father William1 Bass from 1730 to 1736. Thomas and his wife Tamer may have left the county sometime between 1736 and 1750 since they were not included in the tax lists from 1750 to 1766. They sold land in Norfolk County on 17 June 1756 [Bell, Bass Families of the South, 52].

 

3.    Edward1 Bass, born 19 October 1672, was living in Norfolk County on 16 November 1699 when he purchased 15 acres of land on the Western Branch of Elizabeth River from John Fulsher who was the slave owner who freed the Anderson family by his Norfolk County will in 1712. Edward appeared in Norfolk County court on 17 November 1698 and admitted that he owed Hugh Campbell 500 pounds of tobacco, in June 1702 he admitted that he owed Thomas Whinfield 70 pounds of tobacco for goods he purchased at the sale of the estate of William Whitehurst, and on 15 February 1709 he sued Henry Lawley for a 3 pound debt. On 20 July 1711 he was presented by the Norfolk County court for retailing liquor without a license but the presentment was dismissed at his cost when he convinced the court that it was a mistake. On 16 December 1715 he sued Joseph Muns, Jr., for 20 pounds damages for riding his mare [DB 6, no.2, fols. 36, 170, 255; Orders 1708-10, 124b, 141a; 1710-17, 14, 100, 136]. On 30 January 1720/1 he was called "Edward Bass of Norfolk County, Virginia, Parish of Elizabeth" when he purchased 100 acres adjacent to his brother John, near the head of Horsepool Swamp in Chowan Precinct, North Carolina [DB C-1:113]. On 26 March 1723 he was granted 200 acres on Urahaw Swamp in what became Northampton County after 1741 [Hoffman, Province of North Carolina Land Patents, 192]. He and his wife Love sold their land in Chowan County by deed of 28 March 1726 [DB C-1:609].

Between 12 August 1728 and 15 May 1744 he purchased another 615 acres adjoining his land [Bertie DB C:135, Northampton DB 1:40, 89, 129]. His 25 July 1748 Northampton County will was proved in August 1750 and left over 525 acres to his children with the remainder to be sold to discharge debts [Original at N.C. Archives]. He left his wife Lovewell 100 acres during her life. More than ten years later on 7 May 1761 she and her heirs, Lucy Jones and Thomas Cugley, sold this land for 75 pounds to Jethro Bass, her deceased husband's grand nephew [DB 3:121]. Their children named in Edward's will were

6        i. John4, born say 1716.

ii. Katherine Anderson, born say 1718, married to Lewis Anderson when her father made his 25 July 1748 Northampton County will. She received 50 acres in Northampton County which she and Lewis sold on 12 November 1757 [DB 2:424].

iii. Dinah, born say 1720, perhaps the wife of John Pone, "black" taxables in the 1755 Granville County summary list and taxables in the 1754 list of Robert Harris along with the Andersons, Pettifords, and William Bass [CR 44.701.19].

7        iv. Benjamin1, born say 1722, died about 1798.

v. Joseph2, born say 1724. He sold the 50 acres in Northampton County which he received by his father's will on 18 August 1757 and a further 50 acres in Northampton while a resident of Granville County on 2 September the same year [DB 2:399, 489]. On 30 March 1758 he bought 50 acres in Granville County on a branch of Fishing Creek and sold it on 26 February 1765 [DB E:50; G:355]. He was taxable in Granville County on a tithe in the 1758 list of Thomas Person and taxable with his wife Jane in 1762 and 1764 in Samuel Benton's list for Oxford and Fishing Creek Districts, listed as insolvent in 1764, perhaps the Joseph Bass who was head of a Chesterfield County, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [SC:100].

8        vi. Sampson/ Samuel2, born say 1726.

9        vii. Edward3, born say 1728, died before November 1800.

viii. James1, born say 1730, taxable with his brother Benjamin in Oxford District, Granville County, in 1761. On 10 November 1764 he sold 50 acres in Northampton County by deed proved in Granville County [DB H:63].

ix. Kesiah3, born say 1732.

x. Mary3, born say 1734.

xi. Reuben1, born say 1736, bequeathed his father's manor plantation of 100 acres in Northampton County after the death of his mother. He sold this 100 acres on 5 May 1761 [DB 3:96], and in 1764 he was taxed in Granville County with his wife Mary, probably Mary Anderson. He purchased 50 acres in Granville from Lawrence Pettiford on 20 October 1768 [DB H:473]. On 16 February 1777 he sold 50 acres in Granville on Beaverdam Creek [DB L:315], and in 1782 he was taxable on 2 horses. He was taxable on one poll in 1785, and he had 2 males and 4 females in his household in Fishing Creek in 1786 for the state census.

 

4.    John2 Bass (William1, John1), born 4 December 1673, was living in Norfolk County on 15 October 1701 when a case against him brought by Thomas Hodges, Surveyor, for being delinquent "from the high wayes" was dismissed on his paying costs [DB 6:220]. He was not mentioned in his father's will because he predeceased him. On 30 January 1720/1 he bought 200 acres in Chowan Precinct near the head of Horsepool Swamp [DB C-1:115]. A year later on 16 July 1722 he was in that part of Bertie County which became Northampton County where he bought 200 acres adjoining Urahaw Swamp [DB A:105]. Between 1722 and 1729 he purchased 5 tracts of land including a patent for 460 acres, accumulating a total of 1,060 acres adjoining Urahaw Swamp [DB A:129; C:126, 135; Hoffman, Province of North Carolina Land Patents, 225]. His 18 January 1732 Bertie County will named his children, gave his wife Mary "the liberty of the plantation ... for bringing up my small children," referred to "my sd last wife's children," and left 50 acres to his friend, Daniel Wharten Burbegg [SS 876/3:305]. Norfolk County Bass family papers record his death in the year 1732 at the age of fifty-eight. Mary remarried and as "Mary Staples widow and relict of John Bass, Sr." she sold her one third interest in the plantation where she was living on 21 November 1748 [Northampton DB 1:356]. John Bass's children named in the will were

10      i. John3, born say 1700.

ii. Judith Cannady, born say 1702, wife of William Cannady of Edgecombe County. She received 100 acres by her father's will. She and husband William sold this land on 7 April 1744 [Northampton DB 1:175].

iii. Sarah2 Anderson, born say 1704, wife of Lewis Anderson, received 100 acres in Northampton County by her father's will. She and her husband Lewis sold this land on 10 November 1757 [DB 2:233].

iv. Ann1 Johnston, born say 1706, mother of Aaron Johnston who received 100 acres by her father's will. While living in Orange County, North Carolina, on 9 February 1758 he sold this 100 acres in Northampton County [DB 2:455]. He may have been the Aron Johnson who was counted as white in Wake County in 1790 [NC:104].

11      v. Edward2, born say 1710.

12      vi. William3, born say 1712, living in Bute County in 1771.

13      vii. Lovey Bass, born say 1720.

viii. Mary2, born say 1722, received 100 acres on the north side of Urahaw Swamp by her father's will.

ix. Aaron, born say 1724, received his father's plantation on the south side of Bear Swamp. There was an Aaron Bass who was taxable on one poll in Dobbs County in 1769 [NCGSJ XV:74] and taxable on one poll in Johnston County in 1784 [GA 64.1]. There was also an Aaron Bass who was counted as white in Chatham County, head of a household of a male and 3 females in 1790 [NC:87] and head of a Chatham County household of 3 "other free" in 1800.

x. Patience, born say 1726. Her father left her his plantation on the south side of Bear Swamp.

xi. Moses, born say 1728, received land on the north side of Bear Swamp by his father's will. He entered 100 acres on the west side of the Northwest River about 3/4 mile from Raft Swamp including his improvements on 21 November 1752. He was living near "the drains of Drowning Creek" on 1 February 1754 when Robert Carver entered 100 acres there [Philbeck, Bladen County Land Entries, nos. 677, 934]. He was taxable on 3 "white" tithes in Cumberland County, North Carolina, in 1755 [T&C 1], and he received a grant for 100 acres on Raft Swamp in Cumberland County on 21 October 1758 [Hoffman, Land Patents, I:474]. On 19 August 1761 the Cumberland County court granted permission for the mill he had erected on Raft Swamp to be designated a public grist mill, and the court granted him a license to keep an ordinary [Minutes 1759-65, 70]. In May 1762 he posted bond not to leave the county before the next court to answer a suit by the governor and James Simpson, but he was not mentioned again in the Cumberland County court Minutes. His estate was settled in Prince George Parish, Georgetown District, South Carolina, on 28 February 1777. His estate mentioned his cousins, Jeremiah and Wright Bass, and Mourning, Sarah, Elizabeth, and Ann Going, children of Jacob Going [South Carolina DB S-5:283, 284]. His estate settlement did not mention any children, but he was probably related to William Bass, head of a Fayetteville, Cumberland County household of 5 "other free" and 1 white woman in 1790 [NC:42]. He may have been the "William Bass a free negro" who was presented by the Granville County court for living together in fornication and adultery with Patsy House [CR.44.289.19, no date].

xii. Elizabeth2, not mentioned in her father's will but called the "now wife of Edward Taylor" whose son John Taylor was given a deed of gift of 100 acres on the south side of Hunting Quarter Swamp in Northampton County on 6 November 1747 by her brother John Bass [DB 1:321].

 

5.   William2 Bass (William1, John1), born 28 October 1676, was sued by Elizabeth Price in Norfolk County court on 20 November 1713, and on 21 August 1714 he sued Thomas Cretcher for a 1 pound, 12 shilling debt due on the balance of a bill. On 16 September 1715 the court appointed a commission to view the work he had done on John Hodgson's shallop and make a report of the value thereof to the next court [Orders 1710-7, 73, 94, 130]. He married Sarah Lovina/ Leviner on 20 April 1729 [Bell, Bass Families of the South, Chapter on Nansemond Indian Ancestry of Some Bass Families, 15]. Sarah was the "Molatto" daughter of John Nicholls' "Negro" slave, Jean Lovina. She received 200 acres on Western Branch of Elizabeth River by her master's 11 November 1696 Norfolk County will, proved 17 May 1697 [WB 6, fol.95a-96]. William purchased 150 acres adjoining his wife's land from her nephew William Lovina on 12 November 1728 [DB G:110]. He was taxable in the Southern Branch District of Norfolk County near Deep Creek from 1730 to 1732 (with John Staple in his household), from 1733 to 1736, and in 1750 with his unnamed wife and son John Bass [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1730-50, 11, 30, 64, 97, 133, 163, 190]. On 18 March 1736/7 William and Sarah sold 48 acres on the Southern Branch of the Elizabeth River to Thomas Deal, explaining in the deed that it was land "that Major Nichols gave unto the said Sarah Bass before her marriage to the sd. Wm. Bass" [DB 12:188]. He appeared before the county clerk on 20 September 1742, three days after his father's will was proved, and obtained a certificate similar to the one obtained by his father:

William Bass, the Bearer, tall, swarthy, dark eyes, weight abt. 13 stone, scar on back of left hand, is of English & Indian descent with no admixture of negro blood, numbered as a Nansemun by his own Choosing. The sd. Bass dwells in this County and hath a good name for his industry and honesty.

William2 died 20 October 1751 [Bell, Bass Families of the South, 15, 13]. Administration on his estate was granted to John Bass on 17 April 1752, and the appraisal of his estate was recorded in Norfolk County on 19 July 1756 [Orders 1750-3, 82; 1755-59, 77]. On 14 March 1757 Sarah Bass and John Bass ("Son of Sarah") and his wife Elizabeth sold another 50 acres of her land on the north side of the head of Deep Creek, the southern branch of the Elizabeth River adjoining John Bass's line, "being part of a Tract of two hundred Acres of Land given the Above mentiond Sarah Bass by Will of Majr Nichols" [DB 18:41-2b]. Sarah's death on 2 October 1762 at the age of eighty years and the births of William and Sarah's children were recorded in the Bass family papers [Bell, Bass Families of the South, 13]. William and Sarah's children were

i. Sarah1, born say 1727, taxable in May 1743. Her father William Bass petitioned the Norfolk County court on 20 May 1743 to exempt her from the tax on free African American and Indian women because of her weak constitution, and the court agreed to exempt her during her indisposition [Orders 1742-46, 37].

14      ii. John6, born 20 February 1731.

15      iii. William4, born say 1733.

16      iv. Joseph3, born say 1738.

v. Thomas3, born say 1740, taxable in Norfolk County with (his brother) Joseph Bass in 1778 and 1780 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 267, 284]. He married Sally Butler, 14 March 1796 Norfolk County bond, Thomas Deal surety, March 1796 marriage by Rev. Arthur Emmerson. He was taxable in Norfolk County from 1783 to 1790 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 430, 466, 525, 561, 638, 678]. He may have been the father of Jacob Bass (born about 1778) who registered in Petersburg on 23 September 1800: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet four inches high, twenty two years old, short brown hair & much pitted with the small pox - born free in Norfolk County & raised in Prince George County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 208]. He was a "free Mulatto man" charged in Petersburg on 17 June 1800 with stealing a trunk of shoes valued at 40 pounds from the store of Oliver Fuller. He was found not guilty of felony but guilty of the misdemeanor of receiving stolen goods and was discharged on 4 August 1800 [Hustings Court Minute Book 1797-1800, n.p.].

 

6.    John4 Bass (Edward1, John1), born say 1716, died before his father's will was written on 17 July 1748. Elijah may have been his son since his grandfather gave him "land where my late son John dwelt." His son was probably

17      i. Elijah1, born say 1743.

 

7.    Benjamin1 Bass (Edward1, John1), born say 1722, was the executor of his father's Northampton County will by which he received 125 acres where his father was living on Quarter Swamp in Northampton County [Original at N.C. Archives]. He moved to Granville County where he bought 103 acres on Fishing Creek on 7 March 1758 [DB C-2:429]. On 4 April 1758 he sold 50 acres of his Northampton County land and a month later on 22 May 1758 bought 50 acres adjoining his land in Northampton from his brother Samuel [DB 2:460, 461]. In addition to the 125 acres he received by his father's will he had title to another 150 acres since on 10 February 1759 he sold 275 acres of his land in Northampton County which his father had purchased in 1743 and 1744 [DB 3:53].

In 1761 he was taxable in Oxford District, Granville County, with his wife Mary and brother James on 3 "Black polls," and he and his wife and children were taxable in the remaining colonial tax lists for Oxford District. On 10 November 1764 he purchased 50 acres in Northampton County near the Maple Spring Hills from his brother James [Granville DB H:63]. On 19 November 1772 Rodey Bass, a five-year-old orphan, was bound as an apprentice to him [CR 044.101.2-7]. Perhaps she was his grandchild. In 1780 he was taxed on an assessment of 607 pounds in Oxford District, Granville County. In 1782 he was taxable on 103 acres, 2 horses, and 3 cattle. On 5 August 1782 he purchased an additional 480 acres in Granville for which he paid 1,000 pounds. He sold 100 acres of this to his son Benjamin Bass, Jr., for 5 pounds on 18 August 1783, sold 21 acres on 3 November 1794, sold 20 acres on 14 December 1797, and sold the remainder on 14 May 1798 [DB O:197, 331; P:100; Q:115, 199]. He and his wife Mary sold 100 acres in Northampton County at Urahaw Swamp on 26 July 1784 [DB 7:267]. He was head of a Tar River household of 7 males and 4 females in the state census of 1786. His son Absalom was charged with his tax in Tar River District in 1797 and 1798 [Tax List 1796-1802, 132]. He purchased 119 acres on Falling Creek in Halifax County, North Carolina, from John Richardson on 22 April 1799 [DB 18:460]. His children can be identified from the Granville County tax lists. They were

i. Selah, born about 1750 since she was first taxable in 1762 in Samuel Benton's list for Oxford and Fishing Creek Districts. She was probably the Sealia Mitchell, wife of Archibald Mitchell, who was taxed in his household in the 1767 list of Stephen Jett.

ii. Sally, born about 1752 since she was first taxable in 1764 in Samuel Benton's list. She was called Cary Bass in the 24 November 1801 Halifax County deed by which she sold 17 acres "which had belonged to her father Benjamin Bass" to John Richardson, Jr. She was called Sarah Bass (daughter of Benjamin Bass) in her 22 March 1802 Granville County marriage bond to John Richardson, Absolem Bass bondsman.

iii. Winney, born about 1752 since she was first taxable in 1764 in Samuel Benton's list. Her bastard child Jacob was bound to Lewis Anderson, Junior, who she married about 1767 [CR 044.101.2].

iv. Hardy, born about 1755 since he was first taxable in the summary list for 1767. On 23 December 1788 he married Nancy Hines, Granville County bond with Reuben Bass bondsman. In 1790 he was taxable on 100 acres and one poll in Oxford District, and in 1797 he was taxable on only poll tax. He was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800. He and Thornton Pettiford were paid on 5 May 1807 for attending seven days as witnesses in the suit of Fanny Goff against Molly Lee in Petersburg [Hustings Court Minute Book 1805-8].

v. Benjamin3, Jr., born about 1756 since he was first taxable in the 1768 list of Stephen Jett. He married Milley Pettiford, 3 January 1781 Granville County bond with Reuben Bass bondsman. He bought 100 acres in Tar River District from his father in 1783 [DB O:331]. He was taxable in Granville County in Tar River District on one poll and his 100 acres in 1785 and in 1798 [Tax List 1796-1802, 132]. He was head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800. Perhaps one of his ancestors was the Benjamin Bass who was counted in the 1850 Indiana census in Marion Township, Owen County: a forty-seven-year-old "Mulatto" with $1,000 personal estate, living with Delila Bass, both born in North Carolina [household #187].

vi. Morning, born about 1756 since she was first taxable in 1768.

vii. Absalom, born say 1760, not mentioned in the early tax records but taxable in Granville County in 1787 on his father's land. He married Patsy Haynes, 15 January 1794 Granville County bond with Benjamin Bass surety. He was head of a Granville County household of 7 "other free" in 1800.

