KELLY FAMILY

1.   Mary Kelly, born say 1700, servant of Moses Maccubbins, confessed to the Anne Arundel County, Maryland Court in June 1719 that she had a "Mallato" child by her master's "Negroe Harry." In August 1721 she confessed to having another child by Harry. She was ordered to serve seven years for each offense. Her children were bound to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1717-9, 380; 1720-1, 411]. Perhaps one of them was the "Mollatto Girle" (not identified as free) who was listed in the inventory of the Anne Arundel County estate of Moses Maccubbin, Gentleman, on 14 November 1733 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1735-6, 78]. Mary may have been the ancestor of

i. Catherine, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in the the first ward in 1810 [MD:289].

 

COURSEY/ KERSEY FAMILY

1.    Mary Kersey, born say 1720, the servant of Nicholas Glen, was fined by the Talbot County court in August 1742 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Mary Kerse Mulatto" in Glen's account that he recorded in court in November 1744 in a case he brought against her for running away for eighty days and bearing two children in his house. In June 1745 she received corporal punishment for having another illegitimate child [Judgment Record 1742-3, 289-90, 301; 1744-5, 109; 1745-6, 134]. She was the mother of

i. Nero, born in February 1741/2.

ii. ?James1 Carse, head of a Talbot County household of 13 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Jane, born about March 1745, three months old when she was bound to Nicholas Glen/ Glynn until the age of eighteen.

 

Other members of the Coursey/ Kersey family were

i. George Kersey, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1790, perhaps identical to George Course who was head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:937].

ii. John, a "negro" taxable who was living at Jasper Petticoat's in Upper Newfoundland and Seneca Hundred, Montgomery County in 1783 [MSA S1161-8-5, p.25].

iii. Ralph Corse, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:114] and 4 in 1810 [DE:56].

iv. William Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 9 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:314].

v. John Coursey, born before 1776, head of a Lewis and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:306].

vi. Elizabeth Kearse, born about 1767, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 17 September 1810: of a blackish colour ... born free, raised in Talbot County, aged about 43 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 14].

vii. Caesar Corse, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

viii. William Coursey, head of a West Sassafras, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ix. Edmund, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:169].

x. James2, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 4 May 1815: yellow complexion .. born free, raised in Dorchester County, aged about 23 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 25].

 

KING FAMILY

1.    Mary King, born say 1722, was presented by the Prince George's County court on 22 March 1742/3 for having an illegitimate child on information of the constable for King George Hundred. She was not found by the sheriff, so the case was struck off the docket on 27 November 1744. She may have been the mother of Margaret King, a four-month-old child who the Prince George's County court sold to William Cheshire on 23 November 1742 until the age of thirty-one. (The child was called Mary King in the court record and Margaret King in the index) [Court Record 1742-3, 215, 340, 612]. She was the mother of

i. Margaret, born about July 1742.

ii. ?Solomon, head of a Talbot County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

iii. J., head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:579].

 

Mary may also have been the ancestor of members of the King family who were counted in the 1810 census for nearby Prince William County, Virginia:

i. Samuel, head of a Prince William County household of 5 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [VA:513].

ii. Sarah, head of a Prince William County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:518].

 

KNIGHT FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Knight, born say 1692, the servant of Robert Eagle, confessed to the Anne Arundel County court on 11 March 1711/2 that she had a child by "Negroe Rich belonging to Col. Charles Greenberry." The court bound the child, born 6 February 1711/2, to her master until the age of thirty-one and ordered that she serve seven years for the offense [Judgment Record 1708-12, 404, 412]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. William, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

2        ii. Moses, born say 1775.

 

2.    Moses Knight, born say 1775, was head of a Frederick County household of 10 "other free" in 1810 (M. Knight) [MD:635]. He and his wife Marian were the parents of four persons who obtained certificates of freedom in Frederick County about 1822. They were

i. Katy, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 13 August 1821: aged about twenty two or three years ... a Dark Mulatto ... Daughter of Moses and Mariam, free persons.

ii. Susan, born about April 1801, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 14 January 1822: aged twenty years in April last ... yellowish Complexion ... Daughter of Moses Knight and Marian his wife, free persons.

iii. Israel, born about 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 14 January 1822: aged nineteen years in March last ... Black, a flat nose .. Son of Moses Knight and Marian his wife, free persons.

iv. Rachel, born about 1805, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 14 January 1822: aged Sixteen years April last ... yellowish Complexion ... Daughter of Moses Knight and Marian his wife [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 123, 124].

 

LACOUNT/ LECOMPTE FAMILY

Members of the Lacount/ Lecompte family in Maryland and Delaware were

1        i. Thomas1 Lacount, born say 1740.

ii. William1 Lecompte, born say 1742, a "Black Man," head of a Transquakin Hundred, Dorchester County household of 3 "Blacks" in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 51].

 

1.    Thomas1 Lacount, born say 1740, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1765 to 1770, in Duck Creek Hundred from 1773 to 1776, in Little Creek from 1781 to 1787, in Duck Creek in 1788, and in 1789 his name was crossed off the Little Creek Hundred list and he was listed as a delinquent [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frames 508, 520, 553, 566; 1768-84, frames 10, 26, 66, 180, 220, 258, 270, 503, 542, 570, 583, 620; 1785-97, frame 24, 49, 72, 74, 103, 128, 174]. He died before 12 January 1796 when William Lacount was granted administration on his Duck Creek Hundred estate. Hester Lacount, widow of Thomas Lacount, Senr, returned an inventory valued at 39 pounds [RG 3545, roll 132, frames 311-317]. He may have been  the father of

i. William2, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred on a horse and 5 hogs in 1797 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 490, 575; 1797-8, 358, 406].

ii. John, born say 1765, taxable in Little Creek Hundred from 1786 to 1789, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 49, 72, 74, 106, 197, 575; 1797-8, frame 358, 406].

iii. Thomas2, born say 1770, a "Negro" taxable in Duck Creek Hundred in 1797 and 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1785-97, frame 490, 575; 1797-8, 358, 406], married to Letitia Durham on 30 June 1794 when he received her portion of the distribution of the estate of her father John Durham's Little Creek Hundred estate [RG 3545, roll 68, frames 612-23], perhaps the Thomas Lecompte who was head of a Dorchester County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:724].

iv. Elizabeth, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:8], perhaps the mother of Joseph Lacount, born about 1780 in Delaware, a "Mulatto" head of a Spruce Ward, Philadelphia household with wife Mary in 1850 [family no. 201].

v. James, a "Negro" taxable in Little Creek Hundred in 1798 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1797-8, frame 333].

 

LAMB FAMILY

Members of the Lamb family in Maryland were

i. Cato, "Negro" head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1800 [MD:163].

ii. Nathaniel, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:151].

iii. Jeremiah, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:163].

iv. Nathaniel2, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:150].

v. Charles, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:163].

vi. Michael, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:163].

 

LANTOR/ LANTERN FAMILY

Members of the Lantor/ Lantern family were

1        i. Thomas1, born say 1700.

2        ii. Peter1, born say 1705.

 

1.    Thomas1 Lantor, born say 1700, was paid 30 pounds of tobacco in King George County, Virginia, on 8 December 1722 for helping to guard a prisoner in the county jail. He was involved in several minor suits in King George County between 2 February 1722/3 and 6 March 1724/5 [Orders 1721-3, 74, 101; 1723-5, 166, 186, 208, 220, 236]. And he was involved in a number of lawsuits, mostly for debt, in Caroline Court as plaintiff and defendant between 11 May 1732 and 13 June 1746 [Orders 1732-40, 9, 11, 62, 63, 83, 91, 125, 129, 137, 149, 165, 166, 384; 1740-6, 139, 464, 561, 590]. He was the father of Elizabeth Saunders' "mulatto" child born before 12 September 1735 when Elizabeth identified him as the father in Caroline County court. The court ordered Elizabeth to serve her master Samuel Coleman additional time and ordered the child bound to Coleman. On 12 May 1738 Thomas sued Richard Buckner, Gentleman, for work he had done building two sheds adjoining John Buckner's house. The court ordered Buckner to pay him 40 shillings [Orders 1732-40, 307, 378, 481, 491, 503, 520]. On 10 February 1745/6 he produced a certificate in court for taking up two white servants belonging to John Glanton of Caroline County. That same day he was ordered to be placed in the stocks for half an hour, no explanation being given for the punishment [Orders 1740-6, 563, 565]. He was taxable in Orange County, Virginia, on 1 tithe, 4 horses and 5 cattle in 1782 [Little, Orange County Tithables, 144] and taxable on two tithes, 4 horses, and 6 cattle in 1787 [Schreiner-Yantis, 1787 Census, 735]. He was head of an Orange County household of 5 "whites" in 1782 [VA:39] and 7 in 1785 [VA:97]. He may have been the father of

3        i. Elizabeth, born say 1730.

ii. Thomas2 Lanton, born say 1758, married to Mary Walker on 28 August 1783 by Rev. Aaron Bledsoe in Orange County [Ministers' Returns, 13].

iii. Jacob Lantor, born say 1765, married Polly Webb, 20 December 1787 Orange County, Virginia bond, Henry Clayton surety.

iv. Peter3 Lantor, born say 1766, married Hannah Webb, 31 May 1787 Orange County, Virginia bond.

v. Mildred Lantor, born say 1769, married John Webb, Jr., 20 January 1790 Orange County, Virginia bond, Jacob Lantor surety, 20 January marriage.

