HAILEY FAMILY

1.    Honour Haley, born say 1714, confessed in Somerset County court in November 1730 that she had a "negro Bastard Child" at the house of Captain William Turpin in Somerset Parish on 1 August 1730. The court ordered her to serve for seven years and sold her child to William Turpin for thirty-one years. On 25 August 1733 she confessed that she had an illegitimate child by "Jupiter a Negro man belonging to Jonathan Stanton," and the court sold her "Mollatto" daughter named Sarah to William Gray of Monacan until the age of thirty one for 500 pounds of tobacco [Judicial Record 1730-3, 28; 1733-5, 61]. She was the ancestor of

i. Sarah, born 24 July 1733.

ii. ?Stephen Hailey, head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:645].

 

HALE/ HALL FAMILY

Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties

1.    Elizabeth Hall, born say 1690, servant of John Hammond, confessed to the Anne Arundel County Court in June 1710 that she had an illegitimate child by her master's "Negroe" slave James. The court bound her child, born the Sunday before Shrove Tuesday in 1709, to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1708-12, 156]. She was probably the ancestor of

2        i. William1, born say 1740.

 

2.    William1 Hall, born say 1740, was head of a Patapsco Upper Hundred, Baltimore County household of 13 "other free" in 1810 [MD:639]. In 1836 his son Jacob told Martha Tyson, the biographer of Benjamin Banneker, that his father had been granted his freedom and 13 acres in Baltimore County by Walter Hall of Anne Arundel County. He also told her that he was Benjamin Banneker's classmate (which is unlikely since Benjamin lived from 1731 to 1806, and Jacob died in 1843) [Bedini, The Life of Benjamin Banneker, 40, 261]. William was the father of

i. ?James, head of a Patapsco Upper Hundred, Baltimore County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [MD:641].

ii. Jacob1, head of a Patapsco Upper Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:641]. He was employed for more than forty years as the keeper of the graveyard of the Society of Friends of Elkridge Landing, Baltimore County. He died in 1843 [Bedini, The Life of Benjamin Banneker, 40, 261]

iii. ?Levin, head of a Baltimore County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:565].

iv. ?Thomas2, head of a Baltimore City household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:276].

 

Other members of the Hall family in Baltimore and Anne Arundel were

i. William2, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 and 10 in 1810 [MD:84].

ii. Jane, head of a Baltimore City household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:244].

iii. Betsey, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:232].

iv. Thomas1, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:80].

v. Penby, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:31].

vi. Hy., head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:187].

vii. Jacob2, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:80].

viii. Sampee, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:60].

 

Prince George's County

The Hall/ Hale family of Prince George's County moved there from King George County, Virginia, about 1800 according to the "free Negro" registration of Nathan D. Hale [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 14]. They were probably related to Nathan Hall, head of a Prince George's County household of 8 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:75], and William, Elijah, and James Hall (born about 1769-1781), alias Deen, who registered as "free Negroes" in King George County in 1800 [Register of Free Persons, nos. 11, 15, 19]. They may have been related to Abraham Hall, a "free Molatto," who appeared in adjoining Westmoreland County, Virginia Court between 1744 and 1750.

1.    Abraham Hall, born say 1720, was sued in Westmoreland County, Virginia Court on 28 February 1743/4. He appeared in Westmoreland County court a number of times as plaintiff and defendant between 1744 and 1750. He was identified as a "free Molatto" on 24 February 1747/8 in his suit against Crabb for which he was awarded 15 pounds damages by a jury and on 30 November 1749 when he sued William Cox [Orders 1743-7, 14a, 23a, 66a, 67; 1747-50, 57, 95a, 113a, 133, 174a, 198; 1750-2, 8a]. He may have been the father of

2        i. John, born say 1755.

 

2.    John Hall, born say 1755, moved from King George County, Virginia, to Prince George's County, Maryland, about 1799. He was head of a Prince George's County household of 14 "other free" in 1800 [MD:282]. He was the father of

3        i. ?Trecy Hale, born say 1775.

ii. ?Nathan D. Hale, born about 1781 in King George's County, Virginia, married Maria B. Adams. He registered as a free Negro in Prince George's County, Maryland on 26 February 1813: a bright mulatto man, about 31 or 32 years old ... born in King George's County in Virginia and resided there until he reached the age of 18 when he moved to Maryland where he lived for many years as a free man. He was born free. His wife Mary B. Hall, born about 1788, registered the same day: formerly Maria B. Adams, is a bright mulatto woman, about 25 years old ... raised in the town of Piscataway in Prince George's County until she married Nathan D. Hale, her present husband. She was born free.

iii. James D. Hale, born about 1793, registered in Prince George's County on 22 October 1813: a dark mulatto man, about 20 years old ... son of H. Hale, a free person of color.

 

3.    Trecy Hale, born say 1775, was a "free woman of colour" of Prince George's County. She was the mother of

i. Mary Ann Hale, born about 1796, registered in Prince George's County on 9 May 1821: Polly who calls herself Mary Ann Hale, is about 25 years old. She has a bright complexion ... daughter of Trecy Hale, a free woman of color [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 14, 16, 36].

 

Eastern Shore of Maryland

Members of a Hall family in the Eastern Shore of Maryland were

i. Jane, one of "2 "mulato girls" bound to Edward Harris of Queen Anne's County when the inventory of his estate was taken on 28 January 1741/2, each with nine years to serve and valued at 20 pounds [Prerogative Court Inventories 1741-2, 26:490].

ii. Ann, one of "2 mulato girls" bound to Edward Harris on 28 January 1741/2 when the inventory of his Queen Anne's County estate was taken on 28 January 1741/2 [Prerogative Court Inventories 1741-2, 26:490].

iii. Sarah, head of a Talbot County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:521].

iv. Isaac, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:892].

v. Augustin, head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:149] and 5 in 1810 [MD:905].

vi. Fulbury, head of a Worcester County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [MD:608].

 

Other members of the Hall family in Maryland were

i. Frederick, born 6 March 1736 according to his pension file, head of a Montgomery County household of 1 "Free Negro or Mulatto" over 16, 3 under 16 and 2 female "Free Negroes or Mulattos" in 1790 [MD:235] and 4 "free colored," including a man and woman over 45, and a female slave over the age of 45 years in Fairfax Township, Fairfax County, Virginia, in 1820. He applied for a pension for his service in the Revolution while living in Washington, D.C., on 24 September 1833, stating that he enlisted in the 3d Maryland Regiment on 8 May 1777 and served a total of six years. He was born in Port Tobacco, Charles County, and had a record of his age in the book of the Episcopalian Church there. He lived principally in Fairfax County, Virginia, since the Revolution before moving to Washington. Adam Adams made a deposition in Charles County in his favor on 12 March 1833. His name appeared on the muster rolls on 11 May 1777 but was listed as a deserter on 10 January 1778; enlisted again on 25 March 1779 and was on the rolls to April 1780, so his application was denied [file R7569, http://www.fold3.com].

ii. Richard, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iii. John, head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:564].

iv. Jane, head of a Charles County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:505].

v. Bridget, head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:533].

vi. Tamer, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:418].

vii. Sarah Moore, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 30 March 1819: Daughter of Ann Hall ... about twenty five years of age, complexion dark ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 47]. Sarah was probably married to the son of Leonard Moor, head of a St. Mary's County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:419].

 

HAMILTON FAMILY

1.    Isabell Hambleton, born say 1718, was living at Colonel George Dent's when the Charles County court presented her for bearing a "Molatto" child by information of George Thomas, the constable for William and Mary Parish [Court Record 1734-9, 263]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Charles, head of a Hampshire County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:805].

ii. Dido, head of a Hampshire County, Virginia household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [VA:793].

 

HAND FAMILY

1.    Jane Hand, born say 1745, was a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790. She paid a 30 shillings fine for bastardy in Charles County on 10 November 1772 [Court Record 1772-1773, Liber U, no.3, 169-70]. She may have been the mother of

i. George, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. John, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:560].

iii. James, head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:173].

iv. Jonathan, head of a Sussex County, Maryland household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [DE:406].

 

HANSER/ HANZER FAMILY

1.    Mary Vincent, born perhaps 1648, was a neighbor of the Johnson family in Accomack County.(1) In 1665 Richard Johnson and Thomas Tunnell agreed to support Mary's child by Aminadab, a slave of Southy Littleton, a planter on Nandua Creek in Accomack County [DW 1663-66, fol. 91]. The elder Aminadab died before 14 April 1665 when Southy Littleton of Accomack County gave the younger Aminadab "ye sonne of my servant Aminadab negro deceased and Mary Vincent Three cows and there female increase wch were formerly given to my said servant" [DW 1664-71, fol. 20]. On October 1666 Mary married John Okey, and they moved to Somerset County, Maryland, and then to Sussex County, Delaware, with the Johnson family [Torrence, Old Somerset, 399-400, 453, 474]. Mary's child by Aminadab was

2        i. Aminadab1, born about 1664.

 

2.    Aminadab1 Hanzer, born about 1664, apparently adopted the name Hanzer sometime before April 1683 when he recorded his cattle mark in Sussex County, Delaware [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 222]. He was about twenty-four years old in September 1688 when he, John Okey and Mary Okey testified in Sussex County court that they had helped John Barker move his cattle from Accomack County to Sussex County, Delaware. His wife, Rose Hanser, also testified [Court Records 1680-99, 262]. In March 1689/90 he was called "Aminidab Hanger Negro," a twenty-six year old, and his wife was called Rose Hanjaw, an eighteen year old, when they testified in Accomack County court about this same court case in which John Barker was convicted of appropriating seven cattle belonging to William Burton and Thomas Bagwell. Rose testified that in 1684 she lived in John Barker's house on the land of William Burton and Thomas Bagwell [W&cO 1682-97, 181, 181a]. Rose may have been Rose Matthews who testified with Aminadab in another case concerning John Barker which was held in Sussex County court on 8 September 1685 [Court Records 1680-99, 93]. In February 1690 Aminadab acted as attorney for William Burton and Thomas Bagwell in their Sussex County court case, and on 2 September 1696 he and Edward Carey each purchased 200 acres of a 400 acre tract in Sussex County [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 682, 1025-6; DB A-198]. He was found not guilty in Sussex County court of stealing a fishing boat valued at 20 pounds on 4 November 1706 [RG 4815.017, dockets 1707-41, frame 3]. John Burton mentioned him in his 10 February 1708/9 Sussex County will [de Valinger, Sussex County Probate Records, 21]. He sued Aminadab Oaky (perhaps his half-brother?) in Sussex County court on 3 May 1704 over some damage which their neighbors were ordered to inspect and report back to the court [Horle, Records of Sussex County, 1191]. On 9 April 1713 Aminadab Oaky posted a 100 pound security in Sussex County court to guarantee Aminadab Handsor that he would abide by the arbitrators' decision regarding the removal of a fence. He sold his 200 acre tract to Thomas Marriner on 28 May 1715. Aminadab and Rose were still living on 16 October 1717 when their son Aminadab, Jr., mentioned them in his Sussex County will. Aminadab, Sr., died before 8 December 1725 when Rose Hanzer was called the "widow, relict, and administrator of the estate of Aminadab Hanzer ... Deceased" in the deed by which she sold to Job Barker for 33 pounds 150 acres being part of 200 acres (part of a larger tract of 400 acres which Aminadab Hanzer and Edward Carey purchased from Sarah Painter on 3 September 1695). Rose died before 5 May 1752 when their descendants, Bridget Norman, William Handsor "who lives in Kent County" (signing), Samuel Hansor (signing), Elias Hansor, and Mary Brown sold to Benjamin Burton 50 acres which was part of 400 acres in Little Creek Hundred called "Ebonezer ... being the Dwelling place of Rosanna Hanzor Deceased." On 2 February 1773 Thomas and William Handzer, "Mallatos," made a quit claim deed for 350 acres on Ivey Branch which had been granted to "Aminadab Handzer Malatto Deceasd" [DB D-4:225-7; F-6:220-2; H-1, 329-30; L-11, 314-5]. Aminadab and Rose's children were

i. Aminadab2, born 23 January 1688/9 [Turner, Records of Sussex County, 146]. He made a Sussex County will on 15 March 1717 leaving a saddle and bridle to his brother Samuel, a yearling steer to his sisters Ann and Mary, and the remainder to his father and mother, Aminidab and Rose Handzer [WB A-1:122].

3        ii. William1, born say 1692.

4        iii. Thomas1, born say 1693.

5        iv. Samuel1, born say 1695.

v. Ann, born say 1710. She may have married Edward Norman, a "mulatto," who baptized his son, Edward, on 16 May 1747 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 92], and they may have been the parents of Bridget Norman who sold land in Sussex County in 1752 "where Rosanna Hanzor formerly lived."

vi. Mary, perhaps the Mary Brown who sold land in 1752 where (her mother?) Rosanna Hanzer had lived.

6        vii. Elias, born say 1712.

 

3.    William1 Handsor, born say 1692, purchased 100 acres, called "Bottle and Cake," at the head of Long Neck in Indian River Hundred by deed proved in Sussex County court on 1 November 1715 and recorded a survey for "Bottle & Cake" in 1716 [DB A-1:301; Shankland's Surveys & Warrants, p.55]. He patented land in Dover Hundred, Kent County, and was taxable there from 1733 to 1765. His son Nehemiah was taxable near him from 1758 to 1765. By his 28 August 1756 Kent County will, proved 16 December 1767, he left his land called "Jolly's Neck" to his youngest son Cornelius (son of Mary), left his gun to his son William, an iron pot to son Jonathan, and his shoemaker's tools to his son Nehemiah. He also named his daughter Naomy (daughter of Mary) [WB L-1:39-40]. The account of the estate named heirs: Cornelius, Naomi, Rhoda, Rachel, and Sarah Handsor [de Valinger, Kent County Probate Records, 238]. His wife Mary apparently died before the will was proved on 16 December 1767 since his wife was called Sarah Hansor when she and (her brother?) John Durham were granted administration on the estate until Cornelius Hansor arrived to the age of seventeen. Sarah, John Durham, William Conselor, and Daniel Durham posted bond for its administration. Sarah was probably "the widow Handser" who was head of a taxable household in Dover Hundred in 1768. She sued her son Cornelius in Kent County court in February 1771 but the case was abated by her death [DSA, RG 3815.031, frame 395]. She died before 8 February 1771 when administration on her estate was granted to her "next of Kin" John Durham [WB L-1, fol. 91]. William was the father of

7        i. William2, born say 1713.

8        ii. Jonathan1, born say 1715.

9        iii. Nehemiah1, born say 1720.

iv. ?Jacob1, born say 1721, taxable in Dover Hundred from 1742 to 1751. In 1748 he was a "Malatto" taxable in adjoining Murderkill Hundred. He and Nehemiah Hanser testified in the Kent County trial against "Negro" Phil who was found not guilty of robbing Thomas Parke on 25 August 1749 [Delaware Archives RG 3811.1, 1749-1750, Court for the Trial of Negro Slaves]. He may have died before 1756 when his father made his will.

v. Naomi, died before 24 December 1793 according to the account of her father's estate.

vi. Cornelius, born say 1752, not yet seventeen years old on 15 February 1768 when Sarah Hansor and John Durham were granted letters of administration of the Kent County estate his father William1 Hansor [WB L-1, fol. 41]. He was indicted by the Kent County court in 1778 to keep the peace [DSA, RG 3505.003, 1735-1779, frame 685]. He was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County in 1776, taxable on a cow and calf in Duck Creek Hundred in 1798, and head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:32]. He died before 6 January 1814 when administration of his Kent County estate was granted to William Collins.

vii. Rhoda, born say 1764, born after her father made his will on 28 August 1756. She assigned her right to her father's estate to Gabriel Harmon before 24 December 1793 when this part of the account of her father's estate was included in the account of the estate of John Durham [RG 3545, reel 68, frame 621].

viii. Rachel, born say 1768, born after her father's death, called a minor above the age of fourteen years in Orphans' Court on 28 August 1783 [Orphans Court Book C:255]. She was living in Dover Hundred on 11 October 1788 when she sold 200 acres which had been granted to her father William Hansor on 9 November 1734 and laid out for him on 21 November 1737 in the forest of Dover Hundred, called Jolly's Neck, adjoining the main branch of the head of Dover River and Chances Branch [A-2:95]. She was taxable on 87-1/2 acres in St. Jones Hundred, Kent County in 1798 and head of a St. Jones Hundred household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45].

 

4.    Thomas1 Hanzer, born say 1693, brought a successful case against Samuel Cary in Sussex County court for assault in November 1727. Richard Poultney withdrew a case against him for debt in Sussex County court in February 1727/8 and he was sued for debt in May 1735 and by Christopher Topham in May 1737. In November 1742 the Sussex County court allowed him 2 pounds for the support of Ann Oakey. He called himself a house carpenter on 22 March 1743 when he petitioned the Sussex County court to be adjudged a servant to his creditors for three years in order to pay a total of 50 pounds debt (a not uncommon request). The court agreed and allowed him to retain enough of his earnings to support his family [RG 4815.017, 1707-41, frames 63, 164, 168, 170, 175, 355, 469, 485; 1741-53, frame 153]. He received a warrant for 150 acres in Sussex County on 20 October 1735 and another 205 acres, called "the Addition," in 1754. He sold (signing) to Benjamin Burton land in Indian River Hundred in Long Neck called "Ebonezer ... part of a tract formerly belonging to Rosanna Handzer the mother of the sd Thomas" by deed proved in 1749 [Warrants, C 1776, p.329; DB H-8, 253]. He and his wife Hester registered the birth and baptism of their son Job at St. George's Chapel, Indian River Hundred, in 1753. He made an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County quit claim deed (signing) with William Handzer (who made his mark) for 350 acres on Ivey Branch in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, on 2 February 1773. They called themselves called "Mulattos and yeoman" in the deed for land for which "one Aminadab Handzer Molatto Deceasd" had been granted a patent [DB L-11, 314-5]. Thomas and Hester were the parents of

i. Job, born 17 June 1753, baptized 9 December 1753 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 96].

