CALVELL/ CALWELL/ CALDWELL FAMILY

1.    Isabella Colvill, born say 1706, the servant of Mr. Daniel Sherwood of St. Michael's Parish, Talbot County, admitted in court in November 1726 that she had a "Mallatto" child by Sherwood's "Negroe" slave Jack on 1 September 1726. The court ordered that she serve her master another six months for his trouble and then be sold for seven years [Judgment Record 1726, 346-7; 1726 (reverse), 87]. She was the mother of

2        i. Martha, born about 1726.

3        ii. Martin Collwell, born say 1745.

 

2.    Martha Calvell, born about 1726, said to have been the "Mullatto" daughter of Elizabeth Calvel but corrected to Esabel Calvel, was sold to Daniel Sherwood until the age of thirty-one in November 1726 [Judgment Record 1726, 326]. She was called "Martha Colvin, a Mallatto woman" in November 1751 when the Talbot County court convicted her of having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." The court sold her for seven years and her child for 31 years for a total of 650 pounds of tobacco to Joseph Dawson. She was called Martha Calvell in November 1753 when she admitted to the same offense and was ordered to be sold for another seven years after the completion of her service to Joshep Dawson [Criminal Record, 1751-5, n.p.]. Martha Caldwell was head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1790. She may have been the mother of

i. Lucy Caldwell, born say 1743, a spinster living in Talbot County in August 1763 when she was convicted of having a child by a "Negro." The Court sold her and her child to Cornelius Dailey for 4,400 pounds of tobacco [Criminal Record 1761-7, 212-3].

 

3.    Martin Collwell, born say 1745, was head of a taxable "free Mullotes" household of two "blacks" in Bay Hundred, Talbot County in August 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland]. He may have been the father of

i. Ary, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 September 1809: a black woman ... about 41 years of age, 5 feet & three quarters of an inch high ... free born ... raised in the County.

ii. Joseph, born about 1780, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 12 September 1812: a Mullatto man ... about thirty two years of age, five feet Seven and one quarter inches high ... born free and raised in the County.

iii. Jeremiah, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 29 January 1811: about 23 years of age, five feet nine inches high ... dark yellow complexion was born free ... raised in the county.

iv. Sally, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 21 August 1815: a Black Girl ... Sally Caldwell ... about 20 years of age 5 feet 1/2 inches high ... born free, & raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 17, 18, 40, 124].

 

Members of the family in Delaware were

i. Palin, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:126] and 5 in 1810 [DE:12].

ii. Solomon, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:65] and 7 in 1810 [DE:75].

iii. Tobias, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:65] and 5 in 1810 [DE:75].

iv. Peter1, head of a New Castle County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:279].

v. Peter2, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:147].

vi. Philip, head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:110] and 3 in 1810 [DE:49].

vii. Oliver, head of a Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:12].

viii. Richard, head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:46].

ix. Prince, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:126].

x. Timothy, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:126].

xi. Stephen, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:50].

xii. Joseph, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:50].

xiii. Anthony, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:50].

 

CALLAMAN FAMILY

1.    James Callaman, born say June 1695, may have been identical to "James a malatto" who was about seventeen years old on 14 April 1713 when Richard Marsham of Prince George's County devised him his freedom at age thirty-five. He was listed in the 15 June 1713 Prince George's County inventory of Marsham's estate:

Negroes:

one Malato Man Robin 7 years to serve, age 27, 16 pounds

(Robert Pearl)

one Malato boy Jemmy 17 years to serve, age 18, 20 pounds

[Prerogative Wills 13:514-20; Prerogative Inventories and Accounts, 35A:299-308].

Robert Pearl's sons Thomas and James Pearl were called the kinsmen of James Colemore when they approved the inventory of his Prince George's County estate which was filed by their brother Daniel Pearl on 23 June 17__ [Prerogative Court Inventories 96:336]. And on 17 August 1768 Daniel Pearl sold a thirteen-year-old slave named Rob who had formerly been the property of James Caulmore, late of Prince George's County deceased, by Frederick County bill of sale of 17 August 1768 [Land Records B:6]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Moses Callaman, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of a free white male and two free white females [MD:242].

ii. John, head of a Frederick County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 [MD:218].

iii. Zilpha Calliman, married Thomas Perrill (Pearl), 5 March 1791 Frederick County, Maryland bond.

iv. Mary Callaman, married Benjamin Lett, son of Samuel and Jemima Banneker Lett, 5 January 1809 Frederick County, Virginia bond.

v, Benjamin Callaman, married Elizabeth Perrill, 2 September 1813 Frederick County, Maryland bond.

 

CAMBRIDGE FAMILY

1.    Anne Hunt, born say 1694, was the servant of Mr. Robert Nearn/ Nairn, merchant of Coventry Parish, on 2 June 1713 when she admitted in Somerset County court that she had a child by a "Negroe." The court ordered that she receive thirty lashes and that her master give security to return her to court to be sold for seven years at the completion of her indenture. Her master Robert Nearn purchased her unnamed son for thirty one years [Judicial Record 1711-13, 283-4]. Ann was apparently the mother of

2        i. William Cambridge, born about 1713.

2.    William1 Cambridge Hunt, born about 1713, was called William Cambridge when he was taxable in the Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County household of Robert Nairn in 1727 and 1728: called Will and taxable in James Nairn's Pocomoke household from 1730 to 1743: called William Cambridge in 1730 and 1743, called either "Will" or "Cambridge" in the intervening years [List of Taxables]. He was called William Hunt Cambridge when he was granted a patent 50 acres in Worcester County called "William's Choice" in 1752 which he expanded to 128 acres in 1754 (called William Cambridge Stuart). He was called "William Cambridge a Molatto" in 1783 when he was taxable in Acquango Hundred, Worcester County, on 128 acres, called "William's Choice enlarged" [MSA S1437, p.2]. He called himself William Cambridge Hunt (making his mark) in his 11 March 1784 Worcester County will, proved 5 January 1787, by which he left his plantation to his wife Esther during her widowhood and then to son Levin, or to son George if Levin died before attaining the age of twenty-one. He also left his daughter Leah a feather bed, furniture and a place and materials to build a house and divided some of his possessions among "all my children" [WB JW 13:109-11]. His widow Esther sold and released "William's Choice" for 30 pounds on 9 March 1798 [DB S:286-7]. Their children were

i. Leah, born say 1763.

ii. Levin, born say 1765, called himself a "free Mollater" on 25 March 1794 when he and George Cambridge gave bond of 30 pounds to support the illegitimate child Peggy he had by Mary Blake in Worcester County in November 1790 [DB P:301]. He called himself "Levin Cambridge (alias Hunt)" on 24 April 1795 when he sold (signing) the 128 acres of land he received by his father's will to Charles Godfrey for about 11 pounds and then repurchased the land from Godfrey for the same price on 25 December the same year. He mortgaged the property to James Bowdoin Robins on 4 November 1796 for 50 pounds and then completed the sale to Samuel Handy, Sr., on 6 April 1798 [DB Q:172-3; R:56, 374; S:284].

iii. George, born say 1767, head of a Bracken County, Kentucky household of 3 "free colored" in 1830, in the same county as William Cambridge, born before 1776, who was head of a household of 4 "free colored."

iv. ?Charles, "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County in 1789, in Mispillion Hundred in 1797, and head of a Mispillion Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:76]. He died before 6 May 1806 when his widow Mary gave up her right to administer his estate. The estate was valued at $201 [DSA, RG 3545, Reel 31, frames 521-4].

v. ?Isaac, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:301].

vi. ?William2, died about 1806 when the inventory of his estate was recorded in Kent County, Delaware [Inventories 1806-12].

 

CAMPBELL FAMILY

1.    Sarah Campbell, born say 1712, was the servant of Thomas Davis on 1 August 1731 when she bore a "mullatto" by a "negro" in Queen Anne's County. The court ordered her sold for seven years to William Price and sold her son James to Price until age thirty-one for 732 pounds of tobacco [Judgment Record 1730-2, 323-4]. She was the ancestor of

i. James, born 1 August 1731, perhaps the James Campbell who was head of a West Sassafras, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. ?William, head of a West Sassafras, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iii. ?Henry, head of a New Castle County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:207] and 3 "other free" in Kent County, Delaware in 1810 [DE:178].

 

CANN FAMILY

1.    James Cann, born say 1715, was called a "free Mallatto Man" on 28 November 1738 when "Mallatto Nan," the servant of Thomas Gantt, Jr., testified in Prince George's County court that he was the father of her eight-month-old child named Nasey [Court Record 1738-40, 269]. He was probably the ancestor of

i. Cross, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

ii. William, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:97].

 

CANNON FAMILY

1.    Margaret Cannon, born say 1725, was the indentured servant of Isaac Smoot on 10 August 1743 when she was convicted by the Charles County court of having a child by a "Negro." The court bound her five-month-old daughter Nelly as an apprentice and ordered that she serve her master an additional seven years [Court Proceedings, vol. 39, 627-8]. She was the ancestor of

i. Eleanor, born about March 1743, an eight-year-old "Mulatto" girl bound until the age of thirty-one when she was listed in the inventory of the Charles County estate of Isaac Smoot on 14 October 1751 [Prerogative Inventories 48:210].

ii. Robert, born about 1748, a three-year-old "Mulatto" boy bound until the age of thirty-one when he was listed in the inventory of the Charles County estate of Isaac Smoot on 14 October 1751 [Prerogative Inventories 48:210].

iii. Patrick, head of an Elk Neck, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

CARNEY FAMILY

1.    Rebecca Corney, born say 1671, was the indentured servant of John Baxter in August 1689 when she was convicted by the Charles City County, Virginia Court of having a "Mulatto" bastard" [Orders 1687-95, 225]. She may have been the mother of

i. William1, born say 1689.

 

2.    William1 Karney, born say 1689, was taxable in Daniel Robbeson's Murderkill, Kent County, Delaware household in 1734, taxable in his own household in 1736 and 1738, and a taxable free "Malato" in 1748 and 1751. He was not taxable in 1752 ("struck out" by the court) [Kent County Assessments Levy Lists]. He was probably the ancestor of

i. Thomas1, born say 1731, taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1752 to 1767, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1768 to 1770, in Duck Creek Hundred from 1778 to 1785: called a "N."(egro) starting in 1781, taxable on personal tax only in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 317, 327, 386, 523, 575; 1768-84, frames 10, 65, 336, 370, 552, 568; 1785-97, frames 6; 1798-9, frame 350], head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:15]. He admitted in Kent County court in February 1771 that he owed John Smith 90 pounds [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-1771, frames 372, 390].

ii. William2, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1781 [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc. , Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781], head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:26].

iii. John, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24] and 7 "other free" in Sussex County, Delaware, in 1810 [DE:442].

iv. Robert, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24].

3        v. Thomas2, Jr., born say 1758.

vi. Nathan, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24].

vii. Jacob, head of an Appoquinimink, New Castle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:442].

 

3.    Thomas2 Carney, Jr., born say 1758, a man of color, was about sixty years old on 24 February 1818 when he appeared in Caroline County court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution. He enlisted in the 5th Maryland Regiment in June 1781 and served for three years. He appeared in court again on 7 March 1822 at the age of sixty-three and listed his property which included a pair of cart wheels and shafts, five pigs, a sheep and lamb, three barrels of corn, some household items and a debt of $92.50 to the estate of Risdon Fountain. He was a farmer with a fifty-seven or eight-year-old wife named Grace, a seventeen-year-old daughter Alice, and a fourteen-year-old daughter Rebecca living with him [National Archives pension file 535203, http://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24] and a "negro" head of a Caroline County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:190]. He was the father of

i. ?Elizabeth, born about 1790, a "molatto woman," obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 16 September 1815.

ii. ?Levi, born about 1793, "molatto complexion," obtained a certificate obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 16 September 1815.

iii. ?Montgomery, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 16 September 1815.

iv. ?Lydia, born about 1801, a "negro woman" who obtained a certificate of freedom in Caroline County on 23 September 1826 [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 77, 186, 215].

v. Alice, born about 1805.

vi. Rebecca, born about 1808.

 

CARR FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Carr, born say 1705, the white servant of Thomas Strong of Shrewsbury Parish, confessed to the Kent County, Maryland Court in March 1725/6  that she had a "Mollatoe" child by Jacob Miner, a "free Negroe," on 1 October 1725. She was the servant of Joseph Young on 17 March 1729/30 when she confessed to the same offense [Criminal Records 1724-8, 155-7; 1728-34, 108]. Elizabeth and Jacob were probably the ancestors of

i. Nancy, born say 1775, mother of Milley Carr who obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 25 September 1816: a bright mulatto girl, about 20 years old ... daughter of Nancy Carr, a free woman of color.

ii. Ann, born about 1777, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 17 June 1808: a mulatto woman, 31 years old  ... bright yellow complexion. She is a free woman ... sold by Prince George's County Court at its August term 1777 to a certain Mary Berry until the age 31, under the conviction of her mother of mulatto bastardy, being at that time a child of three months [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 1, 22].

iii. John, born about 1791, obtained a certificate in Talbot County on 16 August 1814: about 23 years of age ... of a dark Complexion ... born free and raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 88].

 

CARROLL FAMILY

Members of the Carroll family in Maryland were

1        i. James, born say 1720.

2        ii. William1, born about 1733.

 

1.    James Carroll, born say 1720, was a "black man" who rented land from Mrs. Gallaway's in Baltimore County, Maryland in 1750 [Wright, Inhabitants of Baltimore County, 45]. He was probably the ancestor of

i. Peter1, head of a Baltimore City household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:160].

ii. Peter2, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:170].

iii. Maryan, head of a Baltimore City household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:164].

iv. H., head of a Baltimore City household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:310].

 

2.    William1 Carroll, born about 1733, ran away from Notley Young before 21 January 1762 when Young placed an ad in the Maryland Gazette: living near the mouth of the Eastern Branch of Patowmack, a Mulatto Man, about 28 or 29 years of Age, nigh 6 feet high, calls himself Billy Carroll, and is a Carpenter by Trade [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements II:43]. He may have been the father of

3        i. William2, born say 1775.

ii. Margaret, "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:261].

iii. Ann, head of a Montgomery County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:977].

 

3.    William2 Carroll, born say 1775, was a "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:294] and 5 in 1810 [MD:53]. He was the father of

i. ?Christiana Scott, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 14 September 1827: a bright mulatto woman, about 29 years old, and 5 feet 3 inches tall ... freed by William Carroll by manumission this day acknowledged and recorded.

ii. William3, born about 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom on 14 September 1827: a bright mulatto man, about 24 years old, and 5 feet 7-1/2 inches tall ... freed by his father, William Carroll Sr. of this county, by manumission this day.

iii. Charles, born about 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom on 14 September 1827: a bright mulatto boy, about 19 years old, and 5 feet 9 inches tall ... set free by William Carroll Sr. of this county my manumission this day.

iv. John, born about 1812, obtained a certificate of freedom on 14 September 1827: a dark copper-colored boy, about 15(?) years old, and 5 feet 5 inches tall ... set free by William Carroll [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 68].

 

CARTER FAMILY

Members of the Carter family were

i. Anthony, head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 10 in 1800 [MD:405].

ii. Hannah, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Charles, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iv. William, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County of 1 "other free" in 1790.

v. Rachel, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:171].

vi. Pall, "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:258].

vii. Peter, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161].

viii. Nelly, head of a Montgomery County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:235].

ix. Jane, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:437].

x. Anne, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:436].

xi. Stacia, head of a St. Mary's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:402].

xii. Polly, "free Mulatto" head of a Prince George's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:264].

xiii. Philip, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 26 July 1814: aged thirty years or thereabouts ... complexion yellow - hair woolly ... born free.

xiv. William, born about 1784, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 54 November 1807: about twenty three years of age, very bright complexion, was born free.

xv. Enoch, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 5 April 1838: aged about fifty years ... bright complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 2, 27, 115].

 

CARTY FAMILY

1.    John Cartey, born say 1715, was called John Cartey of St. Peter's Parish, Labourer, "being a Mulatto man begotten by a Negroe man upon the body of a white woman" in Talbot County court in November 1741 when he was convicted of marrying a white woman named Margaret Deepup on 10 September 1739. Margaret was sold to John Jones, tanner, for seven years. The court fined Margaret, wife of John Cartey, 1 shilling for assaulting John Jones in February 1742, and in November 1742 Jones sued John Cartey for being absent from his service a total of fifty-seven days in 1741 and 1742 [Judgment Record 1740-2, 327-9; 1742, n.p.]. They were probably the ancestors of

i. Samuel, head of a Harford County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. SSolomon, a "free Negro" sued in Kent County, Delaware court by Henry Farsons on 7 October 1796 [DSA, RG 3830.004, Supreme Court 1791-1821, frame 108], head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:20], called Solomon Carter in 1820, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" [DE:49].

iii. Peter, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:275] and 4 in 1810 [DE:302].

iv. Nathan, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:26].

v. Isaac, head of a Appoquinimink Hundred, New Castle County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:148].

 

CASE FAMILY

1.    Mary Case, born say 1683, was the servant of John West on 3 December 1701 when the churchwardens of Accomack Parish presented her for having a "Mullatto Bastard Child." She was presented by the Accomack County court for having another child on 6 April 1703 [Orders 1697-1703, 122a, 126a, 144]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Elizabeth, head of a St. George Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" and one slave in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:130].

ii. Major, head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:105].

iii. Bridget, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:17].

iv. George, head of an Accomack County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:16].

v. Betty, head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:692].

vi. James, head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:692].

 

CHAMBERS FAMILY

1.   Mary Chambers, born say 1698, was the servant of William Frisby of Worton Hundred, Kent County, Maryland, on 22 November 1716 when she appeared in court and confessed to having two "Mollatoe Children" by a "Negro." The court ordered her to serve an additional seven years and bound her children, a boy and a girl, to her master until the age of thirty-one. she was the servant of William Frisby on 22 April 1718 when the court ordered that she serve him another seven years [Proceedings 1716-8, 85-6; 1718-20, 142]. She was apparently the ancestor of

i. William, head of a Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:147].

ii. Deb, head of a Baltimore City household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161].

iii. Ned, born say 1760, a man of color who enlisted in the Revolution in July 1777 in Chester. He was a laborer living in Anne Arundel County at a great distance from Annapolis in 1823 when he applied for a pension [National Archives pension file 534684 cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 121]. He was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iv. Isaac, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:331].

v. Robert, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:331].

vi. Elizabeth1/ Betsy, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:147].

vii. Elizabeth2, head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:147].

viii. James, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:159].

ix. Tom "& Co.," head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 16 "other free" in 1800 [DE:253].

x. Joseph, head of a New Castle County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:277].

xi. Peter, head of a New Castle County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [DE:282].

xii. John, head of a Spotsylvania County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" and 1 white woman in 1810.

xiii. Polly, head of a Spotsylvania County, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810.