 

2.    Peter1 Lantor, born say born say 1705, was required to post bond for his good behavior in King George County court on 4 February 1725/6 for abetting Richard Haines to assault Thomas Farmer [Orders 1725-8, 298]. He was special bail for Thomas Lantor in a Caroline County, Virginia Court suit on 11 May 1732. He sued Thomas in court about a year later on 8 March 1732/3, but the case was dismissed. He owned land in Caroline County before 8 August 1734 when the court ordered that a road be cleared from Caroline Courthouse to his property. And on 12 September 1734 he was one of the freeholders ordered to clear a road from Bee Tree to the Spotsylvania County line. He purchased land from John Thomas by deed proved in Caroline Court on 14 September 1739 [Orders 1732-40, 9, 54, 152, 157, 558]. On 24 August 1744 he made a claim in Caroline Court for taking up a runaway Negro slave named Jeffery who belonged to Captain James Garnett of Essex County. On 8 November 1745 the Caroline County court allocated 2,400 pounds of tobacco for his building Ginings Bridge [Orders 1740-6, 312, 540]. He was a tithable head of household in Orange County, Virginia from 1755 to 1769, taxable on one tithe in 1755 and 4 tithes in 1759 [Little, Orange County Tithables, 42, 59]. On 11 October 1755 he and (his son?) Reubin Lantor, "Mulattos of St. Thomas's Parish ... Planters," were charged in Orange County court with assaulting and beating John Lynch who they mistook for a runaway servant [Orders 6:178]. On 24 November 1768 Peter was presented by the Grand Jury for concealing his tithable wife, Sarah Lanter, but was excused by the court on the following day [Orders 7:535, 538]. He was taxable in Orange County from 1756 to 1769 - called Lanthorn, Lanter, Lantor, Lanton [Little, Orange County Tithables, 42, 46, 58, 59, 65, 82, 97, 101, 109]. He was probably the father of

i. Reuben, born say 1736, called Reuben Lendrum when he was taxable in Orange County in the same district as Thomas Lendrum [Little, Orange County Tithables, 136].

4        ii. Joseph1 Lantern, born say 1756.

 

3.    Elizabeth Lantern, born say 1730, testified in Kent County, Delaware, on 22 November 1769 that (her son?) Peter Lantorn, who was assessed as a tithable the previous year, was born on 8 April 1750, and therefore should not have been tithable [Kent County Levy Assessments, 1768-84, Reel no.3, frame 38]. She married Robert Game before September 1782 when Robert named her and her daughters Mary and Sarah Lanthorn in his Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware will [WB L-1, fol. 267-8]. She was the mother of

i. Peter2, born 8 April 1750, had an illegitimate child by Keziah Dean in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, about December 1773 [DSA, RG 3505, MS case files, May 1774 Indictments; RG 3805.003, 1735-1779, frame 580]. He was tithable in Little Creek Hundred in 1772 and 1773, in Dover Hundred in 1778, in Little Creek in 1779 and 1780, and a delinquent Duck Creek Hundred taxable in 1781 and 1782 (called Peter Lantern/ Lanthron). In May 1785 he and Francis Day, laborers, were charged with stealing 200 pounds of flour from John Pernell and 400 pounds of bacon from Joseph Harper in Murderkill Hundred on 4 April 1785 [DSA, RG 3805, MS May 1785 Indictments]. He was head of a Murderkill Hundred household of 3 "other free" in 1800 (called Peter Lanteron) [DE:126].

ii. Mary.

iii. Sarah.

 

4.    Joseph1 Lantern, born say 1756, was tithable in Dover Hundred, Kent County, Delaware from 1776 to 1785. He married Elizabeth Harmon, widow and administrator of Daniel Harmon's 10 May 1774 Kent County estate [de Valinger, Kent County, Delaware Probate Records, 289]. He purchased 6 acres in Halifax County, North Carolina, for 44 pounds on 23 December 1789. On 30 October 1795 he, Moses Matthews, and John Kelly purchased 100 acres, tools, furniture, cattle, and hogs from John Harmon, and he purchased 100 acres near the road from Halifax Town to Enfield old courthouse from John Harmon on 3 December 1795   [DB 17:231, 920; 18:130]. Joseph was head of a Halifax County household of 7 "other free" and 7 slaves in 1800 [NC:324]. Perhaps his widow was Charity Lantern, head of a Halifax County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [NC:34]. Joseph Lantern may have been the father of

i. Joseph2, Jr., born about 1772, head of a Halifax County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [NC:324] and a seventy-eight-year-old "Mulatto," born in Delaware, counted in District 1 of the 1850 Montgomery County, Alabama census with (wife?) Nancy Lanton who was born in South Carolina and $1,000 real estate.

ii. James, born say 1780, head of a Halifax County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [NC:33] and 7 "free colored" in 1820 [NC:155].

 

LAWDER FAMILY

1.    Isabella Lawder, born say 1705, was the servant of John Cleaver on 18 August 1724 when George Copper paid the Kent County court 2,200 pounds of tobacco for eight years of her service, 7 years for having an illegitimate "Molatto" child and one year for court fees. She had a child by a white man before 16 June 1730 when the court ordered that she receive twenty one lashes [Criminal Proceedings 1724-8, 15, 127]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Thomas, head of Montgomery County household 3 "other free" in 1790.

ii. James, born about 1774, head of a St. Mary's County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:419], obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 2 August 1814: aged forty years or thereabouts ... complexion bright yellow - hair short ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 28]. He may have been married to Nancy Lawder, the mother of Elizabeth Lewis who obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 28 July 1823: Daughter of a free yellow woman by the name of Nancy Lawder, aged about twenty eight years ... bright complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 62].

 

LAWRENCE FAMILY

1.    John Lawrence, born about 1762, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:422]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 7 March 1815: aged fifty three or thereabouts ... complexion yellow, hair curley ... raised in Saint Mary's County & was born free. He was probably the husband of Ann Mason Lawrence who obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 29 April 1822: daughter of Milly Mason, about 45 years of age ... light complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 30, 59]. John and Ann were probably the parents of

i. Kitty Brian, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 29 April 1822: daughter of Ann Lawrence, about 25 years of age .. very light complexion ... born free.

ii. Cornelius, born about 1797, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 28 November 1816: aged nineteen years ... light complexion ... born free.

iii. Henry, born about 1800, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 11 March 1822: son of Naney Lawrence ... about twenty two years of age, bright complexion ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 37, 59].

 

Other members of the Lawrence family were

i. William, head of Westmoreland County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

ii. Jane, head of Westmoreland County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810.

 

LEE FAMILY

Anne Arundel County

1.    Margaret Lee, born say 1675, a servant of Lyle Welch, confessed to the Anne Arundel County court on 12 March 1705/6 that she had a "Mullattoe male child of her body by a Negro slave" [Judgment Record 1705-6, 172-3]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. John, born say 1720, brother-in-law of John Jones of Anne Arundel County [Archives of Maryland 28:564-8].

ii. William, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:55].

iii. Sarah, head of an Annapolis household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:111].

iv. Philip, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:308].

v. Jacob, head of a Baltimore City household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:115].

vi. Peter, head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1810 [MD:67].

 

Prince George's County

1.    Eleanor Lee, born say 1697, was the mother of Daniel, a "Mallato" boy who was sold by the Prince George's County court to John Wright on 25 June 1717 for 400 pounds of tobacco [Court Record 1715-20, 241]. She was the ancestor of

i. Daniel, born about January 1717, a "Mullatto boy" listed in the Prince George's County estate of John Wright, valued at 18 pounds on 15 December 1729 and a "Mulatto" carpenter valued at 40 pounds, listed with five and a half years to serve in the Prince George's County estate of Ann Wright on 21 June 1742 [Prerogative Court Inventories 1729-30, 15:397; 1742-3, 27:20].

2        ii. ?Lucy, born say 1755.

 

2.    Lucy Lee, born say 1755, was head of a Montgomery County household of 9 "other free" in 1790 and 4 in 1810 [MD:920]. She may have been the mother of

i. John, head of a Montgomery County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:919].

ii. James, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 14 March 1815: a Mulatto Man, light complexion, six feet one and a half inches high ... about Twenty five years of age is free born of a white woman as appears by the affidavit of William Lewis [Certificates of Freedom 1806-27, 49], perhaps identical to J. Lee, head of a Frederick County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:596].

 

Dorchester County

1.    Money Lee, born say 1725, a "Spinster white woman," confessed in Dorchester County court in November 1754 that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe" on 10 December 1753 [Judgment Record 1754-5, 125-6]. She was probably the ancestor of

2        i. Rachel, born say 10 December 1753.

3        ii. David, born say 1770.

iii. Sarah, born say 1773, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:656]. She was the mother of Rachel Denwood, born about 1792, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 3 August 1815: of a light chesnut colour ... born free and is the daughter of Sarah Lee who was convicted for having a child by a slave, aged about 23 years.

iv. Henry, head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:695].

v. Draper, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:655].

vi. Robert, "Negro" head of a Worcester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:727].

 

2.    Rachel Lee, born say 10 December 1753, was convicted of having a child by a slave in Dorchester County. She was the mother of

i. Leah Baltimore, born say 1776, mother of Mahala Baltimore, born about 1796, who obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 18 June 1815: of a light chesnut colour ... daughter of Leah Baltimore who was the daughter of Rachel Lee who was convicted and sold for having a child by a slave, aged about 19 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 26, 27].

ii. Levin Johnson, born about 1780, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 September 1815: of a yellowish colour ... born free and is the son of Rachel Lee who was convicted and sold for having a illegitimate child, aged about 35 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 29].

 

3.    David Lee, born say 1770, was head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:715]. He was the father of

i. Nancy Bishop Lee, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 7 December 1827: of a light chesnut colour, was born free and raised in Dorchester County and is the daughter of Nancy Lee who was manumitted by David Lee, aged about 18 years, granted on information of David Lee [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 57].

ii. Major, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 21 April 1828: light chesnut colour ... born free, and is the son of David Lee aged about 26 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 58].

iii. Pleasant Cornish, born about 1804, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 18 May 1824: of a chesnut colour ... daughter of David Lee a freeman, aged about 20 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 50].

iv. Abraham, born about 1804, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 21 April 1828: dark chesnut colour ... born free and is the son of David Lee, aged about 24 years [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 58].