18      viii. ?Reuben2, born say 1761.

ix. ?Prissy, born say 1764, married Jesse Day, 6 November 1782 Granville County bond, Solomon Walker bondsman.

x. ?Milly, who had an unnamed "base born child" by Jesse Chavers. Benjamin and Absalom Bass were her security in November 1794 Granville County court [Minutes 1792-95, 197-8], and Clement Bunch posted bond in December 1798 for a bastard child he had by her [Camin, N.C. Bastardy Bonds, 87].

 

8.    Sampson/ Samuel2 Bass (Edward1, John1), born say 1724, sold the 50 acres he inherited from his father to his brother Benjamin on 22 May 1758 [Northampton DB 2:460]. He was taxable in Granville County in Nathaniel Harris's list in 1758 and in John Pope's list for Bare Swamp District in 1762, called Sampson Bass. This part of Granville County became Bute County in 1764 and Sampson bought 100 acres in Bute County on the south side of Cedar Creek on Beaverdam Branch from William Bass on 26 January 1771 [Warren County DB 3:224]. He was a resident of Brunswick County, Virginia, on 2 April 1765 when he gave 270 acres in Northampton County near the Virginia border to his son Burwell Bass of Northampton County [DB 4:463]. He was taxed on 2,062 pounds property and 12 slaves in Northampton County in 1780 [LP 46.1]. He was called Samuel, Sr., when he bought 200 acres near the Virginia border on 4 June 1784 [DB 7:276]. His 13 August 1787 Northampton County will was proved in December 1790 [WB 1:408]. He left land and six slaves to his wife Sarah and children, most of whom were considered white. They were

i. Ann2.

ii. Herod.

iii. Susanna Snipes.

iv. Matthew.

v. Samuel3, who received a slave by a Halifax County deed of gift from his father on 14 June 1790, "1 negro man Nat, now in possession of my grandson Burgess Bass which sd negro I lent my son Burrell Bass some years ago" [DB 17:213]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [NC:4].

vi. Burwell.

vii. Lucy Peebles.

viii. Phebe Jordan.

 

9.    Edward3 Bass (Edward1, John1), born say 1728, received 50 acres in Northampton County by his father's will. He sold this and another 20 acres in Northampton County on 15 May 1758 [DB 2:462]. By 1761 he was taxable in the Granville County list for Oxford District with wife Tamer--probably Tamer Anderson, daughter of his neighbor Lewis Anderson, a taxable in her father's household in John Sallis' 1754 tax list. She was also taxed with her father in 1755, but did not appear in his household in the next extant list of 1757 [CR 44.701.19]. On 22 December 1762 Edward purchased 100 acres in Granville County from George Anderson [DB F:281]. On 8 April 1767 he purchased 200 acres at the head of Fishing Creek in Bute County [Warren County DB 1:304] and sold this land twelve years later on 7 May 1779 [Warren DB 7:230]. In 1782 he was taxable in Granville on 100 acres, a horse, and 14 cattle. He had 11 persons in his Raglands District, Granville County household in the 1786 state census. On 9 November 1792 he bought an additional 206 acres on Boling's Creek in Granville for 75 pounds and a month later on 10 December 1792 sold his 100 acres on the north prong of Fishing Creek for 100 pounds [DB N:165; P:77]. His 17 March 179_ will was proved in Granville County court in November 1800 [WB 5:116]. He mentioned his wife Tamer and his children:

i. Stephen, born about 1758, probably the third person taxable in his father's household in the 1771 summary list. He was taxable on one poll in Granville in 1785, 1790 and 1791, and in Oxford District in 1801 [Tax List 1796-1802, 284].

ii. Lewis, taxable on one poll in Oxford District in 1804 and 1806 [Tax List 1803-1809, 79, 177].

iii. Truateny(?). Perhaps this was the Truenty Bass who was paid 3 pounds, 8 shillings for her attendance in the suit brought by Hardy Bass against William Taborn in Granville County court on 11 August 1786 [Minutes 1786-87].

iv. Darling, married Rhoda Anderson, 7 July 1797 Granville County bond with William Mitchell bondsman. He was head of a Granville County household of 2 "other free" in 1800, 3 in 1810 [NC:904], and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:1]. He was taxed on one poll in Oxford District in 1800, 260 acres in 1801, and he was taxable on poll tax for himself and Jason Bass in 1803 [Tax List 1796-1802, 230, 284; 341; 1803-09, 31]. From 1809 to 1820 he was taxable on 109 acres on Bolings Creek in Oxford District. His 10 November 1839 Granville County will was proved in August 1845. He lent all his property to his wife Rodey and after her death, to Henry Anderson who was her son by Jesse Chavis before her marriage to Darling [WB 16:334].

19      v. Prudence, born say 1768.

vi. Mary Ann, perhaps the Mariah Bass who married Edward Mitchell, 5 January 1795 Granville County bond.

vii. Tamer, married John Roe, 2 December 1801 Granville County bond with George Pettiford bondsman. John Rowe married second, Sally Pendergrass, 2 March 1802 Person County bond.

viii. Mordecai, neglected to give in his list of tithables in Wake County in 1794 [MFCR 099.701.1, frame 212], married first, Nancy Askew, 31 October 1799 Wake County bond with Lewis Pettiford bondsman, and second, Nancy Chavis, 13 December 1803 Granville County bond with George Pettiford bondsman. He was taxable on 1 poll in Oxford District in 1806 [Tax List 1803-09, 177]. He was a "Negro" head of a Guilford County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

ix. Dempsey, married Phoebe Day, 4 October 1808 Granville County bond, Reuben Day bondsman. He was head of a Granville County household of 4 "other free" in 1800, 6 in 1810 [NC:858], and 3 "free colored" in Ledge Neck District in 1820 [NC:17]. His 4 December 1827 Granville County will was proved in February 1828. He left all his estate to his wife Phereba [WB 10:405].

x. Justina(?).

xi. Jason.

 

10.    John3 Bass (John2, William1, John1), born say 1700, purchased 200 acres on 10 April 1722 near Urahaw Swamp in the part of Bertie County which became Northampton County in 1742. He purchased 100 acres on Plaquet Branch of Antonkey Marsh, 150 acres on 17 January 1727, and received a patent for 410 acres south of Bear Swamp on 2 August 1727 [DB A:108; B:348, 360]. On 7 February 1736 the Bertie County court fined him for selling brandy without a license [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, I:199]. He was the executor of his father's 1732 will. On 16 August 1736 he bought 200 acres at the mouth of Beech Swamp in Edgecombe County [DB 1:164]. He sold 410 acres of his land in Northampton County to George Anderson on 13 January 1738 [Bertie DB E:530]. He bought 150 acres in Edgecombe on 16 December 1740 [DB F:190] and sold another 400 acres in Northampton by deeds of 2 October and 30 December 1742 [DB 1:40,56]. He was a slave owner by August 1742 when he proved rights on five "whites" and 3 "blacks" in Northampton County [SS 906 by North Carolina Genealogy, 1825]. He voted for Joseph Sikes in the Northampton County election of 1762 [SS 837 by NCGSJ XII:170]. His 14 June 1777 Northampton County will was proved in September 1777. He left 16 slaves and 600 acres to his children [WB 1:292-4]. Most of his children, who were very prosperous, married whites and were considered white. His children were

20      i. Thomas2, born say 1723.

ii. John5, born say 1726, executor of his father's will. His 4 October 1786 Halifax County will was proved November the same year. He left land and slaves to his wife Ann which was to revert to his brothers, Jacob and Isaac, at her death [WB 3:116].

21      iii. Jacob1, born say 1728.

22      iv. Isaac, born before 1745.

v. Abraham, purchased 700 acres in Edgecombe County on the south side of Betty's Branch on 16 October 1765 [DB O:163]. On 8 February 1779 while residing in Nash County he sold 240 acres in Bute and Nash counties. This was part of 549 acres he was granted in Edgecombe County on 9 December 1761. Jean Bass witnessed the deed [Franklin County DB 1:20].

23      vi. Jethro1, born say 1734.

vii. Drury.

viii. Alice Earp, named her grandchildren and left the residue of her estate to Ruth Byrd by her 13 October 1796 Northampton County will, Elizabeth Walden, John Earp, and William Earp witnesses [WB 2:133]. The Earp family of Northampton County was considered white.

ix. Uridice.

x. Elizabeth3 Brittle/ Bittle, wife of John Bittle whose children were named in his 12 January 1787 Northampton County will [WB 1:377]. William Bittle was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [NC:74].

 

11.    Edward2 Bass (John2, William1, John1), born say 1710, received the "manor Plantation" by his father's will. He purchased land by deeds proved in Dobbs County April 1750 to April 1754 [DB 2:409] and January 1777 to April 1779 [DB 11:311]. His eldest child was

i. Wright1, born say 1730, purchased land by deed proved in Dobbs County between April 1765 and April 1769 [DB 7:437] and by a deed from Arthur Bass proved in Dobbs County between 1746 and 1810 [DB 22:442]. He was a Dobbs County taxable in 1769 [SS 837, p.5A, by NCGSJ XV:74]. He was counted as white in the 1790 census for Georgetown District, Prince Georges Parish, South Carolina. He was described in the 29 June 1786 court record of the estate of his uncle Moses as "eldest son of Edward Bass, dec., who was the eldest brother of Moses Bass [South Carolina DB S-5:283, 284].

 

12.    William3 Bass (John2, William1, John1), born say 1712, sold the land he inherited in Northampton County to John Bass on 30 December 1742 [DB 2:185]. He was one of the first members of the Bass family in Granville County where he was taxed in the list of Jonathan White in 1749. In 1761 he was taxable with his son Thomas in Oxford District. On 19 November 1762 he purchased 200 acres on the south side of Cedar Creek near the Beaver Dam Branch from Thomas Huland (Huelin) [DB F:441]. He was a "Black" taxable in Granville County in John Pope's list for St. John's Parish, Bare Swamp District, in 1762. Bute County was formed from this part of Granville County in 1764, and in 1771 he was a Bute County taxable in the list of Philemon Hawkins on 5 "Black" tithes: himself, his wife, daughter "Honner," and sons Ben and John [CR 015.70001, p.12]. He may have been the William Bass who appeared in Granville County court on 7 April 1770 as the "next Friend" of Olive Bass when she sued Jean Tylor, alias Mitchell [Minutes 1754-70, 202]. William sold 100 acres on the south side of Cedar Creek to Sampson Bass on 26 January 1771 and another 100 acres adjoining this on 17 September 1771 [Warren County DB 3:224; 4:263]. His children were

i. ?Simon1, not identified as William's son, but listed adjacent to him in Philemon Hawkins' Bute County list of taxables, taxed on 4 "Black" tithes for himself, his unnamed wife, son James, and (daughter?) Elizabeth.

ii. Thomas4, born about 1749 since he was taxable in 1761 in his father's Oxford District household. He was an overseer, taxable in Nathan Thomas's household in the 1771 Bute County list of Philemon Hawkins [CR 015.70001, p.4].

24      iii. ?Frederick1, born say 1750.

iv. Honor1, born say 1752, taxable in 1771 in Bute County.

v. Benjamin2, born say 1754, taxable in 1771 in Bute County.

vi. John8, born before 1760, taxable in 1771 in Bute County.

 

13.    Lovey Bass (John2, William1, John1), born say 1720, had three illegitimate children bound to George Anderson in Granville County [CR 044.101.2]. She may have been George's mistress. He gave her two cows and calves by his May 1771 Granville County will and gave his plantation to her son Nathan who was living in his household. He gave his wife and children only one shilling apiece [Original in County, not recorded]. Lovey's children were

25      i. Nathan2, born in 1752.

ii. Margaret, born about 1756, twelve years old when she was bound apprentice to George Anderson on 3 August 1768. He gave her a young mare by his May 1771 Granville County will.

iii. ?Wright2, born say 1758, married Tabathy Snelling, 12 November 1781 Granville County bond, Drury Pettiford bondsman. On 8 May 1783 he bought 35 acres in Granville County joining Nathaniel Bass and Tabor and another 35 acres on 14 April 1794 [DB N:177; P:53]. He was taxed on 80 acres and one poll in Fishing Creek District next to Nathan Bass in 1796 [Tax List 1796-1802, 11]. He was head of a Granville County household of 9 "other free" in 1800. He was taxed on his 70 acres in Fishing Creek in 1804 and taxed in Fort Creek District on 222-1/2 acres, 2 free polls, and 2 slaves in 1805 [Tax List 1803-9, 55, 115]. He may have been the Wright Bass who was head of a Wilkes County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:545] and 4 "free colored" in Wayne County, Indiana, in 1830.

iv. Dicey1, born about 1766, a four-year-old "base born mulatto child of Lovey Bass" bound to Mary Anderson, wife of George Anderson, on 18 July 1770 [CR 44.101.2-7]. She may have been Lovey Bass's unnamed bastard child charged to Bartlet Tyler on 13 January 1767 [Camin, N.C. Bastardy Bonds, 87]. She married Drury Pettiford, 12 November 1781 Granville County bond.

 

14.   John6 Bass (William2, William1, John1), born 20 February 1731, purchased 50 acres on 8 July 1742 in Southern Branch Precinct of Norfolk County which was land "Thomas Deall bought of William Bass, the Father of John Bass" [DB 13:17a-18a]. John was sued in Norfolk County court by Richard Freeman on 15 November 1753, but the case was dismissed when both parties reached an agreement [Orders 1753-55, 2]. From 1751 to 1761 he was head of his own household in Colonel Craford's list of tithables for the Southern Branch District of Norfolk County from Batcheldor's Mill to Portsmouth near his brother William Bass. In 1752 John Murer was in his household; in 1756 and 1757 John Price was in his household; in 1761 John Bass was in his household, and in 1761 and 1765 he shared a household with his brother William [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 18, 41, 54, 88, 100, 115, 138, 174, 205]. He and Robert Kinder received a patent for 181 acres in Norfolk County near the head of Deep Creek adjoining Bass's own land on 30 August 1763, and he and his wife Elizabeth of Portsmouth Parish sold their 90 acre share of this land to Ebenezer Hall on 14 May 1764. And they sold a 50 acre tract adjoining this land to Ebenezer Hall on 14 May 1764 [DB 35:362: 21:86B, 200A]. John and his brother William4 Bass were sued for debt in Norfolk County court by Solomon Hodges on 16 November 1764 [Orders 1763-65, 162]. John and his wife Elizabeth and (his brother) Joseph Bass were taxable on 100 acres of land in the list for Portsmouth to New Mill Creek in 1766, 1767, with (John's daughter?) Sarah Bass in 1768, and by himself in 1770. On 19 April 1770 he appeared in court and declared that he had six or seven barrels of corn belonging to John Smith who was indebted to John Ivy [Orders 1768-71, 150, 158, 167]. He died 11 March 1771, and Elizabeth was taxable that year on a tithe and 100 acres and taxable in 1772 with (their son?) William Bass. She was charged with the tax for William in 1774 and for him and (her son?) John Bass in 1778 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 6, 44, 75, 121, 155, 186, 236, 266]. They were the parents of

i. Sarah3, born 13 October 1751. Her birth was also recorded in the register of Southern Branch Parish [WMQ 1:160].

26      ii. William5, born 23 June 1755.

iii. Mille, born 12 January 1758.

iv. John9, born 22 December 1763, taxable in Norfolk County in 1782 and 1783 but not in the subsequent lists [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frame 383, 427].

v. Giles, born 29 January 1764.

vi. Joshua1, born 21 March 1767, taxable in Norfolk County in 1787 and from 1791 to 1796 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frame 561; 1791-1812, frames 18, 35, 78, 98, 133].

 

15.    William4 Bass (William2, William1, John1), born say 1733, received a gun by his grandfather's 1 October 1740 Norfolk County will [WB H:8]. He was a taxable in the Norfolk County list for the Southern Branch District from Batcheldor's Mill to Portsmouth in the household of his father William Bass in 1751, in his own household from 1752 to 1754, in the household of his mother Sarah Bass, in 1756 and 1757, and in his own household in 1759. He was living with his brother John in 1761 and was head of a household with his wife Naomi and (his brother?) John Bass in 1765, taxable on three tithes and 100 acres in the district from Portsmouth to New Mill Creek with his wife Naomy from 1766 to 1768 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1751-65, 18, 41, 55, 88, 100, 115, 138, 174, 205; 1766-80, 6, 44, 75]. Naomy may have been the daughter of Joseph Hall who lived in Norfolk County in 1735 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1730-1750, 157]. Naomy Hall, born say 1743, was taxable in her father's Bertie County, North Carolina household in 1757 [CR 10.702.1, box 1]. William and his brother John6 Bass and John's wife Elizabeth sold 50 acres on the main road to Suffolk adjoining William's own land on 17 May 1764, and he and his wife Naomy sold 30 acres adjoining John Bass on the west side of Deep Creek beginning at the main road on 16 May 1771 [DB 21:238; 25:100]. John Ballentine sued him for a 4 pound, 10 shilling debt on 22 March 1771 [Orders 1768-71, 236]. He was taxable on a tithe and 100 acres in 1770 and a tithe and 70 acres in 1771 but may have been deceased by 10 June 1772 when Naomy was taxable in the household of her brother-in-law Joseph Bass [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 121, 155, 186]. The City of Norfolk Hustings Court dismissed his suit against Peter Warren on 21 July 1766 [Orders 1761-9, 109]. William and Naomy may have been the parents of

27      i. James2, born in August 1760.

28      ii. Willis1, born say 1763.