 

CHUCK FAMILY

1. Margaret Chuck, born about December 1743, was a "Mullatto" child sold by the Prince George's County court to Lingan Wilson, Gent., for thirty-one years in March 1743/4. She was the servant of Margaret Gibson on 22 August 1775 when the Prince George's County court indicted her on two cases of "Mulatto bastardy" for having children by a "Negro slave named Tom." The court found her not guilty (of having the children by Tom) but ordered her to serve her mistress additional time for having illegitimate children. Benjamin Brookes was her security [Court Record 1743-4, 270; 1775-7, 169-73]. She was apparently the mother of

i. Richard, born about March 1772, bound by the Prince George's County court to Elizabeth Brookes until the age of twenty-one [Court Record 1775-7, 165].

ii. George, born about April 1773, bound by the Prince George's County court to Elizabeth Brookes until the age of twenty-one [Court Record 1775-7, 165].

 

CHURB FAMILY

1.    Mary Chirb, born about 1736, was a "Mulatto" (called Mary Churl) with about six years and four months to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Mr. Turner Wooten on 25 February 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 73:52-4]. On 25 August 1761 the Prince George's County court presented her for having a "Molatto" bastard child. On 22 November 1763 she had an another illegitimate child whose father was probably a free man since the court ordered that she serve her master and mistress, William Turnor Wootton and Elizabeth Wootton, only nine months for the trouble of their house. On 25 March 1766 she confessed to the court that she had another "Mulatto" child, and the court sold her son Natt to Wootton to serve until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1761-3, 69; 1763-4, 9; 1765-6, 386, 390]. She was the mother of

2        i. ?Margaret, born say 1756.

ii. ?Dick, born about February 1760, a one-year-old "Mulatto" child bound until the age of thirty-one when he was listed in the Prince George's County estate of Turner Wooten on 25 February 1761.

iii. Natt, born say 1766.

 

2.    Margaret Churb, born say 1756, a free woman, was the ancestor of

3        i. Esther, born about 1772.

ii. ?Robert1, born say 1775, "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:282].

iii. ?George, born say 1777, "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:282].

 

3.    Esther Churb, born about 1772, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 26 May 1817: about 45 years old ... has a dark complexion. She was raised in Prince George's County and is free, being a descendant of a free woman named Margaret Churb. She was the mother of

i. Louisa, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 28 February 1813: a Negro woman, about 20 years old ... has a dark complexion. She was raised in Prince George's County and is free being the reputed daughter of Esther Churb, a free woman of color.

ii. Robert2, born about 1801, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 7 January 1822: a colored man, about 21 years old ... light complexion ... son of Easter Chu(r)b [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 14, 41].

 

CLARK FAMILY

Delaware:

1.    Martha Clark, born say 1727, was sold by the Kent County court for seven years on 28 August 1746 for payment of fees and charges for murdering her illegitimate child [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1744-1750, frame 234]. She was the servant of Robert Buchanan of Kent County, Delaware, in May 1761 when she was convicted of having an illegitimate "Molatto" male child and ordered to serve her master one year for the trouble of his house. The court sold her son, born 4 July 1759, to her master for 7 pounds [RG 3805.002, Quarter Sessions, 1734-79, frame 197]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. Thomas, born 4 July 1759.

 

2.    Thomas Clark, born 4 July 1759, married Elizabeth Morris ("Mustees, free"), on 1 July 1773 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 286]. They may have been the parents of

i. Miers, born 1776-1794, married Nancy Hanzor, "(Colour'd)" on 26 January 1815 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 325]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:222].

ii. Whitington, born before 1776, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 9 free colored" in 1820 [DE:222].

iii. Morris, born 1776-1794, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:222].

iv. Nathaniel, born 1776-1794, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:206].

 

Kent County, Maryland:

1.    Mary Clark, born say 1745, a white spinster, confessed to the Kent County court in June 1765 that she had a child by a "Negroe." The court sold her and her "Molatto" daughter Hannah(?) to Joseph Nicholson, Jr. [Criminal Record 1761-72, 59b]. She was the servant of Joseph Nicholson, Jr., in June 1769 when she confessed to the same offense. The court sold her two-month-old son Moses until the age of thirty one to her master for 5 shillings [Criminal Dockets, 1766-71, August 1769 appearance no. 27]. She was the mother of

i. Hannah, born about 1765.

ii. Moses, born about June 1769.

 

Other members of the Clark family on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were

i. Elizabeth, head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:526].

ii. Lucretia, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:527].

iii. William, head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:533].

iv. Jere, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in Baltimore City in 1810 [MD:74].

v. John, head of an Octararo, Cecil County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 6 "other free" in Talbot County in 1800 [MD:527].

 

Charles County, Maryland:

1.    Mary Clarke, born say 1732, was presented by the Charles County court on 9 June 1752 for bearing a "Molatto" child. The case was struck off the calendar in November 1752 [Court Record 1752-3, 65, 228]. She may have been the mother of

i. Elizabeth, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Richard, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Shadrack, "free Negro" head of a Prince George County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:311].

iv. Benjamin, had of a Charles County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:337].

 

Other members of the Clark family counted in Maryland were

i. Julia, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:170].

ii. William, head of a Baltimore Town household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Jenny, a "Negro" taxable in Elkridge Hundred, Anne Arundel County in 1783 [MSA S1161-1-3, p.3].

iv. Isaac, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

 

CLAYTON FAMILY

1.    Jeffrey Clayton, born say 1753, was head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:158]. He may have been the father of

i. Solomon, born say 1774. He and his wife Clarissa, "free blacks," registered the birth and baptism of their daughter Priscilla at St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore on 28 March and 8 April 1787 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:115].

 

COGER FAMILY

1.    Margaret Coger, born say 1740, was presented by the Queen Anne's County court in November 1771 for failing to list herself as a tithable [Surles, and they Appeared at Court 1770-1772, 45]. She may have been related to Coger, a "Negro" taxable in Island District of Queen Anne's County in 1783 [MSA S1161-1-8-10, p.74, 1/4/5/51]. And she may have been the mother of

i. Samuel, a "black" head of a Queen Anne's County household of 9 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 148], charged with assault and battery by William Haycock in Queen Anne's County court in July 1786 [Surles, and they Appeared at Court, 1779, 1782, 1785, 1786, 1787, 71, 121]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 7 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Isaac, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

iii. James, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:329]. He was called a blacksmith when he charged Solomon and William Haycock with assault and battery in Queen Anne's County in 1787. He posted 10 pounds bond in 1787 for his appearance to answer the suit of Solomon Haycock's wife Dorcas [Surles, and they Appeared at Court, 1779, 1782, 1785, 1786, 1787, 128-9].

iv. William, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:155].

v. Sarah, born about 1749, a 101-year-old "Mulatto woman born in Maryland and counted in the 1850 census for Washington, D.C. [Ward 7, family 783].

 

COKER FAMILY

Members of the Coker family may have been related to the Coger family of Queen Anne's County. Members of the Coker family in Maryland and Delaware were

i. Daniel1, born about 1766, head of a Caroline County household of 11 "free colored" in 1820, an eighty-four-year-old "Mulatto," born in Maryland, living in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1850 with (wife?) Sarah in the household of James Coker who was also born in Maryland [family no. 348].

ii. Moses, born about 1774, a "Negro," purchased three tracts of land in Kent County, Delaware, totalling 150 acres partially in Caroline County, called Old Fields Enclosure, Long Range and Hickory Hill for $140 on 21 January 1817 [DB R-2:155]. He was head of a Caroline County household of 11 "other free" in 1820 and a seventy-six-year-old "Mulatto" farmer with $3,400 worth of real estate in Caroline County in 1850 [MD:82].

iii. Philip, born before 1776, head of a Caroline County household of 4 "other free" in 1820.

iv. David, born about 1775, a seventy-five-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Greenwich, Cumberland County, New Jersey, with "Black" (wife?) Harriet, both born in Maryland [family no. 121].

v. Daniel2, born 1776-1794, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820.

vi. Thomas Cooker, born 1776-1794, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

 

Another Daniel Coker, born about 1780, was the son of a white woman named Susan Coker and a slave of Frederick County, Maryland. He was elected but declined to be the first bishop of the African Methodist Church. He went to Liberia as a missionary and died there in 1846 [Berlin, Slaves Who Were Free].

 

COLE FAMILY

Members of the Cole family who registered in Alexandria, Virginia, claimed their freedom through descent from a white woman [Brown, Free Negroes in the District of Columbia, 30]. Members of the Cole family in Maryland were

i. Thomas1, born say 1730, a "free Negro" who owed the estate of John Clark of St. Mary's County 2 shillings on 28 April 1755 [Prerogative Inventories 59:213].

1        ii. Araminta, born about 1764.

iii. Ann, born say 1766, head of St. Mary's County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

2        iv. Milly, born say 1772.

v. Frances, head of a St. Mary's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:417].

vi. Cava, head of a St. Mary's County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:217].

vii. Monica, head of a St. Mary's County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:232].

viii. Joe, "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:191].

ix. Jesse, "blk." head of  a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:208].

 

1.    Ariminta Cole, born about 1764, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 10 April 1809: aged 45 years or thereabouts ... complexion yellowish, hair short & curley ... raised in Saint Mary's County and obtained her freedom in the late General Court for the Western Shore. She was head of a St. Mary's County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:215]. She was the mother of

i. Cornelius, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 17 November 1823: son of Minty Cole, aged about twenty eight years ... dark complexion ... born free.

ii. Sandy, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 29 December 1826: aged about 24 years, born free, and born and raised in Saint Mary's County, being the son of a free woman of colour named Minta Cole ... dark complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 4, 64, 72].

 

2.    Milly Cole, born say 1772, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:413]. She was the mother of

i. Thomas, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 28 March 1820: son of Milly Cole ... twenty seven years of age, of a Dark Complexion ... born free.

 

Other members of the Cole family were

i. Frances2, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 25 May 1807: about twenty years of age, dark complexion, was born free and raised in the County aforesaid, she has Woolly hair, large features, cheerful countenance.

ii. Mary, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 29 April 1817: aged thirty years or thereabouts ... Dark Complexion, short hair .. born free. She was head of a St. Mary's County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:216].

iii. Lewis, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 10 June 1823: Son of Nelly Cole, about twenty four years of age and is of a dark complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 1, 38, 54, 61].

 

COLLICK/ KOLLOCK FAMILY

Members of the Collick family in Maryland were

1        i. Samuel, born say 1718.

ii. Simon, born say 1720, taxable in the Mattapany Hundred, Somerset County household of Emanuel Harman in 1736 and 1737, called "Simon" in 1736, "Simon Colleck" in 1737 [List of Tithables, 1736, 1737]. He owed the Worcester County estate of Peter Beckett 1 pound on 23 January 1754 and the Worcester County estate of Alexander Buncle 6 shillings on 3 February 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 60:89; 72:137-42]. He was a "Negro" taxable on 100 acres called Spences Venture and another 12 acres called Conveniency's Addition in Bogerternorton Hundred of Worcester County in 1783 [MdHR MSA S1161-11-6, p.2]. He was head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 (Simon Kollok). He was charged with assault and battery in Sussex County court in May 1773 and November 1778 [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frames 133, 204].

iii. Mary Kollock, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

iv William, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:622]. He mortgaged a sailboat and a yoke of oxen to Levin Conner on 14 February 1823 and sold a yoke of steers and the service of his son Benjamin until the age of twenty-one for $19.25 by Worcester County deed of 24 February 1823 [DB AO:391-2, 419-20]..

 

1.    Samuel Collick, born say 1718, purchased 49 acres in Worcester County, Maryland, called Red Oak Ridge, on the north side of the Pocomoke River in Indian Town on 6 June 1744 [Land Records A:193]. He was a "Mollato" taxable on 49 acres in Acquango Hundred in 1783 [MSA S1161-11-5, p.2]. He died sometime before 16 October 1801 when his wife, Esther, and children: Charles Collick, Leah Roberts, Comfort Collick, Betsy Collick, and Hetty Collick sold Red Oak Ridge and an adjoining 8-1/2 acres, called Equantico Savannah, which Esther had purchased [Land Records, U:405]. Esther was head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:828]. (There was also an Esther Collick counted as head of a Worcester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:814]). Samuel and Esther's children were

i. Charles, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:830].

ii. Leah Roberts.

iii. Comfort.

iv. Betsy.

v. Hetty.

 

COLLINS FAMILY

1.    Christian Collins, born say 1697, had three years remaining on her indenture to William Smith on 24 March 1718/9 when she confessed in Prince George's County court that she had an illegitimate child. The court adjudged that the child was "begott by a Negroe man" and ordered her master William Smith to deliver her up to the court to be sold when her indenture was completed and ordered that the child serve Smith until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1715-20, 809]. She may have been the ancestor of

2         i. Henry2, born say 1765.

ii. Sarah, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Israel, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:174].

 

2.    Henry2 Collins, born say 1765, was a "free Mulatto" head of a Prince George's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:263] and 9 in 1810 [MD:18]. He may have been the husband of Susannah Collins, born 1766-1771, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington, D.C., on 21 June 1821: a woman of colour ... swarthy complexion, aged about fifty-five or sixty years. On 10 June 1817 she testified that Thomas Wiseman was free. She was the mother of

i. Mary Douglass, born 1782-1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington, D.C., on 13 October 1827: a mulatto woman ... about forty or forty-five years old, daughter of Susannah Collings ... born free and raised in Prince George's County [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 82]. Other members of the Douglass family were Daniel, head of a Harford County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and Gabriel, head of a Washington County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:636].

 

1.    Mary Collins, born about 1699, was a "Mollatto woman" who had six more years to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the St. Mary's County estate of Mr. John Blackiston on 18 January 1724/5 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1724-1725, 292-5]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Henry1, head of a St. Mary's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:411].

ii. Eleanor, born about 1772, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 4 June 1817: aged forty five years or thereabouts ... dark complexion, hair short & gray ... born free.

iii. Elizabeth, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 24 October 1817: aged about thirty years ... Dark Complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 39, 41].

 

Members of the Collins family in Charles County were

i. Samuel, head of a Charles County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:561], perhaps the Sam Collins who was a "Molatto" servant listed in the inventory of the St. Mary's County estate of Mr. Edward Diggs with three more years to serve on 10 March 1770, valued at 18 pounds [Prerogative Inventories 103:230].

ii. Samuel, Sr., head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:562].

iii. Samuel, Jr., head of a Charles County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:562] and 13 in 1810 [MD:298].

iv. George, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:522]. On 9 February 1804 he made a Charles County mortgage of seven hogs, a cow, a cow yearling and his household goods for twenty-two pounds to Gabriel Moran who agreed to pay George's rent of 1,740 pounds of tobacco due to his landlord Richard Edelen, deceased. George was called a "mulatto" the same day when he indentured himself to serve Moran for eleven months to compensate him for the twenty-two pounds. Moran also agreed to bring down from the fishing landing on the Potomac River as much fresh fish as George wanted for his wife and children at George's cost [Land Records IB #6, 37-40].

 

Members of the Collins family on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were

i. George, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Peter, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:673].

iii. Spindells, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1800 [MD:530].

iv. Grace, head of a Dorchester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:673].

 

COMBESS/ COMBEST FAMILY

1.    John1 Combess/ Combest, born say 1670, was taxable in Spesutia Hundred, Baltimore County, in 1695 (present day Harford County) [Wright, Inhabitants of Baltimore County, 7]. He was the father of

i. Sarah, born 17 January 1693, "d/o John Combest," in St. George's Parish, Baltimore County. She married William Robinson on 8 December 1713 at St. George's Parish.

2        ii. Ketturah, born 10 October 1695.

iii. Mary, born 20 April 1698, "d/o of John Combest," at Swan Creek, St. George's Parish.

3        iv. Martha, born 9 September 1700.

 

2.    Ketturah Combest was born 10 October 1695, "d/o John Combest," in St. George's Parish, Baltimore County. She was head of a household and taxable on herself and (her son?) John Combess on two tithes in Spesutia Lower Hundred, Baltimore County in 1737. He was probably identical to John Combest, a "Mulatto," aged eleven years and six months in June 1716 when he was bound to George Wells by the Baltimore County court [Proceedings 1715-8, 12]. Ketturah was probably the mother of

i. John2, born about December 1704.

 

3.    Martha Combest was born 9 September 1700, "d/o John Combest," at the head of Collats Creek, St. George's Parish [Reamy, St. George's Parish Register, 1689-1773, 1, 3, 7, 16, 21]. She was head of a household, taxable on herself and her son Jacob Combess on two tithes in Spesutia Lower Hundred, Baltimore County in 1737 [Wright, Inhabitants of Baltimore County, 16]. She was the mother of

i. Jacob, born 10 November 1718, "son of Martha Combest" in St. George's Parish. He was taxable on 46-3/4 acres in Spesutia Hundred, Harford County in 1783 [MSA S1161-6-10, p.124].

 

Some of their descendants were in South Carolina by 1770:

i. Josiah and Penelope, witnesses in a murder case against William Fust and Christopher Davis in the South Carolina Court of General Sessions on 19 January 1770 [Journal of the S.C. Court, p.41].

4        ii. Winna, born say 1752.

 

4.    Winna Combest, born say 1752, was a "Mulatto" head of a Cheraw District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790. She may have been the mother of

i. Josiah2, born about 1770, a twelve-year-old "poor Boy" bound to Joseph Booth until the age of twenty-one on 3 August 1782 in St. David's Parish, South Carolina.

ii. Mary, born about 1776, a six-year-old girl bound to Thomas Lankford in St. David's Parish on 3 August 1782.

iii. Joans, born about 1777, a five-year-old girl bound to Francis Robertson in St. David's Parish, South Carolina on 3 August 1782 [Holcolm, Saint David's Parish Vestry, 24, 25].

iv. John3, head of an Edgefield District, South Carolina household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [SC:766].

 

CONNER FAMILY

1.    Margaret Conner, born say 1699, was the servant of Captain Edward Hammond of All Hallows Parish on 3 March 1712/3 when she admitted that she had an illegitimate child for which she received twenty-five lashes. On 5 August 1712 she admitted in court that she had a child by her master's slave Jeffrey. Jeffrey received twenty-five lashes, and the court sold Margaret to her master for seven years in March 1714/5. She received twenty lashes in June 1716 for having a child by a white man Jeremiah Venie [Judicial Records 1713-15, 177, 204, 259; 1715-17, 74, 235]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Abner, head of a Worcester County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 and 7 in 1800 [MD:741].

ii. ?David, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:517].

iii. ?Thomas, head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:159].