 

5.    Samuel1 Hanzer, born say 1695, was mentioned in the 16 October 1717 Sussex County will of his brother, Aminidab. He was involved in a fight with Elias Fisher at the widow Johnson's harvest. Fisher claimed in Sussex County court in May 1723 that Samuel struck and kicked him. However, the sheriff testified that Samuel had tried to avoid a confrontation with Fisher, and Albert Jacobs and James Bailey swore that Fisher called Hanser a "Black son of a Bitch" and struck Hanser first. The jury found Samuel not guilty. Perry Fordham sued him for debt in Sussex County court in May 1729, Thomas Stockley, Joseph Pemberton and Richard Poultney sued him in August 1733, Thomas Petty in November 1730, and Serjeant Smythies sued him for debt in august 1736 [RG 4815.017, dockets 1707-41, frames 56, 69, 244, 281, 285, 289, 404, 414, 460]. On 20 May 1733 he and his wife Ann (both signing) sold 124 acres of land in Sussex County which his father had owned and which he had purchased from the administrator of his father's estate. It was described as being on Fishing Creek or Goldsmith Creek, proceeding out of Rehoboth Bay, bordering land of Robert Okey on the south side of Herring Branch, called "Ebenezer." This was land which was part of Aminadab Okey's Sussex County estate. Samuel received a warrant for 200 acres in Sussex County on 20 October 1735 and sold this land, called "Hanzors Lookout," on 13 April 1744 [DB G-7:18-19, 34, 35; Warrants C 1776, p.329; DB H-8:76]. He may have been the father of

10        i. Samuel2, born say 1730.

 

6.    Elias Hanzer, born say 1712, was married to Nancy before 1 April 1747 when their "mulatta" son John was born [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. Thomas and Peter Robinson sued him in Sussex County court in November 1765 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 292]. Their children were

i. John1, born 1 April 1747, married Eliza Norman at Lewes and Cool Springs Presbyterian Church on 21 September 1768 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279]. He was taxable in Indian River, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1791 and head of an Indian River Hundred household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He left a 7 October 1806 Sussex County will, proved 6 January 1807, leaving his land to his wife Leviney during her widowhood and then to nephew Robert Handser, son of William Handser, and if he died then to John Handser, son of Isaac Handser [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 193; WB F-6:249].

11      ii. William4, born say 1752.

 

7.    William2 Hanser, born say 1713, purchased 212 acres in Indian River Hundred on the east side of Hanzer's Lookout for 30 pounds on 7 November 1752 [DB H-8:339-40]. He was called "William Handzer of ye County of Sussex ... Yeoman" when he purchased 200 acres in Sussex County on 4 March 1767. This was land that (his uncle) Samuel1 Handsor had owned from 1735 to 1744. He sold 100 acres of Handsor's Lookout on the west side of Delaware Bay in Indian River Hundred for 30 pounds on 4 March 1767. He was probably the William Handzer who made an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County quit claim deed with Thomas Handzer, "Mallatos," on 2 February 1773 [DB K-10, 242-3; L-11, 314-5]. He was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County in 1773 and 1774 and taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1777 and 1784. By his 26 October 1784 Sussex County will, proved in 1801, he left a gun to his son David, his land to son Thomas, a bed to son Peter, a bed to wife Jane, and a shilling to grandchildren Aaron, Isabel, Thomas, Elise, and Cary Hanzer and divided the remainder between Elizabeth Roads, Agnes Hanzer, Easter Hanzer, Jane Rigwah and Ann Salmons who was apparently the wife of Henry Sammons. The estate paid Elisabeth Rawles, Nany Rawles, Elizabeth Morris, John Rawles, and David Hodgskin [WB E:312; RG 4545.009, reel 100, frames 107-112]. His children were

12       i. David1, born say 1734.

13      ii. Thomas2, born say 1745.

iii. Peter, born say 1750.

 

8.    Jonathan1 Hanser, born say 1715, sued by James Prettyman in Sussex County court in November 1742. The sheriff sold some of his property, including a horse, a sow and pigs and a saddle. Cornelius Stockley sued him, Nehemiah Handzer and Jonathan Handzer, Jr., in court in August 1769 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 72; 1761-71, 510, 582]. He was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Cord Hazard, Jr., on 12 March 1750 [Orphans Court 1744-51, 80]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1789, perhaps the "Jona. Hanzer a poore Melato" who was a delinquent taxable in 1789. He may have been the father of

i. Sarah, born say 1748, married Levi Morris, in Sussex County, Delaware, in September 1768 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279].

14      ii. Jonathan2, born say 1749.

iv. Caleb, a born say 1760, a delinquent taxable  in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1781 and 1782.

v. Aminadab3, born say 1763, married Hannah Pettyjohn on 13 November 1784 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 298]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1784 and 1789. Perhaps his widow was Hannah Hansor, head of an Indian River Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438].

 

9.    Nehemiah1 Hansor, born say 1720, was taxable in Dover Hundred from 1738 to 1785 [Kent County Levy Assessments]. On 16 May 1752 he purchased 80 acres, formerly owned by John Chance, on the northwest side of the main branch of the Dover River in Little Creek Hundred from Nicholas Lockerman (written as Nehemiah Handson) [DB O:213]. He witnessed the 31 January 1757 Kent County will of William Beckett [WB K-1:62]. By his 15 December 1785 Kent County will, proved 20 November 1787, he left his land on the north side of a branch of the Dover River to his son Nehemiah, Jr. (where Nehemiah, Jr., was then living) and left the remainder of his land and estate to his wife Johannah and his two grandchildren Elizabeth and Jemima Handzer. His wife Johannah and "friend" Peter Miller, Sr., were executors [WB M-1, p. 89 - fol. 90]. Johannah was probably the "Widow Handsor" who was charged for John Hagins' tax in Dover Hundred in 1785 [Levy Assessments, frame 45]. She married Sanders Oakey before 12 November 1787 when she and Saunders Oakey were ordered to return an account of her husband's estate [Orphans Court Book D:144]. Nehemiah's children were

15       i. William3, born say 1740.

ii. Nehemiah2, born say 1750, taxable in Dover Hundred from 1772 to 1788, called Nehemiah, Jr., from 1772 to 1785. He had an illegitimate male child by Ann Griffin in Dover Hundred about January 1774 [DSA, RG 3505, MS case files, February 1775 indictments; RG 3805.003, 1735-79, frame 597]. He may have married Amelia Sisco.

 

10.    Samuel2 Hansor, born say 1735, was twenty-four years old when he was listed in the muster of Captain John Wright's Company of Delaware recruits in the French and Indian War on 11 May 1759 [Public Archives Commission, Delaware, 25]. He was married to Comfort Hanzer before 15 April 1770 when their "Melatto" daughter Ann was baptized at St. George's Chapel, Indian River Hundred. He had married Mary before 14 August 1784 when they registered the birth of their son Samuel at St. George's Chapel [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 99, 106]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1791 and head of an Indian River Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438]. He was apparently married to Bridget Hanzer by 7 March 1805 when she and William Rigwaw (signing) administered his estate, valued at 7 pounds [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 156]. His children were

i. Ann, born 16 M(arch?), baptized 15 April 1770.

ii. Nisa, born 18 February 1772, "melatto" daughter of Samuel and Comfort Hanzor [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101].

iii. Samuel3, born 14 August 1784, baptized 31 July 1785.

 

11.    William4 Hanzer, born say 1752, was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1773 to 1787, called "Wm Hanzor of Elas" in 1787 when he was a delinquent taxable, perhaps the Wm. H. Hanzer who was taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1789 to 1791. He and his wife Easter/ Hester registered the 15 March 1773 birth of their son, Joshua, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. William was head of an Indian River Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437] and 3 in 1810 [DE:455]. He may have been the William Handzor who died before 24 December 1816 when Jane Handzor was granted administration on his estate [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 122]. William was the father of

i. Joshua, born 15 March 1773.

ii. Alce, born 3 September 1777, married Nathaniel Morris, "Two free Mulatoes," in Sussex County, Delaware, on 24 December 1799 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 315].

iii. Agnes, born 1 February 1784, baptized 31 July 1785 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 103, 104].

iv. Robert, son of William and nephew of John Handzer who named him in his 7 October 1806 Sussex County will.

 

12.    David1 Handzer, born say 1734, was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Thomas Waples on 2 September 1766 [Orphans Court 1761-72, 138]. He served in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment and died before the February 1780 muster. His administrator received his pay from 1 August 1780 to 1 November 1782 [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,358, 54,816, 54,479, 55,180; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196]. On 8 December 1784 (his son?) David Handzer, Jr., was granted administration on his Sussex County estate. He was the father of

i. ?David2, born say 1765, a delinquent taxable in Indian River Hundred in 1787.

ii. ?Aaron, born say 1767, a delinquent taxpayer in Indian River in 1787 and a "poore Melato" taxable in Indian River Hundred in 1789, head of an Indian River Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437].

iii. William5, born say 1769, taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1787 to 1790, called "Wm Hanzer of David" in 1789 when he was a delinquent taxable, probably the William who died intestate about 1804 according to the petition of his widow Susan Durham on 21 February 1821 which stated that he had conveyed a 75 acre tract of land in the forest of Jones Hundred to Jacob Stout on 16 January 1804 while she was still an infant under twenty-one [Brewer, Kent County, Delaware, Guardian Accounts, Edmonson to Hopkins, 21].e.

iv. ?Mary, born say 1774, married William Harmon, "free Mulattoes," on 11 May 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 311].

 

13.    Thomas2 Hanzer, born say 1745, was married to Priscilla before 22 April 1784 when they registered the birth of their son Thomas at St. George's Chapel, Indian River Hundred [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. His Sussex County will, proved 18 May 1821, mentioned his sons, Peary, John, Alexander, Nehemiah, and William. They were the parents of

i. Jane, born before 1776, wife of Woolsey Foster who was head of a Dagsboro, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:370].

ii. Thomas3, born 22 April 1784, baptized 31 July 1785, married Katherine Jackson, 4 February 1808 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 320].

iii. Ann, born 1775-1794, perhaps identical to Nancy Hanzor who married Myers Clark on 26 January 1815 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 325].

iv. Peery, born 5 February, baptized 12 August 1792 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Sussex County, son of Thomas and Priscilla Hanson [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 109], married Mary Butcher in Kent County in 1812.

v. John2, born say 1794.

vi. Alexander, born say 1796.

vii. Nehemiah3.

viii. William6.

ix. Sarah Lack.

 

14.    Jonathan2 Hanser, born say 1749, was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex , (called Jonathan, Jr.) 1770 to 1791 and a "Negro" head of an Indian River Hundred household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. He and his wife Agnes registered the 5 September 1772 birth of their son Jacob and the 23 November 1777 birth of their daughter Jane at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101, 103]. Jonathan and Agnes were the parents of

i. Jacob2, born 5 September 1772, head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:214].

ii. Jane, born 23 November 1777.

iii. ?Polly, married Israel Jackson, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 at Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318].

 

15.    William3 Hanzer, born say 1740, was called William Hanzer, Jr., when he was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1773 to 1777. He died before 6 March 1784 when his widow Bridget Handzer and William Rigwaw administered his Sussex County estate. The estate was valued at 11 pounds [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 160]. On 15 December 1785 his father Nehemiah1 Hanser made his will naming grandchildren Elizabeth and Jemima. Elizabeth was called the "daughter of William Handsor deceased" in 1788 when she chose her guardian in orphan's court [Orphans Court Book D:152]. His wife Bridget was head of an Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437]. William and Bridget were the parents of

i. Elizabeth, born say 1773, a minor above the age of fourteen years in 1788 when she chose William Pierce as her guardian in Kent County Orphans Court [Book D:152]. She and her sister Jemima were mentioned in the will of her grandfather, William1 Hansor. She married Benjamin Durham.

ii. Jemima, born say 1775.

 

Another member of the family was

i. Sibilla/ Isabell, sued Thomas Hanzer, Junr., in a Sussex County court case that was agreed to before coming to court [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1771-93, frame 529].

 

Endnotes:

1.    William Vincent was one of the headrights claimed by Richard Johnson for land in Accomack County in 1652 [Deeds 1651-54, 133].

2.    The Hanser name may have originated with William Anzer, the servant of Daniel Jenifer, whose age was adjudged to be eighteen years by the Accomack County court in 1674 [Deeds 1673-76, 144].

3.    John Hagins may have been related to the mixed-race Hagins family of Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. See the Hagins history.

 

HANSON FAMILY

Members of the Hanson/ Hynson family in Maryland were

i. Harry Hanson, born say 1755, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:149].

1        ii. Milley, born say 1775.

iii. Mary, born before 1776, head of a Charles County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

 

1.    Milley Hanson, born say 1775, was living in Prince George's County from 1815 to 1825 when her children obtained certificates of freedom. She was the mother of

i. William, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 14 July 1815: a dark mulatto youth, about 19 years old, and 5 feet 4-1/2 inches tall ... son of Milley Hanson, a free born woman of color.

ii. Eleanor, born about 1807, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 18 April 1825: a dark mulatto woman, about 18 years old, and 5 feet 1 inch tall ... daughter of Milly Hanson.

iii. Caroline, born about 1810, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 18 April 1825: a dark mulatto girl, about 15 years old, and 5 feet tall ... daughter of Milly Hanson [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 19, 50].

 

HARDING FAMILY

1.    Alice Hardin, born say 1682, was the servant of William Coursey on 4 November 1701 when she was convicted by the Talbot County court of having an illegitimate "Mullato" child. The court ordered that she serve her master an additional year for the trouble of his house, be sold for seven years and that her child be sold for the benefit of the county [Judgment Record 1701-2, 85b]. She was probably the mother of

2        i. William, born say 1701.

 

2.    William Harding, born say 1701, a "free mullatto" laborer, was living in Saint Paul's Parish on 26 August 1735 when the Queen Anne's County court sold him for seven years as punishment for marrying a white woman named Mary Harding on 10 March 1734 [Judgments 1732-5, 535]. They may have been the ancestors of

i. Susanna, "Negro" head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 9 in 1800 [MD:161].

ii. Mrs. Harden, head of a Baltimore City household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:228] and 8 in 1810 [MD:358].

iii. Ann Harden, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:228].

3        iv. Abraham, born say 1768.

 

3.    Abraham Harding, born say 1768, was head of a Baltimore Town household of 2 "other free" in 1790. He was married to Mary Harding, "free blacks," on 6 April 1795 when their son, William, was baptized in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore, Maryland. Abraham was buried at St. Paul's Parish on 7 August 1801 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:88, II:6]. Their children were

i. William, born 6 April, baptized 24 May 1795.

ii. Mary, born 21 September 1797, baptized 7 February 1798, daughter of Abraham and Mary Harding, "free blacks" [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:115].

 

HARMAN FAMILY

1.   William1 Harman, born about 1632, was called "William Harman Negro" in the court and tax records before and after he became free. He arrived in Virginia as a slave sometime before 1648 when he was claimed as one of the headrights of planters Lewis Burwell and Thomas Vause [Nugent, Cavaliers & Pioneers, I:171-2]. In 1654 he was called the slave of William Andrews when he recorded his purchase of a calf in Northampton County court. William Andrews died about this time and his widow, Mary, married William Smart [DW 1654-55, 38, 85, fol.85]. In 1660 Smart sold William Harman to William Kendall who, on the same day he purchased Harman, agreed to sell him his freedom if he could provide sufficient security for the payment of 5,000 pounds of tobacco within two years [DW 1657-66, 70, 74, cited by Deal, Race and Class, 398-412]. This was 1,000 pounds more than his purchase price. He was still listed in Kendall's household in 1664 and 1665 [Orders 1657-64, 198; 1664-74, 15].

In March 1666 he sold a colt to Jane Gossall, the twenty-two-year old daughter of Emmanuel Driggers and widow of free "Negro" John Gossall, and stated in the deed that he intended to make her his wife, promising that the colt would be her sole property as long as she lived [DW 1655-68, pt.2, fol.12]. He had married Jane by June 1666 when he submitted the letters of administration on her first husband's estate to the court. He was head of his own household with his wife Jane in the Northampton County list of tithables from 1667 to 1677 [Orders 1664-74, fol. 24, pp.24, 42; 1674-79, 190].

He appeared to have been equally friendly with slaves, free African Americans, and whites. According to the court deposition of a neighbor, he spent New Years Eve of 1672 drinking rum and sugar with the slaves on John Michael's plantation. He was about forty years old when he made a deposition in court about an argument he had witnessed while at the home of John Francisco [Orders 1664-74, ff. 125, 138, 143, 146, 156a-f, 157]. And in the summer of 1683 there was a court hearing about an argument among six of his white neighbors who were gathered at his house to help him harvest his crop [OW 1683-9, 15-16].

In the summer of 1675 he was involved in a dispute with William Gray over the possession of a gun that once belonged to Francis Payne. Payne's widow, Amey, had delivered the gun to Harman, perhaps as a gift, and her second husband, William Gray, white like her, protested and took it back. The court ordered the gun returned to Harman [OW 1674-79, 58-59].

In September 1673 Jane Harman was the wet nurse for the illegitimate child of Nicholas Silvedo, a Portuguese servant, and English maidservant Mary Gale [Deal, Race and Class, 405]. William and Jane were tithables in their own Northampton County household in 1677 [OW 1674-9, 190]. William was still living in April 1699 when he recorded the livestock mark of his son, Manuel Harman [DW 1651-4, 31 at end of volume]. Jane may have been identical to Jane Harman who bought a "parcel of cloathes" in the 15 June 1700 sale of the estate of Philip Mongon, deceased [Orders 1692-1707, 262]. William and Jane's children were

i. Frances, born say 1667. She had an illegitimate child by a white man, Samuel Johnson, in 1685 [OW 1683-9, 112], another in 1686 by Jarvis Cutler, and two more before 1692 [OW 1683-9, 358, 386; OW 1689-98, 160-1]. In May 1690 Thomas Carter was security for her fine for fornication [OW 1689-98, 35, 58]. She married a slave, Anthony George, by 1693 when she recorded her livestock mark in Northampton County court [DW 1651-4, 26 at end of volume]. See further the George history.

2        ii. Manuel1, born say 1670.