 

LENKINS FAMILY

Members of the Lenkins family of Maryland were

i. Henley, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 7 "other free" in 1790, perhaps identical to Henry Linkins, head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:348].

ii. Townly, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Eleanor, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 3 "other free" and 2 slaves in 1790.

iv. Sarah, born say 1750, charged Leonard Swann in Charles County court in March 1769 with begetting her illegitimate child [Court Records 1767-70, 405A]. She was head of a Charles County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:506].

v. Peter, head of a Charles County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:532] and 5 "other free," one white woman over 45 years old, and 2 slaves in 1810 [MD:325] and 10 "free colored" in 1830.

 

LETT FAMILY

Members of the Lett family were

1        i. Mary, born say 1706.

ii. Savory, born say 1713, married Simon Thompson ("negroes") on 10 November 1734 at St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:31].

 

1.    Mary Lett, born say 1706, was convicted by the Baltimore County court in November 1728 and in March 1730/1 for having "Molatto" children by a "Negro" [Barnes, Baltimore Families]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born before August 1728.

ii. Zachariah, born about 1731.

iii. ?Samuel, taxable in Patapsco Upper Hundred, Baltimore County, Maryland, in 1773 in the same list as Benjamin Banneker [http://www.msa.md.gov/megafile/msa/coagser/c400/c428/000000/000051/pdf/msa_c428-000051.pdf]

 

They were apparently the ancestors of

i. Elijah, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790, a "Negro" or "Mulatto" taxable in Loudoun County, Virginia, from 1802 to 1805 [PPTL 1798-1812].

ii. Aquilla, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790, a "free Negro" taxable in Frederick County, Virginia from 1799 to 1802 [PPTL 1782-1802, frames 707, 745, 784, 821].

iii. Meshac, a "free Negro" taxable in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1800 and 1801 [PPTL 1782-1802, frame 784, 764].

iv. Rosalin, head of a Frederick County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 3 in Washington County in 1800 [MD:638].

v. Daniel, taxable in Shenandoah County, Virginia, from 1806 to 1818 [PPTL 1800-18, frames 282, 407, 485, 538, 611, 657, 742, 776, 829], head of a Shenandoah County household of 6 "other free" in 1810.

vi. Charles, a "Mulatto" taxable in Loudoun County, Virginia, from 1803 to 1809: taxable on Benjamin, Elijah and Samuel Lett's tithe in 1803 [PPTL 1798-1812], head of a Jefferson County, Virginia household of 11 "other free" in 1810 [VA:78].

vii. Delilah, born about 1771, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County, Maryland on 13 September 1826: about fifty five years of age...a bright Mulatto Woman...free Born as appears by the affidavit of Nicholas Willson [Certificates of Freedom 1808-42, 187].

viii. Zachariah2, a "free Black" taxable in Shenandoah County from 1801 to 1813 [PPTL 1800-18, frames 54, 221, 282, 326, 408, 485, 538].

 

LEWIS FAMILY

1.    Margaret Lewis, born say 1712, the servant of Thomas Stocketts, had a "mulatto" daughter named Ann Lewis who was born in All Hollows Parish, Anne Arundel County, on 28 November 1733 [Wright, Anne Arundel County Church Records, 47]. In August 1737 she confessed to the Anne Arundel County court that she had another mixed-race child. She was the servant of Thomas Hands in August 1741 when she was convicted of having a third mixed-race child named Sarah [Judgment Record 1736-8, 250; 1740-3, 252]. Margaret was the mother of

i. Ann, born 28 November 1733.

ii. a child, born about 1737.

iii. Sarah, born about 1741.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Samuel1, head of a Frederick County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:969] and 5 in 1810 (S. Lewes) [MD:529].

ii. Samuel2, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:69].

iii. Abraham, head of a Baltimore County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:494].

iv. D., head of a Frederick County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:530].

v. C., head of a Frederick County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:554].

vi. R., head of a Baltimore City household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:518].

vii. John, head of a Baltimore City household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:173].

 

LITTLEJOHNS FAMILY

1.    Jane Little Johns, born say 1725, was the servant of Joshua Hopkins of St. Peter's Parish in March 1747/8 when the Talbot County court convicted her of having a "Mullatto" child by a "Negro." The court sold her fifteen-month-old daughter Mary to Edward Barwick until the age of thirty one. She was the servant of Jonathan Shannahan in June 1754 when she admitted in Talbot County court that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe." The court ordered that she serve her master another twelve months for the trouble of his house and then that she be sold for seven years [Criminal Record 1747-51, n.p.; 1751-5, n.p.]. She was the mother of

2        i. Mary, born about December 1746.

 

2.    Mary Littlejohn, born about December 1746, confessed in Talbot County court on 10 May 1768 that she had a child by a "Negro" slave. The court sold her for seven years to William Rigon for 4 shillings and sold her "Mulatto" child Francis to Rigon for 3 shillings [Criminal Record 1767-74, n.p.]. She was the mother of

i. Francis, born about 1768.

 

LONGO FAMILY

1.    Anthony Longo, born say 1625, was called Tony Longo "a negro" on 1 February 1647 when the Northampton County, Virginia Court ordered him to pay his debt of 384 pounds of tobacco to Francis White. He was taxable on one tithe in Northampton County in 1660 [Orders 1657-64, 102]. Edmund Morgan in "American Slavery - American Freedom" quoted a confrontation Anthony had with a Northampton County court official as evidence that racism had not yet taken hold on the Eastern Shore in the seventeenth century and how quickly Africans assumed typical English disdain for authority:

Anthony Longo: What shall I go to Mr. Walkers for: go about your business you idle rascal: I told him I had a warrant for him: shitt of your warrant have I nothing to do but go to Mr. Walker, go about your business you idle rascal as did likewise his wife, with such noise that I could hardly hear my own words, when I had done reading the warrant: stroke at me, and gave me some blows [Orders DW&c 1654-5, 60a].

He was apparently the father of

2        i. James1, born say 1652.

 

2.    James1 Longo born say 1652, was a tithable head of household in Accomack County from 1676 to 1692 [Orders 1676-78, 32, 58, 1678-82, 17, 101; W&cO 1682-97, 192, 228a, 258a]. He was a delinquent Accomack County militiaman in January 1685. On 20 September 1687 he and Jane Fitzgerald posted bond for Dorothy Bestick, servant of George Nicholas Hack of Pungoteague, who was presented by the court for having an illegitimate child by "George Francis Negro Slave to ye sd Geo Nich Hack." In 1687 Dorothy bound her daughter Sarah to him until the age of eighteen years [W&cO 1682-97, 57, 119a, 142a]. (On 19 February 1690 Dorothy Bestick was presented for having another illegitimate child [W&cO 1682-97, 175a, 181a, 187]. Perhaps her descendants were the two John Bosticks who were heads of "other free" Kent County, Delaware households in 1810 [DE:185, 188]). On 20 September 1687 James was fined 100 pounds of tobacco for assaulting Richard Shulster. Shulster testified that when he passed by James Longo's house on horseback,

James ... leaped over his fence furiously ... laye hold of ye Deponts. horses bridle ... calling the deponent Rogue, Rascall, and severall other scurrilous words over and over againe threatning to beate him and asked me why I did not come to pay him a dayes work ... layd his hands on my shoulder in a violent manner ... caused great paine.

The next day he brought suit in court against Shulster. He was sued by William Twyford on 20 November 1689 for failing to perform carpentry work which he had contracted for, and on 16 June 1691 the Accomack County court presented him for working on holy days [W&cO 1682-97, 119, 170a]. He was called James Longo "the Molatta" on 21 February 1694 when he was presented by the grand jury for turning a road which passed through his land [Orders 1690-7, 32, 123a, 124a]. On 2 April 1706 he petitioned the Accomack County court to permit him to turn this road. The court gave him permission to do so as long as the new road was as near to or nearer to Pungoteague and was well maintained. The court was not satisfied with the new road, and on 9 October 1707 the justices ordered him to reopen the original road. On 5 May 1708 he posted bond for the illegitimate child he had by Isabel Hutton (a white woman) who was presented by the court on 3 June 1707 for having a "Mulatto Bastard Child." On 5 May 1708 she testified in Accomack County court that James Longo "negro or mullatto" was the father of the child she was pregnant with, and on 5 August the same year she was called "Isabel Hutton who lives at James Longoes" when she was convicted of "having a Bastard Child by a Mulatto." The same court ordered that he be arrested for acting in a contemptuous manner when an officer of the court attempted to serve him with a warrant [Orders 1703-9, 68, 74, 98, 101a, 114, 114a, 122, 125]. He left a 13 August 1729 Accomack will, proved 1 September 1730. He left 70 acres of his land to his son James, 70 acres to his daughter Mary Huten, and 70 acres to his daughter Elizabeth, and the remainder of his estate to his wife Isabel. His wife and daughters were executrices of the will [Wills 1729-37, pt.1, 101]. His children were

i. ?Ann, born say 1683, a "Mallatta Woman" living at William Smith's who was presented by the Prince George's County court on 28 March 1703/4 for having an illegitimate child. She was called "Ann Congo," servant of William Smith, on 22 August 1704 when he paid her fine [Court Record 1699-1705, 289a, 309a].

ii. James2, taxable head of a Matapany Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland household in 1727, and head of a household in Wicomoco Hundred from 1731 to 1740: taxable on Nathaniel Morris from 1737 to 1740 [List of Tithables]. He was called James Longer, Carpenter, on 5 June 1733 when he purchased 100 acres called Pole Hamilton on the southeast side of the south east arm of the Rockawakin River in Worcester County for 15 pounds [DB:AZ:108]. On 17 June 1735 the Somerset County court bound out Nathaniel Morris, orphan son of George Morris, to him to make linen and woolen wheels and chairs and to read and write. James was called wheelwright in November 1737 when he sued blacksmith John Farlo for 7 pounds. On 20 March 1738/9 the court allowed him 90 pounds of tobacco for three day testimony in the case of His Lordship against Isaac Saddler and granted him a licence to keep an ordinary. In March 1740/1 Thomas and William Selby were indicted by the Somerset County court for stealing seven turkeys from him [Judicial Record 1735-7, 14; 1737-8, 152; 1738-40, 75, 110; 1740-2, 92, 96].

iii. Elizabeth, living in Stepney Parish in March 1737/8 when she confessed to the Somerset County court that she had a child by Richard Jones. James Longo was her security [Judicial Record 1737-8, 208].

iv. Mary Hutton, born about 1708. Her descendants were John Hutton, head of a Washington, D.C. household of 1 "other free" in 1800 and Sarah Hutton, head of a Kent County, Delaware household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [DE:198].