 

16.   Joseph3 Bass (William2, William1, John1), born say 1738, was tithable in the Norfolk County household of (his brother) John Bass from 1766 to 1768, with Ebenezer Hall in 1770, in his own household in 1771 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 6, 44, 75, 105, 155]. He was taxable in Norfolk County from 1782 to 1813: called a "M"(ulatto) in 1799, 1801, 1802 and 1807; living on Deep Creek in 1801 when he was counted in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" with (his deceased brother William's wife?) Naomy, Lydia, Julia and Polly Bass [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 383, 431, 467, 483, 525, 562, 638; 1791-1812, 295, 371, 427, 642; 1813-24, frame 16] and head of a Norfolk County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:822]. He was surety for the 7 May 1792 Norfolk County marriage of (his daughter?) Elizabeth Bass and Joseph Hall. On 22 June 1796 Robert Harris sued him in Norfolk County court for a debt of 6 pounds, 13 shillings [Orders 1796-7, 39, 66b]. On 24 August 1797 William Bass sued him over the right to 60 acres of land which he was a tenant on, and a jury found in William's favor on 18 June 1791 [Orders 1797-9, 69a]. He may have been the father of

i. Elizabeth, married Joseph Hall, 7 May 1792 Norfolk County bond, Joseph Bass surety, 10 May marriage [Ministers' Returns, 1787-1840, 11].

ii. Lydia, married John Manley in Norfolk County on 6 January 1806 [Ministers' Returns, 1787-1840, 36]. John was head of a Norfolk County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:814].

iii. Julia, born about 1785, listed in Joseph Bass's household in 1801, registered in Norfolk County on 19 August 1816: 5 feet 5-1/2 inches high, about 31 years of age, light complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 122].

iv. Polly, listed in Joseph Bass's household in 1801.

v. Joseph4, a "free Negro" who was hired out by order of the Norfolk County court on 22 June 1824 and 15 August 1825 because he did not pay his taxes [Minutes 18:310; 19:136-7].

 

17.    Elijah1 Bass (John4, Edward1, John1), born say 1743, was still living in Northampton County on 4 April 1758 when he was mentioned in a Bass family deed [DB 2:461]. He married Mary Bass, 13 February 1777 Bute County bond, Richard Scott bondsman. According to her application for his pension, they were married the following day. In 1780 he was living in Granville County where he was taxed on an assessment of 108 pounds in Oxford District. He enlisted in the Tenth Regiment of the North Carolina Line on 10 February 1781 as a substitute for Ebenezar Riggan and was killed in the battle of Eutaw Springs on 8 September 1781 [M804-2038, frames 533, 528]. His children were called orphans of Elijah Bass on 4 February 1781 when the court bound them out to Benjamin Bass [Owen, Granville County Notes, vol. V]. After his death his wife Mary married Benjamin Richardson on 14 February 1783 with Philip Pettiford as bondsman [M804-2038, frame 531]. Elijah's children bound out on 4 February 1781 were

i. John11, born about 1772, married Olive Richardson, 8 December 1798 Granville County bond, Absalom Bass bondsman.

ii. Phatha, born about 1775.

iii. Sarah4, born about 1777, married John Richardson, 22 March 1802 Granville County bond, Absalom Bass bondsman.

iv. David, born about 1779.

 

18.    Reuben2 Bass (Benjamin1, Edward1, John1), born say 1761, may have been one of seven males in Benjamin Bass, Sr.'s Granville County household in the 1786 state census. He married Polly Hines, 23 December 1788 Granville County bond with Hardy Bass bondsman. He was head of a Wake County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [NC:753]. He was called a "free man of color" when he and his daughter Lydia Pettiford petitioned the Wake County court on 15 April 1815 to bind her children to him. His child was

i. Lydia, born say 1779, married Lewis2 Pettiford. She had two children before her marriage, Thomas born about 1796, and Ned born about 1797. She asked the Wake County court to apprentice them to her father because her husband was hiring them out against her will [CR 099.101.1].

 

19.    Prudence Bass (Edward3, Edward1, John1), born say 1768, posted her own Granville County bastardy bond in April 1791, and in January 1794 Edward Bass and Jacob Anderson paid the bond for a child she had by Jesse Day [Camin, N.C. Bastardy Bonds, 87]. She bound her children Jethro and Cullen to her brother Jason in 1801 [Bell, Bass Families of the South, 159]. Her children were

i. Jethro4, born April 1787, married Polly Mitchell, 3 April 1809 Granville County bond, Henry Anderson bondsman. Jethro and Polly were living in household #874 of Harrison Township, Vigo County, Indiana in 1850.

ii. Cullen, born May 1795.

 

20.    Thomas2 Bass (John3, John2, William1, John1), born say 1723, was not mentioned in his father's will because he predeceased him. He purchased 240 acres in Bertie County near Amos Grant's patent line on 24 December 1741 and sold this land on 29 November 1746 [DB F:28; G:6]. In 1751 he was taxable on himself and a slave, Nan, in the Bertie County summary list filed with the central government [CCR 190]. In 1757 he and (his brother?) Isaac Bass were taxables in the list of John Hill, Esqr. On 20 May 1763 he purchased an additional 100 acres adjacent to his land near the Cashie River in Bertie County [DB K:328]. And he and his son John were taxed as "Free Mulattos" that year in the Bertie tax list of John Hill [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. His 20 March 1764 Bertie County will, proved in May 1764, named his wife Thomason and his children: John, Jacob, Mary, and Isbell. Jeremiah and Embry Bunch were executors [WB A:68]. Thomason was probably "Tamerson Bass" who was mentioned in the 21 April 1775 Bertie will of her father Henry Bunch. Thomason was listed as white in the 1769 Bertie County tax list of David Standley, but was a "free Malletor" in Jonathan Standley's 1770 list and David Standley's 1771 list [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. Their children were counted as white in the 1790 census and thereafter. They were

i. John7, born say 1746, taxable in his father's household in 1763.

ii. Jacob2.

iii. Mary4.

iv. Isbell.

v. Sally, called "orphan" of Thomas Bass in the inventory of Thomas Bass's estate by Tomason Bass [Gammon, Record of Estates, Bertie County II, 8].

 

21.    Jacob1 Bass (John3, John2, William1, John1), born say 1725, purchased 100 acres near Urahaw Swamp in Northampton County on 6 February 1746 and sold this land two years later on 4 March 1748 [DB 1:284, 342]. He purchased 150 acres in Granville County on the north side of Swift Creek on 7 March 1757 [DB C:202]. On 20 February 1748 he purchased 200 acres on Tumbling Creek in the part of Edgecombe County which became Nash County in 1777, and he and his wife Ann sold this land on 19 January 1761 [DB 3:319; OO:212]. A few weeks later on 8 February 1761 he purchased 50 acres on the north side of Sandy Creek in Granville County and another 140 acres in the same area a year later on 8 February 1762 [DB E:94; D:94]. He was taxable in 1762 in Goodwins District with son Alexander and slave Dick. This part of Granville County became Bute County in 1764, and Jacob purchased 120 acres on Sandy Creek in Bute County on 3 September 1770 and 125 acres on both sides of Sandy Creek on 1 February 1772. He gave 2 acres of this land to the Baptist Society of Sandy Creek on 16 October 1770 and he and his wife Ann sold another 245 acres on Carraway Branch on 10 May 1775 [Warren County DB 3:6, 526; 5:83, 246]. He was taxable in William Person's 1771 Bute County tax list with son Theophilus and slaves Dick, Bob, and Mollin(?) [CR 015.70001]. In 1771 he and Francis Wells were paid 13 pounds, 10 shillings for building the bridge over Sandy Creek [Bute County Minutes 1767-76, 161]. He was head of a Franklin County household of 7 whites and 10 slaves in 1790 [NC:58]. His children were

i. Alexander, born about 1750, since he was taxable in 1762.

ii. Theophilus, born before 1760, since he was taxable in 1771. He was head of a Franklin County household of 11 whites and 5 slaves in 1790 [NC:58].

iii. ?Jacob3, Jr., head of a Franklin County household of 6 whites and 3 slaves in 1790 [NC:58].

iv. ?Riddick, head of a Franklin County household of 4 whites and 3 slaves in 1790 [NC:58].

 

22.    Isaac Bass (John3, John2, William1, John1), born say 1738, was taxed in his own Bertie County household in the constable's list of Michael Collins in 1756. He married Nancy Bunch, Thomason Bass's sister. He purchased 181 acres in the fork of Peachtree and Back Swamp on 18 February 1754 in what was then Edgecombe County near the present Nash-Franklin County border [DB 4:559]. His 27 December 1800 Nash County will, proved February 1801, left nine slaves and land to his wife Nancy and children who were considered white [WB 1:136]. His children were

i. Cader, the major beneficiary of the 1775 will of his grandfather Henry Bunch. He would not have been mentioned in Isaac's 1800 Nash County will since he predeceased him in Bertie County in 1791. He was taxed on 450 acres and a slave in the 1779 Bertie tax list of Wynn's and King's District [CR 10.702.1, box 2]. He posted bond for a bastard child he had by Sarah Farmer in August 1787 [Camin, N.C. Bastardy Bonds, 8]. Sarah was the daughter of Joseph Farmer, a "free Mulatto" taxable in his own household in the 1763 Bertie list of John Hill.

ii. Jethro2, who received 150 acres by his father's will.

iii. Jesse.

iv. Isaac.

v. John10.

vi. Augustine.

vii. a daughter, married ___ Davenport.

viii. Nise Rogers.

ix. Louicy Lawrence.

 

23.    Jethro1 Bass (John3, John2, William1, John1), born say 1734, received a deed of gift of 200 acres on the north side of Urahaw Swamp in Northampton County from his father John3 Bass on 24 February 1755 [DB 2:185]. He purchased a total of 740 acres of land in the same area between 1761 and 1777 [DB 4:121, 127, 128, 179; 5:11; 6:125, 326]. He and his wife Susannah sold 50 acres of this land on 12 February 1773 [DB 5:265]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 8 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1790 [NC:74]. His 27 September 1794 Northampton County will, proved March 1795, left land and slaves to his children, but left his wife Elizabeth only the labor of one slave until son Jethro became twenty-one [WB 2:73]. Elizabeth challenged the will in Northampton court when it was proved on 2 March 1795 [Minutes 1792-96, 147, 166]. His children named in his will were

i. Council, born say 1760, married Patty Griffin, 4 May 1782 Bertie County bond, Cader Bass bondsman. Council was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1790 [NC:74] and counted as white in 1810 with 8 slaves [NC:715]. His 2 September 1830 Northampton County will, proved December the same year, left twenty-two slaves to his heirs [WB 4:74].

ii. John Redick, probably born after 1770, was to receive schooling according to his father's 1794 will. He received land on the road adjoining John Pinner and the Urahaw Swamp by the division of the estate of his brother Burwell Bass in March 1798 [Gammon, Record of Estates Northampton County, I:24]. John was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:715] and 9 "free colored" and 2 slaves in 1820 [NC:218]. His 9 April 1828 Northampton County will named his wife Rhody and children: Uriah, Peggy, Sterling, Lovel, Mary, Martha, James3, John12, Gideon, and William6. He stipulated that after moving to Indiana the following Fall, Dolphin and James Roberts were to sell his horses and divide the proceeds among his children [WB 4:40].

iii. Burwell, born after 1774 since he was still a minor in 1795. He died before the March 1798 session of the Northampton County court when the land he received by his father's will was divided among his sister Merica and brothers John Redick and Jethro [Gammon, Record of Estates Northampton County, I:24].

iv. Jethro3, born after 1774 since he was still a minor in 1795. He was head of a white Northampton County household with 20 slaves in 1810 [NC:715].

v. Maria/ Merica.

 

24.    Frederick1 Bass (William3, John2, William1, John1), born say 1750, and his wife Olive sold 200 acres on the southwest side of the Pee Dee River on the Flat Fork of Brown Creek in Anson County on 11 August 1777 and purchased 30 acres in the same area on 5 August 1778 [DB 7:196; 4:24]. Olive appeared in Granville County court on 7 April 1770 with (her father-in-law?) William Bass who was called her "next Friend" when she sued Jean Tylor, alias Mitchell. Olive was awarded damages of one penny [Minutes 1754-70, 202]. Frederick was a buyer at the sale of the Anson County estate of Jesse Ivy on 29 January 1785 [Holcomb, Anson County, North Carolina, 138]. He sold 150 acres on the Pee Dee River to (his son?) Frederick Bass, Jr., on 28 February 1797 and 100 acres to (his son?) Simon Bass later that year on 30 September [DB F&G:51, 74]. He was head of an Anson County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [NC:37], 8 in 1800 [NC:204] and 10 in 1810 [NC:33]. His children were probably

i. Frederick2, Jr., born say 1770, head of an Anson County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [NC:35] and counted a second time in Anson, head of a household of two "other free" and a white female [NC:36]. He and his wife Nancy sold their land on the Pee Dee River on 9 August 1799 [DB F&G:39].

ii. Simon2, born before 1776, head of an Anson County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [NC:204] and 9 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:12] and 5 in 1830. He purchased 20 acres adjoining Frederick Bass, Jr., from Letitia Bass on 17 January 1800 and sold this land on 17 August 1801 [DB H-2:177].

29      iii. Elijah2, born say 1775.

iv. Letitia, who sold 20 acres of land adjoining Frederick Bass, Jr., to Simon Bass on 17 January 1800 [DB F&G:66].

v. Olive, head of an Anson County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [NC:204].

 

25.    Nathan2 Bass (Lovey, John2, William1, John1), born in 1752, was probably the illegitimate son of Lovey Bass and George Anderson. He was bound apprentice to George Anderson on 3 August 1768. However, he had already been in George's household in 1767, taxable in Stephen Jett's list [CR 44.701.19]. George gave him his plantation by his Granville County will, proved May 1771. In 1771 he was head of his own household of 3 taxables. On 1 February 1779 Thornton Pettiford was bound to him as an apprentice planter, and the following day he married Sarah Bass, Granville County bond with Hardy Bass bondsman. In 1782 he was taxable on 95 acres, 4 horses and 3 cattle in Oxford District, and in 1786 he had 4 males and 5 females in his household in Raglands District. On 9 October 1787 he bought 170 acres on Fishing Creek adjoining Hugh Snelling for 50 pounds from Lawrence Pettiford. On 16 April 1796 he sold 50 acres on Fishing Creek to John Tyner [DB O:537; P:284]. Tyner may have been his brother-in-law since Nathan paid his tax for him in 1808 and 1817 [Tax List 1803-09, 275]. He was head of Granville County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 and 10 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:9]. He married, second, Martha Bass, 19 June 1806 Granville County bond, Jesse Bass bondsman. His Granville County will, probated in 1837, mentioned his wife Martha, children, son-in-law Lewis Pettiford ("who married my daughter Dinah"), and grandchild Lemuel Valentine [WB 14:20]. His estate papers list children: Warner, Dolly/ Polley, Dicy/ Dinah, Honor, Jesse, Sally, and Patsy [CR 044.508.8]. His children were

i. Warner.

ii. Dolly, married Elijah Valentine, 28 June 1806 Granville County bond, Benjamin Mitchell bondsman.

iii. Dinah/Disey2, born about 1793, married Lewis Pettiford, 23 December 1809 Granville County bond, Elijah Valentine bondsman. Dicy was a fifty-seven-year-old woman listed with Lewis Anderson in the 1850 Granville County Census.

iv. Honor2, married Major Jones, 25 August 1814 Granville County bond, Elijah Valentine bondsman.

v. Jesse.

vi. Sally Pettiford.

vii. Patsy, married Henry Taborn.

 

26.    William5 Bass (John6, William2, William1, John1) born 23 June 1755, was taxable in Norfolk County in the household of his mother Elizabeth Bass in 1772 and 1774, in his own household in 1780 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1766-80, 155, 186, 284] and taxable in Norfolk County from 1782 to 1810: taxable on a slave, a horse and 9 cattle in 1787; a planter on Deep Creek in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" and head of a household with males John, Andrew and William Bass and females (his wife) Lucy and Betsey Bass in 1801; taxable on 2 tithes in 1801, 3 in 1803, 4 from 1804 to 1807 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90, frames 383, 431, 484, 525, 561, 622, 638, 678; 1791-1812, frames 371, 427, 461, 479, 555, 574, 674, 684, 720, 738]. He was head of a Norfolk County household of 7 persons in 1785 [VA:93] and 8 "other free" in 1810 (called William Bass, Sr.) [VA:822]. On 27 May 1797 he recorded a certificate of Indian descent in Norfolk County which is obviously incorrect and conflicts with nearly all earlier Bass family documents:

This doth certify that William Bass, son of John Bass and grandson of William Bass, is of English and Indian descent and is not a Negroe nor yt a Mulattoe as by some falsely and malitiously stated. His late Mother Sarah Ann Bass was a vertious woman of Indian descent, a daughter of Symon Lovina and Joan Tucker lawfully begotten. Sd Joan Tucker was a sister of Robin Tucker a Christian Indian of ye Nansemund nation. The sd. William Bass, the elder, was a son of Mary Bass and William Senr. Mary was a daughter of Great Peter, King of ye Nansemunds. These are ___mon (common?) knowledge. All the Basses of this County descend from Captn Nathaniell Basse, as satisfactorily proved by the records preserved. May ye 17, 1797. Test: Wm. Portlock Junr. [Library of Virginia Accession no.26371].