3        iii. Edward1, born say 1672.

iv. John1, born say 1674.

4        v. William2, born say 1676.

 

2.    Manuel1 Harman, born say 1670, recorded his livestock mark in Northampton County court with his father in April 1699 [DW 1651-4, 31 at end of volume]. He was a tenant on land in Accomack County on 7 December 1714 [Orders 1714-17, 2]. He was taxable in Matapany Hundred of Somerset County from 1723 to 1738: with John Harmon in his household in 1729, taxable on Simon Collick in 1736 and 1737 [List of Tithables, 1723-38]. He was about "seventy odd years of age and "almost past Labour" on 19 June 1739 when the Somerset County court granted his petition to be discharged from paying taxes [Judicial Record 1738-40, 121]. He may have been the father of

i. John2, born say 1712, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in the household of Emanuel Harman in 1729, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737, taxable in his own household in 1739 and with his unnamed "melotto" wife in 1740 [List of Tithables].

 

3.    Edward1 Harman, born say 1672, was living in Northampton County in 1702 when he and (his brother?) John Harman, Johnson Driggus, John Driggus, and Samuel George, "Free Negroes," were convicted of stealing a hog and then abusing and threatening several whites "in an insolent manner" [Orders 1698-1710, 102, 106]. He moved to Accomack County where he purchased 100 acres of land a few miles from Chincoteague in the northeastern part of the county in 1711. He and his wife, Patience, sold this land 25 years later [DW 1729-37, fol. 235-p.236; Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1333]. He may have been identical to Edward Harman who was taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1738 to 1740. Edward and Patience may have been the ancestors of some of the family members who were in Maryland and Delaware:

i. Zachariah, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in William Smith's household in 1733, in Ursley Greer's household (with William Harman) in 1734, in Presgrave William's household in 1735, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737, in Edward Harman's household in 1738, and in Edward Franklin's household in 1739.

4        ii. William3, born say 1715.

iii. John2, born say 1718, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County, in Edward Franklin's household in 1737 and taxable in his own household with his unnamed "melotto" wife in 1740 [List of Tithables].

Edward3, born say 1720, taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County in the household of (his brother?) William Harman in 1739 and the household of (his father?) Edward Harman in 1740. Gershom Mott sued him for debt in Sussex County, Delaware court in November 1748 when the garnishee William Bryan reported that he had only 2 pounds, 17 shillings belonging to Edward. He was indicted by the court in February 1748/9 for an unspecified offense for which Gershom Mott provided 40 pounds security. He died before May 1750 court when his death was reported in the court record [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frames 374, 376, 404, 411, 415, 424, 452, 453, 469, 486, 500].v. Jane, born say 1722, living in All Hollow's Parish, Somerset County, in June 1738 when she was indicted for having an illegitimate child. She was found not guilty. Edward Harmon, planter, was her security for the payment of court fees [Judicial Record 1738-40, 43]. She was a taxable "mulato" in the Bogerternorten Hundred household of Robert Warren in 1740 [List of Tithables, 1740]. On 18 November 1740 she was again indicted for having an illegitimate child, but this time confessed that John Jackson was the father. Robert Warren was her security [Judicial Record 1740-2, 59-60, 310].

5        vi. Daniel1, born say 1725.

6        vii. Job, born say 1726.

 

3.    William2 Harman, born say 1676, was a tithable head of his own household in the Northampton County list of Hillary Stringer in 1720 and a "Negro" tithable head of a household in Stringer's list for 1721 [L.P. 1720, 1721]. He was called William Harmon "Negro" in December 1721 when he paid Hannah Carter's fine of 500 pounds of tobacco for having an illegitimate child [Orders 1719-22, 144]. He died during the winter of 1725/6 when his Northampton County estate was valued at 32 pounds [DW 1725-33, 32]. Two of his children, Edward and Jane, chose Philip Mongon as their guardian [Orders 1722-9, 226].(1) His children were

i. ?Dinah Mongon, wife of Philip Mongon.

7        ii. Jane, born about 1706.

iii. Edward2, born say 1707, a "Negro" tithable in his father's household in the list of Jacob Stringer in 1723 and 1724 [L.P. 1723]. He was tithable in Philip Mongon's household in 1726, a "negro" tithable in Matthew Welch's Northampton County household from 1727 to 1731, and taxable in the household of Henry Speakman from 1737 to 1744 [L.P. 1726 - 1744].

iv. ?Nan, born say 1710, a "negro" taxable in Thomas Moor's household in the list of Matthew Harmonson from 1726 to 1728.

v. ?Jeffry, born say 1712, taxable in Abraham Bowker's Northampton County household in 1727 and 1728.

vi. ?George, born about 1717, a ten-year-old "orphan Mulatto" bound apprentice in Accomack County on 5 March 1727 to Jeptha Perry and then bound instead to Benjamin Salmon on 3 August 1736 when Salmon complained to the court that Perry neither taught him a trade nor "put him to School" [Orders 1724-31, 95a; 1731-36, 190]. He was taxable in Robert Scott's household in Annamessex Hundred, Somerset County, in 1743. On 30 September 1766 the Accomack County court ordered that he be added to the list of tithables [Orders 1765-67, 235].

 

4.    William3 Harman, born say 1715, was taxable in Bogerternorten Hundred, Somerset County in Ursley Greer's household in 1734, in Robert Warren's household in 1737, in his own household from 1738 to 1739 (with his brother? Edward Harman), and taxable in Bogerternorton Hundred with his wife Betty in 1740 "by order of Court" [List of Taxables]. Worcester County was formed from this part of Somerset County in 1742, so his descendants may have been those members of the family counted as "other free" in Worcester County. He and William Butcher owned land adjoining Nathan Brittingham in Broadkill Hundred, 15 miles southwest of Lewes, on 30 April 1759 when Brittingham sold the land to Solomon Parrimore [DB I-9:239]. Jonathan Vaughan sued him and Joshua Bucher in Sussex County court in February 1764 with Daniel Nunez as security for his costs, and Joshua Rocher sued him in August 1764. His death was suggested when the Vaughan's case against him came before the court in May 1768. Perhaps his widow was Tabitha Harmon who was sued by Robert Lacey in May 1770 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 130, 146, 165, 205, 275, 407, 428, 446, 480, 512, 549, 562, 567, 575]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Jeremiah, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124].

ii. Abel, purchased 50 acres in Worcester County called "Scarborough's Castle" adjoining Samuel and Kendall Scarborough for 50 pounds on 11 February 1791 [DB O:67-8]. On 26 February 1799 he and Edward Scarborough posted bond of thirty pounds to indemnify the county of Worcester against any charges from an illegitimate child Abel had by Jenny Handby free single woman [DB T:140-1]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:744].

iii. Sophia, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:830].

iv. Sally, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:745].

v. Lazarous, born about 1758, served in the 6th Company of the 1st Maryland Regiment from 1 August 1780 to 15 November 1783 [Archives of Maryland 18:356, 539]. He was head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124], 9 in 1800 [MD:745] and 7 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:623]. He mortgaged two cows, two heifers, two calves, seven sheep and a sow to James B. Robins for $130 by Worcester County deed on 24 October 1803 [DB W:2]. He made a declaration in Worcester County court on 10 April 1818 to obtain a pension for his service in the Revolution. On 28 July 1821 he stated that he was about sixty years old and was living with his wife Betty and their sons John, aged 18 years, and Joseph, aged 12 years [M805-399].

vi. Jacob, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830.

vii. Levin, born after 1775, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:612] and 4 "free colored" in 1830.

viii. Daniel3, head of a Worcester County household 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:612].

 

5.    Daniel1 Harman, born say 1725, was a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County taxable from 1766 to 1773. He died before 10 May 1774 when his widow, Elizabeth, was granted administration of his Kent County, Delaware estate. She married Joseph Lantern [de Valinger, Kent County, Delaware Probate Records, 289]. Daniel may have been the father of

i. Daniel2, a "Mulatto" taxable in the Kent County Levy Assessments circa 1820.

ii. Gabriel, born say 1760, married Rhoda Hanser. She assigned her right to the estate of her father, William Handsor, to Gabriel before 24 December 1793 when this part of the account of her father's estate was included in the account of the estate of John Durham [RG 3545, reel 68, frame 621]. Gabriel was a "free Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1787 and in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 80, 98, 475, 515], head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45] and 3 "free colored" in Dover in 1820 [DE:36].

 

6.    Job Harman, born about 1725, was a twenty-one-year-old born in Sussex County who was listed in the muster of Captain John Shannon's Company of foot solders in King George's War in September 1746 [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-3]. He had an account with merchant John Shannon for about 12 pounds, 18 shillings for items such as a checked shirt and for cash paid to Mr. Curry in Shannon's account book which is found in the Kent County court dockets [DSA, RG 3505.003, 1735-1779, frame 642]. He was the father of Jemima who was baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River, on 16 April 1750. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for an unspecified offense in February 1759 that was continued through August 1762. John Lockwood sued him in November 1765 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frames 496, 516, 534, 555, 594, 622; 1761-1771, 17, 41, 72, 85, 109, 287, 376, 404]. He was probably married to Comfort and they were probably the parents of Shepherd Harmon: "Mulattoes: Shepherd son of Job and Comfort _____ b. 15 Apr 177(2)" at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 95, 101]. They were the parents of

i. Jemima, baptized 16 April 1750, daughter of Job Harmon, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River.

ii. ?Eunice, born say 1752, married Suthy Pride, "Melattoes," on 13 May 1772 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 284].

8        iii. ?Edward4, born about 1758.

iv. ?William, born say 1770, married Mary Hanser, "free Mulattoes," on 11 May 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 311]. He was a "Negro" taxable in St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, in 1798 and head of an Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437], 5 "other free" in Cedar Creek Hundred in 1810 [DE:303], and 9 "free colored" in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1820 [DE:220].

v. Shepherd, born 15 April 177_ (probably 1772), "mulatto" son of Job and Comfort ___. He married Lina Oakey, "free Mulattoes," on 10 October 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458].

vi. ?Adonijah, married Sarah Jacobs, "free Mulattoes," on 19 January 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310].

vii. ?Kesiah, married Aron Esaw, "Malattoes," on 25 February 1790 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 305]. Aaron Nezor was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438].

 

7.    Jane Harmon, born about 1706, was twenty-one years old in February 1727/8 when she petitioned the Northampton County court to allow her to take control of the remaining part of her father's estate which was then in the hands of her guardian, Dinah Mongong (Philip Mongong's widow) [L.P Pk#12, February 1727/8]. She was a "Negro" tithable in Philip Mongon's household in the 1727 list and in the household of Richard Malavery (Dinah's second husband) in the 1728-31 lists of John Robins. She may have been the same Jane Harmon who was living in Accomack County on 25 April 1749 when several of her children, Elijah, Harman, Solomon, and Nimrod, were bound apprentice shoemakers [Orders 1744-53, 327]. Her children were

9        i. ?John2, born say 1727.

ii. Elijah, born about 1735, a fourteen year old bound to Hezekiel Purnoll on 25 April 1749.

iii. Harman, born about 1738, an eleven year old bound to Hezekiel Purnoll on 25 April 1749.

iv. Solomon, born about 1743, a six year old bound out on 25 April 1749.

v. Nimrod, born about 1747, a two year old bound out in Accomack County on 25 April 1749, head of a Worcester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:124].

 

8.   Edward4 Harman, born about 1758, received pay from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 for service in the Delaware Regiment in the Revolution [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,359; 54,480; 54,860; 54,935; 55,181; Public Archives Commission, Delaware Archives, 196, 607]. He married Agnes Jackson on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302]. He and his wife Agnes registered the 11 January 1792 birth of their son Benjamin at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church in Sussex County. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438], 8 in 1810 [DE:437] and 5 "free colored" in Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred in 1820 [DE:308]. He was about sixty years old on 20 April 1818 when he appeared in Sussex County court to make a declcaration to apply for a pension for his service in the Revolutionary War. He stated that he enlisted under Captain Kirkwood in the First Company of the Delaware Regiment in 1777. Mitchell Kirkwood, Lieutenant Colonel of the Ninth Delaware Regiment, testified in his favor. Hezekiah Lacey testified that Edward worked for his father when he enlisted. He was about seventy and a resident of Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred on 16 November 1820 when he stated that had a wife named Agnes who was about fifty, a twenty-five-year-old son Benjamin and a twenty-three-year-old son Dirickson who did not live with him, a twenty-one-year-old son Paynter, twelve-year-old son Woolsey and a ten-year-old daughter Eliza [National Archives Pension file S36000, microfilm M805-399 and http://wwww.fold3.com]. Edward and Agnes were the parents of

i. Benjamin, born 11 January 1792, "son of Edward and Agness" [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 110].

ii. Dirickson, born about 1797.

iii. Paynter, born about 1800.

iv. Woolsey, born about 1808.

v. Eliza, born about 1810.

 

9.    John2 Harmon, born say 1727, was taxable in Northampton County, Virginia, in 1743 and 1744 [L.P. 1743, 1744] and head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 4 "other free" and one white man over 16 years of age in 1790 [NC:63] and 9 "other free" in 1800 [NC:316]. On 30 October 1795 he sold 100 acres, tools, furniture, cattle, and hogs in Halifax County to Joseph Lantern, Moses Matthews, and John Kelly [DB 17:920] and sold 100 acres near the road from Halifax Town to Enfield old courthouse to Joseph Lantern on 3 December 1795 [DB 18:130]. (Joseph Lantern was taxable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1776 to 1785.) John may have been the father of

i. James, born say 1755, a "Mullatto" bound as an apprentice house carpenter to George Chappel until the age of twenty-one in Princess Anne County, Virginia, on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357]. He and his son James were mentioned in the 30 December 1792 Princess Anne County will of his father-in-law, William Shoecraft [WB 1:210]. He may have been identical to Craftshoe Harmon, head of a Liberty County, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [SC:806].

ii. Eleanor, bound to George Chappel to read, sew, and knit in Princess Anne County, Virginia, on 17 July 1759, no age or parent named [Minutes 1753-62, 357].

iii. Thomas, a "Negro" taxable on 130 acres and 5 "Negroes" in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 119], head of a Georgetown District, Prince Frederick's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:51].

iv. Abraham, head of a South Orangeburgh District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:101].

 

Other members of the Harmon family were

i. Thomas, a "Negro" taxable on 130 acres and 5 "Negroes" in Prince Frederick Parish, South Carolina, in 1786 [S.C. Tax Returns 1783-1800, frame 119], head of a Georgetown District, Prince Frederick's Parish, South Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1790 [SC:51].

ii. Abraham, head of a South Orangeburgh District, South Carolina household of 3 "other free" in 1790 [SC:101].

iii. Southey, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108].

iv. Stephen, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:100].

v. Ann, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:108].

vi. Scarburgh, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:101].

vii. Molly/ Mary, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 1:157] and 7 in 1810 [VA:102].

viii. Easter, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:30].

ix. Emanuel3, born about 1789, registered in Accomack County on 29 September 1807: a light Black, 5 feet 7-1/2 Inches...Born free [Free Negro Register, #5].

 

Other descendants in Delaware were

i. Thomas, head of a New Castle County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:303].

ii. Abraham, head of a Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:328].

iii. John, born say 1745, required to provide 20 pounds security in February 1773 for his appearance in Sussex County court [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-94, frame 124]. He left a 6 April 1776 Sussex County will, proved 24 April 1776, in which he left all his estate to his wife Saborah during her widowhood, left a mare and the increase of one young cow to his daughter Saborah and advised that she should leave his daughter Saborah as much as any of her other children. Elizabeth, daughter of Argal Harmon was a witness [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 570-1]. The State indicted Thomas Marvel of Dagsbury Hundred for assaulting Sabra Harmon on 8 October 1789 [DSA, RG 4805.021, 1755-1791, MS case files, 1790 Indictments]. She died before 23 December 1794 when William Rigley and Isaac Morris administered her estate [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 463].

iv.Argel, sued for debt by James Stephenson, Jr., in Sussex County court in November 1762 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1771-93, frame 117], a delinquent taxable in Sussex County in 1767, taxable on the south side of Broadkill Hundred in 1770, head of a Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:327], 6 in 1810 [DE:427] and one "free colored" in Dagsboro in 1820 [DE:382]. His daughter Elizabeth was a witness to the 6 April 1776 Sussex County will of John Harmon [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 570-1].

v. Eli2, head of a Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:404]. He left a 17 November 1818 Sussex County will which was witnessed by John Rigwah. He left his house to his brother William, left a dollar to his brother Argel, a dollar to each of his sister Milly Mosely's four children, a dollar to his sister Ann's daughter Jane Street, a dollar to his sister Ann's daughter Ephraim Harmon and $30 to his apprentice Cary Hanshaw (Hanser). He also left $10 to the trustees of Harmony Meeting (the Harmony Methodist Episcopal Church) [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frames 519-527].

vi. Ann, named in the will of her brother Eli Harmon, mother of Jane Street and Ephraim Harmon, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:392]. Ephraim was a "Mulatto" who died before 4 August 1840 when administration on his estate was granted John West [RG 4545.009, reel 100, frame 449].

vii. Henry, charged by the Sussex County court with fornication in November 1777 with Esther Hanzer as witness against him and charged with stealing a mare from Hugh Vestry in August 1791 [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frames 168, 480; Case Files 1791].

viii. Betsey, head of a Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:327].

ix.John, a "free Mulatto" convicted in November 1794 of having two illegitimate female children by a white woman Ann Jones of Broadkill Hundred, one in 1792 and the other in 1794. He was whipped, and ordered to wear a four inch high red Roman T for six months as a mark of dishonor [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-94, frames 561-2]. He was head of a Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:342], perhaps the Jonathan Harman who was head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458] and 4 "free colored" in Dagsboro in 1820 [DE:376]. He manumitted slaves "old Arter" and Candis (signing) by Sussex County deed on 30 July 1808 [DB AD-27:359].

x. Benjamin1, indicted by the Sussex County court in February 1749/50, apparently for selling liquor without a license as the clerk made a notation in the case about awarding a license to another person. Robert Fraim sued him for debt in February 1750/1 and Benjamin petitioned the court to serve Frame to pay his debt. He was indicted for an unspecified offense in August 1752, and there were continuances for this and possibly other offenses until August 1758 when he pled guilty and was fined 2 shillings [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frames 437, 470, 515, 537, 555, 579, 608; 1753-60, frames 158, 182, 236, 259, 284, 303, 317, 336, 359, 382, 401, 418, 444]. head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:23].

xi. Nathan1, head of a Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:424], 9 in 1810 [DE:410] and 12 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372].

xii. Nathan2, born before 1776, head of a Dagsborough Hundred household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:374].

xiii. Benjamin2, head of a Duck Creek, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:7].

xiv. James, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45] and 3 "free colored" in Dover in 1820 [DE:34].

xv. William, head of a St. Jones Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:43], 5 in New Castle County in 1810 [DE:303] and 6 "free colored" in Appoquinmink Hundred in 1820 [DE:147].

xvi. Manuel3, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [DE:437].

xvii. Manuel4, head of a Sussex County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [DE:426] and a Dagsborough Hundred household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:374].

xviii. Peter, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:452].

xix. Jethro, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:363].