 

One of their Longo descendants was

i. Daniel, "Mulatto" taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1797 and 1798 [Assessments, frames 7, 483].

 

McDANIEL/ McDONALD FAMILY

1.   Johanna McDaniel/ McDonald, born say 1720, confessed in Dorchester County court in November 1745 that she had an illegitimate "Mollatta" child by a "Negroe" on 10 May 1745. Her unnamed son was bound apprentice to Joseph Sherwood until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1744-5, 474]. On 25 March 1751 she was the spinster servant of Henry Fidderman of Queen Anne's County when she confessed to having a child by a "Negroe." The court sold her son Daniel to Thomas Dockey for 16 shillings. She was called Joanna McDonald admitted to having another child named William by a "Negro" in court in June 1753. He was sold to John Emory for 620 pounds of tobacco. In June 1757 and November 1759 she was convicted of having other children for which she received only a fine [Criminal Record 1751-9, 13-4, n.p.]. She was the mother of

i. Daniel McDaniel, "Free Mulatto" head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1790, called Daniel McDonald, when he was head of a Queen Anne's County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:355].

ii. William, born about 1753.

 

Another McDaniel Family:

1.    Alice McDaniel, born 18 March 1707, was a twenty-one-year-old "Mallatto Born of a white Woman" who was living in Charles County on 13 August 1728 when the court ordered that she serve John Howard (the highest bidder) to the age of thirty one. She was presented by the Charles County court on 11 March 1728/9 for having an illegitimate child on information of Constable George Thomas [Court Record 1727-31, 153, 229].

 

MACDONALD FAMILY

1.    Grace Macdonald, born say 1670, was listed in the 15 March 1713/4 Charles County inventory of Edmund Howard, Gentleman:

One Irish woman named Grace Marryed to a Negroe man - 5 pounds

1 mollatto girl

said Man & woman &c born in Virga before her

Mother's Intermarriage wth said Negroe } 10 pounds

one Do boy named Benjm born since their Marriage - 6 pounds

one Do Girl Alice also borne since Marriage - 11 pounds [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Vol. 35A, 248-52].

Grace Macdonald was a "poor indigent Woman" who died before 14 June 1720 when the Charles County court allowed Thomas Howard 300 pounds of tobacco for taking care of her during "her long sickness" and burying her. The same court bound her thirteen-year-old "Malatto" daughter Alice to him and his wife Elizabeth Howard [Court Record 1717-20, 335, 337; 1720-2, 38]. Grace was the mother of

i. an unnamed "molatto girl," born say 1697 in Virginia.

ii. Benjamin, born about 1704, a "Mollatto Boy named Benjamin 12 years old" listed in the inventory of the 9 October 1716 Charles County estate of Elizabeth Howard on 9 October 1716 [Prerogative Inventories 1716-1717, 15]..

2        iii. Alice, born about 1703.

 

2.    Alice MacDonald, born about 1703, was a thirteen-year-old "Malatto" girl bound to Thomas and Elizabeth Howard by the Charles County court on 14 June 1720. She may have been the mother of

3        i. Joanne, born say 1733.

 

3.    Joanne McDonnald, born say 1733, was convicted of having a "Mulatto" child in Queen Anne's County in June 1753 [Criminal Record, n.p., cited by Hodes, White Women, Black Men, 220]. She was probably the mother of

i. Daniel, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [MD:355].

ii. Charles, head of an Octararo, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

4.    Catherine McDonald, born say 1705, confessed to the Somerset County court on 17 November 1724 that she had a child by a "Negro" man called Frost belonging to Upsher King. The court sold her and her child to Ephraim Wilson [Judicial Record 1723-5, 233].

 

MADDEN FAMILY

1.    Margaret Madden, born say 1705, the servant of Edward Needles of St. Peter's Parish, was convicted by the Talbot County court in March 1724/5 of having an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." The following year in March 1725/6 she confessed to having another child by Sampson, the slave of Aaron Parrot. In November 1727 she confessed to having another illegitimate child by a "Negroe," and the court bound her daughter Grace to her master until the age of thirty-one. In November 1730 the court sold her to her master for twenty-eight years for four convictions and sold her son Isaac, born 29 May 1730, to her master for 4,000 pounds of tobacco. She was convicted and sold for another term of seven years in June 1733, and was called Margaret Maddin a white woman in June 1742 when she was convicted of the same offence and ordered to serve a sixth term of seven years and the court sold her daughter Rose until the age of thirty one [Judgment Record 1725-6, 64-5, 480-1; 1726 (reverse), 44, 56, 62; 1727-8, 345; 1728-31, 312; 1731-3, 673; 1742, 93-4]. She was the mother of

2        i. Grace, born about 1727.

ii. Isaac, born 29 May 1730, a "Mulatto" servant for whom Edward Needles posted 40 pounds security in Talbot County in August 1755 for his appearance to answer charges of having a child by a white woman named Rachel Dee. Charles Manslip and Patrick McQuay were Rachel's security. Isaac and Rachel were found guilty and each paid a fine of 1 pound, 10 shillings [Criminal Record 1751-5, n.p.; 1755-61, 12-14].

3        iii. Rachel1, born say 1735.

iv. Sampson, born about 1738, a fourteen-year-old "Melator" serving until the age of thirty-one when he was listed in the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300].

4        v. Rose, born say 1742.

 

2.   Grace Madden, born about 1727, confessed to the Talbot County court in March 1744/5 that she had an illegitimate child for which she received ten lashes. She was called Grace Madden, Junr., in November 1747 when she was ordered to serve Edward Needles for the trouble of his house. In August 1748 the court ordered that she receive 10 lashes for fornication and bound her son John to Edward Needles until the age of twenty-one [Judgment Record 1744-5, 230-1; Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.]. She was the "Mulatto" servant of Edward Needles in November 1750 when she was ordered to serve another seven years for having an illegitimate "Mulatto" child. The court sold her daughter Sarah to Needles until the age of thirty-one [Criminal Record 1751-5, n.p.]. In March 1752 the Talbot County court convicted her of having two illegitimate "Mullato" children by a "Negroe" slave. The court ordered her sold for seven years for each offense and sold her daughters Margaret and Elizabeth to Edward Needles until the age of thirty-one. In August 1753 she was convicted of the same offense, and the court sold her son Daniel to Needles until the age of thirty-one for 5 shillings. In November 1755 she had another child by a "Negro," was sold for another seven years, and the court sold her eight-month-old daughter Rachel to Elizabeth Needles for 5 shillings. And she admitted to the same offense in November 1758 and November 1761 when the court sold her daughter Jane to Edward Needles. In November 1770 the court convicted her of having a child by a free person, ordered that she pay a fine of 1 pound, 10 shillings for having a child named Levin [Criminal Record 1747-50, n.p.; 1751-5, n.p.; 1755-61, 15-16, 255; 1761-7, 13; 1767-74, n.p.]. She was the mother of

i. John, born about 1748.

ii. Sarah, born about 1750.

iii. Margaret, born about 1751.

iv. Elizabeth, born about 1752.

v. Daniel, born about 1753.

vi. Rachel2, born about March 1755, paid a 60 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in August 1777 for having an illegitimate child and refusing to identify the father. John Needles was security for her maintenance of her daughter Martha [Criminal Record 1775-7, n.p.].

vii. Jane, born about 1761.

viii. Levin, born about 1770, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:531].

 

3.    Rachel1 Madden, born say 1735, was the spinster "Mulatto" servant of Elizabeth Needles of St. Peter's Parish, Talbot County, in November 1752 when the court convicted her of having a "Mulatto" child by a "Negroe" person. The court ordered her sold for seven years after the completion of her service and sold her son Martin to her mistress for 5 shillings. In June 1755 she was convicted of the same offense and the court sold her daughter Sarah to William Weathers until the age of thirty-one for 30 shillings. She had another daughter Ruth by a "Negroe" which she admitted to in Talbot County court in November 1756 [Criminal Record 1751-5, n.p.; 1755-61, 70-1]. She was the mother of

i. Martin, born about September 1752, a four-year-old "Mollatto" boy listed in the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756, with twenty-seven years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:444], head of a Talbot County household of 1 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:506].

ii. Sarah, born about January 1755, paid a 30 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in June 1780 for having an illegitimate child [Criminal Record 1777, n.p.].

iii. Ruth, born about 1756.

 

4.    Rose Madden, born say 1742, was a fifteen-year-old "Mollatto" girl listed in the inventory of the the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756 with sixteen more years to serve [Prerogative Inventories 63:444]. She was the spinster servant of Edward Needles in March 1765 when she admitted in Talbot County court that she had a child by a "Negro." The court sold her son Dick to her master until the age of thirty one for 7 shillings. She admitted to the same offense in August 1766. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and sold her son Jim to Thomas Cannon until the age of thirty one for 12 shillings [Criminal Record 1761-7, 334-5, 468]. She was the mother of

i. Dick, born about 1764.

ii. James, born about 1766.