William and his wife Lucy recorded the births of their children John and William in the Bass family bible [Bell, Bass Families of the South, 13]. On 24 August 1797 he sued Joseph Bass, his tenant on 60 acres of land, over the right to the land, and a jury found in his favor on 18 June 1791 [Orders 1797-9, 69a]. He was living in Portsmouth Parish on 19 July 1798 when he made a Norfolk County deed of gift to Willis Bass "of Hertford County" for 30 acres at the head of the Southern Branch and Deep Creek adjoining Farley near the main road and the dividing line between he land of Willis Bass and John Gibbs (Bass). The deed was witnessed by Wright Bowers, Thomas Archer and James Newton and partially proved on 17 December 1798 but not fully proved by James Newton until 18 December 1809 [DB 45:1]. He (making his mark) made a 6 May 1809 Norfolk County will, proved 17 July 1809, by which he gave his son John Gibbs Bass the upper part of his land adjoining William Cofield and Evans Ridge, a yoke of young steers and a horse; gave his son William Bass half his manor plantation and houses near the main road adjoining Deep Creek, William Cofield and Tucker, a yoke of twin yearlings, and his old mare; gave son Andrew Basss the other half of his manor plantation, a young mare and a yoke of steers; gave Elizabeth Gibbs a feather bed, cow, calf, sow, pigs, a linen wheel, looking glass, skillet and flat iron; gave his loving wife Lucy Bass the use all his property not willed away and his houses, orchard and field belonging thereto during her widowhood and then to be divided between sons John Bass, William Bass and Andrew Bass. Willis Bass and Thomas Newton were executors on $1,500 bond [WB 4:122-3]. William and Lucy's children were

i. John12, born 1 August 1782, "son of William Bass and Lucy his wife." He was called John Gibbs Bass, "free man of colour," on 18 August 1812 when he married Salley Price, "free woman of colour," 18 August 1812 Norfolk County bond, Willis Bass surety [Marriage Bonds 1812, 12-52]. He and his wife Sally sold 20 acres on the north side of Deep Creek and the head of the Southern Branch, bounded on the south by his their own land, on 5 July 1814 for 30 pounds [DB 46:250]. He was called a "Molatto man, a free man of color," in Norfolk County court on 17 June 1822 when Joseph Lewis, a labourer, was charged with shooting him on 27 May 1822, which caused his death the following day. Lewis was sent to the Superior Court for trial at which no members of the Bass family testified because Lewis was a white man [Minutes 17:291-2, 325-6]. He was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to eighteen years imprisonment [Superior court Orders 1820-25, 233, 238]. William's wife Sally may have been the Sally Bass, a "mulatto woman," who charged Asa Price, a "mulatto man," in court on 18 June 1822 with a breach of the peace [Minutes 17:302].

ii. William6, born 4 April 1784, married Elizabeth Perkins, 2 November 1812 Norfolk County bond, Adam Perkins surety [Marriage Bonds, 1812, 12-64]. He registered in Norfolk County on 15 July 1833 after the "not Negro" law was passed: 51 yrs, 5 ft 11, white complexion man of Indian descent [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 902]. On 19 August 1833 the Norfolk County court certified that Eliza Bass ("wife of Wm Bass, son of Wm Bass") was "not a free negro or Mulatto but of Indian descent" upon "satisfactory evidence of white persons" [Minutes 24:43-4]. He (making his mark) left a 2 March 1847 Norfolk County will, proved 21 February 1848, by which he gave 18 acres of land adjoining Andrew Bass to his daughters Elizabeth and Bethsada Bass and the remainder of his land to his son James Michael Bass, lent his daughter Annis Newton a cow, yearling, heifer, calf, sheep, bed and furniture to be divided among her children at her death and left his wife Elizabeth two cows, two yearlings, two hogs and all his other personal property [WB 6:241].

iii. Andrew1, married (his cousin?) Leviney Bass, 1 February 1812 Norfolk County bond, Willis Bass surety. He was taxable in Norfolk County from 1809 to 1817: a "B.M." listed in Norfolk County as a "Free Negro" over the age of 16 living near Willis Bass in D.C (Deep Creek) from 1815 to 1817 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 684, 720, 738; 1813-24, frames 96, 125, 242]. He (making his mark) left a 7 September 1855 Norfolk County will, proved 18 February 1856, by which he gave $5 to his daughter Lucy Bass, $5 to his daughter Jemima who was then in North Carolina, $50 to Laura Francis Smith, and the land where upon which he was then living to Amasa(?) Collins. Douglas Collins and Allen Newton were witnesses [WB 6:448]. Lucy Bass, "daughter of Andrew & Lavinia," of "Indian descent," married Madison of White or Johnson, "free man of Colour," on 6 April 1858 in Norfolk County [Marriage Register, 1850-1876, 127; Minutes 33:241]. (The Nansemond County clerks wrote "of" before the last name of all free people, denoting that they were the former slaves of that family, regardless of whether or not they were freed slaves).

 

27.   James2 Bass (William4, William2, William1, John1), born in August 1760 in Norfolk County according to his pension application, was taxable on a free tithe in Norfolk County in 1787 and from 1798 to 1810: a labourer in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" on Deep Creek and head of a household with males (sons?) John and Willis Bass and females (his wife?) Lott, (daughters?) Lane, Sarah and Lovy Bass in 1801; taxable on a slave in 1810 [PPTL, 1782-90, frame 562; 1791-1812, frames 243, 295, 351, 427, 461, 479, 555, 572, 674, 720]. He (making his mark) leased 5 acres in Norfolk County on the road to the canal for five years on 10 March 1814 for $85 [DB 46:121]. He was a "B.M." (Black Man) who was taxable as a "Free Negro" in Norfolk County from 1813 to 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 15, 56, 96, 125, 242]. He moved to Bedford County, Tennessee, about 1819 and received a pension for his services as a private in the Virginia Militia [National Archives File S1745]. A James Bass, born after 1776, and a John Bass, born before 1776, were "free colored" heads of Bedford County, Tennessee households in 1830. James was the father of

i. Willis2, born say 1787, listed in James Bass's household in 1801, perhaps the Willis Bass who married Olive Chavis, 4 January 1809 Granville County, North Carolina bond, Charles Barnett bondsman. He was head of Granville County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [NC:858], 9 "free colored" in Abrams Plains district of Granville County in 1820 [NC:23] and 12 in 1830. He was taxable on 150 acres on Grassy Creek in Abrams Plains in 1817 and 60 acres in 1820. His grandson Peter Bass and great-granddaughter Alice Revels applied for Cherokee Indian benefits in 1907-8, stating that Willis and Olive Bass were the parents of Elija Bass, Sr., of Granville County, North Carolina, who married Matilda Dutton of Pennsylvania, and they had Elija Bass, Jr., who married Elizabeth Arnold, daughter of Andrew and Emily Arnold of Amherst County, Virginia. Alice Revels stated that her great-grandfather Willis and grandfather Elijah Bass were driven from Virginia in 1812 by whites who confiscated their land. Peter Bass gave his Cherokee name as Peter Chavers. Their claims were rejected because Granville County was "fully 200 miles from Cherokee domain" [Eastern Cherokee claim nos. 14050, 44383, 17660-1]. Elijah, Sr., (born about 1810) was listed with Matilda Dutton of Pennsylvania in the Lawrence County, Ohio census in 1850 and 1860.

ii. John, born say 1790, a "B.M." taxable as a "Free Negro" in Deep Creek, Norfolk County from 1810 to 1817: called "son Jas" (son of James) in 1810 and 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1791-1812, frame 720; 1813-24, frames 15, 56, 96, 126, 242].

iii. Lane, listed in James Bass's household in 1801.

iv. Sarah, listed in James Bass's household in 1801.

v. Lovy, listed in James Bass's household in 1801.

 

28.    Willis1 Bass (William4, William2, William1, John1), born say 1763, was taxable in Norfolk County from 1784 to 1787 but not taxable again in Norfolk County until 1796 [PPTL, 1782-91, frames 466, 525, 562], so he was apparently the Willis Bass who was head of a Hertford County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [NC:26]. He was called Willis Bass of Hertford County on 19 July 1798 when William Bass made a deed of gift to him for 30 acres at the head of the Southern Branch and Deep Creek adjoining Farley near the main road and the line dividing Willis's land from John Gibbs Bass's land. The deed was witnessed by Wright Bowers, Thomas Archer and James Newton. It was paritially proved on 17 December 1798 but not fully proved until 18 December 1809 by James Newton. Willis was taxable in Norfolk County from 1796 to 1817: called a "B.M." (Black Man) when he was a "Free Negro" taxable in Norfolk County from 1814 to 1817: a labourer living on Deep Creek in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes," head of a household with males (his sons?) Wilson and Willis Bass and females (his wife) Jemima, (his daughters?) Viney, Lovy, and Irstellor(?) Bass in 1801; listed with 3 "Free Negroes and Mulattoes" in 1814, and 2 in 1816 and 1817 [PPTL, 1791-1812, frames 168, 222, 295, 351, 371, 383, 427, 479, 555, 574, 642, 684, 720, 738; 1813-24, frames 56, 96, 125, 242]. He was head of a Norfolk County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:822]. He received a land grant for 654 acres between the Western Branch and Deep Creek adjoining Solomon Ives and James Butt on 4 August 1812 and another 173 acres in Portsmouth Parish near the head of Deep Creek on 25 October 1814 [Land Office Grants 63:79; 64:294]. On 28 March 1814 he purchased 17 acres from James Butt on the Gallberry Road in Portsmouth Parish adjoining his own land and the land he had recently patented for $85 [DB 46:160]. He and his wife Jemima recorded the births of their children in the Bass family bible [Bell, Bass Families of the South, 13]. On 21 July 1823 the Norfolk County court granted him and Thomas Newton, "free mulattos," permission to keep a firelock, powder and shot. On 19 June 1826 he was special bail for Willis Bass, Jr., and Nelson Bass in Jordan A. Wright's suit against them for debt, and on 19 November 1827 he was security for Levi Bass's debt of $6.34 to Joseph Berkley. And on 26 November 1827 he, his wife Jemima and Nelson Bass acknowledged their deed of trust to Frances Cary for 654 acres in Portsmouth Parish and 17 acres at the head of Deep Creek. Administration on his estate was granted to Levi Bass on 21 October 1828 with Willis and Nelson Bass as his securities on $1,000 bond [Minutes 18: 165; 19:291; 20:207, 217; 21:29]. Jemima was sixty-six years old on 10 April 1835 when she deposed that she was the only child of James Nickens who served as a seaman in the Revolution [Hopkins, Virginia Revolutionary War Land Grant Claims, 166]. Willis was deceased on 19 May 1834 when the Norfolk County court certified that Jamima Bass was the widow of Willis Bass, deceased, and only heir of her father James Nickens and his brother Nathaniel Nickens [Minutes 24:139]. She was called Jemima Bass, Sr., on 19 August 1833 when the Norfolk County court certified that she was not a "free negro or Mulatto" but of Indian descent on satisfactory evidence of white persons" [Minutes 24:43-4]. Willis and Jemima's children were

i. Lovy/ Levina/ Viney, born about 1788, listed in Willis's household in 1801. Viney married Andrew Bass, 1 February 1812 Norfolk County bond, Willis Bass surety. She started to register in Norfolk County between 26 July and 15 September 1828 but did not complete the registry: Levina Bass, 40 yrs, ____(height blank) a mulatto woman, blank [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 424].

ii. Wilson, listed in Willis's household in 1801, a "B.M." (Black Male) taxable a "free Negro" tithe on Deep Creek in 1815 and 1817, apparently identical to Nelson Bass who was a "B.M." tithable on a "free Negro" tithe on Deep Creek in 1816 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 96, 135, 242]. Nelson (signing) married Nancy Price, 9 December 1817 Norfolk County bond, James Price (making his mark) surety [Marriage Bonds, 1817]. On 21 July 1830 he, William Bass, Jemima Bass, and Margaret Bass were granted an injunction against Thomas Kenton and Christopher Miller to restrain them from cutting timber on a 350 acre tract of woodland which their father Willis Bass left them in his last will. On 19 February 1834 the Norfolk County court bound his orphans Cary and Elr(?)y Bass to William Bass, Jr., until the age of twenty-one to be farmers [Minutes 22:28; 24:100].

iii. Willis3, born about 1796, a "free Negro" tithable in 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frame 242]. He married Sally Burnham (no race indicated), 7 December 1820 Norfolk County bond, Willis Bass, Sr., (both signing) bondsmen. Sally Burnham was probably related to John Burnam a "free Negro" tithable in St. Bride's Parish in 1816 [PPTL 1813-24, frame 170] and to Ruthy and Pruey Burnam who registered in Princess Anne County in 1831 [Register of Free Negroes, 1830-1862, nos. 283-3]. On 18 August 1823 the Norfolk County court certified that Willis Bass, Jr., and Wright Perkins were of good character and granted them permission to keep a firelock [Minutes 18:177]. He registered in Norfolk County on 17 October 1831: age 35, 5 ft 9-1/4, a mulatto, Born free. He registered again on 15 July 1833 after the "not Negro" law was passed: 37 years of age, 5 ft 8-1/2, Indian complexion, man of Indian descent [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 777, 895]. On 13 August 1845 his daughter Caroline married Josiah Elliott [Marriage Bonds, 1843-1847, 101]. Josiah registered in Norfolk County on 21 March 1831: age 22, 5 ft 9-3/4, a mulatto man, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 643].

iv. Levi, born about 1799, registered in Norfolk County on 23 February 1826: son of Willis Bass, 27 years of age, 6 ft. 2, yellow complexion, Born free. He registered again on 15 March 1830 and registered a third time on 15 July 1833 after the "not Negro" law was passed: 34, 6 ft, Indian complexion, man of Indian descent [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 324, 573, 897]. He was listed as a "free Negro" who was hired out by order of the Norfolk County court on 22 June 1824 because he did not pay his taxes [Minutes 17:310]. He, a "free man of colour," married Mrs. Martha Newton, widow, "a free woman of colour," 23 November 1832 Norfolk County bond, William Bass bondsman, both William and Levi signing [Marriage Bonds 1829-1833, 180]. He sold 50 acres on which Willis Bass, Sr., formerly resided to William Bass, sold 50 acres on which his mother was then living to Joshua Bass, and he and William Bass, Jr., made a deed of trust to Margaret Callahan for a piece of land in Norfolk County by deeds acknowledged on 10 March 1830 [Minutes 21:268, 286].

v. ?Lucinda, a "Coloured woman," married William Trumbell, a "Coloured man," 9 September 1820 Norfolk County bond, Willis Bass bondsman (signing) [Marriage Bonds, 1820-1824, 1], 8 February 1822 marriage [Ministers' Returns, 1787-1840, 58]. She was called Lucy Trummell, the wife of Wm Trummell, on 19 August 1833 when she, but not her husband, was certified to be "not a free Negro or Mulatto" but of Indian descent on "evidence of white persons" [Norfolk County Minutes 24:43-4].

vi. Viney, married Andrew Bass, 1 February 1812 Norfolk County bond, Willis Bass surety.

vii. Irstelllor(?), listed in Willis's household in 1801.

viii. ?Lemuel, born say 1798, a "B.M." taxable as a "Free Negro" in Deep Creek, Norfolk County, from 1815 to 1817 [PPTL, 1813-24, frames 96, 126, 242].

ix. Andrew2, born 9 April 1799(?), "son of Willis Bass and Jemima his mother" [Bell, Bass Families of the South).

x. Joshua2, born 14 July 1804 [Bell, Bass Families of the South, 13], registered in Norfolk County on 23 July 1828: 5 ft. 8-1/2, 24 yrs., a man of light complexion, Born free. He registered again on 15 July 1833 after the "not Negro" law was passed: 29 years of age, 5 ft 8-3/4, Indian complexion, man of Indian descent [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 414].

xi. William7, born about 1807, registered in Norfolk County on 15 July 1833 after the "not Negro" law was passed: son of Willis, 26 yrs, 5 ft 9 in, Indian complexion, man of Indian descent [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, no. 903]. On 19 August 1833 the court certified that his wife Jerusha Bass was "not negro or mulatto but of Indian descent" on satisfactory evidence of white people [Minutes 24:43-4].

xii. ?Jemima, "a free person of colour," married to Josiah Elliott ("free person of colour") on 3 January 1835 Norfolk County by George McBain, deacon at the Methodist Episcopal Church in Portsmouth [Ministers' Returns, 1787-1840, 97], perhaps identical to Jemima Bass who registered in Norfolk County on 26 August 1835: 22 yrs, 5 ft 4, Indian complexion, Indian descent. Josiah registered on 21 March 1831: 22 yrs, 5 ft 9-3/4, a mulatto man, Born free [Register of Free Negroes & Mulattoes, 1809-1852, nos. 643, 1029].

 

29.    Elijah2 Bass (Frederick1, William3, John2, William1, John1), born say 1775, was head of an Anson County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:204]. He may have been the Elijah Bass who was counted in Robeson County that same year, head of a household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:362] and 6 in Robeson County in 1810 [NC:237]. He was granted administration on the Robeson County estate of (his brother?) Frederick Bass on 200 pounds security on 9 April 1801 [Minutes 1797-1806, 149]. He was one of the freeholders of Robeson County ordered to work on a road with Breton Barnes on the first Monday in July 1807 [Minutes 1806-13, 38] but was not mentioned again in Robeson County records. He may have been the same Elijah Bass who was head of a Kershaw District, South Carolina household of 6 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [SC:433]. He wrote a 28 December 1839 Kershaw County will, recorded on 16 June 1854, describing himself as a "freeman of Color." He mentioned but did not name his children and lent his wife Milbury Eliza 500 acres "on waters of Beaver Dam and Bell Branch, waters of Twenty Five mile Creek of the Wateree river in Kershaw" which was conveyed to him on 10 February 1809. And he suggested that "my wife may desire to return to North Carolina. Elijah Bass" (signing) [WB A:231]. In August 1846 a grandchild of Elijah Bass named Mrs. White sued a South Carolina tax collector for attempting to collect from her the "free Negro" capitation tax. She testified that her grandmother was a "mulatto," her grandfather a Revolutionary soldier, her father Elijah Bass a "dark quadroon if he was one," and her brother an "ordinary white sandhill boy" [Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning American Slavery, II:400-1]. Elijah may have been the father off

i. Frederick3, born say 1795, purchased 103 acres in Robeson County on the east side of Bay Branch on 6 May 1820 [DB S:275].

ii. Joseph4, born after 1776, head of a Robeson County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:300].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Transcripts of the Bass family vital records and certificates signed by Norfolk County court clerks are contained in Albert D. Bell's, Bass Families of the South, Chapter on Nansemond Indian Ancestry of Some Bass Families, pp. 11-16 (Rocky Mount, N.C. 1961). The photocopy of the Bass family bible in the Virginia State Library says John Bass married the daughter of "ye King of ye Nansemund Nation, by name Elizabeth" [Library of Virginia Accession no.26371].