 

HARRIS FAMILY

 

1.    Jane Harris, born say 1679, was the servant of William Barton in November 1697 when she confessed to the Prince George's County court that she had a "basterd Mallatta Child. The court ordered that she receive sixteen lashes [Court Record 1696-99, 262].

 

1.    Ann Harris, born say 1730, confessed to the Charles County court in November 1750 that she had an illegitimate "Mullatto" child. The court ordered her sold to Jacob Andrew Minitree for seven years and ordered her six-month-old daughter Alice to serve Minitree until the age of thirty-one. On 9 June 1752 the court ordered that she serve an additional fifteen months for running away for twenty-four days. In November 1753 she confessed to having another "Mollatto" child. The court ordered her to serve seven years for the offense and bound her six-month-old son Joseph to her master until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1750, 151; 1752-3, 60; 1753-4, 75, 220-1]. She was the mother of

i. Alice, born about May 1750, a ten-year-old "Mulatto" serving to the age of thirty-one when she was listed in the Charles County estate of Jacob Andrew Minitree which was recorded on 13 August 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 76:280-2].

ii. Joseph, born about June 1753, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:244].

iii. ?Joan, born about 1753, a "Mulatto" aged eight years when she was listed in the inventory of the Charles County estate of Jacob Andrew Minitree on 13 August 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 76:280-2].

 

Members of the Harris family in adjoining St. Mary's County were

i. Zachariah, head of a St. Mary's County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:431].

ii. Robert, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:412].

iii. Elizabeth, head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:412].

 

Eastern Shore of Maryland

1.    James Harris, born say 1710, was a "Mollatto planter" living in Kent County, Maryland, on 20 November 1739 when he confessed that he had assaulted Bulman Medford and was fined 30 shillings [Criminal Records, 172, 1739-60]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Joseph, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Isaac, head of a Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:149] and 5 in 1810 [MD:905].

iii. Stephen, head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162].

iv. Edith, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:905].

 

HARRISON FAMILY

1.    Dorothy Harrison, born say 1750, was presented by the Charles County court on 14 June 1769 for bearing a "Mulatto" child [Court Record 1767-70, 434]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Sarah, born say 1775, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162].

ii. Nicholas, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 23 July 1816: about 28 years of age ... born free and raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1815-28, 37].

iii. Thomas, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 30 May 1816: aged about twenty eight years ... brown complexion ... free born.

iv. Edward, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 30 May 1816: aged about nineteen years ... brown complexion ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 82, 83].

 

 

HARWOOD FAMILY

1.    Anne Harwood, born say 1686, was living in Anne Arundel County in November 1706 when she was convicted of having a "Molato" child "gott by a Negroe." The court ordered that she serve seven years as well as a year and a half for court fees and the trouble of her master's house [Judgment Records 1705-6, 440-1]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. David, "F.M." head of a Queen Anne's County household of 7 "other free" in 1790.

 

HAWKINS FAMILY

1.    Catherine Hawkins, born say 1690, alias "Dict Catherine Binmeter," was the servant of John Hawkins of St. Paul's Parish, Queen Anne's County on 24 November 1709 when she admitted to having a "Mullatto" child who was born on 10 July 1708. The child was bound to her master until the age of thirty-one, and Catherine was ordered to serve an additional seven years [Judgment Record 1709-16, 7]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Francis, head of a Caroline County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Joseph, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:349].

iii. Daniel1, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:337].

2        iv. Daniel2, born say 1756.

3        v. Lucy, born say 1758.

vi. John, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:101].

vii. Hannah, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:99].

viii. Sarah, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:114].

 

2.    Daniel2 Hawkins, born say 1756, was head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:520]. He may have been the father of

i. Daniel3, born about 1781, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 29 July 1812: a Mullatto Man ... about 31 years of age, 5 feet 6-1/2 inches high, was born free & raised in the County.

ii. Levin, born about 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 11 July 1815: a Slender made black man about five feet 10 Inches high ... raised in the County and is about twenty Six years of age [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 16, 22].

 

3.    Lucy Hawkins, born say 1758, obtained her freedom from James Williams in the General Court of the Western Shore in May 1780. She died in Annapolis before 1803 when her children obtained a certificate of freedom from the clerk of the Court of Appeals for the Western Shore: Lucy Organs otherwise Lucy Hawkins being descended from a free Woman, obtained her freedom in the late General Court for the said Shore on her petition ... against James Williams of the City of Annapolis at May Term in the year 1780 ... Lucy Organs otherwise called Lucy Hawkins Commonly called Hominey Lucy died in the City of Annapolis and had at the time of her death several Children and among others the following: Abigail now twenty years of age of a yellowish Complexion, Lucy about Eighteen years of age and nearly the same complexion. Harry about seventeen years of age of a dark Complexion, Hagar about sixteen years of age also of a dark Complexion and Joe about twelve years of age also of a dark complexion. Her daughters, Hagar and Sal, registered the certificate in Anne Arundel County court about four years later in May 1807 when Hagar was twenty years old: ... Hagar, daughter of Lucy Hawkins, about twenty years of a Yellowish Complexion and was born and raised in the City of Annapolis ... Sal about 12 years of a dark complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 21-4]. She was the mother of

i. ?Susanna, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 30 April 1807: about the age of twenty five years ... Complexion Yellow ... born free ... born and bred in the City of Annapolis [Certificates of Freedom 1806-7, 12].

ii. Abigail, born about 1783, twenty years old in 1803.

iii. Lucy, born about 1785, eighteen years old in 1803.

iv. Harry, born about 1786, seventeen years old in 1803.

v. Hagar, born about 1787, sixteen years old in 1803 and twenty years old in May 1807.

vi. Joe, born about 1791, twelve years old in 1803.

vii. Sal, born about 1795, twelve years old in May 1807.

 

HAWS FAMILY

1.    Winefred Haws, born say 1700, the servant of John Welsh, confessed to the Anne Arundel County court in March 1720/1 that she had a child by her master's "Negroe" Jack. She was ordered to serve her master seven years, Jack was given twenty-five lashes, and their child was bound to their master until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1720-1, 88-9]. He was listed in the inventory of the Anne Arundel County estate of John Welsh on 19 July 1734:

1 Molato Boy Jack abt 13 years old to serve till 31 years - 21 pounds

[Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1734-1736, 38-42]. Winefred and Jack may have been the ancestors of

2        i. Peter, born say 1750.

ii. Amy Haw, head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

 

2.    Peter Haw(s)/How, born say 1750, was head of a Lancaster County, Virginia household of 9 "Blacks" in 1783 [VA:56] and 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:349]. He and his brother, William1 Haw, were seamen from Lancaster County in the Revolution. William1 Haw died in service aboard the ship, Dragon. On 1 November 1834 Peter's four children, Rachel Haw, Peter Haw, Alice Haw, and Betsy Haw, applied for bounty land for his services [Hopkins, Virginia Revolutionary War Land Grant Claims, 104]. He was the father of

i. Rachel Howe, "daughter of Peter Howe," married Daniel Jones, 13 June 1794 Lancaster County bond.

ii. ?Nancy Howe, spinster over 21, married Robert Nickens, 5 March 1793 Lancaster County bond.

iii. ?Jane Haws, married Holland Wood, 15 October 1821 Lancaster County bond.

iv. Sally, a 19 year old "free light mulatto woman" who ran away with a "Negro man named Syphax" from Lancaster County according to the 30 September 1795 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 156].

v. Peter2.

vi. Alice.

vii. Betsy, mother of William2 and Milley Haw (wife of William Jones). William2 Haw married Fanny Toulson, 8 January 1827 Northumberland County bond, William Toulson security.

 

HAYCOCK FAMILY

Members of the Haycock family were

i. John, died before 27 March 1765 when his Queen Anne's County estate was taken. The estate totalled 20 pounds, 9 shillings and was witnessed by his brother James Haycock and sister Ruth Lance [Prerogative Inventories 88:90].

ii. James1, born say 1738, owed the Queen Anne's County estate of Mr. John Sayor Blake 82 pounds of tobacco on 8 September 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 76:230], perhaps the James Haycock who was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

1        iii. Ann, born say 1740.

1.    Ann Haycock, born say 1740, was presented by the Queen Anne's County court in March 1770 for having an illegitimate child. She appeared in court in March 1771 but refused to identify the father. Nicholas Griffin and James Haycock were her securities. The court was informed that the child was dead. In November 1770 she was presented for failing to list herself as a tithable but was discharged by the court the following November. On 9 December 1771 she was called a poor woman when the court appointed Rachel Imbert to clothe and maintain her until the following November for 600 pounds of tobacco [Judgments 1771-80, 15-16; Surles, And they Appeared at Court 1770-1772, 2, 10, 42, 78]. Other members of the Haycock family of Maryland were

2        i. Solomon, born say 1760.

ii. James2, Jr., head of a Queen Anne's County household of 7 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1800 [MD:351].

iii. William, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" in 1790. He may have been identical to William Haycock who married Sally Mason, 29 October 1791 Fairfax County, Virginia bond. He was called a "free Mulatto" on 19 November 1792 when he purchased 5 acres of land where he was then dwelling in Queen Anne's County called Darbara's Inlett for 10 pounds. On 13 March 1798 he leased a parcel of land called Balled Eagle which was part of a tract of land called Fandenboy Enlarged for 5 shillings per year from Christopher McCarradine for the term of "his and his present wife's natural lives" [STW2:312-3; STW-5:280].

 

2.    Solomon Haycock, born say 1760, served in the Revolution from Queen Anne's County and was discharged on 3 December 1781 [Archives of Maryland 48:11]. He married Debora Bently, 14 December 1782 banns by the Jesuit Mission in Cordova, Maryland (no race indicated), Peter and Protase (slaves) witnesses [Wright, Vital Records of the Jesuit Mission, 19]. He and William Haycock posted 5 pounds bond each when they were charged with assault and battery by James Coger in Queen Anne's County court in 1787. And Solomon paid 5 pounds for the appearance of his wife Dorcas Haycock to give evidence in her suit against James Coger [Surles, and they Appeared at Court, 1779, 1782, 1785, 1786, 1787, 128-9]. He was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 6 "other free" in 1790, 6 in 1800 [MD:349] and 6 "free colored" in Harford County in 1830. He, or perhaps a son by the same name, was married to Eleanor by 23 December 1807 when their daughter Eliza was born. They registered the births and baptisms of their daughters in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore. They were the parents of

i. Eliza, born 23 December 1807, baptized 22 May 1808, "d/o Sol. & Elenor Haycock."

ii. Sarah, born 16 December 1814, baptized 6 August 1816, "dau. of Solomon and Nelly Haycock (mulatto)" [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, II:39, 53].

 

HEATH FAMILY

1.    Mary Heath, born say 1695, was the servant of Thomas Price of St. Michael's Parish in November 1716 when she confessed to the Talbot County court that she had a child by "Negro Jack," one of her master's slaves. The court bound her "Mallattoe" son William to Thomas Price until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1714-7, 147, 154]. She was the mother of

i. William, born about January 1715/6.

 

HICKS FAMILY

1.    Mary Hicks, born about 1726, confessed to the Anne Arundel County court in August 1741 that she had a child by "Negro Cupid," a slave of her mistress, Margaret Moore. The court ordered that she serve her mistress one year when she arrived to the age of sixteen, then serve another seven years, and bound her daughter, Prudence Hicks, to her mistress till the age of thirty-one. In August 1743 Richard Moore purchased her seven years of service on behalf of his mother, Margaret Moore [Judgment Record 1740-3, 249-50; 1743-4, 161]. She was the mother of

i. Prudence, born before 11 August 1741.

 

Their descendants were most likely

i. James, head of a Baltimore City household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:234], perhaps the J. Hicks who was head of a Baltimore City household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:359].

ii. Jesse, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:240].

iii. John, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790, perhaps the John Hicks who was head of an Annapolis household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [MD:117].

iv. Robert, head of a Prince George's County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:44].

 

HILL FAMILY

1.    Anthony1 Hill, born say 1700, a cooper, was a "mulatto man" who was the servant of Captain Richard Smith on 22 March 1725/6 when he was convicted by the Prince George's County court of stealing cider. The court ordered that he receive 30 lashes and stand in the pillory for a half hour. On 25 August 1730 his mistress Elizabeth Smith, wife of Richard, a Quaker, petitioned the court saying that Anthony was a "Mallatto born of a white woman" and had unlawfully absented himself from their service for six months. The court was undecided how to rule on the issue [Court Record 1723-6, 557; 1729-30, 456]. He married Sarah Williams in All Hallow's Parish, Anne Arundel County, on 18 December 1732 [Wright, Anne Arundel County Church Records, 46]. He was called Anthony Hill, Carpenter, in Anne Arundel County in 1732 when he mortgaged livestock and household goods to Samuel Roberts. He received a deed of gift from William Barton for a 50 acre tract of land called "Essex" in Anne Arundel County in 1739. The sheriff sold this land in 1743 to settle Anthony's debts and imprisonment fines [Land Records 1H & T1, 427; RD #3, 224; RB #1, 310-11]. John Darnall sued him for 3,220 pounds of tobacco in June 1746, but he failed to prosecute and had to pay Anthony's costs. In August 1746 he was presented by the court for failing to list his wife and daughter as taxables. In March 1752 he was acquitted of stealing goods from Ann Salyer [Judgment Record 1746-8, 149-50, 213, 285, 353; 1751-4, 243]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. the husband of Elizabeth Hill, called "Eliza, Daughter in Law" of Anthony Hill in Anne Arundel County court in August 1741 when she was presented for bastardy. The court ruled that the law did not apply to her since she was a "free Negro." She was called Elizabeth Williams in June 1745 when Anthony Hill was security for her appearance in court on a presentment for assaulting Elizabeth Jacobs [Judgment Record 1740-3, 248-9; 1744-5, 322].

ii. Anthony2, head of a Frederick County household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

iii. William, "Mulatto" head of a Port Tobacco, Charles County household of 8 "other free" in and 2 slaves in 1790.

iv. Humphrey, head of a Montgomery County household of 8 "other free" in 1790 and 4 "other free" and 4 slaves in Charles County in 1810 [MD:301].

v. William, "Mulatto" head of a Newport, Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1800 [MD:534].

vi. Ignatius, head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:562] and 3 in 1810 [MD:319].

vii. Sarah, head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:524].

viii. Charity, head of a Charles County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:537], perhaps identical to Charity Hill who was head of a Charles County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:541] and 6 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [MD:349].

ix. James, head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" and one white woman 16-26 years old in 1810 [MD:312].

x. Charles, head of a Prince George's County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:32].

 

Members of the Hill family in Dorchester County were

2        i. Levin, born say 1768.

ii. Daniel, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" and 6 slaves in 1800 [MD:641].

iii. Henry1, head of a Dorchester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:685].

iv. Henry2, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:683].

v. Robinson Hill, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 18 July 1818: of a bright yellow complection ... born free and raised in Dorchester County and is the son of Margaret Robinson, now deceased ... about 22 years old [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 38].

 

2.    Levin Hill, born say 1768, was head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:684]. He and his wife Milley were the parents of

i. Litha, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 15 July 1820: yellow complection ... raised in Dorchester County and is the Daughter of Levin Hill and Milley Hill who was free born, aged about 20 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 42].