 

 

CONSELLOR FAMILY

The Consellor family of Delaware may have descended from John Gonsolvos, an Accomack County, Virginia tithable in 1676 [Orders 1676-8, 33]. The Accomack County court dismissed a suit against Grace Gonsolvo (his widow?) on 11 February 1689 [Orders 1678-82, 59]. A William Comsloe admitted in Dorchester County, Maryland Court in August 1691 that he owed Alexander Fisher 3,200 pounds of tobacco [Court Proceedings in Land Records Liber 4-1/2, p.120].

 

1.    Thomas1 Consellor/ Gonseala, born say 1670, purchased 120 acres on the north side of Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from Griffin Jones by deed acknowledged in court in December 1699. He recorded his earmark on 30 April 1700 and sued Dennis Dyer on 8 September 1702 [de Valinger, Court Records, 90, 150, 233; DB C-1:243]. He was sued in Kent County court on 11 August 1708 and was fined 15 shillings on 11 August 1713 (called Thomas Gonsoaly). In February 1720 John Mar and Simon Irons posted 228 pounds bail for him when he was sued for debt by William Rodeney. The suit was discontinued in May 1721 [Court Dockets 1680-1725, 75; General Court Records 1712-6, n.p.; 1718-22, 110, 121]. He died before 6 August 1726 when administration on his Kent County estate was granted to his widow Joanna [WB F-1, fol. 14]. He was probably the father of

2        i. Thomas2, born say 1690.

 

2.    Thomas2 Consellor, born say 1690, was called Thomas Gonsela of Kent County in November 1721 when he posted 14 pounds bail in Kent County court for Robert Butcher [General Court Records 1718-22, fol. 169]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County in 1727 and 1734 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1726-42, frames 301, 346, 378]. His 26 September 1739 Kent County will, proved 20 October the same year, left a mare to his grandson William Conseelah and named daughters Elizabeth Francisco, Sarah Butcher, and Mary Conselah who was his sole executor [WB I-1, p.10 - fol. 10]. Thomas' children were

3        i. Mary, born say 1708.

ii. Elizabeth Francisco, probably the wife of Daniel1 Francisco.

iii. Sarah, wife of Robert Butcher, Jr.

 

3.   Mary Conselah, born say 1708, was the executor and heir of her father's 26 September 1739 will. She was called Mary Gonsola when she sued Abraham Amley in Kent County court in February 1726/7 and called Mary Gonzalo or Gonzales in August 1728 when she confessed to having an illegitimate child in Kent County. John Craig sued her in August 1737 [Delaware Archives RG 3815.031, dockets 1722-32, frames 148, 266, 229, 235; 1733-40, frame 346]. She was head of a taxable household in Little Creek Hundred in 1743 and 1745 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1726-42, frame 301; 1743-67, 16, 43]. She received a bed, furniture and a mare by the 31 January 1757 Kent County will of William Beckett [WB K-1, 162]. Beckett was probably the father of her illegitimate child William Conseelah who was named in her father's will. Mary was apparently the mother of

4        i. William1, born about 1728.

 

4.    William1 Consellor, born about 1728, was found not guilty by the Kent County court in May 1743 of having an illegitimate child sworn to him by Eliza Butcher. Mary Gonselah came into court and promised to pay his court fees [DSA, RG 3805.002, Quarter Sessions, 1734-79, frame 80; MS case files]. He was not taxable in the Little Creek Hundred, Kent County list for 1745, but was taxable in the next surviving list for 1748 (called William Gonsella) until 1755, taxable from 1759 to 1764 in Little Creek Hundred, from 1765 to 1774 in Duck Creek Hundred, and taxable again in Little Creek Hundred from 1776 to 1778 when he was called William Conselo Sr. According to the Little Creek Hundred tax lists for 1772 and 1773, he owned 130 acres in Little Creek Hundred, 70 acres of which were in the possession of Thomas Consellor [Levy List 1743-67, frames 51, 87, 107, 136, 143, 240, 490, 517, 549, 566; 1768-84, frames 22, 73, 125, 180, 186, 220, 310, 342]. He died before 1 May 1780 when John Durham was granted administration on his Kent County estate [WB L-1, fol. 217]. His children were probably Whittenton and William Conselor whose support was listed in the account of the estate. His widow Mary was a witness to John Durham's will. His children were most likely

i. Thomas3, born say 1748, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1768 to 1778. According to the Levy Assessments for 1772 and 1773 he was living on about 70 acres of land which belonged to William Consellor. He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Durham. The Kent County court indicted John Spruance for assaulting him on 15 August 1783 in Duck Creek Hundred. Joseph Wyatt sued him for a debt of 10 pounds in April 1793 [DSA, RG 3805, MS November 1783 Indictments; RG 3815, MS April 1793 case papers].

5        ii. Elijah1, born say 1750.

iii. Charles, born say 1758, a taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1779 to 1783: listed as a "Negro" in 1780 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 366, 368, 442, 445, 502, 541, 570, 582].

iv. Jonathan, born say 1758, a "Mulatto" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1779 and 1781, called John in Murderkill Hundred from 1782 to 1788, crossed off the list in 1789 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1767-84, frame 370, 522, 546, 573, 595, 628; 1768-84, frame 10, 28, 52, 123, 147]. John Conselor's estate was administered on 8 August 1791 when Thomas Nixon certified that John had settled a debt he owed Ann Adams's "Negro George" [RG 3545, reel 44, frames 846-62].

v. William2, born say 1758, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1778 (called William Concealor, Junr) to 1780 and in Duck Creek Hundred in 1781 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1767-84, frames 342, 366, 445, 522].

vi. Whittenton.

 

5.    Elijah1 Consellor, born say 1755, was taxable in Murderkill Hundred from 1775 to 1785, listed as a "N." taxable in 1785, a "Mulattoe" listed with 83 acres in the care and management of James Dean and 2 mares, 4 horses, a yoke of oxen, a steer, 7 cows, 4 yearlings, 3 cattle, 5 calves, 18 sheep, 2 sows, 2 hogs, and 5 shoats in 1797, in a list of "Negroes and Mulattoes" with 150 acres in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 254, 267, 299, 370, 522, 568, 607; 1785-97, 127, 470; 1797-8, frame 25]. He married Hannah Durham, daughter of John Durham, before 9 April 1788 when she was mentioned in her father's Kent County will [RG 3545, roll 68, frames 612-23; WB M-1, fol. 170-1]. He purchased 38 acres on the road from Fast Landing to Dover from John Durham on 14 February 1788 for 116 pounds and another 46 acres from Francis Denney, administrator of John Durham's estate on 14 May 1789 for 60 pounds; and he purchased 120 acres adjoining John Durham's land for $1,066 on 7 February 1798 [DB Z:199; A-2:155; F-2:82]. His widow Hannah was granted administration on his estate on 29 December 1801. About 500 pounds was divided amongst his widow Hannah and five children: Jeremiah, Elijah, Sarah Miller, Elizabeth and Benjamin [DSA, RG 3545, roll 45, frames 10-20]. Hannah was head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 1 "free colored" woman over the age of forty-five in 1820 [DE:24]. Their children were

6        i. Jeremiah1, born say 1777.

ii. Elijah2, Jr. named in the final settlement of the estate of his father. His estate was administered by Elisha Durham (who signed his name) and by his widow, Elizabeth Conselor. He was a "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1797-8, frame 483] and head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 7 "free colored in 1820 [DE:24].

iii. Sarah, widow of Debrix Miller.

iv. Elizabeth, married John Durham.

v. Benjamin, born say 1780, still a minor when his father died. He was a "N." head of a Duck Creek Hundred household 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:49].

 

6.    Jeremiah1 Concellor, born say 1777, was a "Mulatto" taxable on minor's taxable property of 37 pounds in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1797-8, frames 473, 483]. He died before 29 April 1811 when Elizabeth Conceler was granted administration on his estate on $1,000 bond by Jeremiah's brother Elijah Conceler (signing) who married Jeremiah's widow Elizabeth. The estate paid various bills to Jesse Dean, Deberix Miller, Peter Beckett, Benjamin Sisco, William Sisco, and John Durham and distributed about $500 among the widow and children: Esther, Elijah, Hannah, Harrietta (Henrietta), and Jeremiah [RG 3545, reel 44, frames 856-62]. His children were

i.Esther, married Jesse Dean (signing) bond of 29 August 1814 with Benjamin Concealor bondsman [DSA, Marriage Bonds 20:157].

ii. Elijah.

iii. Hannah.

iv. Harrietta.

v. Jeremiah2.

 

Another member of the family was

i. William3, born about 1769, a ninety-one-year-old "Mulatto" farm laborer counted with (wife?) Esther in Concordville, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, in the 1860 census, both born in Delaware [PA:296].

 

COOK FAMILY

1.    Margaret Cook, born say 1715, was a white woman living with William Robinson of Westminster Parish on 11 March 1734/5 when the Anne Arundel County court presented her for having two "Mollatto" children. She confessed her guilt to the court on 10 June 1735, and the court sold her and her son, born 19 December 1734, to William Ghisolin. On 8 March 1736/7 she confessed to having another child which was adjudged by the court to be "begot by some Negro." Margaret was ordered to serve another seven year term, and her child, a two-month-old girl, was bound to Ghiselin until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1734-6, 238; 1736-8, 138]. Margaret may have been the ancestor of

i. Jack, a "mulatto boy" who Patriarch Creagh of Annapolis gave to his wife Frances until the age of twenty-one by his 5 June 1747 will, proved 12 January 1761 [Prerogative Court (Wills), 31:336].

ii. Jacob, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 10 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Aaron, head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:692].

iv. Thomas, head of a Baltimore City household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:433].

v. Dian, head of a Baltimore City household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:310].

vi. Benjamin, "of Culler," head of a Baltimore County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:680].

vii. Nathan, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:680].

 

COOPER FAMILY

Members of the Cooper family in Maryland were

i. Ben, head of a Talbot County household of 9 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Dick, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1790, perhaps the Richard Cooper who was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:34].

iii. John/ Jack, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 7 in 1800 [MD:534].

iv. James1, head of a Kent County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [MD:146].

v. James2, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:146].

vi. Harry, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:147].

vii. Peter, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:174].

viii. Caesar, head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:158].

1        ix. Eleanor/ Nelly, born about 1771.

 

1.    Eleanor/ Nelly Cooper, born about 1771, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 2 April 1813: Eleanor Cooper, a bright mulatto woman, about 42 years old, and 5 feet 5 inches tall. She is free, being the descendant of a certain Rosamond Bently who recovered her freedom in the Prince George's County Court in a suit against Anthony Addison. She was the mother of

i. Patience, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 27 August 1823: light complexion, is about 30 years old, and about 5 feet 5-1/2 inches tall ... child of Nelly Cooper, a free woman of colour.

i. Mary, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 27 August 1823: light complexion, is about 28 years old, and about 5 feet 5-3/4 inches tall ... child of Nelly Cooper.

ii. William, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 27 August 1823: light complexion, is about 24 years old, and about 5 feet 7 inches tall ... son of Nelly Cooper.

iii. Matilda, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 27 August 1823: dark complexion, is about 21 years old, and about 5 feet 6 inches tall ... daughter of Nelly Cooper.

iv. Rosetta, born about 1807, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 27 August 1823: a bright mulatto girl, about 16 years old, and 5 feet 4 inches tall ... daughter of Nelly Cooper [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 15, 46].

 

CORK FAMILY

1.    "Negroe Cork" was listed in the account of the Kent County, Maryland estate of John Connor on 29 January 1753, owing a debt of 3 shillings [Prerogative Inventories 52 (1752-3), 124-7]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Isaac, a "free negro" taxable in the 4th district of Kent County in 1783 [1783 Assessment MSA S1437, p.4], head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:158]

ii. Moses, "negro" taxable in the 3rd district of Kent County in 1783 (called Moses Caulk) [1783 Assessment MSA S1437, p.2]. He was "Negro" head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1790 and 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:171].

iii. William, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1797 [Assessments 1785-97, frame 470]. He and Joseph Oliver, "people of Colour," bought 7 acres called Killmanins Plains in Queen Anne's County for $45 from Jacob Jeffreys, a "Man of Colour," on 15 September 1810. They sold the same land back to him for $50 on 25 May 1811 [DB STW-9:369].

iv. Jacob1, a "Negro" head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 8 in 1800 [MD:158].

v. Jacob2, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:170].

vi. Samuel1, a "N." head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [DE:48]

vii. John, head of an Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437].

viii. Samuel2, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:40].

 

CORNISH FAMILY

Members of the Cornish family in Maryland and Delaware were

i. William1, born say 1715, a brick maker sued in Dorchester County by John Carville in March 1755 for a debt of 2 pounds, 8 shillings which William had owed since 1753 [Judgment Records, 1754-5, 241-3], probably identical to the William Cornish who was imprisoned for debt in Sussex County, Delaware, and petitioned the court in February 1750 to serve Jacob Kollock, Esq., to pay the debt. The court charged him with assault in August 1757 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 516; 1753-60, 381, 384, 403, 421, 446]. He owed the estate of Peter Beckett of Worcester County 2 pounds, 5 shillings on 23 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:89]. He died before 19 March 1760 when his debt of 4 pounds, 4 shillings to the Dorchester County estate of Colonel Joseph Ennalls was determined to be unrecoverable because of his death. Perhaps his widow was Elizabeth Cornish who owed the estate 9 shillings [Prerogative Inventories 76:169-183].

1       ii. Esau, born say 1718.

2        iii. Samuel1, born say 1720.

iv.John1/ Jack, born say 1722, living in Dorchester County on 20 October 1745 when Charles Hudson and Thomas Stewart posted bond for his good behavior and appearance in November Court [Judgment Record 1744-5, 468], perhaps the John Cornish who was charged with felony by the Kent County court in August 1790. He pled guilty and was ordered to wear a Roman T [RG 3805.002, 1787-1803, frame 156].

3        v. Sidney, born say 1724.

4        vi. Rebecca, born say 1742.

 

1.    Esau Cornish, born say 1718, was bondsman for the appearance of (his brother?) Samuel Cornish in Dorchester County court in November 1742 [Judgment Record 1742-3, 43-4]. He owed 5 pounds of tobacco to the Dorchester County estate of Howels Goldsbrough in 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 75:303-5]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1770. He left a 7 December 1770 Sussex County will in which he named his wife Mary, son Samuel, son Amos, and daughters Sarah and Elener. His wife Mary and son Samuel were executors [WB B:408-9]. He was the father of

5        i. Samuel2, born say 1742.

ii. Amos, charged with felony in Sussex County court in February 1773. Mary Cursey was a witness against him [RG 4805, General Sessions 1767-94, frames 126, 154, 167, 181]. He called himself a "Mollatto" in the 14 July 1786 Worcester County deed by which he sold half the corn and crop on Thomas Benston's land that he owned by agreement with Benston for 8 pounds, 13 shillings [DB L:400]..

iii. Sarah, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458].

iv. Eleanor.

 

2.    Samuel1 Cornish, born say 1720, was sued in Dorchester County court in November 1742 for a 32 pound debt [Judgment Record 1742-3, 43-4]. He may have been identical to ____ Cornish who married _____ in Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church, Sussex County, in 1768 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 124]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, from 1773 to 1790 and head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He may have been the father of

i. Sally, born say 1750, married Moses Parkinson ("Molattoes") on 7 January 1771 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Coolspring, Delaware 1756-1855, 282].

 

3.    Sidney Cornish, born say 1724, a "Spinster," was living in Dorchester County in March 1744/5 when she was found not guilty of having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." She was assessed court costs which Lewis Griffith agreed to pay [Judgment Record 1744-5, 347]. She may have been the mother of

6        i. Ann1, born say 1744.

7        ii. Christianna, born say 1747.

iii. Daniel, born about 1749, a "Mullatto Boy" aged fifteen years and bound until the age of thirty-one on 4 December 1765 when he was listed in the Queen Anne's County estate of Henry Costin, Jr, [Prerogative Inventories 94: 211-2].

iv. Ebby, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:684].

v. Samuel3, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

vi. Sol, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:684].

 

4.    Rebecca Cornish, born say 1742, was the spinster servant of John Ross of Talbot County in November 1763 when the court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro." The court ordered that she be sold for seven years after the completion of her indenture to her master and sold her son Levin Cornish to her master for 3 pounds. She admitted in August 1766 that she had another child by a "Negro" and paid twice the normal fine of 1 pound, 10 shillings because she would not identify the father. In June 1767 she was convicted of fornication and found guilty of stealing gloves, brass buttons, a handkerchief and several other items from Cornelius Dailey. The court ordered that she receive 15 lashes, stand in the pillory and pay four times the value of the goods or 1,500 pounds of tobacco. She was convicted of assaulting Elizabeth Heels in November 1770 and ordered to pay a shilling fine [Criminal Record 1761-7, 235-6, 465; 1767-74, n.p.]. She was the mother of

i. Levin, born about 1763, indicted for an unspecified offense in Sussex County in May 1780 [RG 4805, General Sessions 1767-94, frame 243], a delinquent taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1781, head of a Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:83].

8        ii. ?Charles, born say 1764.

 

5.    Samuel2 Cornish, born say 1742, was taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred, Sussex County, from 1773 to 1790 [Levy List 1767-83; 1780-96] and head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He died before 12 April 1811 when his Sussex County estate was administered by Rachel and William Cornish. His heirs were Rachel, William, John, Elon, Mary, Samuel, Rachel, Hetty and James Cornish, Sarah Morris and Nancy Gurley. Rachel was head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:468] and an Indian River, Sussex County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:222], perhaps the Rachel Cornish who was head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "free colored" in 1830 or the one who was head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830. Their children may have been

i. Nancy Gurley, probably the wife of Bryan Gurley, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:425] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:218].

ii. William, taxable in Indian River Hundred in Sussex County in 1797 [RG 4200.027, Levy Court, reel 2, frame 176].

iii. John2, born 1776-1794, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:427] and head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:220].

iv. Rachel.

v. Samuel.

vi. Hetty.

vii. Sarah, married Nathaniel Morris, "free Mulattoes," on 5 December 1802 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 315, 318].

viii. James.

 

6.    Christianna Cornish, born say 1747, was the mother of

9        i. David, born about 1768.

10      ii. ?Henny, born say 1770.