2.    The marriage of a John Bass was recorded in Perquimans Precinct, North Carolina: John Bas and Love Harris was Married ye 8th day of Janewary 1696 both of Nanse Mum County and Nanse Mum Parresh by Mager Samuel Swann Esqr. [Haun, Old Albemarle County North Carolina, 62]. Love Harris was living in Norfolk County on 19 May 1693 when the court acquitted Ann Harris, Love Harris, and Elizabeth Jennett of any wilful neglect in the death of a 5 week old child of Ann Harris. This was probably the same Ann Harris, widow of Richard Harris, who bound her daughter Jean Harris to Malachy Thruston in Norfolk County court that same day. Four days prior to this she bound her son John Harris to James Lowry, and two months later on 18 July 1693 she presented an inventory of "what little estate Richard Harris died seized of" in Norfolk County court [DB 5, pt. 2, 287, 292-3, 298].

 

BATES FAMILY

1.    Benjamin Bates, born say 1731, was a "Mullatto Bastard Child" who the Charles County, Maryland court sold to Peter Harrant on 9 November 1731 [Court Record 1731-4, 41]. He may have been the ancestor of the members of the Bates family who were living in nearby Prince William County, Virginia, in 1810:

i. John, head of a Prince William County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508]. He may have been the husband of Sophia Bates whose seventeen-year-old daughter registered as a free Negro in Washington, D.C. on 26 July 1827: a mulatto woman ... daughter of Sophia Bates of Dumfries, Virginia, who was born free [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 96-6].

ii. Cyrus, head of a Prince William County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:508].

 

Prince George and Charles City counties

1.    William Bates, born say 1744, the son of Mary Cumbo, was bound out by the Charles City County court in August 1744 [Orders 1737-51, 319]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Fanny, head of a Prince George County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:545].

ii. Hetty, head of a Prince George County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:545].

iii. Archibald, head of a Prince George County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:545].

 

BATTLES FAMILY

Members of the Battles family were

i. Hannah, born say 1716, sued Noble Ladd for trespass viet armis in Albemarle County, Virginia court on 14 May 1747. When the case came to trial on 9 July 1747, Ladd produced a writing signed by Hannah (her mark) on 25 May 1747 by which she acknowledged receiving full satisfaction from him for all damages recovered against him in an action of assault and battery in Albemarle County court. However, the court ruled that it was not valid since she was still under his influence. He appealed to the General Court, but the judgment was confirmed. On 13 August 1748 the case was dismissed when Ladd agreed to pay Hannah all the costs provided Hannah would endeavor to recover them against William Battersby and repay Ladd if she was successful [Orders 1744-8, 280, 300, 388, 414, 415].

1        ii. Sarah, born say 1725.

iii. Shadrack1, born say 1729, received a land grant for 191 acres on the south branches of the Hardware River in Albemarle County on 12 May 1759 [Patents No. 34, 1756-1765, 244. LVA on-line image]. He sold 200 acres on the southside of the Hardware River in Albemarle County to John Duncan for 15 pounds on 21 August 1775 [DB 6:469].

 

1.    Sarah Battle, born say 1725, was living in Goochland County on 16 June 1762 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. James Northam Parish to bind out her son Shadrack to learn the trade of blacksmith [Orders 1761-5, 16]. She was the mother of

2        i. Shadrack2, born about 1753.

3        iii. ?Jane, born say 1760.

4        ii. ?Robert, born about 1772.

iv. ?Elizabeth1, head of a Henrico County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:980], a "fn" taxable on a slave over the age of sixteen in the upper district of Henrico County in 1811, perhaps the mother of Milly Battles who was a "fn" taxable on a slave and 2 horses in the same district in 1812 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1813, frames 658, 717].

 

2.    Shadrack2 Battles, born about 1753, made complaint against John Crouch to the Goochland County court in August 1762, and the court cancelled its order to bind him to Crouch [Orders 1761-5, 78]. He married Dolly Moss in Louisa County on 25 July 1780 [Jones, The Douglas Register, 11, 78]. He was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1782 to 1813: taxable on 2 tithables in 1788, 1799 and 1801; taxable on a slave in 1797 and 1798; taxable on 3 tithes in 1802, listed in St. Ann's Parish from 1805 to 1811; taxable on his unnamed son from 1805 to 1810; called a "F. Molatto" in 1806, a "free negro" in 1810 (also listed as a "Mulatto" in the town of Fredericksville in 1810); a "Mulatto" from 1811 to 1813; taxable on 3 tithes in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 11, 26, 55, 72, 110, 148, 195, 244, 292, 342, 382, 445, 477, 511, 551, 585; 1800-1813, frames 24, 68, 112, 156, 201, 227, 269, 318, 410, 456, 517, 562]. Robert Murray sued him for assault and battery in a case that was continued in Albemarle County from 10 June 1784 past 10 June 1785. Jane Battles sued him for trespass, assault and battery in court on 10 August 1793, but the case was dismissed. Thomas Carr, Jr., sued him for a 2 pound, 12 shilling debt on 13 September 1793; Joice Shiflet sued him for a 1 pound, 10 shilling debt on 7 June 1796 and for a 5 pound debt on 4 April 1797. Jesse White sued him for 5 pounds due by bill on 3 October 1798. He and James Going were security for Michael Ailstock's bond of 6 January 1800 to keep the peace in Albemarle County. He, William Battles, Bartlett Bowles, Zachariah Bowles, Thomas Farrow, and Griffin Butler were among the male laboring tithables ordered to work on the Albemarle County road whereof John F. Hawkins was surveyor on 2 December 1800 [Orders 1783-5, 216, 274, 364, 507; 1791-3, 477, 502; 1795-8, 116, 282, 359; 1798-1800, 133, 382; 1800-1, 250]. On 7 August 1801 he agreed in court that he owed James Mc Clanahan 16 pounds, 7 shillings, on 18 August 1801 he sued Rowland Goodman, and on 7 March 1807 he sued William Thacker for assault and battery but dismissed the case a month later [Orders 1801-3, 38, 57; 1806-7, 112, 172]. He registered in Albemarle County on 10 March 1810: a man of Colour, a black man, aged about fifty seven years, five feet 10-1/2 inches high. Dolly Battles the older (his wife) registered on 4 April 1810: a woman of Colour aged about forty three years, five feet three inches, apppearing of an Indian decent, grey eyes of dark colour [Orders 1810-11, 62, 73]. He was "a man of colour" who was about seventy-four years old on 11 October 1820 when he appeared in Albemarle County court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He testified that he enlisted while resident in Amherst County in 1777 and served for three years. He was a carpenter but was no longer able to support himself and his sixty-year-old wife. He owned 200 acres on the Hardware River in Amherst County which he sold in 1775 [M805-63, frames 183-9]. He was bondsman for the 21 October 1786 Albemarle County marriage of Jonathan Tyre and Usly Gowing. Shadrack was head of an Albemarle County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:151]. He was probably the father of

i. Shadrack3, Jr., born about 1788, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1810 to 1813 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frames 410, 456, 472, 517, 562]. He registered in Albemarle County on 9 March 1810: Shadrack Battles, Jr., a man of Colour aged about twenty two years, five feet 10-1/2 inches high, a Mulatto [Orders 1810-11, 62].

5        ii. Elizabeth, born say 1770.

iii. Polly, born say 1784, married John Spinner, 2 April 1805 Albemarle County bond. On 5 August 1806 John was charged with stealing a pair of sadddle bags and sundry pairs of shoes which were the property of Reuben Marshall. He was sent to the district court to be tried [Orders 1806, 288]. He was probably related to Richard Spinner, head of an Albemarle County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:173] and a "mulatto" with 3 persons in his household over the age of sixteen in 1813; and Keziah and Patty Spinner, each listed as a "mulatto" in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frames 575, 576].

iv. Lucy, born about 1787, registered as a free Negro in the Corporation of Staunton, Virginia, on 25 August 1810: about 23 years of age, yellow complexion, slender made, free born, as appears from her indentures of Apprenticeship [Register of Free Negroes, no. 5].Edward, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1803, a "Mulatto" taxable in 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 156, 562].

v. Edward, born about 1792, registered in Albemarle County on 2 April 1811: a man of Colour aged about nineteen years, five feet six inches high, dark complection [Orders 1810-11, 433]. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, in 1813 [PPTL, 1800-1813, frame 562].

vi. William, taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1800 to 1806 and in 1810 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1799, frames; 1800-1813, frames 23, 156, 201, 246, 269, 410].

 

3.    Jane Battles, born say 1760, sued Shadrack Battles for trespass, assault and battery in Albemarle County on 10 August 1793, but the court dismissed the case. On 5 April 1796 the court ordered the overseers of the poor of the southwestern district to bind her illegitimate child Betty Battels to Dixon Dedman until the age of eighteen [Orders 1791-3, 477; 1795-8, 39]. On 1 January 1810 the Albemarle County court awarded her a judgment of 11 pounds, 17 shillings in her suit against Samuel Smithson [Orders 1808-10, 428]. She was probably the Juanna Battle who was head of a Richmond City household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:330]. She was the mother of

i. Elizabeth3, born say 1786, bound to Dixon Dedman on 5 April 1796.

 

4.    Robert Battles, born about 1772, married Nancy Bowls (Bowles), 12 December 1793 Albemarle County bond, Charles Barnett bondsman. Daniel Bowles (his foster son?) sued him in Albemarle County on 14 August 1794, and the court ordered that Robert show cause why he unlawfully beat and misused Daniel. The court ordered him to post bond of $100 to keep the peace on 8 January 1795 when he was accused of assaulting Lucy Barnett [Orders 1793-5, 202, 298]. And on 6 March 1806 Patrick, "a free negro otherwise called Patrick Johnson," also called "a free Molatto," sued him for trespass, assault and battery. A jury awarded Patrick $10 damages [Orders 1806, 45, 180; 1806-7, 102]. He was taxable in Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, from 1793 to 1813: taxable on a slave in 1798 and 1805; called a "Mulatto from 1805; taxable on 3 tithes and 3 horses in 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1799, frames 382, 415, 445, 478, 511, 551, 585; 1800-1813, frames 67, 112, 156, 201, 246, 291, 339, 382, 429, 473, 517, 562]. He was head of an Albemarle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:185]. He and his wife Nancy registered in Albemarle County on 9 March 1810 as Robert and Nancy Bowles: Robert Bowles a man of Colour...aged about thirty nine years, five feet ten and a half inches high, a mulatto. His wife registered the same day: Nancy Bowles wife of Robert Bowles aged about thirty three years, five feet three and a quarter inches high, a bright mulatto [Orders 1810-11, 59]. He may have been the father of

i. Alexander, born about 1802, registered in Augusta County, Virginia, on 28 October 1823: a free man of a mulatto complexion aged twenty one years in April and was born free in the County of Albemarle [Register of Free Negroes, no.61].

 

5.    Elizabeth2 Battles, born say 1770, was a "FN" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, on a horse in 1805, a "Free Molato" taxable on a horse in 1806, a "FN" taxable on her unnamed son in 1807, a "Mulatto" taxable on a horse in 1812 and 1813 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 227, 269, 318, 499, 541]. She was head of an Albemarle County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:180]. She may have been the mother of

i. Turner, a "Mulatto" taxable in St. Ann's Parish, Albemarle County, from 1810 to 1812 [Personal Property Tax List, 1800-1813, frames 410, 456, 499] head of an Albemarle County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:180].

 

BAZDEN FAMILY

1.    Martha Basden, born about 12 July 1732, was a white child living in Isle of Wight County in 1742 when her brother Joseph died and left her a legacy of eight pounds. On February 1749/50 she released her claim to the legacy to her father. She lived with her father until he died intestate on 20 July 1770. Between 1771 and 1773 she brought a chancery suit in Southampton County against her brother James Basden and the executor of her father's estate because they refused to give her any part of his estate. She argued that she was entitled to eight pounds with interest as well as something for the "care and affectionate behaviour" she rendered to her father in his later years. Her brother James argued that she had been a burden to her father: on Account of her having had two Bastard Children of such a Complexion as almost induced the said James her Father to expose her to the Blame and contempt of the world [Chancery Court Papers 1771-1788; LVA Chancery file 1773-007]. On 9 August 1770 the court ordered her "Malatto" son Lewis bound until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1768-72, 309]. Her children were

i. Lewis, born about 1760, a "F.N." taxable in Isle of Wight County from 1790 to 1794 [Personal Property Tax List 1782-1810, frames 194, 213, 257, 286, 310]. He married Sarah Tann, "25 years old," 27 October 1803 Southampton County bond, Mat Williams surety, 28 October marriage. He was called Lewis Baseden when he registered as a "free Negro" in Surry County on 16 August 1800: a mulatto, grey headed, light complexion, 5' 6 1/2 inches high, 40 years old, born of a free woman resident of Southampton County [Back of Guardian Accounts Book, 1783-1804, no.61], and he was called Louis Bazden in 1810, head of a Surry County household of 4 "other free" [VA:601]. His wife Sally registered in Surry County on 15 February 1812: Sally Bazden late Sally Tann a daughter of John and Susanna Tann decd. free mulattoes of Southampton county, of a bright complexion, aged about thirty four years of age ... is 4'11-1/4" high [Hudgins, Surry County Register of Free Negroes, 47]. Sally apparently died not long after registering because Lewis married Ava Dunkins, 6 June 1817 Southampton County bond.

ii. Nanny, born say 1764, a "Mulatto child of Eliz Basden" ordered bound out by the Southampton County court on 12 April 1764 [Minutes 1763-4, n.p.].

 

BAZMORE FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Bazmore, born say 1695, was taxable on her son John in 1730 in Norfolk County, Virginia [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables 1730-50, 36]. Eight years later the Bazmore family was in Bertie County, North Carolina, where John purchased 317 acres on the "Looseing Swamp" on 21 January 1737/8 [DB E:264]. He proved his rights in Bertie court on 10 November 1742:

John Bazemore, Mary Basemore, Elizabeth Basemore Edwards, Mary Basemore Edwards, Jesse Basemore, Thomas Basemore, John Basemore, Sarah Basemore [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II::381].

The family was taxed as "free Mulattos" in the 1761 tax list of William Gray, the 1763 list of John Hill, the 1764 list of Jonathan Standley, the summary list for 1765 and 1766, the 1768 list of Jonathan Standley, and David Standley's list for 1769, 1770, and 1771 [CR 10.702.1]. However, they were counted as white in David Standley's list for 1772 and 1774, and they were counted as white in the 1790 Bertie County census [NC:11]. Elizabeth was likely born before 1700 since the 13 October 1761 session of the Bertie County court excused her from paying taxes because she was "very aged and infirm" [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:559]. Her children were

i. John, born say 1714, taxable in Norfolk County, Virginia, in 1730 [Wingo, Norfolk County Tithables, 1730-50, 36]. His 4 December 1748 Bertie County deed of sale of 450 acres on Ahoskie Swamp was witnessed by Joseph Hall, another "free Mulatto" from Norfolk County [DB G:271]. In 1763 he was taxed on his son Thomas and 2 slaves in John Hill's list. By 1779 he and his sons were taxable on 9 slaves and 1,826 acres of land in Bertie County for Wynn's and King's District. His 10 July 1789 Bertie County will was proved in May term 1790 and named his children who were all considered white in the 1790 census: John, Jr., Thomas, James, William, Tamer Sowell, Sarah Thomas, and Elizabeth White [WB 2:328].

ii. ?Jesse, born say 1720, one of John Bazemore's head rights in 1742 [Haun, Bertie County Court Minutes, II:381]. He was taxable in the 1756 summary list for Bertie County. He and his wife Frances were "free Mulattos" in the 1761 Bertie tax list of William Gray. He bought land from his brother John [DB K:297]. He was taxed on 503 acres in the 1779 list of Wynn's and King's District and purchased another 8 tracts of land between 1786 and 1796 [DB N:266; O:21-2, 342: P:85; Q:128, 137; S:56]. He was head of a white Bertie County household with 14 slaves in 1790 [NC:11]. His 17 June 1800 Bertie County will was proved in February 1809, and mentioned his wife Frances and his children: Jesse, Turner, Zilpha, Mary, Susanna, Esther Griffin, and Dicey Thomas.

 

BECKETT FAMILY

1.    Peter1 Beckett, born say 1655, was a "Negro" slave who was taxable with Thomas Driggers from 1671 to 1677 in the Northampton County, Virginia household of John Eyres:

Mjr. Eyres

Tho: Driggus }

Peter Beckett }

Mary Crew } Neg 4 [Orders 1664-74, fol.114; 1674-79, 75, 191].