 

Other members of the Hill family in Maryland were

i. John, "free negro" taxable in the 5th District of Kent County in 1783 [MSA 1161-7-5, p.5], perhaps the John Hill who was head of a Cecil County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:259].

ii. William, "free negro" taxable in the 5th District of Kent County in 1783 [MSA 1161-7-5, p.5].

iii. Stephen1, head of a Baltimore City household of 14 "other free" in 1800 [MD:238].

iv. Stephen2, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:228].

v. James1, head of a Baltimore Town household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

vi. Margaret, head of an East Nottingham, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vii. James2, head of an Elk Neck, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

HILTON FAMILY

1.   Coffey1 Hilton, born about 1699, was apparently identical to Coffey who was manumitted with his wife Sue by Evan Jones of Kent County, Delaware, in 1720. Jones gave them his farm, an additional 50 acres, a cow, ewe, horse and a gun [WB D:50, cited by Williams, Slavery & Freedom in Delaware, 80]. Coffee Hilton purchased 50 acres in Duck Creek Hundred from John Reynolds on 2 December 1725 [DB 9:117]. He sued Robert Butcher, administrator of Robert Butcher, in Kent County court in May 1732, and he was indicted by the court in February 1735 for assault but the person he was supposed to have assaulted was not identified [DSA, RG 3815, dockets 1722-32, frame 604; 3805.003, 1735-79, frame 12]. He was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1729 to 1763, probably considered elderly by 1764 when his name was crossed off the list [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1727-42, frames 351, 357, 362, 368, 379, 395, 405, 419, 468, 483, 513; 1743-67, 22, 56, 85, 140, 169, 184, 198, 228, 244, 261, 291, 314, 344, 353, 381, 395, 426]. On 24 December 1754 he confessed in Kent County court that he owed Thomas Green 60 pounds [RG 3815.031, 1754-7, frame 132]. On 26 August 1755 he sold 50 acres called Coffes Purchase on the northside of Frenchmans Branch of Duck Creek and another 50 acres called Cristiana to Nicholas Lockerman for 70 pounds [DB O:310], and on 19 March 1771 he confessed judgment in Kent County court of 90 pounds to Caesar Rodney, trustee of the Land Office of Kent County [RG 3815.031, 1769-71, frame 423]. The sheriff sold approximately 153 acres of his land on Frenchmans Branch to merchant Vincent Lockerman, Sr., of Dover to satisfy the 90 pound judgment on the property [DB T:97]. He was seventy-two years old on 11 September 1771 when he petitioned (signing) the Kent County court saying that he had raised his grandson John, son of his deceased son John, since the age of five, and now that he was sixteen and able to help his grandfather, he had been bound out as an apprentice to Charles Cahoon. The court dismissed the case [DSA, RG 3805, MS court papers, September 1771 Petition]. He was the father of

2        i. ?Coffee2, born say 1722.

ii. ?Phillis, indicted by the Kent County court in May 1750 for felony but not found by the sheriff in August 1750, reported to be deceased in November 1750 court [DSA, RG 3805.002, frames 189, 191, 193].

iii.  ?Elizabeth, indicted by the Kent County court in May 1750 for felony, case dismissed in November 1752 when she was said to have runaway [DSA, RG 3805.002, frames 189, 193, 196, 198, 204, 208, 212].

iv. ?George1, born say 1727, a "labourer" of Duck Creek Hundred who confessed in Kent County court in February 1748 to being the father of an illegitimate female child by Elizabeth Butcher. Cuffee Hilton was his security to support the child. He had a male illegitimate male child by Elizabeth in 1752 for which Thomas Green was his security to support the child [DSA, RG 3805, MS case papers, November 1748 indictments; RG 3805.002, frames 213, 214, 219, 224]. He was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1748 to 1777 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 56, 85; 1768-84, frames 23, 26, 66, 220, 256, 269, 299].

v. ?Emanuel, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1748 to 1774, a "Free Negroe" in Dover Hundred from 1781 to 1783 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 56, 85, 140, 354, 381, 395, 427, 490, 518, 532, 534, 566; 1768-84, frames 23, 26, 66, 74, 107, 119, 180, 220, 500, 540, 580].

vi. John, born say 1733, died about 1760 when his son John was five years old.

 

2.    Coffee2 Hilton, born say 1722, was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1762 to 1781, called "Coffee Hilton, Jr." until 1771, a "N." taxable in 1781 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frame 345, 354, 381, 395, 426, 436, 490, 518, 550, 565; 1768-84, frames 23, 26, 66, 74, 107, 119, 180, 220, 299, 371, 523]. He may have been the father of

i. George2, Jr., born say 1750, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred from 1774 to 1777, perhaps the George Hilton who was a "N." taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1781, a "Free Negro" in Dover Hundred from 1786 to 1788 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 220, 256, 269, 299, 523; 1785-97, frames 46, 108 111], head of a New Castle County household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:17] and 9 in 1810 [DE:301].

ii. John, born say 1757, in the list of taxables in Duck Creek Hundred in 1778 with his tax crossed off [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1767-84, frame 337], probably identical to John Hilton who was head of a New Castle County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:282].

iii. Charles, a "Free Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred in 1785 [RG 3535, Levy List 1727-1850, reel 4, frame no. 108].

iv. James, head of a New Castle County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:207] and 7 in 1810 [DE:178].

 

Maryland

1. Ann Hilton, born say 1738, was the servant of Henry Gaither on 2 August 1758 when the Frederick County, Maryland Court bound her "Molatto" son John to him until the age of thirty-one. She was the mother of

i. John, born 2 August 1758 [Court Minutes 1758-62, 77].

ii. ?Dave, born before 1776, head of a Harford County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830.

 

HINTON FAMILY

1.    Charles Henton, born about 1750, was a 19-20 year old "Mulatto" who ran away from Henry Howard of Elkridge, Maryland according to the 7 December 1769 issue of the Virginia Gazette (Rind) [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 161]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Jube, head of a Baltimore City household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:244].

ii. Rose, head of a Baltimore City household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:242].

 

HITCHENS FAMILY

1.    Major1 Hitchens, born say 1700, was head of a Northampton County, Virginia household of four tithables in 1733 and 1744 and head of a household of 4 free tithables and 2 slaves, Nan and Sue, from 1737 to 1744 [Bell, Northampton County Tithables, 232, 237, 262, 274, 280, 312, 325, 330, 362]:

Master of family tithable names nubr.

Major Hitchens : Tamar, Edward and Anne Hutchins nann & Sue negros 6

Major may have been the son of Mary Hitchens, "Mr. Robinson's wench," who was presented by the churchwardens in Accomack County for having a bastard child about 1700 [Orders 1697-1703, 96]. On 12 May 1747 the Northampton County court presented him for intermarrying or cohabiting with a "mulatoe" woman and presented Siner Bennett alias Hitchens for cohabiting with Major Hitchens, a "mulatoe man." The King's attorney discontinued the suit against Major on 10 June 1747 and discontinued the suit against Siner on 9 September 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 422, 429, 445, 457]. He died before 20 December 1766 when Tamer Hitchens presented his inventory in Worcester County court. Edward Hitchens and Peter Dolbee were nearest of kin [Prerogative Inventories 91:135-6]. By his 10 November 1765 Worcester County will, proved 18 June 1766, he left his wife Tamer the use of his land which was then to descend to his son Edmond(?), and named sons Edward, Major, Edmond and Jard [Jones, Worcester County Wills, JW-3, 1759-1769, 36]. He was the father of

2        i. Edward, born say 1716.

ii. Anne, born say 1720, tithable in Major's household from 1737 to 1744, presented on 8 November 1737 for bastard bearing. Major Hitchens paid her fine [Orders 1732-42, 284, 291].

iii. James, born say 1722, tithable in Major's household in 1738 and 1743.

iv. Major2, Jr., born say 1724, tithable in Major's household in 1740 and 1741 and in Edward Hitchen's household in 1743.

v. Jared, born say 1726, tithable in Major's household in 1743 and 1744. He was called Garret Hitchens, a "mulato," on 12 May 1747 when the court presented Mary Filby for intermarrying and cohabiting with him. The case was dismissed by the King's attorney on 12 August 1747 [Orders 1742-8, 402-3, 429, 444]. He was taxable in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777.

 

2.    Edward Hitchens, born say 1716, was tithable in Major's Hitchens' Northampton County household in 1737. He married a white woman named Tamer Smith before 10 October 1738 when the sheriff was ordered to take her into custody, keep her in the county jail for six months without bail, and to discharge her after she paid a fine of 10 pounds currency as punishment for marrying Edward Hitchens, a "Mulatto man" [Orders 1732-42, 334; Deal, Race and Class, 216]. On 1 January 1773 he sold (signing) for 90 pounds 200 acres of a 215 acre tract called Hitchens Choice in Worcester County near Indian River which was land he received by patent of 22 August 1762 and on the same day sold another 50 acres of Hitchens Choice for 15 pounds [DB I:209-11]. He was taxable in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777 and also listed that year in Baltimore Hundred. He was probably the father of

i. Edward2, Jr., taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777.

ii. Isaac, taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777.

 

And they were likely the ancestors of

i. Milly, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:388].

ii. Eli, born 1776-1794, married head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:378]. He married Hester Jackson on 9 September 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware.

 

HODGKIN FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Hodgkin, born say 1737, was presented by the Prince George's County court on 22 November 1757 for having an illegitimate "Mulatto" child by information of Ruth Vermillion [Court Record 1754-8, 528, 539]. She was the mother of

i. Robert, born about 1757, (no last name) a "Molatto" child maintained by Giles Vermillion from November 1757 until the next court [Judgment Record 1754-8, 539].

ii. ?Nanny Hogskins, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

HODGSKIN FAMILY

1.   Jonas Hodgskin, born say 1720, a "Mallatto," confessed on 19 August 1739 in Somerset County court that he was the father of an illegitimate child by Dorcas Malavery. He was fined 30 shillings [Judicial Record 1738-40, 171]. He was taxable in Pocomoke Hundred of Somerset County in the household of Sue Hogskin (his white mother? who was not a taxable) in 1736, in Henry Schofield's household in 1737, in Seward Tomlinson's in 1738, in Solomon Tomlinson's in 1739, with slaves Robin and Sarah in Annamessex Hundred in 1740, and taxable in his own Pocomoke household from 1746 to 1759 [List of Tithables 1736-1759]. He married Rodey Driges (Driggers) on 23 December 1747 at Coventry P.E. Church, Somerset County, Maryland [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 2:104]. Rhoda was taxable in his Pocomoke Hundred household from 1756 to 1759. He was granted 50 acres in Worcester County on 12 March 1764 called Flemings Pleasure on the east side of Dividing Creek, and he and his wife Rhoda sold this land (making their marks) on 15 June 1770. On 5 August 1769 he mortgaged to William Lane a crop of corn on the plantation whereon Lane's wife was then living and ten hogs on 5 August 1769 [DB H:79-80, 339]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, in 1777 and a delinquent taxpayer in 1787 [Sussex County Levy Lists, n.p.]. His wife Rhoda Hodgskin was called the sister of Drake Driggers in the administration of Driggers' 2 September 1788 Sussex County estate. They were the parents of

i. John, born 10 February 1747/8, "son of Jonas and Rodey Hodgskin" [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 104].

ii. Devericks/ Debrix, born 4 February 1748/9, "son of Jonas and Rodey Hodgskin," [Wright, Maryland Eastern Shore Vital Records, 2:104], a taxable in Little Creek in 1788, 1790, 1791, and 1795 [Sussex County Levy Lists] and head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:375].

iii. ?Stephen, born say 1770, a delinquent taxable in Little Creek, Sussex County in 1787 and a taxable in Little Creek in 1788 and 1790 [Sussex County Levy Lists]. The Sussex County court charged him with assault in February 1786 [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 383, 386, 388, 403].

iv. ?David, born say 1772, a delinquent taxable in Little Creek in 1787.

v. ?Winder, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Dorcas Malavery called him Jonas Miller when she named him as father of her child, but he was called Jonas Hogskin when he confessed. A James Hogskin alias Miller married Mary Hobbs in Somerset County on 25 July 1815.

 

HOLLAND FAMILY

Members of the Holland family were

i. ?Elizabeth Hallin, born say 1730, presented by the Prince George's County court on 24 March 1747 for having a "Malato Bastard" by information of Sarah Johnson [Court Record 1747-8, 259].

1        ii. Barbara, born say 1736.

 

1.    Barbara Holland, born say 1736, the "Mollatto" servant of Thomas Standish, confessed to the Prince George's County court on 25 March 1755 that she had an illegitimate "Mollatto" child named James who was born 20 August 1754. The court ordered that she serve seven years and sold her son to her master until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1754-8, 57]. She was the mother of

i. James, born 20 August 1754, head of a Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:402], 7 in 1810 [DE:452] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:280].

ii. ?Rachel, head of a Montgomery County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iii. ?Jacob, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

iv. ?Robert, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:127] and 3 in 1810 [DE:22].

v. ?Margaret, born about 1777, registered as a free Negro in Washington, D.C., on 24 October 1827: aged about fifty, was born of a white woman [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 96].

 

HOLLY FAMILY

Members of the Holly family in St. Mary's County were

1        i. Joseph1, born say 1745.

2        ii. Phebe, born say 1750.

3        iii. Elizabeth, born say 1758.

iv. Enoch, head of a St. Mary's County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:231].

v. Matilda, head of a St. Mary's County housheold of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:174].

 

1.    Joseph1 Holly, born say 1748, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 8 "other free" in 1790. His widow may have been Mary Holly, head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:441]. She was the mother of

i. Ignatius, born about 1766, head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:407] and 6 in 1810 [MD:222], obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 19 April 1826: son of Mary Holly, aged about 60 years ... light Complection ... born free.

 

2.    Phebe Holly, born say 1750, was the mother of

4        i. Sarah, born about 1769.

ii. Lewis, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 17 February 1829: son of Phebe Holly, aged about thirty five years ... bright complexion.

 

3.    Elizabeth Holly, born say 1758, was the mother of

i. Susan Butler, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 19 October 1824: aged about forty five years ... bright complexion, long hair ... born and raised in Saint Mary's County being the daughter of Betsy Holly.

 

4.    Sarah Holly, born about 1769, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 7 April 1819: daughter of Phebe Holly ... about fifty years of age, bright complexion ... born free. She was the mother of

i. Anna, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 7 April 1819: daughter of Sarah Holly ... dark complexion ... about twenty five years of age, was born free].

ii. Miley, born about 1794, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 7 April 1819: son of Sarah Holly ... about twenty five years of age, bright complexion ... born free.

iii. Phebe2, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 7 April 1819: daughter of Sarah Holly ... aged about seventeen years ... born free.

 

Other members of the Holly family were

i. Tot, born about 1779, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 7 September 1809: aged thirty seven years or thereabouts, Complexion bright - hair short ... born free and raised in Saint Mary's County.

ii. Sarah Mason, late Holly, born about 1786, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 2 August 1814: aged twenty eight years or thereabouts Complexion bright yellow - hair short & Curley ... born free.

iii. Joseph2, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 25 March 1822: about 27 years of age ... dark complexion ... born free being the son of a free black woman by the name of Becky Holly.

iv. George, born about 1798, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 12 March 1819: son of Ann Holly, aged about twenty one years, bright complexion, born free.

v. Leanna, born about 1804, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 16 March 1825: aged twenty one years or thereabouts ... bright complexion, long hair ... born free, daughter of Priscilla Holly [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 27, 45, 48, 59, 67, 68, 74, 79].

 

HOLMES FAMILY

1.    Mary Holmes, born say 1723, was the servant of James Presbury on 6 March 1743/4 when she confessed to the Baltimore County court that she had an illegitimate "Molatto" child. She was probably a mixed-race woman who had a child by a free person since her punishment was a fine of thirty shillings [Court Proceedings 1743-6, 72, 170]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Easther, born about 1769, an eight year old "Mulatto" bound apprentice to Thomas Presbury of Harford County in March 1777 [Maryland Historical Society Bulletin, vol. 35, no.3].

ii. Allen, born say 1773, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:531].

iii. Thomas, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 29 August 1815: a dark mulatto man ... about 23 years of age ... born free & raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 207].

 

They may have been related to the free African American Holmes family of Virginia.

 

HOLT FAMILY

Members of the Holt family were

i. Henny, head of a St. Mary's County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [MD:408] and 7 in 1810 [MD:181].

ii. Betty, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:408].

iii. William, born say 1775, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:154], and 9 in 1810 [VA:29].

iv. John, born about 1778, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 26 May 1809: aged about thirty one years, complexion rather dark ... hair in some degrees resembles that of a Mulatto's ... raised in Saint Mary's County, was born free.

v. Henry Leonard, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 27 September 1810: aged twenty three years or thereabouts - complexion yellowish, hair short & Curley ... born free.

vi. John, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 24 September 1834: aged about 32 years ... dark complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 5, 11, 107].

 

HOPKINS FAMILY

1.    Ann Hopkins, born say 1711, was the servant of John Granger in June 1730 when the Queen Anne's County court sold her "mollato" child Chloe to Colonel Ernaut Hawkins until the age of thirty-one for 209 pounds of tobacco [Judgment Record 1730-32, 1]. She was the servant of George Cooley, in June 1731 when she was convicted by the Talbot County court of having a child by a "Negro." The court bound her son Thomas to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1728-31, 428-9]. She was the mother of

i. Chloe, born about March 1730, three months old when she was bound to Colonel Hawkins in June 1730.

ii. Thomas, born about 1731, called a "Malatto child 20 years to serve" when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of George Cooley on 23 April 1732 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1732-1734, 72-4], a "Negro" head of a Harford County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [MD:738].

 

They were probably the ancestors of

i. Abram, "F.M." head of a Queen Anne's County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1790 [MD:100] and 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:347].

ii. Esther, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162].

iii. Edward, head of an Octararo, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iv. James, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 1 "other free" in 1800 [MD:349].

v. George, "Negro" head of a Harford County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:764].

vi. Margaret, head of a Montgomery County household of 1 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [MD:934].

vii. Gerard, head of a Montgomery County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:931].

 

HORNER FAMILY

1.    George1 Horner, born say 1690, was the common-law wife of Matilda, a "free mulatto woman," in Somerset County, Maryland. She was the servant of Captain Arnold Elzey of Monacan Hundred on 10 March 1707/8, 8 November 1710, and 7 March 1710/11 when she was presented by the Somerset County court for having an illegitimate child. She identified George Horner as the father in each case. The court ordered her to serve her master additional time for the trouble of his house and fined George 600 pounds of tobacco for each offense. She was called "Martilldo ... a certain Mollato Woman servant to Capt. Arnold Elzey" when she petitioned the Somerset County court on 26 November 1713 stating that she was about twenty-two to twenty-three years old and should have been free at age sixteen. The court ruled that she serve six years for fines, court costs, and the trouble of her master's house (for having children). They had another child before 12 November 1714 for which Martildo was ordered to receive ten lashes and serve another six months [Judicial Record 1707-11, 69, 100-1, 431, 451, 453; 1711-13, 299-300; 1713-15, 12, 127-8, 176; 1715-17, 57]. George was living on land belonging to John Bozman on 26 April 1716 when Bozman made his Somerset County will. He was taxable in Manokin Hundred from 1723 to 1740: taxable on William Horner in 1725, on Martilder and William in 1727, on Martilder, William and George Horner in 1728. He was called George Horner, Sr., in 1739 when he was head of a household with Mertildo and John and Arnold in Manokin Hundred. He died before 14 April 1744 when the inventory of his Somerset County estate was recorded. It was valued at over 112 pounds. The June 1745 account of the estate divided the proceeds among his wife Matilda, adult children: Arnold, Elizabeth, and Charles and his underage children: Samuel, Robert, and Mary [Land Records Liber AC-25:12; Baldwin, Maryland Calendar of Wills, 4:88; Maryland Inventories, Liber 29:207; Maryland Accounts, Liber 21:413; Davidson, Free Blacks on the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland, 52]. Matilda was head of an Annamessex Hundred household with Samuel and Robert Horner in 1749. George and Matilda's children were

i. ?George2, Jr., born say 1710, taxable head of his own household in Somerset County in 1733, not mentioned in the distribution of George Horner's estate in 1744. The Somerset County court indicted him for stealing 30 pounds of tobacco from William McClemmey on 1 August 1740, and in November 1749 the court convicted him of stealing a calf which belonged to George Irven and ordered him to pay four times the value [Judicial Record 1740-2, 36; 1749-51, 15].

ii. Arnold1, born say 1712, taxable in Manokin Hundred in 1739. He was living on "Manlowe's Lot" in 1748 when he was sued in Somerset County court for four years back rent [Judicial Records 1747-49, 161, 232]. In March 1749/50 David Wilson sued him for 4 pounds currency due by promissory note [Judicial Records 1747-49, 161, 232; 1749-51, 59, 156].

iii. Elizabeth1, born say 1716.

iv. Charles, born say 1722, taxable in John Rigsby's Somerset County household in 1748.

v. Samuel, born say 1728, underage in 1744, taxable in his mother's household in 1749.

vi. Robert, born say 1730, underage in 1744, taxable in Somerset County in 1749.

vii. Mary, born say 1732, underage in 1744.