 

They were the ancestors of

i. Wm Tiz, born about 1740, an eight-year-old "Melator" serving until the age of twenty one when he was listed in the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. Will was a twelve-year-old "Mollatto" boy bound until the age of twenty one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756 [Prerogative Inventories 63:444].

ii. John1, born about 1749, a four-year-old "Melator" serving until the age of twenty-one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300]. Jack was an eight-year-old "Mollatto" bound until the age of twenty one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Elizabeth Needles on 27 June 1756 [Prerogative Inventories 63:444].

iii. Benjamin, born about 1751, a three-year-old "Melator" serving to the age of twenty-one when he was listed in the inventory of the Talbot County estate of Edward Needles on 27 July 1752 [Prerogative Inventories 54:297-300].

iv. Esther, born say 1757, paid a 60 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in November 1777 for having an illegitimate child and refusing to identify the father. George Burgess was security for her maintenance of her daughter Sophia [Criminal Record 1775-7, n.p.].

v. Ruth, born say 1758, paid a 30 shilling fine to the Talbot County court in August 1777 for having an illegitimate child. Elizabeth Broadway was security for her maintenance of the child [Criminal Record 1775-7, n.p.].

vi. Rebecca Maden, born say 1767, head of a Caroline County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

5        vii. John2, born say 1770.

viii. Levin, born say 1773, head of a Talbot County, Maryland household of 4 "other free" and a white woman in 1800 [MD:531].

ix. Jenney, born say 1775, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:536].

x. George, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

xi. William, born before 1776, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

xii. Toby, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 9 September 1815: a light Black man ... about 28 years of age, 5 feet 6 1/2 inches high [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 13].

xiii. John3, born about 1788, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 28 August 1811: a black man ... about twenty three years of age, five feet Seven Inches and Three quarters ... rather of a bright Complexion was born free and that he was raised in the County [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 53].

xiv. William, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in Talbot County on 27 July 1813: born free and raised in the County ... about 23 years of age, five feet 4 3/4 inches high of a dark Mullatto Colour [Certificates of Freedom 1807-15, 72].

 

5.    John2 Madan, born say 1770, and his wife, Elizabeth, "free Mulattoes," baptized their children in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore, Maryland, on 17 September 1797. John Madden was head of a Baltimore County household of 2 "free colored" in in 1830. They were the parents of

i. William, born 24 July 1791, baptized 17 September 1797.

ii. George, born 5 February 1797, baptized 17 September 1797 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:111].

 

MAGEE FAMILY

1.    Fortune Magee, born say 1687, was a servant of Mrs. Mary Day, called "Fortune a Mallatto girl," in March 1698/9 when she was convicted by the Somerset County court of stealing goods from James Maxwell, a merchant. The court also charged her mistress with encouraging her to steal the goods but found Mrs. Day guilty only of concealing the goods. On 15 June 1705 the Somerset County court ordered that she serve Mrs. Day until the age of thirty-one, explaining that she was the "mulatto" daughter of Maudlin Magee, a white woman living in Somerset County who was married to George Magee at the time. On 7 March 1710/11 the court presented her for having four illegitimate children: one about seven years old, one five, one three and one three months old. On 8 August 1711 she confessed that Penny, "negroe" servant to Mr. Benjamin Wailer was the father of her child. On 6 August 1712 she bound her children, Ross, Sue, and Perlina to Mrs. Day [Judicial Records 1698-1701, 129, 134, 167; 1702-5, 212, 251; 1707-11, 454; 1711-13, 40, 220]. Fortune was taxable in Baltimore Hundred, Somerset County, in 1735 [List of Tithables]. Her children were

i. Rose, born in March 1703.

ii. Sue Magee alias Game, born in April 1705, a "mulatto" woman living in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, Maryland, from 1745 to 1755 when her "mulatto" children, James, Jenney, and Nelly Magee were born.

iii. Perlina, born in April 1707, five years old "next April" in August 1712 when she was bound apprentice.

 

Their descendants in Maryland and Delaware were

i. Robert McGee, head of an Allegany County, Maryland household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:3].

ii. Susannah Megee, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:391].

iii. Job Mcey, head of a Sussex County, Delaware household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [DE:384].

iv. George, born before 1776, head of a Northwest Fork, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:242].

 

MAHONEY FAMILY

Patrick and Charles Mahoney won a suit for freedom against their master John Ashton in October 1797 on testimony that the family descended from a "negro" woman named Ann Joice who was carried by her owner to England and then imported to Maryland by Lord Baltimore as a slave about 1680. The parties in the case agreed that she was the mother of William Digges' Sue (a mulatto woman) and four "mulatto" men: David (a carpenter), Frank Herbert, Jack Wood, and Tom Crane. Ownership of Ann Joice and her children passed to Henry Darnall of Anne Arundel County. William Digges' Sue was the mother of Warren's Poll, Hill's Nelly, and Carroll's Sue. Carroll's Sue was the mother of Nelly, who was the mother of Patrick and Charles Mahoney. The Court of Appeals reversed the ruling and found for Ashton in 1802 [Catterall, Judicial Cases Concerning Slavery, IV:53-5]. Nelly and Charles may have been identical to Nelly Joice, head of a Anne Arundel County household of 1 "free colored" in in 1830 and Charles Joice, head of a Anne Arundel County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830, and a Moses Joice was head of a Baltimore County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

 

Members of the Mahoney family who were free in Maryland were

1        i. Patrick, born say 1760.

ii. Charles1, born day 1768, living in Anne Arundel County on 4 May 1801 when John Ashton recorded a deed of manumission to him in Charles County [Land Records IB #6, 118]. He was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 (called Charles Mahan) [MD:93]. He was the brother of Gabriel and Barney Mahoney and was living in Washington, D.C., on 16 September 1817 when he and Barney manumitted Gabriel's wife and son [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 144].

2        iii. Gabriel1, born say 1770.

3        iv. Barney, born say 1771.

v. James, born say 1775, and his wife Teresa, "free Mulattoes," the parents of Charles Mahony, a nine-month-old child baptized on 16 November 1800 at St. Peter's Cathedral in Baltimore [Piet, Catholic Church Records in Baltimore, 79].

vi. Daniel, born about 1772, a thirty-three-year-old "yellow man" manumitted by John Ashton by deed recorded in Charles County on 13 August 1805 [Land Records IB #6, 418]. He was called Daniel Mahan in 1810, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 8 "other free" [MD:97].

vii. Thomas Mahan, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [MD:59].

viii. Robert Mahan, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:74].

ix. John, head of an Octararo, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

1.    Patrick Mahoney, born say 1760, was manumitted by John Ashton by deed recorded in Charles County on 4 May 1804 [Land Records IB #6, 117]. He was head of an Anne Arundel County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [MD:60]. He was the father of

i. Gabriel2, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 5 April 1815: a bright mulatto youth about 17 years old ... was raised in the family of Benjamin Hall and afterwards sold to his father Patrick Mahony, a free man of color, who afterwards manumitted Gabriel [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 18].

 

2.    Gabriel1 Mahoney, born say 1770, was head of a St. Mary's County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [MD:213]. He was manumitted by Walter Leigh on 28 July 1804, and on 12 March 1810 Gabriel purchased his wife Alley and son Charles from William Zachary. He died on 26 December 1815 intestate and did not free his wife or son. His brothers Charles and Barney manumitted Alley (born about 1773) and seven-year-old son Charles on 16 September 1817 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 144]. Gabriel and Alley were the parents of

i. Charles2, born about 1810.

 

3.    Barney1 Mahoney, born say 1771, his wife Linda (born about 1773), and their eight children were freed by Osborn Sprigg of Prince George's County on 15 February 1813 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 144]. Barney and Linda were the parents of

i. Patsey, born about 1793.

ii. Ellen, born about 1797.

iii. Ann, born about 1801, obtained a certificate of freedom in Washington on 2 August 1831: a bright mulatto woman about thirty years old.

iv. Caroline, born about 1803.

v. Mary, born about 1804.

vi. Susan, born about 1807.

vii. Daniel, born about 1809.

viii. Barney2, born about 1812.

 

Endnotes:

1.    "Negroes" Jack Wood, Davy, and Jack Crane were sentenced to death by the Prince George's County court in July 1770 for murdering a white man named William Elson by cutting his throat with an axe. The court ordered that they have their right hands cut off, that they be hanged by the neck until they were dead, that their heads be severed into four quarters and their remains be set up in the most public place in the county [Court Record 1768-70, 25-6, 589].

 

MALAVERY FAMILY

1.    Richard Malavery, born say 1695, was taxable in Manokin Hundred of Somerset County in Charles Revell's household in 1725 [List of Tithables, 1725]. He married Dinah Mongom (nee Harmon?), widow of Philip3 Mongom, about 1728 when she was a taxable in his Northampton County, Virginia, household. They were called Richard and Dinah Munlavery in the Northampton County list for 1731 [L.P. 1728-31]. They were probably the parents ofof

2        i. Dorcas, born say 1720.

ii. Thomas, born say 1727, taxable in Manokin Hundred, Somerset County, Maryland in 1743 in the household of Isaac Baston. He was sued in Somerset County court by Smith Hersey in August 1747 for 13 pounds which he had signed a promissory note for on 11 May 1745. Thomas claimed that he should not have had to pay the note because he had signed it under duress while in prison. The court found in his favor and ordered Hersey to pay him 1,288 pounds of tobacco for his court costs [Judicial Record 1747-9, 17].

 

2.    Dorcas Malavery, born say 1720, was living in Coventry Parish on 20 March 1738/9 when the Somerset County court indicted her for having an illegitimate child. She confessed and named the father Jonas Miller who was called "Jonas Hogskin (Hodgskin) a "Mallatto" on 19 August 1739 when he confessed and was fined 30 shillings. She was apparently identical to the "mollatto woman Dorcas" named in the Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County will of Robert Boyer on 27 March 1746 which was proved on 12 April 1746:

To negro man Harry, on my wife's decease, 50 acres and his freedom...To my mollatto woman Dorcas & all her children, on my wife's decease, their freedom & 4 head of good cattle [Prerogative Court Wills 24:397].