Sarah Dawson, a white servant, was another member of Eyre's household. She was born about 1661 since her age was adjudged to be sixteen years when Eyre brought her into Northampton County court on 26 November 1677 [OW 1674-79, 203]. Seven years later in 1684 she was given twenty-one lashes and ordered to serve Eyre another six years for having "three bastard Maletto Children by her said Masters Negro slave Peter." On 30 May 1687 and 28 May 1688 she was presented for bastard bearing and the following year on 29 July 1689 was called "Sarah the wife of Peter Beckett slave to Major John Eyre" when the court ordered one of her children released to her, "Shee findinge sufficient security to save the parish harmeless from the said Childe" [OW 1683-89, 59, 280, 292, 358, 442-3]. On 28 July 1702 she consented to the indenture of their daughter Ann, "daughter of Sarah Beckett," to Mrs. Ann Eyre until the age of eighteen [OW 1698-1710, 96]. Peter was free by 30 November 1703 when "Peter Beckett and Sarah his wife" successfully sued John Morrine for debt in Northampton County court. John Robins brought an action upon the case against him, but neither party appeared when it came for trial on 21 January 1717/8 [OW&c 1698-1710, 176; Orders 1710-6, 55]. Peter and Sarah's children were

2        i. Rebecca1/ Beck, born say 1690.

3        ii. Ann, born 10 December 1697.

4        iii. Jean, born say 1700.

5        iv. Elizabeth1/ Betty1, born say 1705.

 

2.    Rebecca Beckett, born say 1690, was summoned to the Northampton County court on 12 January 1724/5 to show cause why her son William should not be bound to John Robins, and summoned the following month on 11 February to answer Mark Freshwater's petition to have her son Mark bound to him because he had been living with him for five years. In the petition Freshwater also called Mark Beckett the "free Negro" son of Peter Beckett [Orders 1722-9, 149, 155, Mihalyka, Loose Papers I:81]. However, Mark was more likely the grandson of Peter since there is no record of a Peter Beckett in the eighteenth century Northampton County lists of tithables which begin in 1720. On 10 March 1724/5 John Robins attested to a note from Rebecca informing the court that she consented to her son Mark's indenture to Freshwater until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1722-9, 172]. Rebecca was a "melatto" taxable in Jonathan Stott's household in 1724 and 1725, tithable in the household of John Drighouse in 1726, in Berry Floyd's household in 1728, and in Joachim Michael's household from 1729 to 1743 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 77, 155, 168, 262, 274, 289, 308, 326, 330, 353]. She was presented by the court on 13 May 1735 for bastard bearing and was granted levy-free status by the court on 12 June 1744 due to an infirmity [Orders 1732-42, 155, 163; 1742-8, 163]. Her children were

6        i. Mark, born say 1711.

ii. William1, born 10 December 1714, ten-year-old son of Rebecca Beckett bound apprentice to John Robins on 10 February 1724/5 until the age of twenty-one [Orders 1722-9, 161]. He was a 10-16 year old boy in the Northampton County household of John Robins from 1724 to 1730 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 58, 76, 104, 113, 118, 167, 201]. On 14 May 1734 Elishe Webb charged him with being the father of her illegitimate child. He was still the servant of John Robins at the time, so the court ordered the sheriff to take him into custody after his term of servitude expired [Orders 1732-42, 97, 103, 107].

iii. Rachel, born about 1718, twelve-year-old daughter of Rebecca Beckett, bound apprentice to Thomas Marshall on 10 November 1730 [Orders 1729-32, 53]. She was presented on 13 November 1739 for bastard bearing [Orders 1732-42, 372].

7        iv. Isaac1, born in April 1724.

8        v. ?Solomon1, born say 1727.

 

3.    Ann Beckett, born 10 December 1697, the four-year-old "daughter of Sarah Beckett," was bound apprentice to Mrs. Ann Eyre by the Northampton County court on 28 July 1702 until the age of eighteen years with her mother's consent [OW 1698-1710, 96]. Ann received twenty-five lashes on 20 June 1716 for having a bastard child by John Drighouse (Driggers). She was called a "Mallato" in July 1718 when she was again punished for having a bastard child [Orders 1710-16, 244, 252; 1716-8, 120]. She was a taxable "melatto" in Richard Carue's household in 1724 and 1725 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 54, 79]. She may have been the mother of

i. Nancy, born say 1715, taxable in Esther Map's household in 1731 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 226].

9        ii. ?Sarah1, born say 1718.

 

4.    Jean Beckett, born say 1700, a "free negro woman," was taxable in the Northampton County household of William Cowdry in 1724, taxable in the household of Thomas Savage, Sr., in 1725, and taxable in the household of Thomas2 Driggers in the list of Matthew Harmonson for 1727, 1729 and 1731. She was his common-law wife, called Jane Drighouse when she was taxable in his household in 1737 and in 1744 with her daughter Esther Drighouse [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 66, 93, 127, 136, 194, 198, 226]. Thomas Drighouse, a "free Negro," left a 21 April 1757 Northampton County will, proved 14 June 1757, by which he made Jane Beckett his executor and left all he had to her and her three daughters: Hester, Betty, and Lydia Beckett [WB 21:281]. Jean's children were

i. Sarah2 Beckett, born say 1721, called the daughter of Jean Drighouse when the sheriff took her mother into custody as bond for her appearance in court for bastard bearing. She received twenty-five lashes on 8 April 1740 [Orders 1732-42, 394; Mihalyka, Loose Papers, II:124]. She was taxable in Thomas Drighouse's household from 1737 to 1739, called Sarah Becket in 1737 and 1738, called Sarah in 1739, and called Sarah Drighouse when she was taxable in Mark Beckett's household in 1740 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 266, 272, 285, 305]. She married Isaiah Drighouse (Driggers).

ii. ?Comfort1 Beckett, born say 1723, tithable in Thomas Drighouse's household in 1739 and 1740 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 285, 308]. She married Jacob Morris by 1743.

iii. Hester Beckett, born say 1727, a tithable in her parents' household in 1744.

iv. Elizabeth2/ Betty.

v. Lydia Beckett.

 

5.    Elizabeth1 Beckett, born say 1705, was called Betty Drighouse when she was tithable in John Drighouse's Northampton County household from 1724 to 1727, but called Betty Beckett in 1727. John married Lydia Carter before June 1728 when she was tithable in his household as Lydia Drighouse. Elizabeth was tithable in her own household in 1728 adjacent to ___ Mongon, but she was again a tithable, "not employed in crop," in John and Lydia Drighouse's household in 1729. She was tithable in James Forse's household in 1731, in Thomas Cable's in 1737, and in Norly Ellegood's household from 1739 to 1744 [L.P. 1729; Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 54, 78, 105, 127, 145. 147, 172, 229, 264, 283, 310, 321, 338, 356]. She was presented for bastard bearing on 14 June 1732 (her fine paid by Major James Forse) and presented on 10 May 1737 (her fine paid by Thomas Cable) [Orders 1732-42, 8, 261, 269]. She was the mother of

i. ?Sarah3, born about 1732, eight-year-old orphan bound to Benjamin Dunton on 8 April 1740 [Orders 1732-42, 396], perhaps the Sarah Backit who was taxable in the household of John Wilkins in 1766 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 380]

ii. ?Peter2, born in February 1734/5, a three-year-old bound apprentice in Northampton County to Samuel Church and his wife Elizabeth on 11 October 1737 (no parent named) [Orders 1732-42, 279], taxable in John Bowdoin's household in 1766 and 1769 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 380, 392].

iii. ?William2, born 6 August 1742, a seven-year-old orphan "Negro" bound apprentice to Eleanor Ellegood on 13 September 1749 [Orders 1748-51, 130].

iv. Isaac2, born 25 November 1746, "son of Betty Beckett," bound apprentice in Northampton County in 1760 [Minutes 1754-61, 230]. He was about thirteen when he was bound to Thomas Bell on 12 August 1760 [Minutes 1754-61, 230]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 354]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1798 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 243, 304, 529].

v. ?Joshua, born 5 December 1748, a six-year-old "Negro" bound apprentice to Ralph Batson in Northampton County on 6 December 1754 [Orders 1753-58, 172, 219-20], said to be about fourteen years old on 13 March 1764 when he was bound to Sarah Batson [Minutes 1761-5, 108]. On 14 November 1770 Isaac Clegg was presented by the grand jury for not listing Joshua as a tithable [Minutes 1765-71, 399]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1783 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 21, 63, 79, 189, 304, 529]. He married Sally Stevens, 21 May 1803 Northampton County bond, Jacob Thompson security. He was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:219].

 

6.    Mark Beckett, born say 1711, had been living with Mark Freshwater for five years when he was bound to him by the Northampton County court on 10 March 1724/5 [Orders 1722-9, 172]. He was a "malatto" boy 10-16 years of age in Mark Freshwater's Northampton County household in the list of John Robins for 1725, a tithable in Freshwater's household from 1727 to 1729, and tithable in Ann Dod's household in the list of John Robins for 1737 and 1738 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 119, 144, 167, 255, 277]. He married Margaret Drighouse, widow of Azaricum Drighouse (Driggers). As guardian of Jacob Drighouse he presented an inventory of the orphan's estate in court on 12 April 1743 [Orders 1742-48, 33, 45, 56, 69]. He and his wife Pegg Beckett were taxable in their own household with Sarah Drighouse (Jean Beckett's daughter) from 1740 to 1743, taxable in 1744 with Jacob Drighouse (Peggy's son), and he and Peggy were taxables in 1765 and in 1769 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 305, 328, 334, 350, 360, 375, 387]. On 22 November 1750 he was paid 490 pounds of tobacco for services to the county, perhaps for work done on the courthouse [Orders 1748-51, 299]. In February 1771 the court bound Levin Beckett to him as an apprentice [Minutes 1771-5, 251]. He was taxable in Northampton County in 1783 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 18]. He was the father of

i. ?Solomon2, born say 1760, a "Mulatto" taxable in Northampton County from 1782 to 1789 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 3, 73, 94]. He served in the Revolution from Northampton County [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 147]. There were three marriages for persons named Solomon Beckett in Northampton County: to Sarah Liverpool, bond of July 1800; to Adah Liverpool, bond of 7 July 1801, Josiah Liverpool security; and to Abigail Stevens, bond of 19 February 1803, Jacob Thompson security. And a Solomon Beckett, born before 1776, was head of a Northampton County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:217A].

ii. Isaiah, born in November 1773, twelve-year-old son of Mark Beckett, bound apprentice in Northampton County to Peter Bowdoin on 14 December 1785. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 11 June 1794 [Orders 1783-7, 379; 1789-95, 354].

iii. Peter4, born 6 January 1775, son of Mark Becket, bound apprentice to Peter Bowdoin on 11 September 1787 [Orders 1787-9, 45]. He may have been the Peter Beckett who married Ariena Nutt, 10 January 1800 Accomack County bond, Babel Major, surety. She may have been the Arena Becket who married Thomas Bibbins, 2 August 1800 Accomack County bond, Peter Bibbins surety.

 

Mark may have been the grandfather of

i. Levin, born in February 1771, bound to Mark Beckett in Northampton County on 10 May 1774 [Minutes 1771-5, 251].

ii. Diana2, born say 1773, "ward of Mark Becket," married Ezekiel Moses, 22 August 1791 Northampton County bond, William Stith security. Ezekiel was head of a Northampton County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:216A].

 

7.    Isaac1 Beckett, born in April 1724, son of Rebecca Becket, was bound to Thomas Marshall on 10 November 1730 [Orders 1729-32, 53]. He was taxable in William Stott's Northampton County household in 1743, a taxable head of a household of himself and (his wife?) Mason Beckett in 1765 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 371], and a "Mulatto" taxable in 1787 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 73]. His wife may have been Mason Stephens, born say 1728, a tithable in her parents' Northampton County household in 1744. Between 1793 and 1803 he acknowledged that he was indebted to the British Merchants, Atchison, Hay, and Company, but could not pay since he had been insolvent since 1793 [Virginia Genealogist, v.17, no.3]. He may have been the father of

i. Elizabeth/ Betty3, born in March 1750, a sixteen-year-old, no parent or race mentioned, bound apprentice in Northampton County to Thomas John Marshall, Gent., on 10 June 1766 [Minutes 1765-71, 46]. She may have been the Betty Beckett who was head of Occohanock, St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:86] or the one who was head of a Machipungo, St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1800, living near William Roberts [Virginia Genealogist 2:128].

ii. Peter3, born in August 1752, fourteen years old when he was bound apprentice in Northampton County to Thomas John Marshall, Gent., on 10 June 1766 (no parent named) [Minutes 1765-71, 46]. On 8 June 1779 he and Mary Jeffery were witnesses for Abraham Collins in his suit against Scarburgh Bingham [Minutes 1777-83, 167]. He was a delinquent Northampton County taxable in 1786 [Virginia Genealogist 20:269] and was taxable from 1787 to 1801, called Peter Beckett, Sr., starting in 1800 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 63, 114, 304]. Between 1775 and 1803 he admitted that he was indebted to British Merchants, Atchison, Hays, and Company. He reported that (his brother?) William Beckett sailed to the West Indies just before the Revolution, was pressed aboard a British armed ship, and had lived in Dublin since then [Virginia Genealogist 17:259-60].

iii. Mary, born say 1765, married Mark Moses, 13 December 1785 Northampton County bond, Isaac Becket security.

iv. Kesiah, married Henry Liverpool, 17 March 1799 Northampton County bond, Solomon Liverpool security.

v. Sukey, married Patrick Collins, 14 November 1807 Northampton County bond, William Drigus security.

 

8.    Solomon1 Beckett, born say 1727, was a tithable in Joachim Michael's Northampton County household in 1744, a tithable with (his wife?) Peggy Beckett in 1765 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 362, 371], and a "free Negro" taxable in Accomack County from 1783 to 1800, called Solomon, Sr. [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 39, 238, 441]. He was head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 7 "other free" in 1800, living near Jo. Stringer's [Virginia Genealogist 2:129]. He may have been the father of

i. George, born say 1753, sued in Northampton County court for a 4 pounds, 8 shilling debt on 13 April 1774 [Minutes 1771-5, 247]. He was a seaman from Accomack County who served in the Revolution and died intestate leaving no children. His estate was divided in Accomack County among his four sisters, Nancy, Betty, Rebecca, and Mason [Orders 1832-36, 251].

ii. Nancy Beavans, born say 1762, deceased by 24 February 1834 when George Beckett's estate was divided among her five children. The same court order referred to her as "the said Mary" [Orders 1832-6, 251]. Her children named in the court order were Solomon, Thomas, Peter, Mary, and John Beavans.

iii. Betty3, born say 1764, deceased by 24 February 1834 when George Beckett's estate was divided among her four children Peter, Rachel, Rosey, and Nanny. Perhaps her daughter was the Rosey Beckett who registered in Accomack County on 26 June 1832: born about 1783, a Black, 5'2-1/4", born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 575].

iv. Rebecca2, born say 1766, registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358]. She died before 24 February 1834 when George Beckett's Accomack County estate was divided among her three children: Rosey, Solomon, and William.

v. Mason, born say 1770, head of a Machipungo, St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:129].

 

9.    Sarah2 Beckett, born say 1718, was a tithable in Jonathan Bell's Northampton County household in 1737, tithable in Peter Dowty's household in 1738, in Daniel Fisher's in 1739, in Roland Dowty's household in 1740, and in Arthur Downing's household in 1743 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 274, 289, 348]. She received twenty-five lashes on 8 April 1740 for bastard bearing and was presented on 7 November 1743 for bastard bearing [Orders 1732-42, 394; 1742-8, 131]. She was a "free Negro" who petitioned the Northampton County court on 13 November 1749 to bind her "Negro Child Spencer" to William Bradford of Accomack County [Orders 1748-51, 139-40]. Her children were

i. Rachel, born 25 May 1743, a three-year-old daughter of Sarah Beckett, bound apprentice to Posthumus Core in Northampton County in 1746 [Orders 1742-48, 344], perhaps the Rachel Beckett who was head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:12].

ii. Dinah1, born say 1745, daughter of Sarah Beckett, bound to Posthumus Core on 8 October 1745, whipped for bastard bearing on 13 May 1766 [Orders 1742-8, 255; Minutes 1765-71, 39, 59]. She registered as a "free Negro" in Northampton County on 12 June 1794 [Orders 1789-95, 358].

iii. Spencer, born 17 October 1749, "Negro Child" of Sarah Beckett bound apprentice to William Bradford of Accomack County on 13 November 1749 [Orders 1758-51, 139; L.P. #35, Sarah Beckett's Petition]. He was a "Mulatto" or "Negro" Northampton County taxable from 1787 to 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 73, 94, 190, 243, 304, 387].

10      iv. ?Comfort2, born in December 1753.

v. John1, born September 1756, "negro son of Sarah Becket," bound apprentice to Zerobabell Downing in Northampton County on 18 November 1759 [Minutes 1754-61, 205]. A suit brought against him by John Michael, Sr., was dismissed by the Northampton County court on 8 June 1784 [Orders 1783-7, 116]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1793 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 152]. He was head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:129].

11      vi. Adah, born say 1760.

 

10.    Comfort2 Beckett, born in December 1753, was a four-year-old "Negro orphan" bound apprentice to Caleb Scott in Northampton County on 14 February 1758 [Orders 1753-58, 477]. She was the mother of

i. Abraham2, born about 1782, son of Comfort Becket, twelve years old in July 1794 when the Northampton County court ordered the Overseers of the Poor to bind him to Ephraim Stevens [Orders 1789-95, 369]. He was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820, called Abram Becket, Jr. [VA:218].

 

11.    Adah Beckett, born say 1760, was presented by the grand jury of Northampton County on 9 May 1780 for bastard bearing [Minutes 1777-83, 237]. She was a "Negro" taxable on a free male in 1804 and 1805 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frame 365, 387]. She was the mother of

i. Peter5, born about 1780, son of Adah Beckett, eleven years old on 13 April 1791 when the Northampton County court ordered the Overseers of the Poor to bind him to Hezekiah James [Orders 1789-95, 133]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1798 to 1805: called Peter Beckett, Junr., from 1798 to 1801; called "Negro son of Adah" in 1802 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 242, 305, 325, 387].