 

7.    Ann Cornish, born say 1744, paid a 1 pound, 10 shillings fine in Talbot County court in November 1761 for having an illegitimate child [Criminal Record 1755-61, n.p.]. She was head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1800 [MD:685]. She was the mother of

i. ?Elisha, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:684]. On 15 August 1806 he manumitted his forty-year-old slave Thomas Jolly by Dorchester County deed [DB HD 23:446-7].

ii. Lisbon, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 September 1815: of a blackish colour ... born free ... son of Ann Cornish who was also born free, aged about 25 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 29].

 

8.    Charles Cornish, born say 1764, was listed as one of the recruits from Caroline County in the Revolution "to the 10th December on 14 August 1781 [Archives of Maryland, 18:385]. He was head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in Baltimore City in 1800 [MD:169]. He may have been the father of

i. Rachel, a "free black" who married Isaac Elzey, the slave of George Hall in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore on 28 June 1795 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:88].

 

9.  David Cornish, born about 1768, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 September 1821: of a light chesnut colour ... free born and is the son of Christianna Cornish who was free born, was raised in Somerset County ... aged about 53 years. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830. He and his wife Nancy were the parents of

i. Ann2, born about 1806, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 September 1822: yellow complection ... raised in Dorchester County and born free and is the Daughter of David Cornish and Nancy his wife, aged about 16 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 45, 47].

 

10.    Henny Cornish, born say 1770, was the mother of

i. Amelia, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 October 1816: of a chesnut colour ... born free and is the Daughter of Henny Cornish who was also born free, aged about 25 years.

ii. Milley, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 10 August 1821: of a dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Henny who was also born free, aged about 27 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 34, 44].

 

Other members of the family in Maryland were

i. Curtis, head of a Dorchester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Ann, head of a Montgomery County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Beck, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

iv. Ned, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 25 July 1806: blackish colour ... born free, raised on Taylor's Island.

v. Jack, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 15 August 1806: blackish Colour ... born free, raised in Dorchester County, aged 18 years.

vi. Delia Evans, born abut 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 11 September 1822: of a dark chesnut colour ... raised in Dorchester County and born free and is the daughter of Lucy Cornish, a free negro woman, aged about 19 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 1, 47].

 

COURSEY/ KERSEY FAMILY

1.    Mary Kersey, born say 1720, the servant of Nicholas Glen, was fined by the Talbot County court in August 1742 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Mary Kerse Mulatto" in Glen's account that he recorded in court in November 1744 in a case he brought against her for running away for eighty days and bearing two children in his house. In June 1745 she received corporal punishment for having another illegitimate child [Judgment Record 1742-3, 289-90, 301; 1744-5, 109; 1745-6, 134]. She was the mother of

i. Nero, born in February 1741/2.

ii. ?James1 Carse, head of a Talbot County household of 13 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Jane, born about March 1745, three months old when she was bound to Nicholas Glen/ Glynn until the age of eighteen.

 

Other members of the Coursey/ Kersey family were

i. George Kersey, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1790, perhaps identical to George Course who was head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:937].

ii. John, a "negro" taxable who was living at Jasper Petticoat's in Upper Newfoundland and Seneca Hundred, Montgomery County in 1783 [MSA S1161-8-5, p.25].

iii. Ralph Corse, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:114] and 4 in 1810 [DE:56].

iv. William Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:314].

v. John Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:306].

vi. Elizabeth Kearse, born about 1767, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 17 September 1810: of a blackish colour ... born free, raised in Talbot County, aged about 43 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 14].

vii. Caesar Corse, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

viii. William Coursey, head of a West Sassafras, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ix. Edmund, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:169].

x. James2, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 4 May 1815: yellow complexion .. born free, raised in Dorchester County, aged about 23 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 25].

 

Endnote:

1. There was a Charles Coursey who was an Indian living in Somerset County, Maryland, when he owed 13 shillings to the estate of Mathias Gale in 1731 and 2 pounds, 3 shillings to the estate of Levin Gale in 1743 [Prerogative Inventories 77 (1762): 121, 158], but there were no non-white Courseys mentioned in the records of Sussex County, Delaware or Somerset and Worcester counties until the 1820 census.

 

COTT FAMILY

1.    John1 Cott, born say 1750, may have been identical to "Negro Jack" who successfully petitioned the Kent County, Delaware court for his freedom from Thomas Collins, Esquire, (of Duck Creek Hundred) on 23 May 1770. The court ruled that he be discharged and "Enjoy all the benefits a free Negro or Molato may or can within this government" [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-1771, frames 222, 235, 247]. John Cott was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1771 to 1780 except for 1775 when he was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred. He was a delinquent taxable in Dover Hundred in 1781 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 103, 128, 184, 220, 262, 310, 334, 366, 445, 482]. He may have been the husband of Deborah Cott, daughter of William Durham who died before 27 July 1797 when administration on his Kent County estate was granted to (his wife) Mary Durham [WB N-1:179]. He may have been the father of

i.John2, a "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 13], head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:29], married to Sally Ann Dean, daughter of Jesse Dean, a "colored man," when Jesse made his Kent County will which was proved in December 1839 [WB R-1:160]. He was a seventy-six-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the 1850 census for Little Creek Hundred living with seventy-eight-year-old Mary Cott [family no. 202].

 

COURSEY/ KERSEY FAMILY

1.    Mary Kersey, born say 1720, the servant of Nicholas Glen, was fined by the Talbot County court in August 1742 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Mary Kerse Mulatto" in Glen's account that he recorded in court in November 1744 in a case he brought against her for running away for eighty days and bearing two children in his house. In June 1745 she received corporal punishment for having another illegitimate child [Judgment Record 1742-3, 289-90, 301; 1744-5, 109; 1745-6, 134]. She was the mother of

i. Nero, born in February 1741/2.

ii. ?James1 Carse, head of a Talbot County household of 13 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Jane, born about March 1745, three months old when she was bound to Nicholas Glen/ Glynn until the age of eighteen.

 

Other members of the Coursey/ Kersey family were

i. George Kersey, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1790, perhaps identical to George Course who was head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:937].

ii. John, a "negro" taxable who was living at Jasper Petticoat's in Upper Newfoundland and Seneca Hundred, Montgomery County, in 1783 [MSA S1161-8-5, p.25].

iii. Ralph Corse, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:114] and 4 in 1810 [DE:56].

iv. William Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:314].

v. John Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:306].

vi. Elizabeth Kearse, born about 1767, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 17 September 1810: of a blackish colour ... born free, raised in Talbot County, aged about 43 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 14].

vii. Caesar Corse, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

viii. William Coursey, head of a West Sassafras, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ix. Edmund, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:169].

x. James2, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 4 May 1815: yellow complexion .. born free, raised in Dorchester County, aged about 23 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 25].

 

COX FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Cox, born say 1688, was the white servant of Thomas Coleman on 12 November 1706 when the Charles County court ordered her to serve him an additional 250 days for running away. Later that day in the same court she confessed to having an illegitimate "Mollatto" child for which she was sold (as a servant) to Jacob Miller for 2,000 pounds of tobacco [Court Record 1704-10, 271, 274]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Abner, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:174].

Members of the Cox family on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were

1        i. Jemima, born about 1741.

2        ii. Ann, born say 1748.

 

1.     Jemima Cox, born about 1741, was a "Mulatto Wench" with twelve years and nine months to serve when she was listed in the Dorchester County estate of Margery Gibb on 30 December 1760 [Prerogative Inventories 76:333]. She may have been the mother of

i. Stephen, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:684].

 

2.     Ann Cox, born say 1748, was bound as a "Mulatto" servant bound to Mary Hatcheson for thirty-one years in March 1769 when she confessed to the Kent County court that she had two illegitimate children during her service. The court ordered that she be brought to court to be sold when she arrived to the age of thirty one [Criminal Dockets 1766-71, nos. 8,9]. She was probably related to

i. Levin, head of a Talbot County household of 7 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Jacob, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Tom, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:531].

 

CRAWLEY FAMILY

Members of the Crawley family of St. Mary's County were

i. William, born say 1755, head of a St. Mary's County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 and 2 in 1800 [MD:422].

ii. Benjamin, born say 1760, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

1        iii. Winnifred, born say 1770.

 

1.     Winnifred Crawley, born say 1770, was the mother of

i. ?Ann, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 13 March 1826: aged about 34 years ... a bright Mulatto ... born free.

ii. Nealey, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 8 January 1824: son of Wenefred Crawley, aged twenty four years ... dark complexion ... born free.

iii. John Barton, born about 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 8 January 1824: son of Winefred Crawley, aged about 21 years, bright complexion ... his hair long & bushy [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 65, 69].

 

CREEK FAMILY

1.    William1 Creek, born say 1710, or other members of his family were listed in the inventory of the Anne Arundel County estate of Samuel Chew on 6 January 1718: "2 East India Indians - 30 pounds" and the inventory of the Anne Arundel and Calvert County estate of another Samuel Chew on 15 October 1737: "Negroes Age: Peg Creek 40 - 54 pounds...Wm Creek 8 - 41 pounds, Ned Creek 6 - 30 pounds" [Prerogative Inventories 1718, 464-9; 1737-1739, 218-223]. He successfully petitioned the Anne Arundel County court for his freedom from his master Samuel Chew on 8 March 1736/7. He testified that he was born in the East Indies and carried as a young boy to England where he was apprenticed to an apothecary. Chew's nephew testified that William played a prank by giving someone a love potion. This so offended the apothecary's wife and daughter that the apothecary consigned William to the captain of a ship headed to Maryland [Judgment Record 1736-8, 126]. William was probably the ancestor of

i. Jane1/ Jenny, head of a Washington County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:572] and 4 in 1810 [MD:535].

ii. Richard, head of a Baltimore City household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:271].

iii. Jane2, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:86].

iv. Hagar, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:85].

v. James, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:529].

vi. William2, born before 1776, head of a Washington County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

vii. Catherine, born before 1776, head of a Washington County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

 

CROMWELL FAMILY

1.    Isaac Cromwell, born about 1709, was the forty-year-old "mulatto servant" of Thomas Cresap of the old town of Potomac, Frederick County, Maryland, when Cresap advertised in the 1 June 1749 issue of the Pennsylvania Gazette that he and Ann Greene, a forty-five year old English servant, had run away. Nine years later on 23 February 1758 Cresap advertised in the Maryland Gazette that Isaac spoke a little Dutch and English, that Anne Green was his wife, that they took their five or six-year-old daughter Susanna with them, and that they had spent some time in Baltimore County but had since moved on [Scott, Abstracts of the Pennsylvania Gazette, 1748-55, 49; Green, The Maryland Gazette 1727-61, 206]. They were the parents of

2        i. ?Mary, born say 1740.

ii. Susanna, born about 1752.

 

2.    Mary Cornwell/ Cromwell, born say 1740, the servant of Dr. Charles Neel, Sr., was presented by the Frederick County, Maryland Court for having a "base born mulatto child" in August 1760. As punishment in November 1760 the court ordered her sold for seven years [Court Minutes 1750-9, 151; 1758-62, 292-3]. Her children were most likely

i. David, head of a Talbot County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:534].

ii. George, head of a Talbot County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:531].

3        iii. Milly, born say 1780.

iv. William, head of a Baltimore County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:463].

v. Charles, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:97].

 

3.    Milly Cromwell, born say 1780, was the mother of Mary Cromwell who was living in Frederick County in 1819 when she obtained a certificate of freedom. Milly was the mother of

i. Mary, born about 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 26 November 1819: a bright Mulatto Girl, aged about Sixteen years ... the daughter of a certain Milly Cromwell who was a free born woman as appears by the affidavit of Jacob Hoff [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 102].

 

CUNNINGHAM FAMILY

1.    Mary Cunningham, born say 1730, was living at John Kinsman's on 13 November 1750 when the Charles County, Maryland Court presented her for bearing a "Mullatto Child" by information of Constable Alexander MacPherson [Court Record 1750, 140]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. John, head of a Washington County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:570].

ii. Benjamin1, head of a Hampshire County, Virginia household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [VA:818].

iii. Philip1, head of a King George County, Virginia household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:193].

iv. Benjamin2, head of a King George County, Virginia household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:193].

v. Cyrus, born about 1777 when he was bound as an apprentice, registered in King George County, Virginia, on 28 May 1799: of a dark yellow Colour aged about twenty two years and about five feet ten inches high is now a free man, has served William Hooe, Gent., of this County twenty one years [Register of Free Persons, no.10].

vi. Philip2, Jr., head of a King George County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:195].

vii. Nancy, head of a Goochland County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:688].

viii. Jas.(?), head of a King George County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:195].

ix. Charity, head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [NC:76].

 

CURTIS FAMILY

Members of the Curtis family in Maryland were

i. Jonathan, born say 1715, a "free Negroe" of Charles County who had an account with William Hunter & Company between October 1746 and 18 November 1747 for goods valued at 19 pounds, 12 shillings Maryland currency. The goods included a pocket book, shoes, rum, cloth, sheeting, buttons, thread, handkerchiefs, and a padlock. In March 1749/50 William Hunter was in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, when he sued Jonathan in Charles County court for payment of the debt. Samuel Luckett was Jonathan's security [Court Records 1748-50, 630-2].

ii. Mary1, born say 1730, a "negro" who owed 5 pounds to the St. Mary's County estate of Thomas Phillips on 23 November 1757 [Prerogative Inventories 65:152-3], head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and a "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:189].

iii. Cloe, born say 1740, a "free Negro," married Isaac, "negro of Jane Taney, in St. Mary's County in 1761 [Parsons, Marriage Register of Rev. Joseph Mosley, 24].

iv. Will Ferrall, aka Will Butler and Will Curtis, a "yellow slave," a house carpenter who ran away from Edward Mattingly of St. Mary's County, Maryland, and was seen in Virginia according to the 22 September 1768 issue of the Virginia Gazette (Rind) [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 121].

1        v. Lucy, born say 1753.

vi. Joseph, head of a St. Mary's County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in Charles County in 1800 [MD:514].

vii. Esther, head of a St. Mary's County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 and 5 in 1800 [MD:424].

2        viii. Sarah, born about 1759.

3        ix. Milly, born about 1759.

x. Samuel, "F.N." head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1790.

xi. Margaret1, born about 1764, head of a St. Mary's County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:417] and 3 in 1810 [MD:217], obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 10 August 1808: forty four years of age, black complexion, was born free & raised in the County.

xii. Mary2, head of a St. Mary's County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 and 2 in Charles County in 1800 [MD:537]. She may have been the mother of Gerard Curtis, born about 1800, who obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 20 February 1822: son of Mary Curtis ... about twenty two years of age, of a dark complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 2, 58].

4        xiii. Rebecca1, born say 1760.

xiv. James, head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:402].

xv. Mary3, born say 1774, married Francis Savoy on 16 February 1795 in St. Mary's Mattawoman Parish, Charles County [Colonial Dames of America, Records of St. Mary's Parish, 1793-1861, 162].

5        xvi. Elizabeth, born about 1779.

6        xvii. Ann, born about 1782.

xviii. Nance, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 8 August 1806: about twenty three years of age, dark complexion, was free born.

xix. Sophia, born about 1784, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 9 November 1808: by birth a free woman, about twenty four years of age ... light complexion.

xx. Minta, born about 1785, "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:176], obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 20 February 1817: aged thirty two years or thereabouts ... Dark Mulatto, long hair.

xxi. Mary, born about 1786, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 2 August 1814: aged about twenty eight years or thereabouts ... Complexion Black - hair short & Curley ... born free.

xxii. Matilda, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 8 August 1806: about eighteen years of age, dark complexion, was free born.

xxiii. Cornelius, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 20 September 1808: about twenty years of age, black complexion, was born free & raised in the county ... big mouth & thick lips, large boney hands, low forehead, short Woolly hair.

xxiv. Rebecca2, born about 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 8 August 1806: about seventeen years of age, of a dark complexion, was free born.

xxv. Henry, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 29 April 1818: son of Nancy Curtis, aged about thirty two years ... dark complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 1, 2, 3, 38, 76].

 

1.    Lucy Curtis, born say 1753, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:416]. She was the mother of

i. Gustavus1, born about 1773, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 16 May 1820: son of Lucy Curtis ... about 47 years - of a dark complexion ... born free. He may have been identical to Gusly Curtis, "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:198].

ii. Nancy, born about 1784, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 29 March 1819: daughter of Lucy Curtis ... about thirty five years of age, Black complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 47, 55].

 

2.    Sarah Curtis, born about 1759, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790,10 in 1800 [MD:411] and 9 in 1810 [MD:189]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 20 August 1814: aged fifty five years or thereabouts ... Complexion rather Black - hair short & gray ... born free. She was the mother of

i. Margaret2, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 22 June 1814: Daughter of Sarah Curtis, aged about twenty two years, complexion dark. She was called Margaret Curtis alias Shorter when she registered on 14 August 1833.

ii. Susanna, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 10 April 1823: daughter of Sarah Curtis, aged about twenty one years ... light complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 26, 30, 61, 99].

 

3.    Milly Curtis, born about 1759, was a "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:192]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 14 August 1812: aged fifty three years or thereabouts ... complexion black - hair short and curley ... born free. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born about 1776, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 14 August 1812: aged thirty two years or thereabouts ... complexion dark - hair short & curley ... born free being the Daughter of Milly Curtis.

ii. Mary, born about 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 14 August 1812: aged twenty three years ... complexion black - hair short & woolly ... born free being the Daughter of Milly Curtis.

iii. Gustavus2, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 14 August 1812: aged eighteen years ... Complexion black ... born free being the son of Milly Curtis [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 20, 21].

 

4.    Rebecca1 Curtis born say 1760, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:410] and 9 in 1810 [MD:197]. She was the mother of

i. Henry, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 6 September 1820: son of Rebecca ... about thirty eight years of age, of a dark complexion ... born free.

ii. Nancy, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 8 April 1819: Daughter of Rebecca Curtis ... about twenty six years of age, of a Dark Complexion ... born free.

iii. Harriot, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 20 February 1822: daughter of Rebecca Curtis ... about twenty four years of age, of light complexion ... born free.

iv. Sarah Ann, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 8 April 1819: daughter of Rebecca Curtis ... about nineteen years of age, of a Dark Complexion ... born free.

v. Elizabeth, born about 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 4 May 1819: daughter of Rebecca Curtis, about sixteen years, of a bright complexion ... born free.

vi. Joseph, born about 1805, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 29 July 1828: son of Rebecca, aged about twenty three years ... dark complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 49, 50, 56, 58, 78].