 

Their descendants were

i. William, born say 1720, a planter who was convicted by the Somerset County court in 1742 of stealing hogs worth 500 pounds of tobacco and given 15 lashes [Judicial Record 1742-4, 87].

ii. Arnold2, Jr., charged in Somerset County court on 16 June 1767 with assaulting William Luke. he was called Arnold Horner, Jr., planter on 20 August 1771 when he admitted owing John Bell ten pounds, fifteen shillings [Judicial Record 1766-7, 160; 1769-72, 208].

iii. Elizabeth2, confessed to the Somerset County court on 5 August 1766 that she had a child by James Shingwich and confessed to a child by James Ring on 17 March 1767. She was acquitted of stealing petticoats from Mary Caldwell in March 1769 but convicted of stealing articles worth 992 pounds of tobacco in June 1769. The court ordered that she stand in the pillory for thirty minutes, receive thirty-nine lashes and be sold for fourfold the value of the articles [Judicial Record 1766-7, 14a, 106; 1767-9, 257; 1769-72, 50]. She was sentenced to death by hanging but pardoned by the Governor on condition she leave Maryland [Archives of Maryland 32:315].

 

HOUSTON FAMILY

1. Fortune Magee, born say 1687, was a servant of Mrs. Mary Day on 15 June 1705 when the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County who was married to George Magee at the time. On 7 March 1710/11 the court presented her for having four illegitimate children: one about seven years old, one five, one three and one three months old. On 8 August 1711 she confessed that Penny, "negroe" servant to Mr. Benjamin Wailer, was the father of her child. On 6 August 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1698-1701, 134; 1702-5, 251; 1707-11, 454; 1711-13, 40, 220]. Fortune was taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County, in 1735 [List of Tithables]. Her children were

i. Ross/ Rose, born in March 1703.

2        ii. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705.

iii. Perlina, born in April 1707, five years old "next April" in August 1712 when she was bound apprentice.

 

2.     Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, was a "mulatto" woman living in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1741 to 1754 when her "mulatto" children, Belinder, Davey, Jenney, James, and Nelly Magee were born. She was the mother of

3        i. Belinder, born say 1747.

ii. David.

iii. James.

iv. Nelly.

 

3.    Belinder Magee/ Houston, born say 1737, was called a "Mollatto woman" Bellinder McGhee on 19 May 1768 when she was listed in the inventory of the Worcester County estate of John Houston with five weeks remaining to serve [Prerogative Inventories 95:312]. She may have taken the name of her master John Houston and been identical to Bellinder Houston, a "Negro" head of a Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800, living near Susannah Magee [DE:391]. She was probably the mother of

i. Lydia Houston, born say 1755, married Nathan Norwood on 22 March 1775 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 288].

ii. Susannah Magee, born say 1764, called "Sue a Molatto" girl with twenty-seven years to serve when she was listed in Worcester County inventory of the estate of John Houston on 19 May 1768 [Prerogative Inventories 95:312], called Susannah Magee, a "Negro" head of a Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391].

iii. David Houston, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:324] and 2 "free colored" in Dagsboro Hundred in 1820 [DE:374].

iv. Jacob Houston, head of a Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:367].

 

HOWARD FAMILY

1.    Barbara Howard, born say 1718, was the mother of Sarah Howard, a five year old "Mulatto" who was bound by the Anne Arundel County court in June 1737 to Robert Perry until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1736-8, 171]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born 25 December 1731.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Poll, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:93].

ii. Harry, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:403].

iii. William, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:507].

iv. Charles, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:66].

v. Rachel, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:432].

 

HOWE FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth How/ Hough, born say 1700, the servant of Daniel Richardson, confessed to the Anne Arundel County court in June 1718 that she had a child by "Negroe Sam belonging to her Master." The court bound their son to John Maccubbins until the age of thirty-one. She was called Elizabeth Hough in November 1721 when she confessed to having another child by Sam. She was sold for seven years and Sam received twenty lashes [Judgment Record 1717-9, 202, 210-11; 1720-1, 22-3, 214-5]. They may have been the ancestors of

i. Robert, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:504].

ii. Anthony, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:504].

iii. H., head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:506].

iv. Sarah, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:218].

 

HUBBARD FAMILY

1.    Jane Hubbard, born say 1685, was the mother of a "Mulatto" daughter named Elizabeth who was bound out by the churchwardens of Washington Parish, Westmoreland County, Virginia, before 30 October 1705 [Orders 1705-21, 3]. They were probably the ancestors of

i. Ruth, born about 1722, a fifty-four-year-old "mulato" head of Broad Creek Hundred, Harford County, Maryland household with (her children?) Belt (thirteen years old), Joe (ten), and Hanna (six) in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 88].

2        ii. William, born say 1750.

iii. Abram, counted with his wife Dorcas and four children in a "List of Free Mullatoes and Negroes" living in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:41]. He was head of a Westmoreland County household of 11 "other free" 1810 (called Abram Herbert) and 12 "free colored" in 1830, perhaps the father of Talbert Hubbard, head of a Westmoreland household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

 

2.    William Hubbard/ Hubert, born say 1750, was mentioned in a 30 April 1795 entry in the account book of Benjamin Banneker [Bedini, The Life of Benjamin Banneker, 249]. He was head of a Patapsco Upper Hundred, Baltimore County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:639]. He married a daughter of Robert and Molly Banneker. He and his wife were the parents of

i. Henry, born say 1770, obtained a certificate of freedom in Loudoun County on 24 December 1795 on testimony of Henry Jarvis that: he was the son of a free woman and grandson of Robert Banneker, whose wife was also a free woman. Robert Banneker lived in Baltimore County about two and a half miles from Ellicott's Mills.

ii. Charles, born say 1772, called brother of Henry Hubbard on 24 December 1795 when he obtained a certificate of freedom in Loudoun County [Certificates of Freedom in Loudoun County courthouse, cited by Journal of the AAHGS 11:123]. He (called Charles Hubbert) was head of a Loudoun County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:288].

 

Other likely descendants were

i. Isaac Hubbert, "negro" head of a Caroline County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:165].

ii. Isaac, head of a Halifax County, North Carolina household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [NC:26].

iii. ?Anthony Herbert, head of a Kent County, Virginia household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:755].

iv. Nancy Herbert, head of a Norfolk County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [VA:832].

v. Mary, married John Butler, 13 February 1802 Bertie County, North Carolina bond, Buffin Harrison bondsman.

 

HUGHES FAMILY

Members of the Hughes family of Maryland were

1        i. Isabell, born say 1700.

ii. Caleb, born say 1704, a "free Negroe" who had an illegitimate child by a white woman named Katherine Banks before 21 June 1726 when she confessed to the Kent County, Maryland court [Criminal Record 1724-8, 183, 222-5]. He or perhaps a son by that name was taxable in Little Creek Hundred of Kent County, Delaware, in 1767 [Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 552, 566].

2        iii. Mary, born say 1727.

iv. James, born 1726-1736, a 40-50 year old "Black Man" counted in the 1776 census for Nanticoke Hundred, Dorchester County [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 40], a taxable "negro" in the Upper District of Dorchester County in 1783 [MSA S 1161-5-6, p.10], and head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1790.

v. William Elbut, aka Hughes, born about 1745, a forty-year-old "mulatto" who claimed to be a Revolutionary War soldier when he was jailed in Williamsburg, Virginia, according to the 9 July 1785 issue of the Virginia Gazette and General Advertiser [Headley, 18th Century Newspapers, 113]. He was a taxable "negro" in the Upper District Hundred of Dorchester County in 1783 [MSA S1161-5-6, p.7] and head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:693].

vi. Christina, born say 1754, mother of David Hughes, born about 1774, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 11 December 1816: of a blackish colour ... raised in Dorchester County, born free and is the son of Christina Hughes who was also born free, aged about 42 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 34].

 

1.    Isabell Hughes, born say 1700, and (her daughter?) Sarah Hughs were summoned to testify in Kent County, Delaware, for "Mulatto Moll alias Molly Gibbs." Moll was a slave who claimed she and her children were entitled to their freedom from Waitman Sipple and Andrew Caldwell because she was the daughter of a white woman named Fleetwood Gibbs. Isabel deposed in Dover on 1 July 1760 that she knew Moll but not as Moll Gibbs, she did not know that Moll was the issue of a free woman, she had seen Moll suckle (her children) Joseph and Flora about twenty-five years past, she had heard that Moll won her freedom in a court of law but did no know of her own knowledge anything that would benefit Moll's case [Delaware Archives RG 1225, chancery case G#1].(1) She was a widow on 3 June 1757 when she made her Little Creek Hundred, Kent County will, proved 19 January 1763. She named her son John, son-in-law John Durham, and daughter Sarah Hewes who was her executrix. Edward Norman witnessed the will [WB K-1, fol. 301-3]. Her children were

i. a daughter, wife of John Durham.

ii. Sarah, confessed to the Kent County court in February 1743/4 that she was delivered of an illegitimate female child two months previous but refused to identify the father. John Hughes paid her fine [RG 3805.002, Quarter Sessions, 1734-79, frame 92]. She was subpoenaed to appear to testify in favor of "Mulatto Moll" in 1760 but not deposed. She married James Dean [de Valinger, Kent County Probate Records, 205]. She was granted administration of the Kent County estate of her husband on 4 August 1787.

3        iii. John1, born say 1740.

 

2.    Mary Hughes, born say 1727, a "Spinster," was living in Dorchester County, Maryland on 13 August 1745 when she admitted to having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe Slave." The court sold her two "Molatta Children" to Henry Hooper, Jr., to serve until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Records 1742-5, 409]. Her descendants were most likely:

i. Harry1, head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1790.

ii. Harry2, head of a Dorchester County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Shadrick, head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:684].

iv. Mary, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:687].

v. Mary, head of a Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vi. Hannah, purchased a "Negro" slave named Joseph from the administrator of the Dorchester County estate of Charles Muir on 11 November 1790 for 30 pounds [HD 2:732].

vii. Enoch, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 6 May 1809: of a Chesnut colour ... born free ... aged about 21 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 7].

viii. Nancy, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 7 May 1816: of a blackish colour ... born free in Dorchester County and is the daughter of Milcah Hughes who was also born free, aged about 20 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 32].

 

3.    John1 Hughes, born say 1740, was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:34] and 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:29]. He may have been the father of

i. Thomas, born say 1764, a "Mulattoe" taxable in Kent County in 1797 and 1798 [Tax Assessments, frames 15, 479], head of a Little Creek, Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:33], administrator of the estate of Thomas Durham. He married Mary Durham [de Valinger, Kent County Probate Records, 494].

ii. John2, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:126] and a Duck Creek Hundred household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:54]. On 27 April 1802 he purchased 5 acres on the northside of the northwest branch of the Dover River in the forest of Little Creek Hundred for 29 pounds [DB G-2:232].

iii. William, born before 1776, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:53].

 

Members of a Hughes family on the Western Shore of Maryland were

i. John, a "Mollatto Child" living with James Heap of Charles County in August 1749 when the court allowed Heap 300 pounds of tobacco for the child's support until the next court session in November 1749 [Court Record 1748-50, 413].

ii. George, head of a St. Mary's County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 and 2 in 1800 [MD:427].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Moll "Gibbs" lost her case. Depositions were taken in Queen Anne's County from the family that had owned Moll before she was sold to Waitman Sipple. Their testimony as well as Moll's indicate that she was first owned by Evan Jones, then Charles Hilliard, then John Whittington, then John Dempster of Queen Anne's County who sold Moll and her husband Weymouth to Waitman Sipple of Kent County, Delaware. Waitman Sipple answered that Moll was the daughter of an Indian slave. In August 1713 the New Castle County court convicted Fleetwood Gibbs, servant of Peter Mackfareland, of bearing a bastard child [RG 2805.015, reel 1, frame 13]. No race was indicated for the child, but the race of the child or father would not have been relevant in 1713.

 

HUTT FAMILY

1.    Hannah Hutt, born say 1705, received twenty one lashes by the Kent County court in November 1724 for having an illegitimate child. Charles Hillyard agreed to pay her fine and court fees in exchange for three years service after the completion of the time she was then engaged to serve. In May 1728 her unnamed child was bound to Hillyard until the age of eighteen, he having maintained the child for six years [DSA, RG 3815.031, 1722-1732, frames 65, 153, 206]. She was the mother of

2        i. John, born say 1722.

 

2.   John Hutt, born say 1722, was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County (the same district as Charles Hillyard), from 1755 to 1759 and in Little Creek Hundred from 1760 to 1763 [RG 3535, Levy Assessments 1743-67, frames 140, 169, 184, 198, 212, 228, 244, 264, 269, 305, 315, 383]. He sued John Lawrence for debt in Kent County court in February 1754, Samuel Hand and Silvester Luck sued him for debt in November 1762 [RG 3815.031, dockets 1750-54, frame 588; 1760-2, frame 515]. On 25 May 1758 he petitioned the Kent County court stating that he had been bound out by the justices until the age of thirty-one to Charles Hilyard, Sr., who died and left him to his widow who married Presly Raynond. John claimed that Raymond died before paying him his freedom dues [Brewer, Kent County Guardian Accounts, Houston to McBride, 30]. He was the father of a "Mollatto" child who was being kept by Jacob Gay (Guy) on 18 November 1766 when the Kent County Levy court allowed him 1 pound, 16 shillings for taking care of the child the previous three months and another 12 shillings per month for the ensuing year, perhaps identical to the "Negro Child nam'd Hutt" who John Ham agreed to have bound to him by the Kent County levy court on 15 November 1768 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frame 529; 1768-84, frame 6]. Perhaps his wife was Sarah Hutt, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:26]. He may have been the father of

i. Presley, born say 1760, received pay for service in the Delaware Regiment in the Revolutionary War from 1 August 1780 to 4 November 1783 [DHS, MS Delaware Regiment Pay Records, 1778-1783, certificates 54,361; 54,861; 55,018; 55,273], a delinquent "Negroe" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1780, 1781, 1788, delinquent in 1789, a "Negro" taxable on a cow and a calf in 1797 [Levy List 1768-84, frame 425, 491; 1785-98, frames 104, 128, 174, 516], head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:13].

ii. David1, sued by John Farson in Kent County court on 20 May 1796 [RG 3815, MS case files, 1-20]. head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:24] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:28].

iii. James, a "free Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred in 1787 [Kent County Tax List, 1785-89, frame 98], head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:16].

iv. Charles, taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1784, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1788, and from 1797 to 1798 [Kent County Levy Lists, 1768-1784, frame 620; 1785-1797, frames 104, 128, 174, 492, 574; 1798-9, 401]. The Kent County court charged him with assault and battery on Sarah Loller and charged him and (his wife?) Sarah Hutt with riot in November 1792. Sarah Hutt accused Phillis Hutt of assaulting her in Duck Creek Hundred on 1 May 1787 [RG 3805.002, 1787-1803, frames 228-9; MS Indictments May 1787]. James Morris sued him for a debt of 26 pounds in April 1793 [RG 3815, MS case papers].

v. David2, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:43].

 

HYNSON FAMILY

Members of the Hynson family of Maryland were

1        i. Joseph1, born say 1760.

ii. Isaac Hynson, head of Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:161].

iii. Cuff Hynson, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1800 [MD:174].

iv. Harry, head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:849].

 

1.    Joseph1 Hynson, born say 1760, was head of a Talbot County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [MD:510] and 7 in Baltimore City in 1810 [MD:239]. He may have been the father of

i. Joseph2, born about 1782, obtained a certificate of freedom in Baltimore County on 28 April 1832: about 50 years of age, of rather light complexion, born free & raised in Talbot County [Baltimore County Negroes Manumitted 1830-2, n.p.].

ii. S., head of a Baltimore County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:504].

 

IMPEY FAMILY

1.    Sarah Empy/ Impee, born say 1685, confessed to the Anne Arundel County court on 11 June 1717 that she had two illegitimate "Mollatto" children by Mark Williams. The court ordered that she receive twenty-five lashes [Judgment Record 1717-19, 10-1]. She was buried in All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel County, two years later on 28 June 1719 [Wright, Anne Arundel County Church Records, 200]. She was probably the mother of

2        i. Peter, born say 1705.