 

Other Beckett descendants were

i. Rosey, registered in Accomack County: born about 1764, a Black, born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 821].

ii. Solomon3, born say 1765, a "free Negro" taxable in Accomack County from 1787 to 1810: called "Solomon Junr." in 1787, taxable on a slave over the age of sixteen in 1800 and 1810 [PPTL 1782-1814, frames 129, 356, 443, 526, 723], head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:128].

iii. Nancy, born before 1776, head of a Northampton County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:217A].

iv. Abraham1, born say 1776, taxable in Northampton County from 1793 to 1813 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 152, 190, 304, 529]. He married Sarah Thompson, 26 October 1797 Northampton County bond, Jacob Thompson security.

v. Anthony, head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:103].

vi. Sarah4, head of an Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:60].

vii. Peter, registered in Accomack County: born about 1783, yellow complexioned, 5'9-1/2", born free in Accomack County [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 750].

viii. John2, born in December 1784, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: Black, rather light, 5 feet 6-1/8 Inches...Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 6].

ix. Harry, born 17 September 1785, registered in Accomack County: Black, 5 feet 3-3/4 Inches...Born Free [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 9].

x. John3, born in Spring 1790, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: light Black, 5 feet 4 Inches, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 28].

xi. Edmund, born about 1785, registered in Accomack County: Black, 5 feet 8-1/2 Inches...Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 30]. He was taxable in Northampton County from 1811 to 1813, living on Caleb Downing's land [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 486, 529].

xii. Samuel, born say 1787, taxable in Northumberland County from to 1813, listed as a "Blk" taxable from 1804 to 1813 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 558, 583, 632, 652, 666, 681].

xiii. Isaac3, born in December 1793, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: a light black, 5 feet 9 Inches, Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1785-1863, no. 77].

 

BEE FAMILY

1.    Cleopatra Bee, born say 1720, was presented by the churchwardens of Bruton Parish in York County on 20 July 1741 for having a "Molatto" bastard child [OW 19:45, 79, 89]. She was fined 50 shillings by the churchwardens of Chesterfield County on 7 February 1753, probably for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1749-54, 428]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Francis, born about 1753, a "mulatto man" residing in Northumberland County on 12 October 1795 when the court certified that he was born free [Orders 1790-5, 579]. He was taxable in Northumberland County from 1783 to 1801: taxable on a slave in 1788, 1794, 1796, 1797 and 1801 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 251, 282, 326, 347, 392, 421, 436, 443, 458, 475, 490, 504, 513]. He married Elizabeth Dikes, 12 April 1796 Northumberland County bond. She may have been the Betty Bee who sued Rawleigh Alexander for trespass, assault and battery. The Northumberland County court dismissed the suit on 15 March 1797 on agreement of the parties [Orders 1796-7, 113]. He married, second, Sally Evens, 21 February 1798 Northumberland County bond, William Corbell security. He was taxable in Lancaster County from 1803 to 1814 [PPTL, 1782-1839, frames 237, 385, 390] and head of a Lancaster County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:337]. He registered in Lancaster County on 17 August 1812: Age 59, Color dark mulatto...was an indented servant until 31 years of age. Sally, born about 1774, registered on 15 July 1811: Age abt. 37, Color dark mulatto...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 5, 6]. Frank, Sally, Massee, Jenny and Peggy Bee were in a list of "free negroes & mulattoes in Lancaster Coutny in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1839, frame 385].

ii. Isaac1, born about 1755, an eighteen-nineteen-year-old "mulatto" whose "father was a freeman," ran away from Lewis Burwell of Mecklenburg County according to the 8 September 1774 issue of the Virginia Gazette (Purdie & Dixon).

iii. Polly, living in Richmond City on 8 February 1796 when she emancipated her niece Sally Carter whom she had purchased from Rev. James Henderson of Williamsburg [Hustings DB 2:218].

iv. Massy, head of a Lancaster County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:339].

v. Gabriel, born say 1780, taxable in Northumberland County from 1796 to 1813, listed as a "Blk" man starting in 1807 [PPTL 1782-1812, frames 444, 475, 491, 504, 513, 529, 549, 563, 599, 621, 632, 652, 681]. He married Nelly Toulson, 29 September 1802 Northumberland County bond, James Toulson security. Gabriel was a "free mulatto" head of a Northumberland County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:973]. He registered as a "free Negro" in Northumberland County on 30 July 1814: black man, about __ age, 5 feet __, Born of free parents in Northd County [Register, no.71].

vi. Isaac2, born about 1788, registered in Northumberland County on 13 September 1813: negro man, about 25 years, Born of free parents in Northd County [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 69].

vii. Shadrack, born about 1789, living in Northumberland County on 12 October 1795 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor to bind him out [Orders 1790-5, 579]. He registered in Northumberland County on 9 January 1809: black man, aged 20 years, 5 feet 9-1/4 inches high [Register of Free Negroes, 1803-50, no. 39].

 

BELL FAMILY

1.    Jane1 Bell, born say 1662, was a Surry County, Virginia taxable in Thomas Davis' household in 1689 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, vol.23, 3:56]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Jane2, born say 1720, living in Surry County on 16 June 1742 when the churchwardens of Albemarle Parish were ordered to bind out her child (no race mentioned) [Orders 1741-44, 32].

2        ii. Samuel, born in Surry County, Virginia, in 1749.

3        iii. Graham1, born say 1750.

iv. William, an infirm "Mulatto" supported by public taxes in Petersburg on 6 October 1795 [Hustings Court Orders 1791-7, 154a].

v. Hardy, born about 1800, a "Boy of Color" bound to Samuel Bell by order of the 27 August 1810 Robeson County court [Minutes II:214]. He was head of a Robeson County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:310].

vi. Zadock, born say 1775, purchased 13 acres on Little Fishing Creek in Halifax County, North Carolina, on 6 November 1797 [DB 18:303]. He was head of a Halifax County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [NC:290] and 5 in 1810 [NC:7]. He was probably the husband of Lucy Bell who was mentioned in the 3 December 1808 Halifax County will of her father Austin Curtis Jones [WB C:484]. Her mother was probably Ann Curtis.

4        vi. Jane3/ Jenny Bell, born say 1776.

 

2.    Samuel Bell was born in Surry County, Virginia, in May 1749. He was living in Sampson County, North Carolina, in February 1782 when he volunteered in Captain Coleman's Company under Major Griffith McRae and Colonel Lytle. He marched to Wilmington, to Georgetown, and to Charleston, but was never in any engagement. After the war, he lived in Sampson County until about 1807 when he moved to Robeson County where he applied for and was granted a pension on 31 August 1832 [M804-0207, frame 0489]. He was head of a Sampson County household of 10 "other free" in 1790, 15 in 1800 [NC:509], 5 in Robeson County in 1810 [NC:234], and 2 "free colored" in Robeson County in 1820 [NC:309]. His children were probably

i. Joshua, born 1776-94, a bricklayer, head of a Cumberland County, North Carolina household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:154].

ii. Rebecca, married Ephraim Hammonds, 26 February 1812 Cumberland County bond, Thomas Sampson bondsman.

iii. Hetty, a "free female child," bound to Elizabeth Howell by the New Hanover County court on 23 September 1795 [Minutes 1792-98, 152].

 

3.    Graham1 Bell, born say 1750, was sued for debt in the Hustings Court of Petersburg on 3 May 1790. He was called a shoemaker when he purchased a lot in Petersburg on Halifax Road from Isaac Gilmore for 50 pounds by deed proved on 7 November 1791. He purchased from Anne Murray of Petersburg "four Negroes" Molly, Graham, Peyton and Kidder on 22 September 1789 and manumitted Molly, Graham, Peyton, Kidder and Beverly on 2 January 1792 [Hustings DB 2:147, 157]. He posted bond for William Vaughan when he was sued by James Littlejohn on 6 September 1796 [Orders 1784-91, 317, 334; 1791-7, 11, 177b]. On 15 July 1795 he purchased for 200 pounds a half acre in that part of Petersburg where Captain Erasmus Gill first laid out his land into lots, being the northern half of lot no. 9 [DB 2:443-4]. He was taxable in Petersburg from 1800 to 1815: listed with 2 slaves, 3 horses, and a wagon in 1800, listed as a "free Negro" in 1815 [PPTL 1800-33, frames 3, 72, 138, 279, 394, 451]. He appeared in Greensville County court on 19 May 1804 to post his property as a $500 bond for the appearance of his son Graham Bell, Jr., who was charged with forging a bond of $333 to himself from Sterling Edmond of Brunswick County. Asa Byrd was one of the witnesses who testified against Graham, Jr. [Orders 1799-1806, 387-8]. He was married to Polly Spruce, former wife of David White by 6 October 1806 when the Petersburg court granted him administration of White's estate on 500 pounds bond. On 7 August 1809 the court ordered the sergeant to take possession of a lot and houses that had belonged to David as well as any personal estate not yet administered by Graham Bell and his "reputed wife" Polly Spruce and to dispose of them as the law directed [Hustings Court Minute Book 1805-8, n.p.; 1808-12, n.p.]. He left a 4 May 1816 Petersburg will (signing) by which he lent his wife Mary Bell two lots and tenements in Petersburg--one to be rented out for her support and the support of his two youngest daughters, and directed that the lots be sold after her death and divided among his eight children: Graham, Peyton, Beverly, Archer, Fanny, Polly, Margaret, and Caroline; and directed that $100 be paid by his executors to his son Kidder Bell. He named his son Archer and sons-in-law Thomas Brewster and William Bowler executors. On 6 December 1817 Graham, Peyton, Beverly, Fanny and her husband Thomas Brewster, Polly and her husband William Bowler, "free people of colour," (signing) with Miller Bowler as witness, brought a case in chancery to sell the lot with the agreement of the widow Mary Bell who was living with one of the plaintiffs [Chancery Cause 1819-004]. His widow Mary Bell registered in Petersburg County on 24 November 1821: near 5 feet 2 inches high, about 55 years old in October last, of brown complexion, Emancipated by Graham Bell her late husband now deceased in the Hustings Court of Petersburg in January 1792 [Register of Free Negroes 1819-33, no. 1129]. Graham, Sr., was the father of

i. Graham2, born about 1780, registered in Petersburg on 11 April 1814: a light brown Mulatto man, five feet nine and a half inches high, thirty four years old January last, a shoe maker, born free & raised in the Town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 748]. He may have been the Graham Bird Bell who was living in Sussex County on 16 July 1778 when the court ordered the churchwardens to bind him out [Orders 1777-82, 47]. And he may have been the husband or father of Susan Bell, born about 1800, who registered in Petersburg on 24 June 1822: 22 yrs old, 5 feet 2 inches high, dark complection...Emancipated by Graham Bell in the Hustings Court of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1819-33, no. 1157]. He was a "Fn" taxable Richmond City in 1814 and 1815 [PPTL 1787-1819].

ii. Peyton, a "Free negro" taxable on 2 horses and a coach in the Richmond City tax list for 1814 and 1815 [PPTL 1787-1819].

iii.Kidder, a "free Negro" taxable on a slave in Petersburg in 1815 [PPTL 1800-33, frame 452] and 2 slaves in the upper district of Chesterfield County in 1825 [PPTL 1812-27, frame 640].

iv. Beverly.

v. Archibald/ Archer, a "Fn" taxable on a slave over 12 years old in Richmond city in 1814 and 1815 [PPTL 1787-1819].

vi. Fanny, wife of Thomas Brewster. Thomas Bruster was head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:342] and a "Fn" taxable on 2 slaves over the age of 12 in Richmond City in 1812, 1 slave in 1813 and 1814; 2 slaves, a stage wagon and a gold watch in 1815 [PPTL 1787-1819].

vii. Polly, born 11 May 1799, wife of William Bowler, registered in Petersburg on 24 November 1821: wife of Wm Bowler of the City of Richmond...5 feet 3 inches high said to be 22 yrs old 11 May last of light brown complection...black strait hair, has had holes in her ears...born free and raised in the town of Petersburg [Register of Free Negroes 1819-33, no. 1128].

viii. Margaret Bowler, born about 1799, registered in Petersburg on 21 July 1824: 5 feet 2 inches high, about 25 years of age, light complexion, daughter of Graham Bell, decd, late of Petersburg, born free in the said town [Register of Free Negroes, 1819-33, no. 1352]. She may have been the wife of Miller Bowler who was listed as a "Free negro" in Richmond City in 1814 and 1815 [PPTL 1787-1819].

ix. Caroline, born about 1804, registered in Petersburg on 21 July 1824: 5 feet 2 inches high, about 20 years of age, light complexion, daughter of Graham Bell, decd, late of Petersburg, born free in the said town [Register of Free Negroes, 1819-33, no. 1353].

 

4.    Jane3/ Jenny Bell, born say 1776, was head of a Bertie County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:35]. She may have been the mother of the following children indentured in Bertie County, no parent indicated:

i. David, born 5 March 1794, no race indicated, bound to Benjamin Wimberley as an apprentice shoemaker on 12 August 1799 [CR 10.101.8, by NCGSJ XV:169].

ii. Reuben, born May 1796, no race indicated, bound as a shoemaker to Benjamin Wimberley on 12 August 1799 [NCGSJ XV:170].

iii. Winifred, born 1798, no race indicated, bound to Ebenezer Smith on 10 August 1807 [CR 10.101.9 by NCGSJ XVI:154].

iv. Solomon, born about 1800, seven-years-old when he was bound to Ebenezer Smith on 10 November 1807 and called "an orphan of colour Six years of age" when he was bound to Richard Veale to be a shoemaker on 15 August 1809 [NCGSJ XVII:40].

v. Joseph, born about 1801, "an orphan of colour," bound to Ebenezer Smith to learn shoemaking on 15 August 1809.

vi. Nancy, born about 1803, "an orphan of colour" bound to Richard Veale on 15 August 1809.

 

Lancaster County

1.    Elizabeth1 Bell, born say 1684, was a white servant who ran away and absented herself from the service of her master, William Chapman of Lancaster County, for twenty-one days. On 12 May 1703 the court ordered that she receive twenty lashes at the county whipping post, serve her master an additional forty-two days, and serve another eighteen months to pay the expense of her recovery. She was the servant of George Flower on 14 June 1704 when she was ordered to serve an additional five years for having a "Bastard child by a negroe." She was the servant of John Brown on 11 July 1706 when she was again tried for having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe" [Orders 1702-13, 32, 75, 148a]. She was probably the mother of

2        i. Jane, born say 1702.

ii. William, born about February 1704/5, a "Mulatto" man servant who still had eight years to serve Captain Thomas Carter on 14 February 1727/8 when he came into court and agreed to serve Robert Carter, Esquire, an additional four years at the expiry of his indenture if he would purchase him from his master [Orders 1721-9, 263]. He was the "Molatto" servant of John Carter, Esq., in February 1737/8 when he petitioned the Charles City County court for his freedom. In April 1738 the court examined a record of the Lancaster County court and ruled that he serve another two years [Orders 1737-51, 34, 39].

 

2.    Jane Bell, born say 1702, was a "mulatto servant" living in Lancaster County, Virginia, on 13 June 1733 when she agreed to serve her master John Hubbard until Christmas that year and then to serve Charles Lee an additional year in return for Lee's buying her time from her former master and allowing her to live with her husband who was Lee's slave [Orders 1729-43, 85]. She was probably the mother of

3        i. Frank, born say 1720.

4        ii. Elias, born say 1740.

 

3.    Frank, born say 1720, a "Mullatto woman," was listed in the 19 January 1756 Lancaster County will of John Hubbard, proved 19 June 1761. John Hubbard, of the lower precinct of Christ Church Parish, left Franks' "Mullatto" daughter Lucy Bell to his daughter Judith Hubbard and left Frank, her son Abraham, and his "Mullatto woman Betty" and her three children during the time of their service to his sons William and Joshua Hubbard [Deeds & Wills 1758-63, 149-50]. She was the mother of

i. Lucy, born say 1738.

ii. Abraham, born say 1740.

5        iii. Elizabeth1, born say 1741.

 

4.    Elias Bell, born say 1740, was a defendant in a Lancaster County court in a suit for trespass, assault and battery brought by Mary Lawry on 16 April 1764 for which a jury awarded her 1 penny. He sued Thomas Pollard, Jr., for debt at the same court [Orders 1764-7, 18, 40, 61]. He died before 25 April 1789 when his daughter Betty Bell was married in Lancaster County. His children were

i. Elizabeth2, born say 1770, "daughter of Elias Bell, decd.," married Benjamin Pinn, 25 April 1789 Lancaster County marriage.

ii. ?John, born about 1777, registered in Norfolk County on 20 July 1812: 5 feet 6 inches 35 years of age, light complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, #79]. He may have been the husband of Nancy Bell, sole heir of James Thomas, a Revolutionary seaman from Norfolk County. She registered in Norfolk County on 20 July 1812: 5 feet 3 In. 32 Years of age of a dark Complexion, Born free as appears by the oath of James Pretlow [Register, #76].

iii. ?Lurana, born about 1779, registered as a "free Negro" in Norfolk County on 17 July 1810: 5 feet 4 Inc., 31 years of age, of a light Complexion [Register, #26]. She was head of a Norfolk County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:817].

iv. ?Coleman, born about 1782, registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 17 September 1805: Age 23, Color black...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 2]. He married Agge Weaver, 26 December 1806 Lancaster County marriage. He was head of a Lancaster County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:338]. On 23 June 1834 he was in Northumberland County when he gave his consent and was security for the marriage of (his son?) James Bell, "colored," to marry Eliza Jones, widow.

v. ?Thorton, born about 1783, head of a Westmoreland County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:768], called William Thornton Bell when he registered in Westmoreland County in May 1832: a man of light complexion, 5 feet 10 inches high, about 49 years of age [Register of Free Negroes, 1828-1849, no.149].

vi. ?Sally, born about 1793, registered in Norfolk County on 20 July 1812: 5 feet 4 1/2 inches 19 years of age light complexion, Born free [Register of Free Negros & Mulattos, #80].