 

5.    Elizabeth Curtis, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 7 June 1814: aged thirty five years or thereabouts ... complexion dark, hair short and wooly ... born free. She may have been identical to Betty Curtis, head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:334]. She was the mother of

i. John, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 8 April 1819: son of Elizabeth Curtis ... about twenty one years of age, dark complexion ... born free.

ii. Eleanor, born about 1801, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 13 September 1821: daughter of Elizabeth Curtis ... aged about twenty years, of a bright complexion .. born free.

iii. Rebecca, born about 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 8 April 1819: Daughter of Elizabeth Curtis ... about sixteen years of age, of a dark complexion ... born free.

iv. Nancy, born about 1805, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 13 September 1821: daughter of Elizabeth Curtis ... about sixteen years of a age, of a dark complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 26, 49, 58].

 

6.    Ann Curtis, born about 1782, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:409]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 10 August 1812: aged thirty years ... complexion not very black - hair short .... born free. She was the mother of

i. Bednego, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 4 May 1819: son of Ann Curtis ... about twenty years of age, of a dark complexion ... born free.

ii. Joseph, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 4 September 1820: son of Ann Curtis ... aged about twenty, dark complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 19, 50, 55].

 

DALTON FAMILY

1.    Henry1 Dalton, born 8 September 1750, a "mulatto" and apparently the son of white woman, was bound to Samuel Pruitt until the age of thirty-one years in Frederick County, Maryland court in August 1750 [Rice, Frederick County, Maryland Judgment Records 1748-65, 49]. He was probably the son of Ann Dorton who was presented by the Prince George's County court on 27 March 1750 for having a base born child (no race indicated) on information of Jane Martin [Court Record 1749-50, 128]. He was a "Mulatto" who petitioned the Frederick County court on 23 November 1775 stating that he had been bound to Samuel Pruitt in 1750 but that Pruitt had since died and that his present master John Randle had no other claim to him than his marrying the widow of the deceased. The court ordered that he be at his liberty [Minutes 1773-5, 420]. He married Eleanor Russell on 4 June 1781 [Barnes, Maryland Marriages, 1778-1800]. Eleanor was probably a descendant of James Russell, a "Mallatto" who won his freedom in Charles County court on 13 March 1721 because he was the son of a white woman and had reached the age of thirty-one [Court Records K-2:236]. He was living in Prince George's County by 26 August 1729 [Court Record 1729-30, 136]. Henry was taxable in Monongalia County, Virginia, from 1791 to 1821: called "Henry Dorton Senr. a man of color" starting in 1810, listed with 2 tithables starting in 1802, his profession a farmer in 1820 [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 91, 101, 139, 177, 199, 216, 238, 264, 289, 319, 349, 373, 406, 455, 520, 536, 583, 611, 629, 679, 856, 898, 679, 787, 808, 856]. He was head of a Eastern District, Monongalia County census of 12 whites for 1810 [VA:495], 8 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169] and 8 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:344]. He was granted a pension for his service in the Revolution, stating in his application on 31 November 1832 that he was born in Bladensburg, Maryland, in 1748, enlisted in 1777 at Redstone settlement near Brownsville, Pennsylvania, resided in Prince George's County for nine years after the Revolution and then moved to Monongalia County. He died on 11 June 1836 [National Archives Pension file S-5362; http://www.fold3.com]. He was probably the father of

i. Daniel Dorton, born before 1776, head of a Harford County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. Levi, born about 1785, a "man of color" taxable in Monongalia County from 1805 to 1821: his profession a mason in 1820 [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 406, 455, 520, 536, 583, 629, 679, 787, 808, 856, 898, 916, 976]. He married Hannah Billey, 12 January 1806 Monongalia County bond and was head of an Eastern District, Monongalia County household of 3 whites in 1810 [VA:495], 9 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169] and 12 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:344], a "Mulatto," born in Maryland, listed in the 1850 census for Monongalia County with (wife?) Ann and with $500 real estate [VA:481].

iii. Elizabeth, born 1776-1796, head of a Monongalia County household of 2 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169].

iv. John, a "man of color" taxable in Monongalia County from 1810 to 1821: his profession a mason in 1820 [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 536, 583, 679, 787, 808, 856, 898, 916, 976]. He was head of a Eastern District, Monongalia County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169] and 7 in 1830 [VA:344].

v. Henry2, Jr., born about 1794, a "man of color" taxable in Monongalia County from 1812 to 1821, his profession a stone mason in 1820 [PPTL 1783-1821, frames 611, 679, 787, 808, 856, 898, 916, 976]. He was head of an Eastern District, Monongalia County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830 [VA:344] and a "Mulatto" head of a Decatur, Washington County, Ohio household with white wife Elizabeth in 1850 [family no. 76], a "Mulatto" farmer, born in Virginia, counted in the 1870 census for Troy Township, Athens County, Ohio, in 1870 with "Mulatto" (wife?) Hannah (born in Ohio) and $400 real estate [OH:20].

vi. Bethuel, born about 1797, a fifty-three-year-old "Mulatto" counted in the Eastern District, Monongalia County census of 1850 with $600 real estate with white (erased?) wife Nancy [VA:469, family no. 185], a "Mulatto" widower living in Clinton District, Monongalia County in 1880 [VA:17].

vii. Nimrod, born 1794-1806, head of a Monongalia County household of 1 "free colored" in 1820 [VA:169].

viii. ?Malachi, born about 1796, head of a Wilkes Township, Gallia County, Ohio household of 7 "free colored" in 1840 [VA:53], a "Mulatto" farmer, born in Virginia, counted in the 1850 Wilkeson, Vinton County, Ohio census with (wife?) Mahala Dorton [OH:589, family no. 1026].

 

DAVIS FAMILY

1.    Mary Davis, born say 1657, the daughter of Richard Davis of London, England, was a white woman who married a "Negroe man" named Domingo, the slave of Joseph Tilley of Calvert County, Maryland. Mary and Domingo were living with Lord Baltimore when she wrote the details of her marriage and the birth and baptism of her children in a bible. Her daughter Rose produced a transcription of the bible in Anne Arundel County court in August 1715 in an unsuccessful petition for her freedom [Court Judgments 1715-7, 93, 178, 244-6]. Mary and Domingo were the parents of

i. Thomas, born 14 March 1677 on Lord Baltimore's plantation on Lyon's Creek in Calvert County, baptized by Mr. Wessley(?) in the house of Richard Massoms. James and Ann Thompson were the godparents.

2        ii. Rose, born 11 August 1684.

 

2.     Rose Davis was born 11 August 1684 at the "Top of the Hill" plantation in St. Mary's County. She was baptized at Nottley Hall by a priest named Mr. Richard Hebert. Henry and Rose Wharton were the godparents. Rose was thirty-one years old in August 1715 when she brought an unsuccessful suit for her freedom against Henry Darnall in Anne Arundel County court [Court Judgments 1715-7, 93, 178, 244-6]. In March 1779 her granddaughter Rosamond Bentley petitioned the Prince George's County court for her freedom, and in August 1781 Rosamond and her brother William and sisters Mary, Eleanor and Margaret Bentley won their cases. In an apparent effort to minimize their African ancestry, Rose's witnesses testified that the family descended from Mary Davis, a white English woman, and an East Indian man - instead of a "Negroe man" as stated in Mary Davis' bible. Rose's daughter was described as "Indian Polly" [Judgment Record 1777-82, 713-5]. Rose was the mother of

i. Polly, born say 1710.

 

Another Davis family:

1.    Elizabeth Davis, born say 1736, confessed to the Anne Arundel County court in August 1758 that she was the mother of two "Molatto" children named Sam and David. The court sold her children to James Barnes until the age of thirty-one and ordered that she serve a total of fourteen years [Judgment Record 1757-60, 320, 324]. She was the mother of

i. Sam, born June 1754, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:81].

ii. David, born February 1757.

iii. ?John, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 5 "other free" and 5(?) slaves in 1810 [MD:78].

 

Queen Anne's County:

1.    Belvidera Davis, born say 1731, was a white spinster woman who was convicted by the Queen Anne's County court for having "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe." The court sold her "Mollatta" child Anne to Nathaniel Wright for 2,520 pounds of tobacco in June 1751 [Judgments 1750-1, 269; Criminal Record 1751-9, 27-8]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Eleanor, born say 1755, was fined 30 shillings by the Queen Anne's County court in March 1774 for having a child by a "Negroe" slave in May 1772 [Judgment Records 1771-80, 137-9].

ii. Abraham, head of a Caroline County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 5 in Talbot County in 1800 [MD:517].

 

Other members of a Davis family were

i. Moses, head of a Baltimore City household of 16 "other free" in 1800 [MD:190].

ii. Abraham, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 7 "other free" in 1790, perhaps the Abraham Davis who was head of a St. Mary's County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:431].

iii. Daniel, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:186].

iv. William, "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:301], perhaps the William Davis who was head of an Annapolis household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:116].

v. James, head of a Frederick County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:835].

 

 

DAWSON FAMILY

1.    Jane Dawson, born say 1695, was presented by the Charles County court on 9 November 1714 for having an illegitimate "Mallatto" child by information of John Dodson, constable, and on evidence of (her master and mistress?) William and Elizabeth Midellton [Court Record 1711-5, 469]. She was probably the mother of

i. Ann, mother of a "Mallatto" child Jenny, born 9 August 1748, sold by the Prince George's County court to William Hardy for 750 pounds of tobacco on 22 November 1748 [Court Record 1748-9, 30]. Jenny was a "Mallato" girl bound until the age of thirty one when she was listed in the Prince George's County estate of William Hardy on 26 June 1758 [Prerogative Inventories 64:439-41].

Talbot County

Members of a Dawson family in Talbot County were

i. Tom, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:540], perhaps the husband of Patty Dawson, born about 1773 who obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 13 June 1818: a negro woman ... about 45 years of age, 5 feet 2 1/2 Inches high ... born free and raised in the County.

ii. Isaac, born about 1780, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 19 July 1806: five feet, one inch high, twenty six years of age, of a yellowish complextion ... raised in Talbot county ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 84, 150].

iii. Stepney, head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:172].

 

DAY FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Day, born say 1695, was the indentured servant of John Sanders on 13 March 1710/1 when she admitted in Charles County court that she had an illegitimate "Malatto" child by a "Negro man named Quasey belonging to her master." And on 11 August 1713 she admitted to the court that she had a second mixed-race child [Court Proceedings D-2:70; E-2:301, 304]. Her descendants may have been

i. Mary, born say 1744, confessed to the Prince George's County court on 27 March 1764 that she had a "Mulatto" child. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and that her five-week-old daughter Lydia be sold to her master, Henry Purdie, until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1763-4, 60].

ii. Benjamin1, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790. Samuel Hanson sued him and Thomas Thompson in Charles County court for a debt of 4,020 pounds of tobacco on 13 November 1770. (He was called Benjamin Davis in his first appearance, but called Benjamin Day in the index and in his second appearance) [Court Record 1770-2, 216; 1772-3, 577].

iii. Henrietta, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

iv. Vinney, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

v. William1, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vi. Henry, born before 1776, head of a Charles County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

 

DEAN FAMILY

Delaware

1.    James1 Dean, born say 1737, was taxable in Kent County, Delaware, in 1755. He was called a carpenter on 25 May 1762 when he purchased 5 acres in Little Creek Hundred for 30 pounds. Jonas Miller and Edward Norman (signing) were witnesses [DB Q:57, 89]. His 2 June 1787 Little Creek Hundred, Kent County will, proved 26 June 1787, left his land, house, and personal estate to his wife Sarah (Hughes), daughters Rebecca and Keziah, and son Jesse [WB M, fol. 144-5]. His children were

2        i. Jesse1, born say 1762.

ii. Rebecca.

iii. Keziah, born 4 May 1757, sued Thomas Murphy in Kent County court on 12 May 1773 for unjustly detaining her seven days past the time she was bound to him as an apprentice "for relief of the poor." She stated that she was born on 4th May and should have been released on her birthday. Mary Freeman was her witness. She had an illegitimate child by Peter Lantern/ Lantron about December 1773 [DSA, RG 3505, MS case files, Petitions-Apprentices May 1773; Indictments May 1774].

 

2.    Jesse1 Dean, born say 1762, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1783 and a "Mulattoe" taxable on 15 acres and a wooden house in 1797 and 1798. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:34]. He was married to Elizabeth Durham by 2 January 1806 when he was paid her share of the estate of her father William Durham. In his Kent County will, proved in December 1839, he called himself a "colored man." He left his land and other estate to his wife Rebecca, sons William and Jesse, Elisha Durham "colored man," daughter Sally Ann Cott (wife of John Cott) granddaughter Mary, and Elijah Concealor, son of his last wife. He also adopted his sons William and Jesse who were born to his wife Rebecca before their marriage. Perhaps Elisha Durham was also an illegitimate son since he left him furniture, carpets, his best cow, and other stock and listed him in the will before his daughter [WB R-1, 160]. His children were

i. William.

ii. Jesse2.

iii. Sally Ann, wife of John Cott. John was head of a Little Creek Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:29].

 

Other members of the family were

i. James2, born say 1770, a "Mulattoe" taxable in 1797 on 3 acres and a small house in Kent County, Delaware who was farming another 83 acres which belonged to Elijah Concellor. He was head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:54].

ii. James3, born 1776-1794, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:54].

iii. Michael, head of a Caroline County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and a "negro" head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:188].

iv. David, born before 1776, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:14].

v. Jessa, born before 1776, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:28]. She may have been the mother of "Free man of color" Jesse Dean who died intestate in Kent County, leaving 50 acres of land before 1843 when his half brothers John Dean and Thomas Butcher petitioned the legislature for title to the property, stating that they were the children of the same white man by different women of color [Schweninger, Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 1, 33].

Maryland

1.    Richard Dean, born say 1720, sold a black cow to Richard Smith by Frederick County, Maryland bill of sale on 6 March 1758, making his mark "RD" [Land Record F:458]. He purchased lot no. 66 in Sharpsburg from Joseph Chapline by Frederick County deed of 21 January 1764. The word "Negro" followed his name in the two places it appeared on the original deed and in the three places it appeared in Joseph Chapline's original acknowledgement of the deed. But it was crossed out, and the clerk did not transcribe anything about race when he recorded the deed. The word "Black" was inserted in place of "Negro" in the three places on Joseph Chapline's acknowldegement, perhaps at some later time [Land Record J:232-3; MSA Special Collections 2477-5-47, location 00/66/09/28]. The deed may have identified Richard by race in order to distinguish him from a white Richard Dean who lived in the same area. Richard and his wife Catherine Dean sold this land to Griffith James for 55 shillings on 16 June 1764, making his mark "RD" [Land Record J:652-3]. Catherine was apparently the daughter of Robert Perle/ Pearl who named her in his 3 September 1765 Frederick County will [Prerogative Court Wills 33:351]. They were probably married and living at Monocacy Hundred on 24 November 1747 when the Prince George's County court quashed a grand jury presentment against Katherine Perle for bastardy [Court Record 1747-8, 90, 297]. On 2 August 1777 Richard purchased 50 acres in Washington County from Moses Chapline for 20 pounds Pennsylvania currency, and the deed was recorded with "Del'vrd to Massom Dean" in the margin. On 23 January 1779 Massam Dean, his wife Ann Dean and (his mother) Catherine Dean sold 50 acres called "Resurvey on Roots Hill" in Washington County to Christian Road for 425 pounds, 10 shillings Maryland currency [Land Record A:13-5; B:448-9]. Richard and Catherine's children were identified in the Washington County chancery court suit of Toby heirs vs. Chapline from 1810 to 1812 [MSA accession no. 17,898-638-1/2; location 1/35/5]. They were

i.Massam, born say 1747, apparently named for Robert Pearl's former master Richard Marsham. He enrolled in the first militia company organized for the Revolutionary War in the Elizabeth Town District of Frederick County on 6 January 1776 [Peden, Revolutionary Patriots of Washington County, Maryland]. He purchased 26 acres in Washington County on the Old Town Creek for 32 pounds, 10 shillings on 24 March 1781 from Francis Deakins [Deed Book B:498-9]. He was taxable on 52 acres called "Town Creek" in the assessment for Skipton and Fifteen Miles Creek District of Alleghany County in 1793 [Assessment Record, Maryland Archives digital file, image 46]. He was head of an Allegany County, Maryland household of 9 "other free" in 1800 (called Marsham Dean) [MD:3] and was counted as a white male over the age of forty-five in Perry County, Ohio, in 1820 [OH:5]. He left a 16 June 1825 Perry County, Ohio will naming his children Massom, Jr., Catherine (later married George Higgins), Mary Ann (never married) and James Dean as well as his granddaughter Elizabeth Jemiah, daughter of Massom, Jr., and Mary Brooks [WB AB:52].

ii. Catherine, born say 1753, married Charles Dowd, a Revolutionary War veteran who died 14 June 1821 in Monongalia, Virginia [Pierce, Selected Final Pension Payment Vouchers--Maryland, 51]. About 1800 she and her brother James Dean testified about the location of a fence on the tract of land called "Resurvey on Hills, Dales and the Vineyard" in Washington County which was the property line of Michael Toby and Massam Dean [MSA accession no. 17,898-638-1/2; location 1/35/5, depositions of Jonas Hogmire and Frederick Rohrer]. She and Nancy Dowd were called "free persons of color" on 13 November 1818 when a group of white men were indicted by the Monongalia, Virginia court for committing a riot on them by the information of Charles Dowd [Zinn, Monongalia County Records of the District, Superior and County Courts, 8:136].

iii. James, born say 1755, enrolled in the first militia company organized for the Revolutionary War in the Elizabeth Town District of Frederick County on 6 January 1776 [Peden, Revolutionary Patriots of Washington County, Maryland]. He was head of a Washington County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 5 in 1800 [MD:641]. About 1810 he made a deposition in the Washington County chancery case of Toby heirs vs. Chapline about events which had taken place before 13 July 1779 when Joseph Chapline sold part of a tract of land called "Resurvey on Hills, Dales and the Vineyard" near Little Antietam Creek to Michael Toby. James stated that his brother Massam Dean purchased part of the tract from Joseph Chapline and not obtaining a deed from Chapline, sold the land to Michael Toby. He deposed that his father had fenced a road that ran along the property line into "Richard Dean's Meadow" [MSA accession no. 17,898-638-1/2; location 1/35/5].

Endnotes:

1.    Many thanks to Beverly Dean Peoples of Raleigh, North Carolina, for her research of the Richard Dean family.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ladeanxx/richarddeane.htm

 

 

DELANEY/ DULANEY FAMILY

Members of the Delaney/ Dulaney family of Maryland were

i. Isaac, head of a Baltimore City household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:184].

1        ii. Mary, born say 1770.