Dorcas sued James Ottley in Somerset County court on 18 August 1747 for detaining her as a servant. She was apparently identical to Dorcas "wife of Negro Harry" whose "Malatto" children were bound to Ottley by the same court [Judicial Record 1738-40, 74, 128, 171; 1747-49, 6, 10]. She was called Darkes Melavery when she was taxable in Pocomoke Hundred, Somerset County, in 1749 and 1750 [List of Tithables, 1749, 1750] and called Dorcas Malavery in August 1750 when she petitioned the court saying that Ottley had sold one of her children to someone in Accomack County and was mistreating the other two. The case was dismissed with each party paying their own costs [Judicial Record 1749-51, 178]. The children of "Negro Harry and his wife Dorcas" were

i. David, born in November 1739, "Malatto son of Negro Harry and Dorcas his wife," eight years old when he was bound apprentice to James Ottley on 18 August 1747.

ii. Harry, born in November 1741, six years old when he was bound to James Ottley.

iii. Elijah, born in October 1745, two years old when he was bound to James Ottley.

 

MALLORY FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Murrely, born say 1682, the servant of Robert Tyler, was convicted by the Prince George's County court on 26 November 1700 of having an illegitimate "Malatta" child by a "Negro Man." The court ordered that she be sold for seven years at the expiration of her indenture. She was called "Elizabeth Mallary Servant to Robert Tyler" on 25 November 1702 when the court ordered that she serve him 12 months for the trouble of his house in having a "Malatta" child. She was called "Elizabeth Mallary Late Servant to Mr. Robert Tyler" on 28 March 1703/4 when the court sold her for seven years to Abraham Clark who promised that "she shall not work in the Grounds" [Court Record 1699-1705, 80a, 215, 289a]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Lucy Mallory, married John Johns, 24 January 1761 in Goochland County [Jones, The Douglas Register, 109].

ii. Aggy Mallery, head of a Richmond City, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:374].

iii. Mallory Johns, born say 1752, a "mulato" taxable in Tillotson Parish, Buckingham County, Virginia in 1773 [Woodson, Virginia Tithables from Burned Counties, 62] and head of an Amherst County household of one "other free" in 1810 [VA:286]. He had a case against Caleb Watts for slander in Amherst County court in March 1802 [McLeRoy, Strangers in Their Midst, 162].

 

MARSHALL FAMILY

1.    William Marshall, born say 1720, a white planter, married Anne Perle, a "Mulatto" woman in Prince George's County before 23 August 1743 when the court ordered that he be sold for seven years. He was ordered to be released from prison so the case could be tried at the Provincial Court [Court Record 1743-4, 17]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Tom, head of a New Castle County, Delaware household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [MD:269].

Clement, head of a Prince George's County household of 5 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [MD:78].

ii. William, head of a New Castle County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:301], perhaps the husband of Lucy Marshall, head of a Milford, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:86].

iii. John, born say 1770, married to Susanna, "free negroes," when they registered the birth and baptism of their daughter Mary in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore: born 31 December 1792, baptized 3 March 1793 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:64].

iv. Isaac, head of an Accomack County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [VA:113].

 

MASON FAMILY

Members of the Mason family in Maryland were

i. Benjamin, born say 1735, a "free Nigoroe" who owed 4 shillings to the St. Mary's County estate of Richard Forris about 1760 [Prerogative Inventories 71:150-2], "a Mulatto fellow born at the mouth of the Patuxent" who was among three sailors who ran away from the ship Dragon according to an advertisement placed by their captain in the 6 August 1761 issue of the Maryland Gazette [Green, The Maryland Gazette 1727-61, 271]. He was a "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:208].

ii. Henny, head of a St. Mary's County household of 13 "other free" in 1790 and 15 in 1800 [MD:420].

iii. Milly1, born say 1755, mother of Ann Lawrence (born about 1777) who obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 29 April 1822: daughter of Milly Mason, about 45 years of age ... light complexion.

iv. Joseph, head of a St. Mary's County household of 6 "other free" in 1790, 5 in 1800 [MD:392] and 7 in 1810 [MD:208].

v. Dinah, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 6 "other free" in 1790 [MD:99].

1        vi. Drady, born about 1765.

vii. Elizabeth1, head of a St. Mary's County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

viii. Chester, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" and a slave in 1790 [MD:82].

ixi. Henry1, born about 1778, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 12 November 1813: thirty five years ... complexion yellow, hair short and woolly ... born free. He was a "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [MD:221].

x. Milly2, born about 1781, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County in August 1807: about twenty six years of age, yellow complexion, was free born.

xi. John, born about 1783, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 23 November 1813: aged thirty years ... Complexion Copper, hair short & woolly ... born free.

xii. Elizabeth2, born about 1787, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 5 August 1807: about twenty years of age, yellow complexion, was born free. She was head of a St. Mary's County household of 1 "other free" in 1810 [MD:215].

xiii. Matthew, born about 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 12 March 1810: aged twenty one years or thereabouts ... Complexion not being black, hair short ... born free.

xiv. Priscilla, born about 1790, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 21 August 1809: aged nineteen years or thereabouts ... born free.

xv. Rebecca, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 24 August 1809: eighteen years ... complexion yellow - hair streight ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 1, 2, 7, 8, 24, 59].

 

1.    Drady Mason, born about 1765, was a "blk." head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [MD:222]. She obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 2 August 1814: aged forty nine years or thereabouts ... Complexion bright yellow - hair short & Curley ... born free. She was the mother of

i. James, born about 1789, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 17 August 1809: aged 20 years or thereabouts ... Complexion rather dark, hair short & nappy ... son of a free born woman named Drayten Mason.

ii. Perry, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 13 July 1824: son of Drady Mason, about 22 years old, bright complexion ... born free.

iii. Harry2, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 13 July 1823: son of Drady Mason, aged 21 years .... dark complexion [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 7, 28, 65, 66].

 

MASSEY FAMILY

Members of the Massey family were

i. Ame, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Thomas, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:357].

iii. John, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:151].

iv. Abraham, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:163].

v. David, head of a Kent Count household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:151].

vi. Henny, born say 1780, living in St. Mary's County on 3 November 1819 when her son Alexander obtained a certificate of freedom: son of Henny ... about seventeen of a very bright complexion ... born free and was borned and raised in Saint Mary's County [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 53].

 

MATTHEWS FAMILY

Members of the Matthews family were

i. Nicholas, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 9 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Edward, head of a Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

1        iii. Catherine, born about 1771.

iv. George, head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:561].

v. Susanna, head of a Frederick County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:909].

 

1.    Catherine Matthews, born about 1771, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 28 July 1826: a black woman, about 55 years old, and 5 feet 5 inches tall ... born free in Prince George's County. She was the mother of

i. Mary Peal, born about 1796, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County between 24 September and 15 October 1827: a black woman, about 31 years old, and 5 feet 3-1/2 inches tall .. daughter of Catherine Matthews. Her daughter Frances Bacon registered the same day: a black woman about 17 years old, 5 feet 2-1/4 inches tall ... daughter of Mary Peal.

ii. Henny, born about 1802, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 28 July 1826: a dark mulatto woman, about 24 years old, and 5 feet 1-1/2 inches tall ... born free ... daughter of Catherine Matthews.

iii. Rezin, born about 1804, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 29 July 1826: a black man, about 22 years old, and 5 feet 7 inches tall ... son of Catherine Matthews [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 58].

 

MAYHEW/ MAYHALL FAMILY

1.    Thomas1 Mayhew, born say 1708, may have been identical to "1 Indian Man Named Tom" who was valued at 32 pounds and listed among the slaves of the Honorable Thomas Addison, Esquire, deceased, on 10 August 1727 when his widow Eleanor Addison brought the estate to an appraisement in Prince George's County, Maryland [Prerogative Court Inventories 1727-9, 12:295-313]. Thomas India petitioned the Prince George's County court in March 1729 stating that he was free born, baptized in England, and imported with his mother into Maryland under indenture. However, he was detained as a slave by Madam Eleanor Addison [Court Record 1728-9, 413]. He was probably the father of

2        i. Thomas2, born say 1735.

 

2.    Thomas2 Mayhew, born say 1735, escaped from the Prince George's County jail according to the 29 May 1760 issue of the Maryland Gazette. He was described as "of a very dark Complexion, his Father being an East-India Indian ... formerly lived in lower Prince George's County" [Green, The Maryland Gazette, 1727-61, 246]. He may have been the father of

i. Robert Mayhall, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 9 "other free" in 1790.

ii. William Mahuel, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

MEAD FAMILY

Members of the Mead family in Maryland and Pennsylvania were

i. Lucy, born say 1750.

ii. Primus, born say 1760, head of a Delaware County, Pennsylvania household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

 

1.    Lucy Mead, born say 1750, was head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:278]. She may have been the mother of

2        i. Jeffey, born say 1773.

 

2.    Jeffrey Mead, born say 1773, and his wife Phoebe registered the birth and baptism of their daughter Mary Anne in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore. Their daughter was

i. Mary Anne, born 1 April, baptized 17 April 1796 [Reamy, Records of St. Paul's Parish, I:96].