 

5.    Elizabeth, born say 1731, a "Mullatto woman" named in John Hubbard's 19 January 1756 Lancaster County will, may have been a member of the Bell family. She and her three children were willed to Hubbard's sons William and Joshua Hubbard during the time of their service. She had 11 months to serve when she was listed in the inventory of Hubbard's estate, recorded 17 July 1761 [DW 1756-63, 150a, 162a]. She may have been identical to or the daughter of Betsy Bell who was head of a Norfolk County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:822]. And she may have been the mother of

i. Dorcas, born about 1754, married John Weaver, 10 June 1789 Lancaster County bond. She registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 18 July 1803: wf/o John, Age 49, Color dark, Served till 31 years of age [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1].

ii. James, born about 1754, registered in Southampton County on 11 May 1808: age 54, Black, 5 feet 9 inches, free born from Richd. Cty. per certificate. He registered again on 1 October 1812: age 58, Blk., 5 feet 7-1/2 inches, free born, see certificate Lancaster County. And he registered again on 12 May 1815: age 61, Blk., 5 feet 8 inches, free born [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1832, nos. 425, 904, 954].

iii. Sarah, born about 1755, registered as a "free Negro" in Lancaster County on 17 October 1803: Age 48, Color dark...born free [Burkett, Lancaster County Register of Free Negroes, 1].

 

BENNETT FAMILY

1.    James Bennett, born say 1700, was one of the Chowan County Indians who sold their land on Bennett's Creek in 1734 in the part of Chowan County which later became Gates County:

James Bennett, Thos Hoyter, Charles Beasley, Jeremiah Pushin, John Robins, John Reading & Nuce Will Cheif men of the Chowan Indians ... [Chowan DB W:250].

He and John Robins were also called chief men of the Chowan Indians on 19 November 1758 when they sold 300 acres of Indian land by deed proved in Gates County [DB 2:101]. He, James Bennett, Jr., and Amos Bennett were called "Bennett's Creek Indians" in October 1763 when they sold land by deed acknowledged in Chowan County court. And a deed from him and John Robins was proved in Chowan County in October 1765 [Minutes 1761-6, 164, 273]. His descendants were probably

i. George, born about 1768, a thirteen-year-old "Indian Boy" ordered by the Gates County court to be bound as an apprentice shoemaker to Edward Brisco in February 1781 [Fouts, Minutes of Gates County Court 1779-86, 29]. He was head of a Gates County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:23], 4 in 1800 [NC:262], 5 in 1810 [NC:842] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:143]. He and (his brother?) Joseph Bennett and James and Benjamin Robins were called "chief men and representatives of the Chowan Indian Nation" on 12 April 1790 when they sold for $100 four hundred acres of land which was part of the original Indian patent of 24 April 1724 [DB A-2:153].

ii. Joseph, born about 1769, a twelve-year-old "Indian Boy" called Josiah Bennett in February 1781 when the Gates County court ordered him bound as an apprentice cooper to Henry Booth [Fouts, Minutes of Gates County Court 1779-86, 29]. He was head of a Gates County household of one "other free" in 1790 [NC:23] and an insolvent Gates County taxpayer in 1794 [Fouts, Minutes of Gates County Court, I:17].

iii. Nancy, born before 1776, head of an Edenton, Chowan County household of 2 "free colored" women in 1820 [NC:130].

iv. Rachel, head of a Currituck County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [NC:138].

v. Esther, head of a Chowan County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:532].

 

BERRY FAMILY

1.    John1 Berry, born say 1660, was a white man living in York County, Virginia, in September 1693 when he had a son by Mary Jewell/ Cuttillo, "a mollotto." She was living in the lower precincts of Poquoson Parish on 24 May 1694 when she was presented by the court for having a child by him [DOW 10:341; Richter, A Community and its Neighborhoods, 343; Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 61]. John Berry and Mary Cuttillo were the parents of

2        i. James1 Cattilla, born 16 September 1693.

 

2.    James1 Berry, born 16 September 1693, son of Mary Cattilla, was called James Cattilla when his birth was registered in Charles Parish, York County (no father named). He was called James Berry and married to a woman named Mary in Elizabeth City County on 2 October 1719 when the birth of their son James was registered in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 50]. He was presented by the Elizabeth City County court on 20 November 1728 for not coming to church [Orders 1723-30, 285, 295]. He was called James Berry, Sr., on 2 November 1761 when the Elizabeth City County court granted him and Charles Hopson (Hobson) a certificate for taking up a runaway slave named Daniel belonging to Thomas Whiting. On 7 December 1762 the court ordered that he be levy free [Court Records 1760-9, 46, 114]. He was called "Old James Berry" in 1765 when the Elizabeth City Parish vestry paid Edward Cuttillo for boarding him [von Doenhoff, Vestry Book of Elizabeth City Parish, 163]. He died before 15 January 1779 when the inventory of his York County estate was taken. His children were

3        i. James2, born 2 October 1719.

ii. ?Ann, born say 1734, taxable in Sarah Cuttillo's York County household on 19 November 1750. She married Edward Cuttillo.

iii. ?Samuel, born say 1750, a "Mulatto" man, a shoemaker, who ran away from Judith Harbert of Hampton according to an ad she placed in the 18 July 1771 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements, 1:313].

 

3.    James2 Berry, born 2 October 1719, was baptized on 6 December 1719 in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 50]. He was a resident of Elizabeth City County on 7 December 1762 when he was granted administration on the estate of John George, deceased. On 7 November 1764 the court ordered that his wife be added to the list of tithables [Court Orders 1760-9, 114, 262]. He was married to Mary by 14 May 1769 when their son James was born [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 50]. The York County court presented him on 16 November 1772 for not listing Charles Hopson as a tithable [Judgments & Orders 1772-4, 151]. In August 1771 he purchased land in Elizabeth City County called Finches Dam tract from Martha Armistead. James transferred this land to his son Edward by early 1780. In March of that year Callowhill Mennis petitioned the York County court for permission to clear a road from his plantation through Edward Berry's land to the main county road [Richter, A Community and its Neighborhoods, 359]. He rented a slave from Anthony Robinson in January 1778 according to the account of Robinson's York County estate [WI 22:405]. His wife Mary died on 8 October 1784 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 203]. He was taxable in the lower precinct of Charles Parish, York County, in 1784 [PPTL, 1782-1841, frame 83] and taxable in Elizabeth City County on 2 horses and 18 cattle in 1785, 1 a horse and 11 cattle in 1786, and taxable on a horse from 1792 to 1798 [PPTL 1782-1820, frames 37, 45, 112, 122, 132, 149, 157, 163, 170]. John Hunter sued him and his wife Ann in Elizabeth City County court for a 1 pound, 15 shillings debt on 21 August 1786 [Orders 1784-8, 309-10]. His 7 February 1800 Elizabeth City County will was proved on 27 February 1800. He left his estate to his wife Ann and named his son James Berry and Elizabeth Davis executors [DW 34:522]. He was the father of

4        i. Edward1, say 1750.

ii. Elizabeth2, married Thomas Epps according to a York County court suit she and her husband brought in chancery against the heirs of her brother Edward Berry. She may have been living in Lunenburg County about 1779 when her father's estate was settled [LVA, chancery case 1798-002].

iii. James3, born 14 May, baptized 18 June 1769 [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 50].

iv. Frances, born 5 September, baptized 21 December 1777.

 

4.    Edward1 Berry, born say 1750, was married to Martha and living in Charles Parish by 9 July 1775 when their son James was born, and he was married to Elizabeth by 4 March 1783 when their daughter Sally was born. His son Edward was identified as a "Mulatto" when he was baptized on 12 March 1786 in Charles Parish [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 50-1]. He was taxable in Elizabeth City County from 1782 to 1784: taxable on 3 horses in 1782, listed as Armiger Webb's tithe in 1783, taxable on slave Milley in 1784 [PPTL 1782-1820, frames 2, 16, 23], taxable in York County on a free tithe and slaves Peter, Dinah, Joe, Lucy, and Dinah in 1784; taxable on 3 tithes, 2 slaves over the age of 16, 6 horses and 14 cattle in 1785; taxable on a slave in 1790 and taxable on 100 acres in York County in 1791 [PPTL 1782-1841, frames 76, 98, 160, 244; Land Tax List, 1791, p.1]. He was also taxable in Elizabeth City County on a 12-16 year-old slave in 1790 [PPTL 1782-1820, frame 100]. Edward and his sister Elizabeth were identified as the heirs of James Berry in a 1798 York County chancery case in which Edward's sister brought a successful suit against Edward's heirs [LVA, Chancery case 1798-002]. The inventory of Edward's estate, valued at 202 pounds, was taken in York County in October 1790. It included a slave woman and three children. His wife remarried and was called Elizabeth Cotillo (Cuttillo) on 21 December 1791 when she returned an account of his estate. The 19 October 1803 division of his estate assigned 40 acres and the dwelling house to Elizabeth's husband Edward Cattilla, and the remaining 105 acres was divided among Edward's children James, Edward, Sarah, Mary, and Elizabeth [WI 23:450-2, 634; Orders 1803-14, 140-1]. Edward was the father of

i. James4, born 5 June, baptized 9 July 1775, son of Edward and Martha [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 50], taxable in York County in 1803 and 1804 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841].

ii. Martha, born 23 April, baptized 14 June 1778, daughter of Edward and Martha [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 50].

iii. Sally, born 4 March 1783, baptized 18 May, "dau. of Edwd and Eliza ___a City" (of Elizabeth City) [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 51].

5        iv. Edward2, born 26 December 1785.

v. Mary, born say 1787.

vi. Elizabeth3, married Charles Hopson (Hobson), 20 June 1808 York County bond, Abraham Hopson bondsman.

 

5.    Edward2 Berry, born 26 December 1785, "a Mulatto," was baptized on 12 March 1786 in Charles Parish, York County [Bell, Charles Parish Registers, 50]. He was taxable in York County from 1806 to 1820 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-1841, frames 315, 351, 363, 385, 403, 468, 480]. He owned 25 acres of land in 1852 when his widow Elizabeth Hopson (who married James Hopson) brought a successful chancery suit against their children James, Thomas, Elizabeth, Abraham, Mary, Edward, Martha and Rebecca in order to have the land sold [LVA chancery suit 1852-004]. Edward and Elizabeth were the parents of

i. James, born say 1807, died before the 1852 chancery suit was filed leaving a widow without issue who married John Epps Hopson.

ii. Thomas, born about 1809, registered in York County on 19 September 1831: a bright mulatto, nearly 22 years of age, 5 feet 9-1/4 inches high, tolerably long curly hair, hazle eyes ... Born free [Free Negroes Register 1831-50, no.295]. He died before 1852 leaving one unnamed child.

iii. Elizabeth, born say 1811, married to John Cotillo before 1852.

iv. Abraham, born say 1813, died without issue before 1852.

v. Mary Ann, born about 1814, registered in York County on 19 September 1831: a girl of very light Complexion, nearly 17 years old, 5 feet 5 inches high ... a scar on the left arm in Consequence of being vaccinated, full black eyes ... Born free [Register, no.292]. He married Michael Hall and died leaving one child before 1852.

vi. Edward3, born about 1817, registered in York County on 16 February 1835: a bright Mulatto about 18 years of age 5 feet 8 Inches high ... broad face, long curly hair, flat nose ... Born of free parents in York County [Register, no.387].

vii. Martha, born say 1819, married Edward White before 1852.

viii. Rebecca, born say 1821, married Topping Brown before 1852.

 

Other members of a Berry family were

1        i. Elizabeth1, born say 1726.

2        ii. Ann, born say 1728.

3        iii. Margaret, born say 1735.

 

1.    Elizabeth1 Berry, born say 1726, was the "Mulatto" servant of Drury Stith in August 1747 and 28 March 1750 when the Brunswick County, Virginia court bound her son James Berry and daughter Mary Berry as apprentices to her master [Orders 1745-49, 244; 1749-50, 53]. She was the mother of

4        i. James1, born about 1747.

5        ii. Mary, born say 1748.

 

2.    Ann Berry, born say 1728, a "free Mulatto Woman," was living in Spotsylvania County on 6 August 1754 when she bound her three-year-old daughter Mary Berry to Roger Dixon until the age of eighteen years to learn to knit, spin and other household business [WB B:209-10]. She was the mother of

i. Mary, born 20 March 1751, head of a Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:107b].

ii. ?James2, a "Mulatto Bastard" bound apprentice until the age of twenty-one by the Orange County, Virginia court on 25 March 1768 [Orders 1763-9, 480].

 

3.    Margaret Berry, born say 1735, was the mother of Anthony Berry, "a mulatto" who was bound apprentice to Tim. Cleven in Anson County and brought before the Cumberland County, North Carolina court on 20 January 1757 when Cleven's request for an indenture was rejected by the court. On 17 January 1758 she brought her orphan son John Berry into court to be bound apprentice to Michael Blocker. He was bound, instead, to William Dawson, Esq., on 18 January 1758 when Margaret confessed to the court that Anthony was born while she was a servant [Minutes 1755-9, 18, 32]. She was probably related to Henry Berry who, according to tradition, was one of the first free African Americans to come to Robeson County with James Lowry [Blu, The Lumbee Problem, 36]. James Lowry's grandson, Henry Berry Lowry, was named for him. Margaret's children who were bound apprentices in Cumberland County were

i. Anthony, born about 1754, bound apprentice to Tim. Cleven in Anson County and then to William Dawson, Esq., of Cumberland County, North Carolina on 18 January 1758 [Minutes 1755-59, 32].

ii. John, born say 1756, bound apprentice to Michael Blocker on 17 January 1758.

iii. Thomas, born say 1757, a child brought into court by Margaret Berry, bound to Michael Block by order of the 20 July 1758 Cumberland County court, no race or parent named [Minutes 1755-9, 38].

 

4.    James1 Berry, born about 1747, was one of the members of Captain Joseph Spencer's 7th Virginia Regiment who did not return from furlough in Gloucester Town. Spencer advertised a reward for their return in the 8 August 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette, describing James as

a mulatto fellow, about 30 years old, 5 feet 8 or 9 inches high; enlisted in Fredericksburg but served his time with Mr. Thomas Bell of Orange County [Virginia Gazette, Purdie edition, p.4, col. 3].

He may have been the James Berry who was taxable in Dinwiddie County in the household of Dr. Thomas Stewart in 1785 and a "free" taxable in 1793 and 1799 [Personal Property Tax List, 1782-90 (1785 B, p.23); 1791-9 (1793 A, p.2), (1799 B, p.2)], and he may have been the ancestor of

i. Nancy, a "F.N." taxable in Henrico County on a slave above the age of 16 years from 1801 to 1804 [Personal Property Tax List B, p.2] and on 1 acre of land in 1802 [Land Tax List A, p.3]. She married Adam Flood (called Adam Floyd), 31 March 1806, "both free people of color," Henrico County bond, Samuel Cole surety.

ii. Lucy, married Dempsey Stewart, 4 February 1786 Greensville County, Virginia bond, Cannon Cumbo bondsman, Thomas and Barney Steward witnesses.

iii. Lucinda, head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:331].

iv. Polly, head of a Southampton County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1810.

v. Thomas, born about 1785, registered in Petersburg on 26 December 1806: a light brown free Mulatto man, five feet nine and a half inches high, spare made, twenty one years old, shoe maker, registered by desire of his father [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 403].

 

5.    Mary Berry, born say 1748, was bound by the Brunswick County, Virginia court to Drury Stith, Gentleman, on 28 March 1750. On 25 September 1775 the Brunswick County court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out her "Mulattoe" son Thomas Berry. She was called Molly Berry (no race indicated) on 28 October 1782 when the court ordered the churchwardens of St. Andrew's Parish to bind out her children Thomas, Betty and Sylvia [Orders 1749-50, 53; 1774-82, 92, 115; 487]. She was the mother of

i. Thomas, perhaps the Thomas Berry who was taxable in Norfolk County from 1799 to 1816: a labourer in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes" at Gosport in 1801, a "free Negro" in Portsmouth in 1813 and 1816 [Personal Property Tax Lists, 1791-1812, frames 295, 383, 479, 738, 770; 1813-24, frames 16, 126].

6        ii. Betty, born about 1765.

iii. Sylvia.

 

6.    Betsy Berry, born about 1765, registered in Petersburg on 9 January 1811: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet 3/4 inches high, forty six years old, long bushy hair, born free & raised in the County of Prince George [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 653?]. She was the mother of

i. ?Julius, taxable in the upper district of Henrico County in 1802 [Land Tax List, 1799-1816] head of a Petersburg Town household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:121b].

ii. ?Sarah, head of a Richmond City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:336].

iii. ?Polly, born 31 December 1788, registered in Petersburg on 21 December 1809: a light brown Mulatto woman, five feet two inches high, twenty one years old 31st instant, born free & raised in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 501].

iv. ?Betsy, born about 1791, registered in Petersburg on 8 June 1810: a brown Mulatto woman, five feet high, nineteen years old, long bushy hair, born free in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 552].

v. Nancy, born about 1795, registered in Petersburg on 8 June 1810: a brown Mulatto girl, five feet one and a half inches high, long bushy hair, fifteen years old, daughter of Betsy Berry a free woman residing in Dinwiddie County [Register of Free Negroes 1794-1819, no. 553].

 

Other members of the Berry family were

i. Nancy, head of a Jefferson County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:102].

ii. Naney, head of a Barnwell District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:53].

 

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