 

1.    Mary Dulaney, born say 1770, a "free woman of colour," was living in Prince George's County from 1813 to 1820 when her children obtained certificates of freedom. She was the mother of

i. Elizabeth, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom registered as a free Negro in Prince George's County on 25 November 1813: a bright mulatto woman, about 23 years old ... raised in the family of John T. Wood of Prince George's County ... daughter of Mary Dulany, a free woman of color.

ii. William, born about 1792,  obtained a certificate of freedom on 25 November 1813: a bright mulatto man, about 21 years old ... raised in the family of Mary Dulany ... son of Mary Dulany.

iii. Moses, born about 1798,  obtained a certificate of freedom on 30 March 1815: a dark mulatto youth, about 17 years old ... son of Mary Dulany.

iv. Nancy, born about 1801,  obtained a certificate of freedom on 15 May 1820: a Negro woman of dark complexion who is about 19 years old ... daughter of Mary Dulany [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 16, 34].

 

DEVAN FAMILY

1.   William Devan, born about 1767, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County in 1817: a Mulatto Man aged about fifty years, about five feet five Inches high ... born of a white woman in the family of Richard Simpson to Whom said William Devan was bound by the Orphans Court of the County aforesaid as appears by the affidavit of Charles Simpson. He may have been the father of

i. Lydia, born about 1786, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County in 1817: a Mulatto woman about five feet Eight Inches high ... about thirty one years of age is a free born woman, she being the issue of a free born woman as appears by the affidavit of John Rene [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 78].

 

DOBSON FAMILY

1.    Margaret Dobson, born say 1722, the white servant of Nicholas Goldsborough of St. Peter's Parish, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1742 that she had a child by a "Negroe." The court ordered her sold for seven years and bound her daughter Diana, born 6 May 1742, to her master until the age of thirty-one. In March 1744/5 she was sold for a second term of seven years, and the court bound her "Mulatto" son James to her master until the age of thirty-one. She was living in St. Michaels Parish on 20 October 1747 when she was convicted of having her son Jethro by a "Negro" [Judgment Record 1742, 293; 1744-5, 238-9; Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.]. She was the mother of

2        i. Diana, born 6 May 1742.

ii. James, born in 1745, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:507].

iii. Jethro, born about January 1747, nine months old on 20 October 1747 when he was sold to Nicholas Benson for the 4 pounds which was due to him for keeping Jethro for the first nine months of his life [Judgment Record 1747-50, n.p].

 

2.    Diana Dobson, born 6 May 1742, was the servant of Nicholas Goldsborough, Sr., in November 1764 when she was convicted by the Talbot County court of having two illegitimate children [Criminal Record 1761-7, 311-3]. She may have been the mother of

i. Abram, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:537].

ii. Benjamin, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:444] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:324].

 

They were probably the ancestors of

i. Isaac, born about 1766, manumitted by Archelus Price of Talbot County on 16 August 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom on 29 September 1812: a Mullatto Man ... named Isaac Dobson who is now about 46 years of age, 5 feet 5 3/4 in. high ... set free by him the said Archelus Price on the 16 August 1808 [Certificates of Freedom 1807-28, 40].

 

 

DODSON FAMILY

Members of the Dodson family in Maryland were

1        i. John, born say 1765.

ii. Anthony, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:854].

 

1.    John Dodson, born say 1765, was head of a Prince George's County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:43]. He was the father of

i. John, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 14 July 1810: black man ... about 23 years old ... raised in the family of John Henry Hall and was born free, being the son of John Dodson, Sr., and his wife Nancy who were free persons of color.

ii. ?Nancy, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 9 May 1821: a colored woman, about 30 years old ... is free being the reputed daughter of Ann(?) Dodson a free woman of color.

iii. William, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 25 May 1821: a colored man about 26 years old ... light complexion. He is free being the reputed daughter (sic) of Margary Dodson, a free woman of color.

iv. Henry, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 13 July 1812: a black boy, about 15 years old, with thick lips and flat nose ... raised in Prince George's County ... son of Margary Dodson who was a free born woman of color.

v. Jane, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 7 June 1819: a Negro girl, about 21 years old ... dark complexion. She is free, being the reputed daughter of John Dodson and Margary, his wife.

vi. Margaret, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 22 July 1815: a mulatto girl, about 15 years old ... large flat nose and thick lips. She is free and the reputed daughter of John Dodson and Margary, his wife, free people of color.

vii. Mary Ann, born about 1806, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 22 Jun 1821: a colored woman, about 14 years old ... has rather a light complexion. She is free, being the reputed daughter of Margary Dodson, a free woman of color [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 6, 10, 18, 28-9, 36-7].

 

DOGAN FAMILY

1.    Alice1 Dogan, born about 1685, was called the "Mallato" servant of Captain Thomas Dickson of Coventry Parish in March 1711/2 when the Somerset County court convicted her of having a child in 1703 by "Harry her Master's Negroe" at Annemessex. On 9 November 1711 the court presented her for having a child about September 1711, and on 4 March 1713/4 she confessed to the court that she had a child by "Abram, Mrs. Coulbourne's Negro," in Stepney Parish. The court sold her child to Samuel Handy, Gent., until the age of thirty-one for 1,000 pounds of tobacco and ordered her to serve another four years. On 4 August 1713 she complained to the court that she was about twenty-eight years old and ought to be free, and in June 1714 the court sold her children Shelly, over five years old, and George, to be two, to her master for 1,500 pounds of tobacco [Judicial Records 1711-13, 91-2, 132; 1713-5, 27, 69, 299]. She was the ancestor of

i. Shelly, born about 1709.

ii. George, born about 1712.

2        iii. ?Catherine1, born say 1714.

iv. ?Leah, a spinster (no race indicated), confessed to the Somerset County court on 15 November 1768 that she had an illegitimate child. She refused to name the father and paid a fine of three pounds [Judicial Record 1767-9, 70, 237].

 

2.    Catherine1 Dogan, born say 1714, had an illegitimate child named Toby who was born on 2 October 1732 and bound out until the age of twenty-one by the Somerset County in March 1732/3. She was apparently identical to "Kate free mollatto" of Coventry Parish, the servant of William Coulbourn, who confessed to the Somerset County court on 15 March 1736/7 that she had a child named Alice, born six months previous, by a "negro." The court sold Alice to William Colebourn, Jr., until the age of thirty-one for 50 shillings. The court indicted her again for fornication in August 1737 [Judicial Record 1737-8, 2-3, 126]. She was the mother of

i. Alice2, born about September 1736, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:529].

ii. ?Catherine2, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

 

DONALDSON FAMILY

1.    Sarah Donalson, born say 1734, the spinster servant of Abigail Wilson, admitted to the Somerset County court in March 1757 that she was guilty of "Inordinate Copulation" by having a child by a slave the prior month. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and bound her daughter Sarah to James Wilson until the age of thirty-one. In June 1763 she confessed that she had a "Negro Bastard" child by "Negro Bristo," a slave of Elizabeth Waters, and the court bound their daughter Rhoda to James Wilson for thirty-one years and ordered Sarah to be sold for seven years after the completion of her service [Judicial Record 1757-60, 2-3]. She was the mother of

Rhoda, born 20 December 1762.

2        i. ?Bridget, born say 1752.

ii. Sarah, born February 1757.

 

2.    Bridget Donaldson, born say 1752, the "free Mulatto" servant of James Wilson, admitted to the Somerset County court that she had a child by a "Negro slave." The court ordered her sold for seven years and sold her son Levin to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judicial Record 1769-72, 139]. She was the mother of

i. Levin, born in 1770.

 

DOUGLASS FAMILY

Members of the Douglass family in Virginia and Maryland were

1        i. Gabriel, born say 1760.

ii. Adam, head of a Rockbridge County household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:271].

iii. William, head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:89], perhaps identical to William Douglas who was head of a Petersburg Town household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:334a].

iv. Charles, "F.N." head of a Culpeper County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:26].

 

1.    Gabriel Douglass, born say 1760, was head of a Washington County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:636]. He was the father of Thomas Douglass who registered as a free Negro in Washington, D.C., on 3 October 1821: son of Gabriel Douglass, a free man, and his wife, who is also free. Douglass has passed as free in Harper's Ferry for some years past [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 10]. He was the father of

i. Thomas, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:63].

ii. ?James, head of a Prince George's County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:44].

 

DOVE FAMILY

The Dove family of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, may have been related to John Dove, the "Mallatto slave" of Doctor Gustavus Brown, who was brought before the Charles County, Maryland court on suspicion of burglary on 14 November 1727 [Court Records 1727-31, 42]. Vincent Askin, by his 1 October 1745 Charles County will, proved 22 October 1745, directed that, at his death, his "mulatto man John Dove" was to have his freedom [Prerogative Court (Wills), 1744-6, Liber 24, folio 229]. And "John Dove Mullatto" was valued at 60 pounds in the inventory of Askins'estate in 1745 [Prerogative Court (Inventories), 1745-6, Liber 32, pp. 36-7].

 

1.    Mary Dove, born say 1710, was a "Negro woman" slave listed in the Anne Arundel County, Maryland, inventory of the estate of Eleazer Birkhead on 28 April 1744 [Prerogative Court (inventories) 1744-5, 43]. Birkhead's widow married Leonard Thomas, and Mary Dove sued him in Anne Arundel County court for her freedom in June 1746 [Judgment Record 1746-8, 118]. The outcome of the suit is not recorded, apparently because Thomas took her with him when he moved to Craven County, North Carolina. In September 1749 the Dove family was living in Craven County when William Smith complained to the court on their behalf that Leonard Thomas was detaining them as slaves:

Moll, Nell, Sue, Sall, & Will, Negroes Detained as Slaves by Leonard Thomas That they are free born Persons in the Province of Maryland and brought to this Province by the said Leonard Thomas.

William Smith travelled to Maryland to prove their claim, and they were free by November 1756 when James Dove, "a free negro a "Negro Servant," complained to the Craven County court that Smith was mistreating him, Nelly, Sue, Sarah, Moll, and William Dove [Haun, Craven County Court Minutes, IV:11-12, 366]. The Dove family owned land in Craven County by 1775.

William Dowry, the grandson of Mary Dove, was still held in slavery in Anne Arundel County in 1791 when he sued for his freedom in the General Court. In October 1791 a white woman named Ann Ridgely testified in Anne Arundel County that the family descended from Mary Dove, of brown complexion, whose grandmother was

a Yellow Woman and had long black hair, but this deponent does not know whether she was reputed to be an East Indian or a Madagascarian, but she has understood that she was called in the family Malaga Moll [Craven County Miscellaneous Records, C.R. 28.928.10, cited by Byrd, In Full Force and Virtue, 38].

Mary died before 6 April 1763 when the Craven County court appointed her son James Dove administrator of her estate on security of 100 pounds [Minutes 1762-66, 13d]. Members of the family in Maryland were

i. Dolly, "Negro" head of a Kent County, household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Jim, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:531].

 

DOWNS FAMILY

1.    Eliza Downes, born say 1708, was the servant of Sarah Dashiell of Stepney Parish on 15 March 1725/6 when the Somerset County court ordered that she be sold for seven years for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Record 1725-7, 97]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Paddy, "N." head of a Muddy Branch, Little Creek, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:31].

ii. James, "N." head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE;46].

iii. James, head of a Little Creek, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:40].

iv. Isaac, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:35].

v. Charles, (Negro) head of a Caroline County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:194].

vi. Ben, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:195].

vii. Daniel, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:195].

 

Prince George's County

1.    William Downs, born say 1765, was a "free negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:303]. He was probably the father of

i. Robert, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 3 September 1816: aged about twenty four years .. . brown complexion ... free born and ... raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 89].

 

DRIGGERS FAMILY

The Driggers family originated in Northampton County, Virginia where they were free by 1645. They spread to Maryland, Delaware, North Carolina and South Carolina during the colonial period. See the Virginia section for the entire Driggers history. Listed below are the branches of the family which lived in Maryland and Delaware.

 

1.    Emmanuel Driggers, "Negroe," born say 1620, was the slave of Francis Pott on his plantation in Magotha Bay, Northampton County, Virginia. He was free by 27 May 1645 when he purchased a cow and calf from Pott and recorded the sale in the Northampton County court [DW 1645-51, 82]. His children were

2        i. Thomas, born about 1644.

3        ii. Devorick/ Devorax1, born say 1656.

 

2.    Thomas Driggers, born about 1644, remained a slave in Northampton County. He married a free woman named Sarah King, daughter of "King Toney Negro."  She was in Somerset County, Maryland, before 23 April 1688 when she, called "negroe Woman & wife to Thomas Griggers Negro," complained to the Somerset County court that Margaret Holder had stolen some of her goods. Peter George, "Negroe" of Wiccocomoco Hundred, posted five pounds sterling security for Sarah's appearance. The court heard testimony from Peter George, Mary George, Mary Johnson, and Sarah Driggers, Jr., and found in favor of Margaret Holder. By 14 August 1688 Sarah, Peter George, three unnamed women, and an unstated number of men petitioned the Somerset County court to stop taxing them as slaves since they were free born. The court ruled that for that year the women should be exempt, but the men should pay taxes. The court also ordered that they obtain certificates from where they formerly lived to prove that they were free born [Archives of Maryland 91:47; Judicial Record, 1687-89, 58]. In 1689 Sarah was back in Northampton County [Orders 1679-89, 463]. Their children were free because their mother was free. Two of their children who moved to Delaware and Maryland were

i. Sarah1, born say 1667, raised by John and Christian Francisco until she was twenty-one years old. In 1691 she was bound to William Kenny "to go to the Southward with him" [OW 1689-98, 121, 125]. He may have been the William Kening, Jr., who sued Sarah Driger for defamation in Sussex County, Delaware Court on 3 June 1691 [Court Records 1680-99, 497]. She brought a successful suit against Edward Fadlooks(?) in Kent County, Delaware Court on 14 November 1717 [Court Dockets 1680- February 1725, fol. 119].

4        ii. William2, born say 1682.

 

3.   Devorick/ Devorix1 Driggers, born say 1656, was the son of Emmanuel Driggers, a slave who was freed in Northampton County, Virginia. Deverax received a bay mare from his father by a 1673 Northampton County deed [D&c 1668-80, fol.59-60]. He moved to Somerset County, Maryland, about 1677 when he was one of the headrights claimed by Stephen Cosden in his patent [Maryland Provincial Patents, Liber 15:433]. In 1689 he signed a Somerset County address of loyalty to King William and Queen Mary [Torrence, Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore, 349]. On 12 January 1701/2 he provided security in Somerset County court for Deborah Wildgoose who had an illegitimate child by Samuel Webb. He was living in All Hollows Parish when he and several whites were presented for being drunk on the Sabbath. He was acquitted after paying court costs [Judicial Records 1702-5, Liber G-I, 21; 1707-17, 16]. He was renting a 300 acre plantation in Bogerternorten Hundred of Somerset County in 1707 [Somerset County Rent Roll, 1707, Calvert Papers, ms. 174, MHS]. He received a cow from his sister in Somerset County on 27 July 1708 [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, Book 1 (Somerset County Livestock Marks), 160]. He died before 2 March 1708/9 when court suits against him by David Hudson and John Swann & Co. were suspended by his death [Judicial Record 1707-11, 176, 215]. His estate was valued at about 37 pounds [Inventories and Accounts, Liber 30:88]. His administrator John Jermain was sued by a number of Deverix's creditors to whom he had written promissory notes at Snow Hill, one of them his lawyer for six cases between March 1698 and March 1706. Jermain recovered 1,600 pounds of tobacco that William Godard of Wicomico had owed Deverix [Judicial Record 1706-11, 223-4, 228, 256-60, 434; 1711-13, 57]. He may have been the father of

i. Devorax2 Driggers, born about 1680, was a "Molatto" Accomack County tithable in Jonathan Owen's household in 1696. He was sued by Robert Houston in Accomack County court on 7 August 1704 [Orders 1690-7, 222a, 224, 235; 1703-9, 30a]. He and (his wife?) Arendia Driggas were witnesses with Thomas Purnell to the 24 December 1720 Somerset County will of Henry Hudson, Sr., a wealthy planter [Maryland Wills 16:279; Baldwin, Maryland Calendar of Wills, 5:36]. He was taxable in Thomas Purnell's household in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County in 1723 and 1724 and in Peter Beckett's household in 1725, listed in Baltimore Hundred from 1730 to 1733 [List of Taxables]. He was called a carpenter on 17 November 1730 he admitted in Somerset County court that he owed Christopher Glass for 500 pounds of tobacco and 650 pounds of beef which he had contracted for in writing on 10 November 1729. Peter Beckett provided special bail for him [Judicial Record 1730-3, 43-4]. On 16 June 1731 he purchased 75 acres in Somerset County on St. Martins River in present-day Worcester County [Land Records, Liber SH:324]. He and his wife Ann sold this land in 1734 and were renting it in 1748 [Worcester County Debt Book, 1748, 190]. They may have been the parents of an apprentice named Davarix Drigus who was valued at 6 pounds in the inventory of the estate of Thomas Parnall in June 1723 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1724-1725, 263]. He may have been the father of

 

4.    William2 Driggus, born say 1682, was probably the son of Thomas Driggers, a Northampton County slave, and his wife Sarah King. William was called the "Maletto Servant" of Daniel Neech when he recorded his cattle mark in Northampton County court in 1698 [DW 1651-54, 30 at end of volume]. He was living in Somerset County, Maryland, in April 1708 when he was presented for carrying Mary Winslow out of the county to avoid prosecution for having an illegitimate child by Daniel Francisco. The court ordered that he, a "Mollatto," receive twenty-five lashes when he told the justices that

they had no more to do with sd Woman than his Arse

Edward Winslow and David Hudson were security for him [Judicial Records 1707-11, 94, 96, 102; 1713-5, 5, 26]. William signed his 7 January 1720 Somerset County will which was proved 7 May 1722. He left his 100 acre plantation called "Drigus Adventure" to his son William and mentioned unnamed children under eighteen years old and his wife, Jane. He specified that his children were to be cared for by their uncle, John Driggus of Accomack County, if his wife remarried. The inventory of his estate included a parcel of old books [Maryland Wills, Liber 17:285; Inventories 8:65]. Jane was called a "maleto widow" in 1724 when Winslow Driggus (William's son by Mary Winslow?) was taxable in her Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County household [List of Taxables]. William's children were

i. William3, born about 1702.

5        ii. ?Winslow1, born say 1705.

iii. ?John, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County from 1734 to 1740.

iv. Sabra, born say 1722, presented by the Somerset County court on 17 November 1741 for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Record 1740-2, 175].