 

MILLER FAMILY

1.    Jacob Miller, born say 1705, was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1727, taxable in Murderkill Hundred from 1735 to 1738 when he was identified as a "Negro," and taxable in Dover Hundred from 1756 to 1765. He sued Tabitha Francisco in Kent County in August 1731 [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1722-1732, frame 509]. He was called Jacob Miller (Negro) in Kent County court when John Holliday sued him for debt in November 1737 and on 26 February 1747 when he admitted in court that he owed Robert Willcocks 27 pounds [RG 3815.031, Common Pleas, Dockets 1733-1740, frames 347, 358; 1744-50, 388]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Aaron, born say 1745, a "Negro" taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, in 1766, in Little Creek Hundred in 1772 and 1774, in Murderkill Hundred in 1778, Dover Hundred in 1779 and 1780, a "Free Negro" in Murderkill Hundred in 1782, in Little Creek Hundred in 1783, in Murderkill Hundred in 1784 and 1785, a "free Negro" taxable in Dover Hundred in 1788, 1794 and 1797 [DSA, RG 3535, 1743-67, frame 543; 1768-84, frames 129, 222, 346, 364, 429, 452, 550, 575, 598, 629; 1785-97, frames 13, 28, 111, 310, 399], head of a Kent County household of 10 "other free" in 1800 [DE:50].

ii. Rike/ Right/ Rake, born say 1747, confessed to the Kent County court in November 1771 that he had an illegitimate female child by Elizabeth Beckett about July 1769, before she married Jacob Gibbs [DSA, RG 3805, MS, indictments]. He was taxable in Dover Hundred in 1768, called a "Free Negro" there in 1780, a Murderkill Hundred delinquent in 1780, a Dover Hundred taxable in 1780 and 1781 [DSA, RG 3535, 1768-84, frames 11, 108, 429, 432, 449, 452, 500]. He may have been identical to Drake Miller who was taxable in Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County, in 1796, in a non-alphabetized list with Deberix and Isaac Miller in 1796 [RG 2535, 1780-96]. He was counted as white in Dagsboro Hundred in 1800 (age 26-45), head of a Dagsboro, Sussex County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 (over 45) [DE:374]. On 11 December 1814 Drake and his wife Polly sold 27 acres of their land in Dagsborough Hundred near Folly Road which led from Salisbury to Indian River [DB 32:98].

iii. Debricks/ Debrix1, born say 1750, taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1777 to 1784, listed as a "Negro" starting in 1782 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1767-84, frames 310, 335, 341, 367, 369, 443, 503, 531, 542, 570, 583, 620], taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County on 2 horses, a cow and a heifer in 1796, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:307].

iv.Isaac, a taxable "Negro" in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1779 to 1784, taxable on 81 acres in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, in 1796 [DSA, RG 2535, 1768-84, frames 367, 369, 443, 446, 503, 542, 570, 583, 620]. He was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [DE:375], 4 whites (a male 26-45) and 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:451] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:274]. He patented 81 acres in Sussex County called "Green Glade" on 14 December 1797 and sold this land for $200 on 18 September 1805 [DB AB:140].

v. John, a taxable "Negro" in Dover Hundred from 1770 to 1773.

vi. Peter, a taxable "Negro" in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County from 1777 to 1797 head of a Little Creek Neck, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:35] and 3 in Sussex County in 1810 [DE:435].

vii. Haste, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:307].

viii. Deberox2, born 1776-1794, head of a Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 7 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:49]. He left a 5 April 1841 Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County will, proved 22 April 1841, naming his wife Sarah, children Josiah, Elijah, Enoch, Robert, and Rachel; and grandchildren Rachel and John Hews, children of his daughter Maria [WB R:197].

ix. Charles, a taxable "Negro" in Jones Hundred, Kent County in 1780, head of a Dover Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:41].

 

Somerset County

1.    Susannah Miller, born say 1684, was presented by the Somerset County court on 13 March 1704/5 for having an illegitimate "Mallato" child, William Hickman informer [Judicial Record 1702-5, 212].

 

Queen Anne's County

1.    Eliza Miller, born say 1750, pleaded guilty to "Mulatto Bastardy" in November 1770 in Queen Anne's County court. The court sold her daughter Mary for thirty-one years to Mr. Joshua Calk for 111 pounds of tobacco [Surles, and they Appeared in Court, 1770-1772, 14]. She was the mother of

i. Mary, born say 1770.

ii. ?John, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 9 "other free" in 1810 [MD:149].

iii. ?Peter, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:151].

 

MINOR FAMILY

1.    Jacob Miner, born say 1700, was a "free Negroe" who had a "Mollattoe" child by Elizabeth Carr, the white servant of Thomas Strong of Shrewsbury Parish, Kent County, Maryland, in 1725 [Criminal Records 1724-8, 155-7]. He may have been the ancestor of

i. Jonathan Minor, head of a Spotsylvania County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" in 1810.

 

MITCHELL FAMILY

1.    Anne Mitchell, born say 1705, the servant of John Edmondson of St. Peter's Parish, confessed to the Talbot County court in March 1724/5 that she had an illegitimate child by a "Negroe." In November 1725 the court sold her daughter Esther to her master until the age of thirty-one. She was convicted of having a second mixed-race child in March 1726/7. In March 1727/8 the court sold her to her master for fourteen years. In March 1730/1 she was fined six hundred pounds of tobacco for having a child by Benjamin Guy alias Williams. Benjamin was ordered to serve Edmonson for one year to pay for their fines. She was fined for fornication again in March 1732/3 [Judgment Record 1723-4, 277; 1724, 38; 1725-6, 73-4; 1727-8, 23, 454; 1728-31, 349; 1731-3, 631]. She was the mother of

i. Esther, born before 3 March 1723/4, bound to serve John Edmondson in November 1725 until the age of thirty-one. In November 1741 she was called a spinster "Mulatto" woman of St. Peter's Parish when she confessed to the Talbot County court that she had two illegitimate children and paid a thirty shillings fine for each [Judgment Record 1740-2, 318-9].

 

MOLUCK FAMILY

Members of the Moluck family in Dorchester County were

i. Jimmimey Molix, a Black Man," head of a household of 5 "Negroes" in Transquakin Hundred in 1776 [Carothers, 1776 Census of Maryland, 50].

ii. Roger, head of a Dorchester County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Moses, head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "other free" and a white woman in 1790.

iv. Isaac, purchased his wife Moriah and son Isaac from Reubin Wittgot by Dorchester County deed on 13 May 1810 for 25 pounds and set them free [DB HD 17:177-9]. He was head of a Dorchester County household of 3 "free colored" in 1830.

v. John, a "Negro" man purchased by George Ward from Levin Traverse for the purpose of manumitting him on 16 July 1792. On 29 July 1801 Peter Ferguson and John Reid sold John Molock a horse and colt, cow and calf, five sheep, eight hogs, a blacksmith bellows, anvil, vice, three pair of tongs and five hammers for 20 pounds [DB HD 3:493; 26:383].

vi. Rhody, purchased her husband Isaac Molluck from John Watson by Dorchester County for $1 on 26 January 1814 and set him free the same day [DB ER-2:627-8].

vii. Polly, born about 1792, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 22 May 1810: a Mulatto Girl about eighteen years of age ... with straight hair, was born free and raised in Dorchester County [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 12].

 

MONK FAMILY

Members of the Monk family were

i. Bennet, born say 1738, a "molato" boy bound to Absolom Kent until the age of twenty-one on 21 April 1745 when Kent gave Bennet to his wife by his Calvert County will, proved 27 May 1745 [Prerogative Wills 24:113].

ii. Jane, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Edward, head of a Montgomery County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

iv. William, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

v. Peter, born before 1776, head of a Dorchester County household of 4 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Elizabeth, born say 1785, living in Saint Mary's County on 6 August 1822 when her daughter Ann obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County: daughter of Eliz. Monk ... aged about 16 years, of a light complexion ... born free ... in Saint Mary's County [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 60].

 

MOODY FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Moody, born say 1755, was indicted by the Kent County, Maryland court for "Mulatto Bastardy" in March 1775, November 1775, and August 1776 [Criminal Dockets, March 1775 presentments, no. 5]. She may have been the mother of

i. James, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:151] and 5 in 1810 [MD:904].

 

MOORE FAMILY

Members of the Moore family in Maryland were

i. Daniel, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 3 in 1800 [MD:151].

ii. Daniel, Jr., head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:152].

iii. John, head of an Octararo, Cecil County household of 4 "other free" in 1790.

iv. William, head of a Baltimore City household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [MD:284].

v. Richard, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:151].

vi. Hannibal, head of a Talbot County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:521].

1        vii. Peggy, born about 1758.

2        viii. Levi, born say 1770.

 

1.    Peggy Moore, born about 1758, was "upwards of fifty years old" on 19 April 1808 when she obtained a certificate of freedom for herself and son Joseph Moore in Washington, D.C.: a colored woman named Indian Peg, who now calls herself Peggy Moore ... upwards of fifty years old. She testified that her son Joseph, born in October 1779, was born in Charles County where she lived from her childhood. Joseph was brought up by Thomas Gilpin [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 224]. Peggy was the mother of

i. Joseph, born in October 1779. He may have been the Joseph Moore (no race indicated) who was being held as a slave by William Hepburn before 21 August 1786 when the Fairfax County, Virginia court ordered him discharged because he was born of free parents [Orders 1783-8, 254].

 

2.    Levi Moore, born say 1770, was head of a Dorchester County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:732]. He was the father of

i. Nancy, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 13 August 1811: of a copper colour ... born free, raised in Dorchester County, Daughter of Levi Moore aged about 16 years on information of Levi Moore.

ii. Matilda, born about 1799, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 18 April 1816: dark chesnut colour ... born free .... daughter of Levi Moore aged about 17 years information of Levi Moore

iii. Kitty, born about 1801, obtained a certificate of freedom in Dorchester County on 18 April 1816: dark chesnut colour ... born free .... daughter of Levi Moore aged about 15 years information of Levi Moore [Certificates of Freedom for Negroes 1806-64, 17].

 

MORGAN FAMILY

1.    Jane Morgan, born say 1750, was presented by the Queen Anne's County court for "Mulatto Bastardy" in March 1770 but struck off the docket in November 1771 [Surles, And they Appeared at Court 1770-1772, 9, 44]. She may have been related to

i. Thomas, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:164].

ii. Rose, head of a Kent County household of 5 "other free" and a slave in 1800 [MD:152].