 

2.   Peter Impey, born say 1705, a "free mallatto," married Phillis Emerson, "negro servant to Thomas Gassaway," in All Hollow's Parish on 11 July 1725. He married, second, ___ in All Hollow's Parish on 21 January 1731. In August 1741 he and his wife and Anthony Hill were summoned to testify against Arthur Savoy in a case in which Savoy was convicted of stealing a mare from Robert Killeson. In August 1743 Peter was imprisoned for a debt he owed Stephen Higgins [Judgment Record 1740-3, 237, 248, 251; 1743-4, 169]. Peter may have been the ancestor of

i. Jacob, head of a Baltimore City household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:67].

ii. David, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:98].

iii. Jane, born before 1776, head of a Frederick County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

 

JACKSON FAMILY

Charles County, Maryland:

1.    Elizabeth Jackson, born say 1688, was living at Samuel Cookleys on 11 June 1706 when she was presented by the Charles County, Maryland Court for having a "Mollatto Child" [Judicial Records Liber B-2:211, 244-5]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Mary, a "free Mullatto" whose petition to be exempt from paying taxes was rejected by the Charles County court on 9 November 1742 but accepted on 10 November 1747 [Court Record 1741-3, 461; 1746-7, 179].

ii. William1, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 13 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1800 [MD:487].

iii. Samuel, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 6 in 1800 [MD:521].

iv. Susanna, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

v. John, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:520].

vi. John B., "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

vii. Barton, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

viii. James, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 11 in 1800 [MD:568].

ix. William2, head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:529].

x. Edward, "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:286].

xi. Wall, "free Negro" head of a Prince George's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:296].

xii. Charles, born about 1765, registered as a free Negro in Prince George's County on 20 December 1825: a very dark mulatto, about 60 years old, and 5 feet 4-1/4 inches tall ... obtained his freedom by petition to the Prince George's County Court at its September Term 1785 [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 54].

 

Queen Anne's, Dorchester and Kent counties:

1.    Anne1 Jackson, born say 1723, was a "free molatto" spinster living in Saint Paul's Parish when the Queen Anne's County court ordered that she receive 10 lashes for having an illegitimate child on 10 January 1743 [Judgment Record 1744-6, 166]. They may have been the ancestors of

i. Joseph, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:150] and 4 in 1810 [MD:848].

2        ii. Anna, born say 1777.

iii. Adam, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:216].

 

2.    Anna Jackson, born say 1777, was the mother of

i. Nancy, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 12 September 1816: of a yellowish colour ... raised in Dorchester County and was born free and is the daughter of Anna Jackson who was also born free, aged about 19 years.

ii. Sally, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 12 April 1816: of a chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Anna Jackson [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 34].

 

Baltimore:

1.    Dorcas Jackson, born say 1755, was the mother of

i. Hezekiah, born about 1775, a seventeen-year-old "free mulatto" who was baptized in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore on 23 December 1792 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:64].

 

Dorchester County:

1.    Anna Jackson, born say 1777, was the mother of

i. Nancy, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 12 September 1816: of a yellowish colour ... raised in Dorchester County and was born free and is the daughter of Anna Jackson who was also born free, aged about 19 years.

ii. Sally, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 12 April 1816: of a chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Anna Jackson [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 34].

 

Delaware

1.    Henry Jackson, born say 1669, was called "Harry a Maletto," the servant of William Sterling, in March 1689/90 when Francis Betteley deposed to the Northampton County, Virginia court that he had been harrowing wheat in company with Harry when Harry told him where Mr. John Baron stored cloth and other goods (which Betteley later stole). Harry was called Henry Jackson, "maletto servant to William Sterling," on 29 September 1690 when he sued for his freedom. The case was resolved by the parties agreeing that Henry would serve one year and then be discharged from service with reasonable clothing. On 28 May 1697 he, called "the maletto," was presented for driving a cart on Sunday. He was discharged from the presentment on payment of the court fees [Wills, Orders, 1689-98, 46, 62, 64-5; 1698-1710, 427, 451]. He had a child by Ann Shepherd, a "Christian white woman" who was presented by the Accomack County, Virginia Court for having an illegitimate child. When required to identify the father of her child on 6 June 1721, she told the Accomack County court that it was "Indian Edmund," but on 6 July 1721 she admitted that it was Henry Jackson, "a Mullatto." The court ordered that she be sold for five years [Orders 1719-24, 33]. Henry and Ann may have been the parents of

2        i. John, born say 1720.

 

2.    John Jackson, born say 1720, may have been the John Jaxon who was taxable in Bogerternorton Hundred of Somerset County in the household adjoining Edward Harman in 1739 [List of Tithables, 1739]. He had a child by Jane Harman in Somerset County before 18 November 1740 when she confessed that he was the father [Judicial Record 1740-2, 59-60, 310]. He was a "mulatto" who baptized his son William on 15 June 1746 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 91]. His children were

3        i. William, born say 1740.

ii. Patience, born 25 9ber 1748 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 94]. She married Job Friend ("Melattoes") on 8 June 1772 in Sussex County [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 284].

iii. ?James, called a "Poore Muloto & Several in his family" when he was a delinquent taxable in Indian River in 1789, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 3 "free colored" in Indian River Hundred in 1820 [DE:208].

iv. ?Stephen, servant of John Regua/ Ridgeway in March 1754 when the Sussex County court ordered him to serve additional time to make up for thirty day's lost service worth 52 shillings [Delaware Archives RG4815.017, 1753-1760, frame 93]. He was taxable in Indian River from 1773 to 1784, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:320] and 5 "free colored" in Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County in 1820 [DE:388].

4        v. ?Annanias, born say 1760.

 

3.    William Jackson, born say 1746, son of John Jackson, was baptized on 15 June 1746 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River. He, a "mulattoe," and his wife Nelly registered the 19 October 1768 birth of their daughter, Lydia, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 91, 98]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1773 and 1774, head of a Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:458] and head of a Nanticoke Hundred household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:232]. Their children were

i. Lydia, born 19 October 1768, baptized 20 August 1769.

ii. ?Agnes, born say 1770, married Edward Hermon (Harmon) on 27 November 1788 in Sussex County, Delaware.

iii. ?Israel, married Polly Handsor, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 302, 318].

 

4.    Annanias Jackson, born say 1760, and his wife, Hester, registered the 10 March 1785 birth of their daughter, Hester, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:208]. They were the parents of

i. Hester, born 10 March 1785, married Eli Hitchins on 9 September 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318]. Eli was head of a Dagsboro, Sussex County household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:378].

ii. Katherine, married Thomas Hanzor on 4 February 1808 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 320].

 

JACOBS FAMILY

The Jacobs family of Delaware and Maryland probably descended from the Virginia branch of the family (which see).

 

1.    Abel1 Jacobs, born say 1745, a "mulatto," was living in Indian River, Sussex County, Delaware, when he and his wife, Sarah, registered the 10 July 1769 birth of their son, Abraham, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 98]. Abel was taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1777 [DSA, RG 2535, roll 1]. His children were

i. Abraham, born 10 July 1769, baptized 20 August 1769, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437].

ii. Sarah, married Adonijah Harmon, "free Mulattoes," on 11 May 1795 in Sussex County, Delaware.

iii. Abel2, married Nancy Morris, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310, 318].

 

Members of the Jacobs family in Maryland and Pennsylvania were

2        i. Patty, born say 1760.

ii. Andrew, head of a Northampton County, Pennsylvania household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

 

2.    Patty Jacobs, born say 1760, was head of a Baltimore Town household of 6 "other free" in 1790. She may have been the mother of

i. Phoebe, born say 1780, "free Mulatto" mother of Ann Jacobs, a five month old "Mulatto" baptized 19 February 1799 at St. Peter's Church, Baltimore [Piet, Catholic Church Records in Baltimore, 63].

ii. Samuel, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in the 7th Ward in 1810 [MD:84].

iii. Nace, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:70].

iv. R., head of a Baltimore household of 3 "other free" in 1810 in the Eastern Precincts [MD:517].

 

JEFFERY FAMILY

1.    Richard Jefferys, born say 1745, a "free Negroe formerly servant to John Willson of Kent County in Maryland," was free on 9 February 1767 when he purchased from William Trusty alias William Gibbs 12-1/2 acres in Queen Anne's County which was whatever rights William had to Killmanning's Plains after he had sold his 12-1/2 acres left to him by the will of John Gibbs. He mortgaged 73 acres called Killmaners Plains to Eleazer Massey on 13 July 1774 [DB RT H:56]. He was apparently the father of

i. Jacob, a "Man of Colour" who sold 7 acres called Killmanins Plains in Queen Anne's County for $45 to William Cork and Joseph Oliver, "people of Colour," on 15 September 1810. They sold the same land back to him for $50 on 25 May 1811, and he sold 23 acres called Killmanins Plains adjoining his land for $94 on 27 May 1811 [DB STW-9:369; JB-1:29-31].

ii. ?Rachel, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:351].

iii. ?George, taxable "free Negro" in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1781 to 1784 [frames 510, 550, 575, 633].

iv. ?Simon Jeffers, "Negro" head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790 and 8 in 1800 [MD:162].

v. ?James, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162].

vi. ?Betty, head of a New Castle County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [DE:223].

vii. ?Levi Jeffers, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:377].

viii. ?Levi Jeffers, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:390].

 

JERVIS FAMILY

1.    Margrett Jervice, born say 1697, was living in Monokin Hundred of Somerset County on 2 June 1714 when she confessed in court that Captain Arnold Elzey's "Negroe servant" was the father of her "Mallato" child. The court sold her for seven years and her child Money for thirty-one years to Mr. Worthington for 3,000 pounds of tobacco. Casah "Negroe man servant" of Major Arnold Elzey confessed that he was the father and received 30 lashes. She was the spinster servant of Mrs. Alice Worthington of Stepney Parish on 4 June 1717 when she confessed that she had an illegitimate child by "Buboe Negroe." The court ordered her sold for seven years, sold her child to her mistress until the age of thirty one for 500 pounds of tobacco, and ordered that Buboe receive 30 lashes. The court sold Margaret to Merrick Ellis, Gentleman, for 1,000 pounds of tobacco on 18 August 1724 [Judicial Record 1713-5, 70-1; 1715-7, 211, 235, 239-40; 1723-5, 217]. She was the ancestor of

i. Money, born about March 1714, apparently identical to "Mollatto" Moll Jervice whose six-month-old son Sam was sold by the Somerset County court to Alice Ellis for 31 years in August 1733 for 500 pounds of tobacco [Judicial Record 1733-5, 56].

ii. Ann Jervis, born say 1716, a spinster living in Stepney Parish on 15 June 1736 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by a "negroe" on 10 March 1735. The court sold her for seven years and her son until the age of thirty-one to Alice Ellis [Judicial Record 1735-8, 198].

iii. Friday, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:866].

 

JOHNSON FAMILY

The Johnson family originated in Northampton County, Virginia, before 1650. Members of the family were in Somerset County, Maryland, by 1665, in Delaware by 1677, and in North Carolina by 1720. Included below are the members of the family who moved to Maryland and Delaware during the colonial period. For the complete family history, see the Johnson History in the Virginia section.

1.    Anthony1 Johnson "Negro," probably born about 1600, was free before 10 January 1647 when he purchased a calf from James Berry by deed proved in Northampton County, Virginia [ODW 1651-54, 123]. He patented 250 acres in Northampton County at "great Naswattock Creek" for the transportation of five persons including his son, Richard Johnson, on 24 July 1651 [Patents 1643-51, 326]. His wife, Mary, and their two daughters were excused from paying taxes by the Northampton County, Virginia Court on 28 February 1652 [ODW 1651-54, fol.161].

In 1665 he and his wife Mary, his son John, and his wife Susanna, and their slave John Casor moved to Somerset County, Maryland with Randall Revell and Ann Toft, who claimed them and many whites as head rights for 2,350 acres of land [Patents 8:495-6]. Anthony and his wife sold 250 acres of their own land, left 50 acres to their son, Richard, and took fourteen head of cattle, a mare, and eighteen sheep with them [Accomack DW 1664-71, fol.10; p.12-fol.12]. On 10 September 1666 he leased 300 acres in Somerset County on the south side of Wicomico Creek in Wicomico Hundred, called "Tonies Vinyard," for two hundred years [Land Records O-1:32-33].

He apparently died before August 1670 when "a jury of white men" in Accomack County decided that his land should be escheated since "he was a Negroe and by consequence an alien" [Virginia Genealogist 2:20, 109-113]. His lease in Somerset County, Maryland, was renegotiated by his widow, Mary, for ninety-nine years with the provision that her sons, John and Richard, would assume the lease after her death [Land Records O-2, 20-21]. Her slave, John Casor, recorded his livestock brand in court with her consent on 3 September 1672, and she recorded her mark a few weeks later on Mary recorded her livestock mark on 26 September 1672 [Archives of Maryland 54:760-1]. He was called "John Cazara Negro" when he was a witness (signing) to a power of attorney by which she assigned her son, John, authority over her property and authority to sue for some debts in Virginia, and he was also witness on 3 September 1672 to her deed of gift to her grandchildren. She called herself "Mary Johnson ... Negro (the relict of Anthony Johnson ... Negro deceased)" in the deed by which she gave cattle to her three grandchildren, Anthony, Richard, and Francis [Somerset County Judicial Record 1671-75, 159-62]. She was called "Mary Johnson of Wiccocomoco ... widow" in July 1676 when she purchased a mare and assigned it to John Corsala (her slave) [Somerset County Judicial Record 1675-7, 95]. She was called executor of Anthony Johnson deceased on 17 January 1690 when Edward Revell acted as her attorney in a suit she brought in Accomack County court [WDO 1678-82, 154]. She was living in Sussex County, Delaware, in March 1693/4 when Mary Okey appeared in court to support her complaint that her son, John, was not maintaining her as he had promised [Court Records 1680-99, 646, 655]. The children of Anthony and Mary Johnson were

2        i. John1, say 1631.

3        ii. Richard1, born about 1632.

iii. a daughter, excused from paying tax by the Northampton County court in February 1652, perhaps the Joan1 Johnson who in 1657 received 100 acres in Northampton County from "Deabendanba, Kinge of nusangs," being land next to her brother, John [Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 671].

iv. a daughter, excused from paying tax by the Northampton County court in February 1652.

 

2.    John1 Johnson, born say 1631, received a grant for 550 acres in Northampton County on 10 May 1652 "at great Naswattock Cr. adjacent to 200 acres granted Anthony Johnson" for the importation of 11 persons including Mary Johnson [Patents 3:101]. He received this patent after suing a white resident of the county, also named John Johnson, who tried to illegally take possession of the land. In 1660 he was head of a household of two tithables in Northampton County, called John Johnson Negro [DW 1657-66, 57-58, 103; DW 1651-54, fol.200]. He and his wife, Susanna, sold their land in 1664 [Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore, 671]. In November 1654 he and Mary Gersheene, an African American servant of his father were punished for fornication [ODW 1654-55, fol.35, ODW 1651-54 p.226-fol.226]. On 17 January 1664/5 his wife, Susannah, petitioned the Northampton County court to release him from jail where he was held for begetting a child by Hannah Leach who was probably white [Orders 1664-74, fol.92]. In 1665 he moved to Somerset County, Maryland, with his parents.

He was called "John Johnson Negro" on 11 March 1667/8 when he and two white men, Alexander King and John Richards, were charged in Somerset County court with stealing corn from an Indian named Katackcuweiticks. They confessed their guilt and were ordered to deliver two barrels of corn to the King of the Manoakin at Manoakin Town. He was sued by Randall Revell in Somerset County court for a minor debt on 13 January 1674/5 and appeared as a witness in a court case against Revell. The justices were at first doubtful about admitting the testimony of an African American against a white person. However, his testimony was allowed after he assured the court that he was a Christian and "did rightly understand the taking of an oath." He gave his age as thirty-seven in his deposition in 1670. He testified again in 1676 and was witness to several deeds. Edward Surman appointed him as guardian ("assistant") to his children by his will which was proved in Somerset County court on 10 January 1676/7 [Archives of Maryland 54:675, 707, 712; Judicial Records 1670-71, 10, 15, 6, 205; 1671-5, 41, 260, 267-8, 429, 457; 1675-1677, 47, 78]. He moved to Sussex County, Delaware, where he received a patent for 400 acres on Rehoboth Bay in September 1677. He purchased 200 acres in Sussex County and sold this land by deed which he acknowledged in court in April 1683. In August 1683 he was accused of murdering his wife, Susan. The court took depositions from John Okey and Jeffry Summerford, and released him because they saw "no sign of murder." He appeared in Sussex County court as a witness on seven occasions between March 1680/81 and February 1688. He sued John Okey for debt in May 1685. And he was a defendant on sixteen occasions, mainly for debts. The court postponed action on one of these cases because he was in Virginia between December 1684 and May 1685. He was identified as a "Negro" on only three of these occasions; one was a case in which he had the estate of Nathaniel Bradford in his custody. In August 1704 he was called "John Johnson, Free Nigroe, Aged Eighty Years and Poor and Past his Labour" when the Sussex County court agreed to maintain him for his lifetime on public funds. He was apparently still living in November 1707 when Walter Groombridge had a suit against him for a debt of three pounds [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 103, 110, 144, 166, 190, 193, 204, 214, 216, 229, 235, 251, 253, 299, 315, 342, 356, 365, 384, 447, 462, 516, 540, 635, 797, 857, 919, 1201, 1314]. John1's children were

4        i. John2, born perhaps 1650.

ii. Anthony2, born perhaps 1655, who was devised a cow and a calf by the will of his grandmother, Mary Johnson. He was a sued in Sussex County, Delaware Court on 7 May 1706 and was a witness in a Sussex County case in November 1709 [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 1227, 1291].

iii. ?Joan2, "Negro," married John Puckham, a baptized Monie tribesman, on 25 February 1682/3 in Somerset County, Maryland [Register of Liber IKL, Somerset Courthouse, cited by Torrence, Old Somerset, 143]. See the Puckham history.

iv. an unnamed son, born say 1667. William Futcher claimed in February 1689 Sussex County court that Johnson's son had been bound to serve him for nine years. The suit was canceled because of Futcher's death [Court Records 1680-99, 294, 322, 342]. Perhaps this was William Johnson "Molater" who bound himself to serve Ralph Doe Carpenter of Somerset County for four years on 2 June 1700 in order to pay his debts. On 31 March 1702 the Somerset County court ruled the indenture was insufficient and set William at liberty [Judicial Record 1701-2, 105-6].