 

5.  Winslow1 Driggers, born say 1705, was taxable in the Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household of Jane Drigus in 1724 and in the household of Isabee Parkins in 1725. He was called Winsley Drigers when his Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware taxes were charged to William Beckett in 1727 (listed with Robert Butcher, Robert Whud (Wood), Julius Caesar, Thomas Consellor, Jacob Miller, and Daniel Francisco) and in the Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, when his taxes were charged to Isaac Perkins in 1729 and 1730 [Kent County Assessments, Film RG 3535, reel 1, frames 354, 360, 364]. He was sued in Kent County by Hugh Durburow in August 1729, by John McDowell in May 1733 but was not found by the sheriff, and he sued the executors of Robert Wood in November 1733. The sheriff's warrant for McDowell's case read "William Grigers" [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1722-32, frame 363; 1733-1740, frames 12, 37, 73, 131; May Term 1733 case papers, executions #41-86]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Jacob, born say 1733, a "Negro" indicted in the November 1754 session of the Kent County court for stealing a dark bay gelding worth 10 pounds from John Durham on 1 October 1754 [DSA, RG 3805.0, MS case files, November 1754 indictments].

ii. Drake, taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundreds, Sussex County, Delaware, from 1770 to 1787. Administration of his Sussex County will was granted to John Wiltbank on 2 September 1788. It mentioned his sister, Rhoda Hodgskin [de Valinger, Calendar of Sussex County Probate Records, 195].

iii. Rhoda, sister of Drake Driggers, married Jonas Hodgskin.

iv.Richard, taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1773 [Kent County Assessments, frame 0183] and taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1779 when an X was placed next to his name [DHS, MS Kent County Papers, 1680-1800, Official Tax lists, etc., Duck Creek Hundred 1779-1781].

v. Luke, taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1774. He was indicted by the Sussex County court in February 1775 for an unstated offense. Lydia Coursey gave 40 pound recognizance to appear to give evidence against him [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 164].

vi. Benjamin, taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware in 1777.

vii. James, born say 1758, listed in the payroll of Captain Matthew Manlove's Company in the Revolutionary War on 1 October 1776, having served a month and seventeen days and paid 3 pounds, 16 shillings [Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 70-1].

viii. William5, born say 1765, a delinquent taxpayer in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1787, taxable in Dover, Kent County in 1788, and head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425]. He purchased 13 acres leading to Thomas's Chapel in Murderkill Hundred for 8 pounds on 5 December 1799 [DB F-2:234-5].

ix. Betty, married Peter Becket on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302].

x. Noval, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425].

xi. Mary/ Molly, purchased 15 acres called Second Chance on Gabriels Branch in Worcester County, the crop of corn, a cow, nine hogs, ten pigs, two beds and furniture, a ewe and lamb, all his household furniture and 40 shillings of paid accounts from William Jarman (of Wm) for 6 pounds on 11 September 1794 [DB P:493].

xii. Elizabeth, "Negro," had an illegitimate child by "Negro" Moses Wall in Dover Hundred in June 1785 [DSA, RG 3805, MS November 1785 Indictments]. Moses was a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1782 to 1784 [RG 3535, Levy Assessment List 1768-84, frames 542, 620].

 

DUFFY FAMILY

Members of the Duffy family were

i. Sarah, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 25 October 1822: descendant of Susan Dove who was a white woman ... bright yellow Complexion ... about forty years of age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 11].

ii. Ziposah, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:828] and 4 in 1810 [MD:602].

iii. Leah, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:828] and 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:602].

iv. Isaac, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" and 3 slaves in 1810 [VA:91].

 

DUNLOP FAMILY

1.    Mary Dunlop, born say 1717, was living in St. Paul's Parish, King George County, Virginia, in 1735 when the birth and baptism of her son James was recorded (no race indicated). She was the mother of

i. James, born 6 August 1735, baptized September 29, 1735 [St. Paul's Parish Register, 60].

 

Their descendants who moved to Prince George's County, Maryland, were

2        i. Joseph, born about 1768.

ii. Naney, head of a Richmond City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:333], perhaps the mother of Nancy Dunlap who obtained a certificate of freedom  in Prince George's County, Maryland, on 7 July 1819: about 5 feet 3-1/4 inches tall, about 22 years old, and of a yellow complexion ... daughter of Nancy Dunlap, a free woman of color ... born in King George County, Virginia and has been residing in Prince George's County for about a year [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 29].

 

2.    Joseph1 Dunlop, born about 1768, registered as a free Negro in King George County on 25 September 1798: a mulatto man about thirty years old and five feet three inches high was born free [Register of Free Persons 1785-1799, no.9]. He moved to Prince George's County, Maryland, before 7 August 1817 when his son George registered there as a "free Negro." He was the father of

i. Winny, born say 1788,  obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County, Maryland on 7 July 1819: a black woman about 5 feet 2-1/2 inches tall, and about 51 (31?) years old ... free and the daughter of Joseph Dunlap and Lydia his wife free people of color, born in Virginia King George County, who have been residing in Prince George's County for the last twelve months.

ii. ?Ann, born about 1794,  obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 16 December 1825: a dark mulatto woman, about 31 years old, and 5 feet 3-1/2 inches tall.

iii. George, born about 1796,  obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County, Maryland on 7 August 1817: a dark mulatto man, 5 feet 8 inches tall, and 21 years old ... the son of Joseph Dunlop Sr. of Prince George's County, a respectable colored freeman.

iv. Joseph2, born about 1797,  obtained a certificate of freedom on 14 September 1818: a colored man of dark complexion, about 21 years old, and 5 feet 8 inches tall. He is a free man, being the legitimate son of Joseph Dunlop Sr., a free man of color.

v. Treasy, born about 1803,  obtained a certificate of freedom on 19 February 1825: a mulatto woman, about 22 years old, and 5 feet 1 inch tall ... daughter of Joseph Dunlop Sr. [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 23, 27, 29, 50, 54].

 

DURHAM FAMILY

1.    Daniel1 Durham, born say 1690, was taxable in Mispillion Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, between 1729 and 1740 and taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1745 to 1748. He may have died sometime between 1753 and 1754 when (his son?) Daniel Durham was no longer called "Jr." in the levy assessment lists [Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 24, 43, 51, 87, 143, 168]. He may have been identical to Daniel Doron/ Durrum/ Derham who was taxable in Somerset County from 1723 to 1725 [List of Taxables, 1723-1725]. He was probably the father of

2        i. John1, born say 1710.

3        ii. Daniel2, born say 1718.

iii. ?Sarah, married William Hanser about 1757. She died before 8 February 1771 when her "next of kin" (brother?) John Durham was granted administration on her Kent County estate [WB L-1, fol. 91].

 

2.   John1 Durham, born say 1710, was taxable in Mispillion Hundred from 1741 to 1742 (called a shoemaker in 1741), a taxable in Dover Hundred in 1743 and 1744, and taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1745 to 1789: in 1768 listed with John Durham Junr who was called his son in the list for 1772 which included a third John Durham, only his estate listed in 1789 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 499, 503; 1743-67, frames 12, 44, 51, 87, 107, 143, 168, 187, 196, 209, 226, 240, 263, 269, 290, 316, 347, 377, 383, 397, 437, 520, 552; 1768-84, frames 26, 65, 103, 128, 184, 222, 262, 310, 334, 342, 366, 368, 442, 445, 502, 541, 570, 582, 619; 1784-97, frames 8, 24, 48, 71, 74]. He purchased 54 acres in Little Creek Hundred on the westside of Ellingsworth Branch adjoining Andrew Tybout's and Israel Alston's land for 40 pounds on 8 February 1750 [DB P-3:4]. He was named in the 19 January 1763 will of his mother-in-law, Isabell Hughes [WB K-1, fol. 301-3]. In February 1773 the Kent County court indicted six white men: James Cockrell, Andrew Jenkins, William Hawkins, William Maddin, John Brown and Edward McConnaway with riot and assault and battery when they attacked him at his home and damaged his rush-bottomed chair and other property on 19 November 1772 at Little Creek Hundred. William Durham, Whittington Durham, John Cott, Elijah Consiglio (Consellor) and Margaret Sisco were his witnesses [DSA, RG 3505, MS case papers, Indictments February 1773]. On 14 February 1788 he sold 38 acres adjoining the road from Fast Landing to Dover to Elijah Consellor of Duck Creek Hundred for 116 pounds, and on 24 February 1788 he sold a lot of 3 acres adjoining this to James Dean for 45 pounds [DB Z:198-9]. By his 9 April 1788 Little Creek Hundred, Kent County will, proved 14 May 1788, he gave his sons William, Isaiah, and Whittington Durham his estate except for 5 pounds each to his daughters Sarah Sisco, Letitia Lacount, Elizabeth Concilar, and Hannah Concilar as well as 5 pounds for four years to Rebecca Durham for raising his son John Durham's children. He also gave 10 pounds to Clayton Durham until he came of age but did not state their relationship. Mary Concilar, Eleanor Puckham, and John Durham (making their marks) witnessed the will. The account of the estate included payments to John Cott, Ephraim Francisco, William and Daniel Songo, Jesse Dean, Mary Consellor, Stephen Sparksman, and Jacob Gibbs [RG 3545, roll 68, frames 612-23; WB M-1, fol. 170-1]. His children were

4        i. William1, born about 1730.

5        ii. Isaiah, born say 1740.

iii. Whittington1, born say 1742, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1759 to 1772, in Duck Creek Hundred from 1773 to 1783, and in Little Creek Hundred from 1784 to 1791, a "N." in 1790 and in 1791 when he was listed as delinquent [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 240, 263, 269, 290, 316, 347, 377, 383, 437, 520, 552; 1768-1784, frames 65, 103, 128, 180, 220, 299, 336, 370, 522, 568, 619; 1785-97, frames 6, 24, 48, 71, 74, 106, 136, 197, 226]. He was charged with contempt by the Kent county court in February 1789 for failing to comply with a judgment of the court in August 1779 regarding his conviction for fornication with Elizabeth Hughes, and he sued Philip Denny in court in November 1769 [DSA, RG 3805.002, 1787-1803, frame 52, 54; RG 3815.031, frame 135]. He was administrator of Charles Clark's 20 October 1785 Kent County estate [WB M-1, fol. 68].

iv. Sarah, married John Sisco according to the distributive account of her father's estate.

v. Letitia, married Thomas Lacount according to the distributive account of her father's estate.

vi. Elizabeth, married Thomas Concilar according to the account of her father's estate [de Valinger, Probate Records of Kent County, 401].

vii. Hannah, married Elijah Consilar.

viii. John2, called "John Derham Jun. deceased" on 19 June 1776 when administration on his Kent County estate was granted to his father [WB L-1:180].

ix. ?Clayton, born say 1773, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frames 483, 572; 1797-8, frame 351].

 

3.   Daniel2 Durham, born say 1718, applied for a warrant for 150 acres in Mispillion Hundred on 27 October 1739 [Warrant Book A:64]. He was called Daniel Doram, Jnr., when he was taxable in Mispillion in 1740 and 1741 and on 17 May 1744 when he purchased 100 acres in Little Creek Hundred [DB N:1:46]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1742 to 1776. He sued Spencer Cole in Kent County court in August 1741, the executor of John Hammett (of Mispillion Hundred) sued him in November 1741 and he admitted he owed a debt to Isaac Pounds in May 1743 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1740-1744, frame 208, 213, 296, 414, 480, 510]. He sold an acre of land adjoining John Hansor on the west side of Landing Road to Thomas Butcher on 12 February 1783 [Brewer, Kent County Land Records, 1785-1789, 48; DB Y:206]. By his 4 December 1779 Kent County will, proved 17 August 1786, he divided his land, a boy named George until he reached twenty-one years of age, and goods among his wife Eleanor, sons Benjamin, Daniel and Thomas, and daughters Joanah, Hester, Rachel, Mary, Eleanor, and Sarah. His estate paid bills to Charles Cambridge and Sabella Hanser [WB M-1, fol. 118; RG 3545, roll 68, frames 494-8]. His children were were

6        i. Benjamin1, born say 1747.

ii. Joanah, born say 1749.

iii. Hester, born say 1751.

iv. Rachel, born say 1753.

7        v. Daniel3, born say 1755.

vi. Mary, born say 1757.

vii. Eleanor, born say 1759, perhaps the Eleanor Puckham who witnessed John Durham's 9 April 1788 Kent County will.

8        viii. Thomas1, born say 1761.

ix. Sarah.

 

4.    William1 Durham, born about 1730, was a "Mulatto" mason aged about twenty-three years on 15 November 1753 when his master, Griffith Griffith, a mason of Bristol Township, Pennsylvania, advertised in the Pennsylvania Gazette that he had run away [Scott, Abstracts of the Pennsylvania Gazette 1748-55, 261]. He was called a "malatto" when he married Mary Waldrek, "malatto both free," on 17 January 1756 in St. Michael's and Zion Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [St. Michael's and Zion Church Marriage Register 1745-1784, microfilm of original at Historical Society of Pennsylvania]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1765 to 1768 and taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1770 to 1777 and in 1785 and 1788, a "N." taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1790 and 1792, in the list of "Mulatto's and Negroes" in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 508, 552; 1768-84, frames 10, 74, 107, 119, 180, 220, 254, 299; 1785-97, frame 6, 127, 267; 1797-8, frame 75]. He died before 27 July 1797 when administration on his Kent County estate was granted to (his wife) Mary Durham on 500 pounds bond posted by Joseph Farrow [RG 3545, reel 68, frame 733; WB N-1:179]. Mary was called "Mulatto (widow of William Durham, Senr.)" in the 1798 Levy Lists [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1797-8, frame 479]. The account of his estate names heirs: Ibba (Isabella), Benjamin, and Mary Durham, Elizabeth Dean, Mary Hughes, Deborough Cott and Susannah Hansor [RG 3545, reel 68, frames 733-44; de Valinger, Kent County Probate Records, 528]. His children named in the distribution of the estate, dated 24 September 1805, were

i.  William2, born say 1762, called William Durham, Jr., in the list of taxables for Duck Creek Hundred in 1783, a "Mulatto" taxable in the lists for 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frame 568; 1797-8, frames 12, 75].

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1767, wife of Jesse Dean, since he was paid her share of her father's estate on 2 January 1806.

iii. Sarah, born say 1769, wife of John Derram.

iv. Mary Hughes, born say 1771.

v. Deborah Cott, born say 1773.

vi. Susannah Hansor, born say 1775.

vii. Benjamin2, born say 1778.

viii. Isabella, born say 1780.

 

5.    Isaiah1 Durham, born say 1740, was taxable Duck Creek Hundred from 1775 to 1783, in Little Creek Hundred from 1785 to 1800: listed as a "N." starting in 1790, a "mulattoe" in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 254, 267, 299, 336, 370, 522, 568; 1784-97, frames 8, 24, 48, 71, 74, 106, 136, 226, 267; 1797-8, frames 7, 473]. He died before 19 May 1800 when administration on his Kent County estate was granted to Mary Durham and William Vanstavoren. The inventory of his estate was taken by Joseph Farrow and totalled 195 pounds. Mary "of Isaih" was head of a Muddy Branch, Little Creek Hundred household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:31]. Mary was married to John Francisco by 2 February 1803 when the estate was distributed among Isaiah's children. On 24 February 1806 Vanstavoren petitioned the court that Isaac Derham "Mulatto" died seized of land, a widow and nine children; his widow had married John Francisco a "Mulatto," but no guardian had been appointed for the children [RG 3545, roll 68, frame 600; Brewer, Kent County, Delaware, Guardian Accounts, Caton to Edinfield, 153, 203]. His children who received their share of the estate were

i. Pheby.

ii. William3.

iii. Elijah.

iv. Margaret

v. Isaiah2

vi. Rebecca, perhaps the Rebecca Durham who married Asa Street, 23 January 1811 Delaware bond, Asa Street and Daniel Songo bondsmen [DSA, Marriage Records 18:292].

vii. Jeremiah.

viii. John3, born 1794-1776, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:11] and head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:28].

ix. George2, born 1794-1776, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:46]. On 21 February 1821 he and his wife, late Susan Handsor, widow of William Handsor late of Jones Hundred, deceased, petitioned the court saying her deceased husband William Handsor had died intestate after conveying a 75 acre tract of land in the forest of Jones Hundred to Jacob Stout on 16 January 1804 while she was still an infant under twenty-one. She had not signed over her rights to the land which was then in the possession of "free David Hopper, alias Henby" [Brewer, Kent County, Delaware, Guardian Accounts, Edmonson to Hopkins, 21]. David Hopper was head of a Dover Hundred household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:35].

 

6.    Benjamin1 Durham, born say 1758, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1778 and in Dover Hundred in 1779. As executor of the estate of his father Daniel Durham he called himself a yeoman of Little Creek Hundred on 1 December 1786 when he made a deed for 1 acre of land, on the west side of Landing Road which lead from Carbines Bridge and adjoined John Hanzor, to Thomas Butcher, stating that Thomas had paid his father 11 pounds for it [Brewer, Kent County Land Records 1785-1789, 68-9]. He married Elizabeth Hansor, daughter of William and Bridget Hansor, after 1791. He was taxable on 87-1/2 acres in Jones Hundred, Kent County in 1798 and head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45]. Benjamin and his first wife had Daniel and Elizabeth. He died intestate owning 15-3/4 acres in Jones Hundred and a widow and seven children: Daniel, Elizabeth, Handsor, William, Susan, Hannah and Eleanor Durham before 14 August 1815 when James Williams, "mulatto" labourer of Little Creek Hundred, petitioned the court that he had purchased the right of Handsor Durham, Daniel Durham, and Williamd Durham (who had since died intestate without issue) and asked the court to lay out the dower land. The court ruled that the land did not bear division and sold the entire plot to him for $45 [Brewer, Kent County, Delaware, Guardian Accounts, Caton to Edinfield, 202-3]. Benjamin was the father of

i. Daniel4, died about 19 February 1815 after making a nuncupative will to John McCoy. He divided his estate equally between his sister Elizabeth Durham and two half-sisters Hannah and Eleanor Durham and appointed Hugh Durham his executor. On 9 March 1815 Hugh Durham was granted administration on the will on $700 bond. The estate owed money to Mary Cambridge [WB P-1:68-9; RG 3545, roll 68, frames 519-523].

ii. Elizabeth.

iii. Handsor, born say 1794, married Margaret Consilor, 1 June 1815 Kent County bond. He and his wife Margaret sold part of a tract called Jolly's Neck in Saint Jones Hundred to Hugh Durham on 13 May 1817 [DB R-2: 97, 321].

iv. Hannah.

v. Eleanor.

 

7.    Daniel3 Durham, born say 1755, was taxable as Daniel Durham, Junr, in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, in 1772, in Duck Creek Hundred in 1773, in Little Creek in 1774, delinquent in 1775, listed in Little Creek in 1778, in Dover Hundred from 1780 to 1792 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 128, 180, 220, 222, 238, 342, 452, 499, 539, 571, 580; 1784-1797, frames 2, 9, 108, 110, 133, 224, 264]. He made a 1 October 1795 Kent County will (signing) which was proved 8 April 1801 by Lewis Gano and Benjamin Durham. He gave his son Hugh a mare and divided the rest of his personal estate between Parker, Hannah, Hugh, Joseph and Sarah Durham, the child his wife was pregnant with and his wife Nicy Durham. His wife Nicey/ Unicy was head of a St. Jones Hundred household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:44]. She married Griffin Bass before 28 April 1801 when the will was proved. His heirs Parker Durham, Hannah Williams, Hugh, Joseph, Sarah, and Mary Durham each received over 11 pounds [RG 3545, roll 68, frames 505-515; WB O-1:25]. His children were

i. Parker.

ii. Hannah Williams, perhaps the wife of James Williams who purchased Benjamin Durham's land in Little Creek Hundred.

iii. Hugh, born say 1765, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:41]. He purchased land in Saint Jones Hundred called Jolly's Neck from Hanzor Durham on 13 May 1817 [DB R-2:97, 321].

iv. Joseph.

v. Sarah.

vi. Mary, born say 1796.

 

8.    Thomas1 Durham, born say 1761, was underage when his father made his 4 December 1779 Kent County will. He was a delinquent taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1786 and taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1790 to 1794 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frame 607; 1785-97, 226, 267, 337]. He died before 10 August 1795 when administration on his estate was granted to Thomas Hughes who married Thomas Durham's widow Mary [RG 3545, roll 68, frame 709; WB N-1:126; de Valinger, Probate Records of Kent County, 494]. Mary was head of a Little Creek Neck, Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:38]. His children were

i. Jemima, born say 1786.

ii. Joseph, born say 1788.

iii. Sarah, born say 1790.

iv. Whittington2, born say 1792, married Hester Sisco, 27 August 1817 Delaware bond, John Durham surety [DSA, Marriage Records 19:62].

v. Thomas, born say, 1794.

 

Other members of the family were

i. Ann, born say 1737, confessed in Kent County court in August 1753 that she had an illegitimate child named Jonathan. John and Daniel Durham were her securities to support the child [RG 3805.002, Common Pleas, Dockets 1734-1779, frame 226].

ii.Isaac, born say 1750, a laborer indicted in Kent County court in August 1768 for having an illegitimate female child by Ann Songo of Little Creek Hundred [DSA, RG 3805, case papers, August 1768 indictments]. He sued Aaron Hart in court in February 1779 [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1769-71, frames 20, 39]. He was taxable in Dover Hundred from 1770 to 1779 when he was delinquent, listed as a "Free Negro" from 1780 to 1800: a delinquent taxable in 1780, taxable in Dover Hundred in 1781, in Little Creek Hundred in 1782, in Dover Hundred from 1783 to 1800, taxable in 1797 on two cows, two yearlings, and a calf said by Isaac to be in his care for his children, taxable in what was then St. Jones Hundred in 1800 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 69, 183, 216, 240, 298, 339, 413, 428, 500, 540, 571, 580; 1784-1797, frame 10, 45, 411; 1798-1800, frame 328], head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [DE:50] and a "negro" head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:212], perhaps the Isaac Durham, born before 1776, who was head of a Baltimore County household of 5 "free colored" in in 1830.

9        iii. Richard, born say 1745.

iv. Ezekiel, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1774.

v. Charles, a "N." taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1788, in Little Creek Hundred from 1790 to 1794, in Duck Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1784-97, frames 127, 226, 267, 337, 347, 484, 572; 1798-9, frames 351, 382], head of a Duck Creek Hundred household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:18]. Administration on his Kent County estate was granted to Thomas Consellor and Thomas Hawkins on 6 May 1812 [RG 3545, roll 68, frame 492].

 

9.    Richard Durham, born say 1745, was taxable in Jones Hundred, Kent County in 1770 and also taxable that year in the south side of Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County from 1773 to 1781, and a "Free Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred in 1782. He witnessed the 2 May 1787 Sussex County will of Elias Johnson and the 30 May 1787 Sussex County will of James Wilkins. He was granted administration on the 6 March 1793 Sussex County estate of George1 Durham [de Valinger, Sussex County Probate Records, 207, 208, 280]. He may have been the father of

i. George1, born say 1763, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County in 1783. Administration on his Sussex County estate was granted to Richard Durham on 6 March 1793 [de Valinger, Sussex County Probate Records, 280].

ii. Miller, born say 1765, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1785 and a delinquent taxable in 1786.

 

DUTTON FAMILY

Members of the Dutton family in Maryland, Delaware and Virginia were

1        i. Mary, born say 1740.

2        ii. Isaac, born say 1742.

iii. Stephen1, born say 1744, had an illegitimate child by Easly Wright, a spinster of Coventry Parish, Somerset County, before June 1767 [Judicial Record 1766-7, 152].

3        iv. David1, born say 1745.

v. Stephen3, born about 1769, an eight-year-old "negro" bound apprentice in Harford County to Benjamin Richardson in October 1777 [Maryland Historical Society Bulletin, vol. 35, no.3].

vi. Guy, born before 1776, head of a Harford County household of 6 "free colored" in 1830.

vii. Eleanor, "free negro" head of a Fairfax County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:251].

viii. Levin, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Somerset County on 4 June 1821: born free ... dark brown complexion ... in the twenty eighth year of his age [Certificates of Freedom 1821-32, 1-2].

 

1.    Mary Dutton, born say 1740, was a "Mulatto" who registered the 13 June 1759 birth of her daughter Leah and the 18 August 1762 birth of her son Stephen in Stepney Parish, Somerset County [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, III:43, 46]. She was a spinster of Coventry Parish on 16 June 1767 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had an illegitimate child (by an unnamed free person) and was fined three pounds [Judicial Record 1766-7, 152]. She was the mother of

i. Leah, born 13 June 1759.

ii. Stephen2, born 18 August 1762. He was taxable on 100 acres in Wicomico Hundred, Somerset County, in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.68], head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391], 7 in 1810 [DE:325], and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:396].

iii. ?David3, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:307] and 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:414].

iv. ?Hanabel, born before 1776, head of a Nanticoke, Sussex County, Delaware household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:224].

 

2.    Isaac Dutton, born say 1742, was bound as an apprentice blacksmith in Somerset County in 1759 [Judicial Record 1757-61, 225]. He married Elizabeth Hill, "(both free Mulattoes)," on 13 October 1763 in Stepney Parish, Somerset County [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 47]. They may have been the parents of

i. David2, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:321].

 

3.    David1 Dutton, born say 1745, married Bethia Bibbons on 17 September 1766 at Stepney Parish, Somerset County [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 49]. He sued Benjamin Gilliss (blacksmith) for seven pounds, four shillings in Somerset County court on 19 November 1771 [Judicial Record 1769-72, 268]. He was a "free Mulatto" who purchased a total of 91 acres in 1772 and 1775 in the part of Somerset County which later became Wicomico County, Maryland. He was taxable on 50 acres, called "Crooked Chance," and 40 acres, called "Poor Chance," in Rewastico, Somerset County, in 1783 [MSA S1161-9-10, p.40]. David died in 1798 not long after purchasing a larger tract of land in Nanticoke Hundred, Somerset County [Land Records Liber F-2, 395; Liber O-32, 206]. David and Bethia were the parents of

i. Nancy, born 7 August 1768, "daughter of David and Bethier," registered in Stepney Parish.

ii. Suckey, born 14 March 1771, "daughter of David and Bethyer," registered in Stepney Parish.

iii. Betheyer, born 20 January 1774, "daughter of David and Betheyer," registered in Stepney Parish [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 49, 50, 52, 53].

 

DYER/ DIAS FAMILY

1.    Priscilla Dyer, born say 1699, was a "Molatto" woman having 10 more years to serve and valued at 14 pounds when she was listed in the Queen Anne's County inventory of Doctor Thomas Godman in 1730 [Prerogative Court Inventories 1729-30, 15:723]. She was called Priscilla Dias, the servant of Thomas Godman of Christ Church Parish, Queen Anne's County, in March 1730 when she confessed that she had an illegitimate child named Rachel. She received twenty lashes and was ordered to serve her master an additional eighteen months. She was called a spinster, with no master identified, when she was punished for having six more illegitimate children between 1731 and 1740 (called Priscilla Dyer in 1732, Priscilla Doyas in March 1741). No race was mentioned in the court records [Judgment Record 1728-30, 221-2; 1730-1, 154-5; 1732-5, 13, 485-6; 1735-9, 146-7, 452; 1740-2, 92-3]. On 2 August 1787 the court allowed her six pounds for her annual support [Surles, And They Appeared at Court, 1774-7, 89, 117]. She was the ancestor of

i. Rachel, born before March court 1730 when the court bound her to serve James Ringold until the age of twenty-one with the consent of her mother [Judgment Record 1728-30, 222].

ii. George1 Dias, born say 1740, convicted in Queen Anne's County court in March 1770 of having an illegitimate child named Risdon Anderson by Mary Anderson [Surles, And They Appeared at Court, 1777-2, 5, 40]. Risdon was head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [DE:68].

iii. George2 Dias, born about 1761, petitioned with Thomas Hopkins for their freedom from Vinson Benton in Queen Anne's County court in 1774 [Surles, And They Appeared at Court, 1774-7, 18, 50, 73], a "man of Colour" who was residing in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, on 5 May 1818 when he appeared in court to apply for a pension for his services in the Revolution (called George Dias). He stated that he enlisted in Queen Anne's County, Maryland, and served until 1783. He received a land warrant and pension. On 14 July 1820 he was residing in Philadelphia when he made a further application (called George Dice, signing), stating that he was a shoemaker and had only one son who was eighteen years old and still learning a trade [National Archives pension application no. S42,161, Bounty Land Warrant no. 618-100, http://www.fold3.com]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 (called George Dice) [MD:509] and 2 "free colored" males in the Middle Ward of Philadelphia in 1820 (called George Dies).

iv. ?Ann Dyer, head of a Worcester County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [MD:608].

v. ?John Dyer, a "free Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1783 and 1785 [Levy Assessments 1768-84, frame 571; 1785-1850, frame 46].

 

EASTER FAMILY

1.    Frances Easter, born say 1730, was presented by Charles County court on 13 March 1749/50 for bearing an illegitimate "Melato" child by information of John Franklin, constable for the lower part of Durham Parish. On 12 June 1750 she was convicted of the charge, and the court bound her four-month-old son John to Bayne Smallwood [Court Record 1748-50, 604, 720]. She was the mother of

i. John, born February 1749/50.

 

EASTON FAMILY

Members of the Easton family were

i. Clem, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Samuel, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and a "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 2 in 1800 [MD:271].

iii. John, born about 1784, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 12 June 1816: aged about thirty two years ... yellowish complexion ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 85], perhaps the John Easton who was head of a Hampshire County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:805].

iv. Sarah, head of a Campbell County, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:881].

 

EDMUNDS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Edmunds, born say 1700, was the mother of Francis Edmunds, "a Mallatoe," who was sold by the Prince George's County court to Samuel Perrie until the age of 30 years on 25 November 1718 when Francis was five months old. The court ordered that William Mattingly be paid for keeping Elizabeth and her child for five months, and on 25 August 1719 the court ordered that Richard Bevans or John Gardiner be paid 600 pounds of tobacco for keeping Elizabeth [Court Record 1715-20, 722, 934]. Elizabeth was the mother of

i. Francis, born about July 1718, a "Molatto man" with about 6-1/3 years to serve and valued at 20 pounds when he was listed in the 25 July 1737 inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Richard Beaven [Prerogative Court Inventories 1739-41, 24:189-90]. Richard Bevan gave Frank Edmund, "alias Mollatto Frank," his freedom by his 27 February 1738/9 Prince George County will which was proved 21 May 1739 [Prerogative Court Wills, 22:58].

 

ELBERT FAMILY

Members of the Elbert family were

i. Isaac, "free negro," taxable in the 4th District of Kent County, Maryland in 1783 [MSA 1161-7-4, p.6].

ii. William Elbut, aka Hughes, born about 1745, a forty-year-old "mulatto" who claimed to be a Revolutionary War soldier when he was jailed in Williamsburg, Virginia, according to the 9 July 1785 issue of the Virginia Gazette and General Advertiser [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 113]. He was a taxable "negro" in the Upper District Hundred of Dorchester County in 1783 [MSA S1161-5-6, p.7] and head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:693]. He was probably related to the Hughes family of Dorchester County.

iii. Phil, a "negro" head of a Caroline County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:210].

iv. Lydia, born about 1794, obtained a certificate in Talbot County on 28 April 1819: 25 years of age ... four feet 11 1/2 Inches high .... born free and raised in the County.

v. Nicholas, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 12 April 1819: a negro man ... about Twenty one years of age, 3 feet and a half Inches high, dark complexion ... born free and raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1815-28, 105, 109].

 

ELLIS FAMILY

1.    Margaret Ellis, born say 1739, was a white woman who confessed to the Kent County, Maryland Court in March 1759 that she had a child by a "Negroe" man on 10 February 1759. The court sold the child named Jonas to Charles Tilden until the age of thirty-one [Criminal Proceedings 1748-60, 219]. Margaret was the mother of

i. Jonas, born 10 February 1759.

ii. ?Richard, head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:148].

iii. ?Joseph, "Negro" head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:117] and 3 in 1810 [DE:15].

iv. ?Cuffy, "Negro" head of a Murderkill Hundred Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:115] and 3 in 1810 [DE:54].

 

ENGLAND FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth England, born say 1725, was living in Kent County, Maryland, in August 1746 when she submitted in court that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negro." The court ordered her to serve Peter Cole, Junr for seven years [Criminal Records 1742-4, 318-9]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Rebecca, born 11 April 1770, a "Mola." bound to Phebe Gale by indenture in Kent County court on 24 April 1774 [Court Minutes 1774-82, n.p.].

ii. Thomas, a "Negro" taxable on 50 acres in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1798 [Assessments 1798-9, 352].

 

ENGLISH FAMILY

1.    Margaret1 English, born say 1705, a spinster servant woman of Edward Worrell of St. Paul's Parish, confessed to the Kent County, Maryland Court on 15 June 1725 that she had a "Mullatto" child by a "Negroe." The court ordered that she serve her master four months after the expiration of her service and that she and her child be sold by the county to Jervis Spencer, she to serve seven years and her child until the age of thirty-one. The court also referred to a prior conviction for the same offense in March 1721. In June 1727 she confessed to having a child by "Negroe Robin" [Criminal Records 1724-8, 82-4, 303-4]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. Margaret2, born say 1721.

 

2.    Margaret2 English, born say 1721, was called "Pegg English a Mollatto Woman of St. Paul's Parish," the servant of Edward Worrell, on 21 August 1739 and 18 March 1739/40 when the Kent County court ordered that she receive corporal punishment for having illegitimate children (by a free person). On 17 June 1740 she (or her mother?) was called Margt. English spinster when she confessed to having an illegitimate child (by a slave), and the court ordered her sold for seven years and her child bound to her master, Edward Worrell, until the age of thirty-one. On 17 November 1741 she confessed to having a child by a free person and received fifteen lashes [Criminal Proceedings 1738-9, 152; 1739-42, 66, 72, 225-6]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Peter, (no race indicated) petitioned the Kent County court that he was unjustly detained as a servant by Bastus Wilkins [Court Minutes 1774-1782, n.p.].

ii. Susanna, born say 1750, indicted by the Kent County court in November 1774 and August 1775 for not giving in her tax [Criminal Dockets, 1774-6, August 1775 appearance no. 89].

 

ENNIS FAMILY

1.    Eliza Hannis, born say 1692, had a child by "Negro Cesar," the servant of John Menekin, before August 1712 when Menekin was ordered to bring Caesar before the Anne Arundel County court [Judgment Record 1712-15, 6]. Eliza and Caesar may have been the ancestors of

2        i. "Mulatto Sue," born say 1730.

 

2.    "Mulatto Sue, born say 1730, was the mother of a five-year-old boy named Jonathan Annis who was bound by the Anne Arundel County court to Charles Frissel on 13 August 1751 until the age of twenty-one [Judgment Record 1751-4, 85]. She was the mother of

i. Jonathan, born March 1746/7. He may have been identical to John Annis who was married to Sarah when their daughter Mary was born on 9 May 1774 and baptized "a few days after" in St. Anne's Parish, Anne Arundel County [Wright, Anne Arundel County Church Records, 105].

ii. ?Peggy, head of a Baltimore County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:452].

 

The Annis family was probably identical to the Ennis family:

i. Anthony Ennis, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:85].

ii. Samuel Ennis, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:85].

iii. Hector Enos, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:98].

iv. Joshua Ennis, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:61].

v. Benjamin Ennis, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:183].

vi. Charles Ennis, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:109].

vii. R. Enness, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:507].

viii. Winney Ennis, "F. Negroe" head of a Fauquier County, Virginia household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [VA:420].

ix. William Ennis, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Charles County on 15 September 1814 and registered it in the Court of the District of Columbia in Alexandria: a bright mulatto man, about twenty six years of age ... a free born person and was born and raised in New Port Parish , twenty-three years of age, a bright mulatto [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, p. 23].

x. James Ennis, born 1776-1794, head of an Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:214].

 

EVANS FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Dennis, alias Evans, born say 1687, was convicted of having a "Mullattoe" child by the Anne Arundel County court in November 1707. She charged the child to a white man named Jeremiah Connelly, but he was acquitted and she was ordered to serve her mistress, Madam Biggs, twelve months for the trouble of her house. She confessed to having another child in August 1709 which she admitted was fathered by Mrs. Biggs' "Negroe Dick." She had another "Malato" child who was about five weeks old in November 1711 when he was sold to James Carroll to serve until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Records 1707-8, 649-50; 1708-12, 75, 374, 411]. She may have been the ancestor of

2        i. Hannah, born say 1760.

ii. Mary Evens, head of a Montgomery County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:914].

 

2.    Hannah Evans, born say 1760, was born free in Dorchester County. She was head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:669]. She was the mother of

i. Lucy Cornish, born about 1781, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 November 1826: of a dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Hannah Evans who was also born free, aged about 45 years.

ii. James, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 24 August 1826: of a chesnut colour ... born free and is the son of Hannah Evans who was also born free, aged about 28 years.

iii. Hooper, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 19 June 1824: chesnut colour ... son of Hannah Evans, who was born free, about 22 years of age [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 50, 55].

 

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