v. ?Comfort, born say 1680, "free Nigrene," presented by the Sussex County, Delaware Court for having a bastard child in 1699. James Walker of Rehoboth Bay agreed to pay her fine and give her a three year old heifer in exchange for her serving him an additional thirteen months, and she bound her two-year-old son to him until the age of twenty-one [Court Records 1680-99, 768, 774, 775]. In February 1706 she confessed to having a bastard child by Justice William Bagwell's servant, Patrick Delany, and in May 1706 she admitted to having a child by Rice Morgan [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 1218, 1219, 1276, 1281].(1)

 

3.    Richard1 Johnson, born about 1632, was one of the five persons his father claimed head rights for in 1651. On 8 February 1653 Governor Richard Bennett instructed Nathaniel Littleton to deliver a black cow to him. On 28 September 1652 he claimed two headrights, and on 21 November 1654 he received a patent for 100 acres in Northampton County adjoining his father and his brother John [ODW 1651-54, fol.103, p.133; Patents 1652-55, 296]. On 19 January 1663/4 he was called "Richard Johnson negro" when he brought suit in Accomack County court against Richard Buckland about a house he had built for Buckland [DW 1663-66, 54]. He remained in Accomack County on 50 acres left to him by his father when his father took the rest of the family to Maryland [Accomack DW 1664-71, p.12-fol.12]. He purchased 590 acres near Matomkin from Christopher Tompson in December 1675 and conveyed half this land to his son, Francis, in 1678 [WD 1676-90, 14; Virginia's Eastern Shore, 1088]. He was taxable in Accomack County on two tithes from 1676 to 1681 (called Richard Johnson, Sen.) [Orders 1676-8, 34, 57; WDO 1678-82, 18, 100]. He died before 19 March 1689 when his wife Susan Johnson, called a widow, was sued by Hendrick Johnson for some cooper's work he had performed for her after her husband's death [WDO 1678-82, 55, 155, 268, 322]. She came into court to give account of the estate of William Silverthorne which included several yards of linen lent to "Richard Johnson Negro Since deceased" [W&cO 1682-97, 142, 155, 157]. She may have been white since their son Richard was called a "Mulatto." Their children were

i. Francis, born perhaps 1655, received a calf by his grandmother's 3 September 1672 Somerset County deed of gift. He apprenticed himself to George Phebus in Somerset County for three years to be a cooper in November 1673 [Judicial Records 1671-75, 161-2, 336-7]. He moved to Sussex County, Delaware, with his uncle, John1 Johnson, by 8 September 1685 when he was summoned as a witness in a court case between William Futcher and John Crew [Court Records 1680-99, 99]. He sued Henry Stretcher in Sussex Court in November 1686, and he was called "Francis Johnson, the Negro" in June 1687 when the court ordered William Orion to pay him 20 shillings for taking up his runaway servant, John Martin.(2) He testified in court for Henry Stretcher in October 1687. He was in Accomack County about February 1689 (called "Francis Johnson Mollatto" and "Brother" of Richard Johnson) when he agreed to complete a fence which Richard contracted to build for Colonel John West. In 1689 he sold the land in Accomack County which his father had conveyed to him in 1678 in order to pay a debt of 6,000 pounds of tobacco [WD 1676-90, 507a, 508; W&cO 1682-97, 155a, 156, 187-187a]. He was living on land adjoining William Futcher in Rehoboth Bay, Sussex County, in December 1690 and testified in Sussex County in March 1693 in a case between John Barker and Aminadab Handsor [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 757; Court Records 1680-99, 600]. He was called a "Mollatto" on 30 March 1699 when he purchased 300 acres, called "Rotten," on the north side of Indian River in Sussex County, Delaware [DB A-1:83, 226]. On 4 November 1707 Hill Drummond brought suit against him in Accomack County court for uttering scandalous words [Orders 1703-9, 103-103a]. On 8 April 1713 he paid Comfort Driggers' fine of 500 pounds of tobacco for the illegitimate child she had in Accomack County earlier that year. Perhaps Elizabeth Johnson, who gave evidence against Comfort, was a relation of his [Orders 1710-4, 56a, 58]. He was security in Accomack County court for Edward Winslow and his wife Anne who failed to appear to answer Thomas Dashiell and Ephraim Heather of Somerset County [Orders 1714-7, 19].(3) He may have been the Fran. Johnson who William Driggus appointed as one of the executors of his 7 June 1720 Somerset County will [WB 17:285].

ii. Richard2, born say 1660, received a calf by his grandmother's 3 September 1672 Somerset County deed of gift [Judicial Records 1671-75, 161-162]. He and his wife, Anne Johnson, were servants of John Cole of Accomack County in 1680. She was required to serve her former master, William Whittington, an additional four years for having two illegitimate children while in his service [Northampton Orders 1678-83, 34; Accomack WDO 1678-82, 288-9]. On 3 September 1679 he was called Richard Johnson, Jr., when John Cole and his wife sued him in Accomack County court for kicking Mrs. Cole. On 5 August 1681 he deposed that about Christmas of 1680 he was the servant of John Cole of Motamkin [WDO 1678-82, 108, 288]. On 3 April 1688 Adam Michael sued him for 5,000 pounds of tobacco as a penalty for his nonperformance of a bond, and on 20 December 1688 Colonel John West sued him for failure to build a fence consisting of 400 wood panels for his cornfield (called "Richard Johnson Mollatto"). Richard completed only 40 or 50 of the panels before turning the work over to "his Brother Francis Johnson" in exchange for a gun and several other items. On 16 June 1689 Captain William Custis won a suit against him for about one pound. Maximillian Gore acted as his security. He was a tithable head of an Accomack County household in 1692. Esther Pharis identified him as the father of her illegitimate child who was born on 4 June 1695 [W&cO 1682-97, 129a, 132a, 150a, 155a, 156, 160, 258a; Orders 1690-9, 153, 173]. He was called "Richard Johnson, Mollattoe" in September 1699 when the Sussex County, Delaware Court presented him for stealing a mare belonging to William Faucett of Somerset County. He was excused after explaining that he had already returned the mare, "taking of the Mare threw mistake, being so like his mare" [Court Records 1680-99, 780]. On 8 October 1707 he was called Richard Johnson "Mulatta" in Accomack County court when Hill Drummond brought a suit against him for debt [Orders 1703-9, 103-103a]. He may have been the Richard Johnson of Carteret County, North Carolina, who purchased 130 acres on Core Sound on the east side of North River from George Cogdell and sold this land on 2 October 1724 to (his nephew?) Jacob Johnson and (his niece's husband?) Theophilus Norwood. The deed was proved by John Simpson and Enoch Ward, who also proved the will of (his brother?) William1 Johnson [DB C:113-4].

 

4.    John2 Johnson, born perhaps 1650, was named as John Sr.'s son in 1670 when they recorded their livestock brand in Somerset County, Maryland [Archives of Maryland 54:757]. On 29 August 1677 he purchased a 44 acre lot on the east side of the Chesapeake Bay and south side of the Wicomico River which he named "Angola." This land probably adjoined "Tonys Vineyard" where his grandmother was then living [Maryland Provincial Patents, Liber 20:224-5; Davidson, Free Blacks, 29]. The land was escheated in 1706 with the notation, "no heirs as I understand" [Maryland Provincial Rent Roll, Vol. no. 1, 34]. He was in Sussex County, Delaware, in December 1680 when he was fined for singing "a scurlous disgracfull song" about Samuel Gray and his wife and would have been whipped if William Futcher had not posted security for him. He married Elizabeth Lowe (an English woman) in Sussex County, Delaware, on 13 March 1680/1 [Court Records 1680-99, 2, 23]. She was probably the Elizabeth Johnson who was twenty years old on 14 August 1683 when she appeared as a witness in court. He apparently left the county sometime before February 1683/4 when he was accused of killing a sow belonging to Andrew Depree and taking the meat to John Okey's house [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 228, 260]. On 5 March 1699/1700 the Kent County, Delaware Court referred to him and his wife as "John Johnson a free Negroe, and Elizabeth his wife (an English woman)" when they were accused of running away and leaving their seven year old daughter, Susannah, in the custody of Thomas Nicholls. The court bound her to Nicholls until the age of eighteen [Court Records 1699-1703, 14]. He may have been identical to John Johnson "Negro" who was sued in Cecil County court on 14 June 1710 for failure to pay his taxes in 1707, 1708 (on two tithes), and 1709. He was called a "Negro" in the same court when Paul Phillips sued him for debt and he sued Anne Millener. On 31 September 1704 he bound his daughter Sarah Johnson, who was about seven or eight years old, to Paul Phillips until the age of twenty-one. Phillips had assigned the indenture to Thomas Wouleston by 9 June 1713 when the court ordered her to serve the remainder of her time to him according to her indenture [Judgment Records 1708-16, 70, 71, 85, 88-9, 202]. John was the father of

i. ?John3, born say 1682, a "Malattoe" servant boy ordered by the Sussex County, Delaware Court in September 1698 to serve his master, Justice John Hill, another seven months for running away for a month [Court Records 1680-99, 744].

ii. Susannah, born about 1693.

iii. Sarah, born about 1696-1697, seven or eight years old on 31 September 1704 when her father bound her as an apprentice to Paul Phillips in Cecil County.

 

Their descendants in Maryland and Delaware were most likely:

i. Sarah, a "Malatto" who was the servant of Nathaniel Horsey in Annamessex Hundred, Somerset County, when she admitted that she had an illegitimate child by "Ned Negroe" belonging to her master [Judicial Record 1713-15, 176, 219; 1715-17, 43-4].

ii. William, a "Molatto," died before 25 July 1778 when John Rowland was granted administration on his Sussex County estate. His inventory amounted to 122 pounds and included a parcel of books and carpenter's tools His widow received 16 pounds as her third and 38 pounds was distributed to the unnamed heirs [RG 4545, roll 132, frames 244-6].

iii. Thomas, born say 1750, a "Melato," owed 5 shillings to the Worcester County estate of Mr. Alexander Buncle on 3 February 1761 [Prerogative Inventories 72:137-42].

iv. Sabra, born say 1750, a "free Mallatto," admitted to the Worcester County, Maryland Court in June 1769 that she had an illegitimate child by Ned Dutton in November 1768. She paid her fine and James Riggan of Pocomoke Hundred paid her court costs [Proceedings 1769-79, 40].

v. Milby, convicted of assaulting John Regua/ Ridgeway in February 1754 Sussex County court [Delaware Archives RG4815.017, 1753-1760, frames 49, 66, 86], taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County from 1773 to 1777, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:488]. He died about 1805 when Mary Johnson was granted administration on his estate [RG 4545, roll 131, frame 290].

vi. John5, a taxable "Molattoe" in Baltimore Hundred, Sussex County in 1777.

vii. William, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "other free" in 1790.

viii. George, head of a Worcester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:798].

ix. Levi, head of a Somerset County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:491].

x. Rachel, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

 

Other Johnson families:

1.    William Johnson, born say 1705, a "free negro," petitioned the Prince George's County court on 27 June 1732 saying that he came into Maryland as a free man with Captain William Spaven who sold him as a slave to Colonel Joseph Belt. Captain Spaven testified that he met up with William Johnson in London, that Johnson stated that he was in great necessity, asked what voyage he was bound out on, and agreed to go with him to Maryland. When they arrived in Maryland, Spaven sold Johnson to Colonel Belt for his lifetime. The court ruled that Johnson serve five years from the time of his arrival in 1729 [Court Record 1730-2, 541]. He may have been the ancestor of some of the members of the Johnson family who were free on the Western Shore:

i. Polly, head of a Baltimore Town household of 3 "other free" in 1790 and 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246].

ii. Michael, head of a Washington County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:644].

iii. Rachel, head of a Montgomery County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:236].

iv. Nicholas, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246].

v. Susanna, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246].

vi. James, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:246].

 

Talbot County

1.    Margery Johnson, born say 1698, the servant of Clement Sale, confessed to the Talbot County court in November 1717 that she had a child by Phoenix, a "Negro planter" of St. Peter's Parish [Judgment Record 1717-9, 6-7]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Frederick, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1800 [MD:517].

ii. John, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162].

iii. Robert, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162].

iv. Suky, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:674].

 

Somerset County

1.    Abigail Johnson,born say 1740, was the servant of Andrew Francis Chaney of Somerset Parish, Somerset County, on 16 March 1761 when she confessed that she had a child by Hector, a "Negro" slave of Thomas Williams. The court ordered her sold for seven years and ordered her son David sold for thirty-one years [Judicial Records 1760-3, 130b-131]. She was the mother of

i. David, born about January 1762, head of a Lewis and Rehobeth, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:302].

 

Another member of a Johnson family was

i. Abraham, a "Malatto man" listed in the inventory of the Dorchester County estate of Govert Loockerman on 18 August 1728 with one year left to serve [Prerogative Court Inventories 1728-9, 13:184].

 

Endnotes:

1.    Patrick Delaney's age was adjudged as thirteen years by the Accomack County, Virginia Court on 7 February 1700 [Orders 1697-1703, 84].

2.    Francis Johnson was identified by race in only one of the seven times he was named in Sussex County court [Horle, Records of the Sussex County Court, 356, 425, 468, 481, 720, 757, 863].

3.    Edward Winslow provided security for William Driggers in Somerset County court when he was convicted of having an illegitimate child by Mary Winslow [Somerset County Judicial Records 1707-11, 95-6].

 

JOLLEY FAMILY

Members of the Jolley family were

i. James, head of a Baltimore City household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:248].

ii. Thomas, born about 1766, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 15 August 1806: blackish colour ... raised by General Henry Hooper and manumitted by Elisha Cornish on 15 August 1806, aged about 40 years [Certificates of Freedom, 1806-64].

iii. John, head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:666].

iv. Henry, head of a Dorchester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:666].

v. Will, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" and 9 slaves in 1800 [MD:700].

vi. Harry, head of a Dorchester County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:691].

vii. Peter, "Negro" head of a Caroline County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 [MD:158].

 

JONES FAMILY

Anne Arundel County

1.    Mary Jones, born say 1683, the servant of Jonas Twogood, was convicted by the Anne Arundel County court in March 1702/3 of having an illegitimate "Malatto" child. She may have been the ancestor of

i. John1, born about 1718, a thirty-five year old "mulatto" whose escape from the Anne Arundel County Jail was reported in the 15 February 1753 edition of the Maryland Gazette [Green, The Maryland Gazette, 1727-1761, 115]. He and two white men, Stockett Williams and John Ijams, were charged with stealing goods from a warehouse in Anne Arundel County. Williams and Ijams were pardoned in exchange for their testimony against another white man named Jeremiah Williams. Stockett Williams testified that John Jones lived for a time in Prince George's County and had a brother-in-law named John Lee [Archives of Maryland 28:564-8].

ii. Elizabeth, born say 1725, presented by the Anne Arundel County court in August 1746 for not listing herself as a tithable [Judgment Record 1746-8, 214].

iii. Agnes, "Negro" head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

iv. John2, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:97].

v. George, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

Baltimore County

1.    Winifred Jones, born say 1707, servant to Thomas Sheredine, was convicted by the Baltimore County court of "Mulatto" bastardy in August 1725, June 1728 and November 1733. Her son James, born in 1733, was bound to her master [Liber IS#TW#3, 313; Liber HS#6, 16, 30, 142-3, cited by Barnes, Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759]. She was the mother of

i. Nan, born about 1725, a "Molatto" with 3-1/2 years to serve when she was listed in the inventory of the Baltimore County estate of Major Thomas Sheredine [Prerogative Inventories 50:174].

ii. Sampson, born about 1730, a "Molatto" with 8 years to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Baltimore County estate of Major Thomas Sheredine [Prerogative Inventories 48:174].

iii. Joan, born about 1732, a "Molatto" with 10 years to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Baltimore County estate of Major Thomas Sheredine [Prerogative Inventories 48:174].

iv. James, born about 1734, a "Molatto" with 13 years to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Baltimore County estate of Major Thomas Sheredine [Prerogative Inventories 48:174].

v. Jonas, born about 1738, a "Molatto" with 16 years to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Baltimore County estate of Major Thomas Sheredine [Prerogative Inventories 48:174].

vi. ?Honse, head of a Baltimore County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:567].

 

1.    Mary Jones, born say 1714, was the mother of an illegitimate "Mulatto" child who was bound to Thomas Hughes by the Baltimore County court in August 1724 [Liber IS#TW#3, 26, 201, cited by Barnes, Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759, 377]. She was the mother

i. Mary, a "Molatto" girl valued at 18 pounds in the 20 November 1739 Anne Arundel County inventory of Thomas Hughes [Prerogative Court Inventories 1739-41, 24:288-90].

 

Prince George's County

1.    Hannah Jones, born say 1740, confessed to the Prince George's County court in June 1761 that she had a "Mulatto" child. The court ordered her sold for seven years and bound her two-year-old daughter Amey to her master, Thomas Beall, Sr. [Court Record 1761-3, 47]. She was the mother of

i. Amey, born about June 1759.

 

Other members of the Jones family on the Western Shore were

i. Cassy, head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:853], the mother of Daniel Jones who obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 18 September 1820: a black man, aged about forty three years ... son of a certain Cassey Jones a free woman of Colour ... as appears from the affidavit of Ignatius Jones [Certificates of Freedom 1808-42, 113].

ii. Michael, head of a Montgomery County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Lewis, head of a Frederick County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:983].

iv. Porsey(?), head of a Frederick County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:853].

 

Talbot County

1.    Sarah Jones, born say 1707, was living in St. Peter's Parish in November 1727 when she confessed to the Talbot County court that she had a mixed-race child by a "Negroe." The court sold her and her eight-week-old child to Thomas Wiles [Judgment Record 1727-8, 352]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. William, a "Mulatto," admitted to the Kent County court in November 1774 that he had an illegitimate child by Rachel Clark. They were fined 30 shillings [Criminal Dockets 1774-6, dockets 63, 64].

ii. David, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Aimy, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:508].

 

Other members of the Jones family on the Eastern Shore were

i. Peter, a "Negro" baptized on 10 May 1768 by Father Joseph Mosley of St. Joseph's Mission. John Tucker, "Negro," and Esther, "Negro," were the godparents [Wright, Vital Records of the Jesuit Missions, 4]. Peter was head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:162].

ii. John, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

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