 

Members of a Morgan family of St. Mary's County, Maryland, were

i. Jane, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

ii. James, head of a St. Mary's County household of 5 "other free" in 1790 and 5 in 1800 [MD:419].

iii. Susanna, head of a St. Mary's County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

iv. William, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 19 June 1809: aged twenty four years or thereabouts ... complexion Yellowish, hair short ... raised in the County aforesaid and was born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 5].

v. Gustavus, born about 1795, obtained a certificate of freedom in St. Mary's County on 12 March 1819: son of Eleanor Morgan, aged twenty four years ... born free [Certificates of Freedom 1806-64, 45].

 

Other members of a Moragn family in Maryland were

i. Samuel, head of a Baltimore City household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:310].

 

MORRIS FAMILY

Mixed-race members of the Morris family in Maryland and Delaware may have been related to William Morris "Mallatto" of Accomack County, Virginia [Orders 1703-9, 38, 42a]. They were

1        i. Nathaniel, born say 1722.

2        ii. Elizabeth1, born about 1726.

iii. Thomas, born say 1728, a "mulato" taxable in Nanticoke Hundred of Somerset County in 1748 [List of Tithables, 1748].

 

1.    Nathaniel1 Morris, born in October 1720, orphan son of George Morris, was bound by the Somerset County court as an apprentice to James Longo to make linen and woolen wheels and chairs and to read and write on 17 June 1735 [Judicial Record 1735-7, 14]. He was taxable in the household of James Longo in Wicomoco Hundred, Somerset County, from 1736 to 1740. He was also listed in his own household with wife Eliza in 1740 [List of Tithables]. He registered the birth of his son, Levi, in St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Sussex County, Delaware, on 17 January 1747/8 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 93]. He may have been the Nathaniel Morres who owed the Worcester County estate of Peter Beckett 12 shillings on 23 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:89]. He was taxable in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, from 1770 to 1774. He was the father of

3        i. Levi1, born 17 January 1747/8.

ii. Elizabeth3, born say 1752, married Thomas Clerk (Clark) ("Mustees, free"), 1 July 1773 in Lewes and Coolspring Presbyterian Church [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 286].

 

2.    Elizabeth1 Morris, born about 1726, was a "Molatto Girle" aged twelve years old, bound until the age of twenty-one, and valued at 18 pounds in the 25 July 1738 Talbot County estate of John Vickers [Prerogative Court Inventories 1737-9, 23:488]. She may have been the mother of

i. John, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 8 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Elizabeth2, born say 1750, presented by the Queen Anne's County court in March 1770 for having an illegitimate child by a "negro." She was sold for seven years and her daughter Jane, born 7 January 1770, was sold for thirty-one years to William Robinson for a total of 2,600 pounds of tobacco [Surles, And they Appeared at Court 1770-1772, 5].

 

3.   Levi1 Morris, born 17 January 1747/8, married Sarah Hanzer, in September 1768 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279]. He was a delinquent taxable in Sussex County in 1767, a delinquent taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundreds, Sussex County, in 1787, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438] and 5 in 1810 [DE:456]. The Sussex County court fined him six pence for assault in February 1773 [RG 4805, General Sessions, 1767-1794, frame 132]. He may have been the father of

i. Nathaniel2, born say 1775, married Alice Handsor, "Two free Mulatoes," on 24 December 1799 in Sussex County, Delaware, and second, Sarah Cornish, "free Mulattoes," on 5 December 1802 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 315, 318]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438] and 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:220].

ii. Nancy, married Abel Jacobs, "free Mulattoes," on 18 April 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 310, 318].

iii. Levy2, born 1776-1794, married ___ Oakey in May 1805 and second, Eunice Johnson, "Mulattoes," on 19 December 1810 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 322]. He was head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [DE:416] and 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:208].

iv. Simon, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:308].

v. Isaac, head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:214].

vi. Minty, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 9 "free colored" in 1830.

vii. Gabriel, born before 1776, head of a Worcester County household of 7 "free colored" in 1830

 

MORTIS FAMILY

1.    Mary Mortus, born say 1702, was the servant of Thomas Wilson on 27 March 1721/2 when the Prince George's County court presented her for having an illegitimate "Malatto" child. On 26 June 1722 she confessed that her master's "negroe man" Hannibal was the father. The court sold her and her child to John Middleton and ordered that Hannibal receive fifteen lashes [Court Record 1720-2, 484, 561, 619-20]. She was probably the mother of

2        i. Anne, about 1722.

 

2.    Anne Mortis, born about 1722, was the "Molatto" servant of Thomas Edelen on 22 June 1742 when she was presented by the Prince George's County court for having an illegitimate child. On 22 November 1742 she confessed to the charge, and the court ordered that she receive fifteen lashes. On 22 November 1743 the court bound her son Bob to Thomas Edelin, Jr., until the age of thirty-one. On 23 June 1747 she was called "Molatto Nan" when the court sold her for seven years to Thomas Edelin Jr. and sold her twelve month old "Mullatto" daughter Rachel to Baruch Williams until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1742-3, 2, 240; 1743-4, 2, 147, 169, 170; 1746-7, 629]. She still had three years to serve when she was called "Mulatto Nan" in the inventory of Thomas Edelin's Prince George's County estate on 25 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 58:140]. She was the mother of

i. an unnamed "Molatto Boy" to be free at age twenty-one when he was listed in the 11 November 1754 Prince George's County estate of Mary Edelen [Prerogative Inventories 58:245].

ii. Robert, born about 1742, a "Molatto" to be free at the age of thirty-one when he was listed in the inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Mary Edelen on 11 November 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 58:245].

iii. Rachel, born about June 1746.

 

MOSE FAMILY

1.    Ruth Mose, born say 1735, was the white woman servant to Edward Brown in August 1755 when the Queen Anne's County court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro." The court sold her daughter Lucy for thirty-one years to her master for 320 pounds of tobacco [Criminal Record 1751-9, n.p.]. She was the mother of

i. Lucy, born about 1755.

 

MOSELY FAMILY

Members of the Mosely family were

1        i. William, born say 1725.

2        ii. Absolem1, born say 1730.

 

1.    William Mosely, born say 1725, a "mulatto," registered the birth of his daughter, Elizabeth, on 17 January 1747/8 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 93]. He was the father of

3        i. ?John, born say 1746.

ii. Elizabeth, born 17 January 1747/8.

 

2. Absolem1 Mosely, born say 1730, was indicted by the Sussex County court in February 1749. He posted 50 pounds bond and John Corwill was surety for another 50 pounds. The case was dismissed in August 1750 on his committment to pay all fees [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frames 448, 453, 470]. He purchased 104 acres called Oliver's Folly on the north side of Sow Bridge Branch in Sussex County from William Winsley for 12 pounds, 10 shillings on 4 May 1765 [DB K-10:270]. He was taxable in Slaughter Creek, Sussex County in 1770 [RG 2535, reel 1]. He left a 25 April 1795 Sussex County will, proved 30 April 1795, by which he named his sons Purnell, Absolem, Curnell and other unnamed children [WB E:33-4]. His land was listed as half cleared and worth about 30 shillings per acre in the 1796 tax list for Cedar Creek Hundred [RG 2535, reel 2]. He was the father of

i. Purnell, born before 1776, head of a Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:463] and 10 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:334]. He was an eighty-year-old "Mulatto" laborer living with John Mosely in the 1850 Dover Hundred census [DE:345].

ii. Absolem2, born 1776-1794, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372].

iii. ?Cornelius1, married Alce Hanzer, "Blacks, freed" 29 June 1779 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 294]. He was taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, from 1779 to 1780 [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 407, 429, 430, 452], a delinquent taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1790 [RG 2535, roll 2] and head of a Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:414].

iv. ?George, a delinquent taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1790 [RG 2535, roll 2].

 

3.   John1 Mosely, born say 1746, and his wife, Elizabeth, had their son, Billy, baptized on 9 September 1770 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 100]. He purchased 50 acres in Nanticoke Hundred, Sussex County, on the southwest side of the Raccoon Swamp that empties into the Nanticoke River for 50 pounds on 7 August 1786 [DB N-13:299]. He was taxable in Dagsborough Hundred in 1784 and in Nanticoke Hundred from 1789 to 1796 when he was listed as a "Molatto" [DSA, RG 2535, roll 2]. He was head of a Nanticoke Hundred household of 8 "other free" in 1800 [DE:342], 8 in 1810 [DE:462], and 5 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:330]. They were the parents of

i. William2, born 1 October 17__, baptized 9 September 1770.

ii. ?Solomon1, taxable in Duck Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, from 1768 to 1772 when he was delinquent [RG 3535, Kent County Levy List, 1768-84, frames 23, 75, 119, 148], called "Solmon Mosely the elder," a yeoman of Kent County, in November 1772 when the grand jury indicted him for stealing two bushels of wheat from Risdon Bishop of Little Creek Hundred [DSA, RG 3805, MS case files November 1772 indictments]. He was head of a Cedar Creek, Sussex County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [DE:307].

iii. ?Jacob, head of an Octararo, Cecil County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vi. ?John2, head of a Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [DE:455] and 6 "free colored" in Broadkiln Hundred in 1820 [DE:334].

 

Other members of the family in Delaware were

i. Solomon2, born before 1776, head of a Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:425] and 2 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:372].

ii. Emeline, head of a Sussex County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [DE:445].

iii. Benjamin, born before 1776, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:334].

iv. Hezekiah, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:410].

v. Cornelius2, born 1776-1794, head of a Murderkill Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:6].

vi. John3, born 1776-1794, head of a Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:334].

vii. Isaac, head of an Appoquinimink Hundred, New Castle County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:156].

 

MUNT/ MUNS FAMILY

1.   Mary Munt, born say 1700, the servant of Richard Cooper, confessed to the Talbot County court in August 1719 that she had a child by her master's slave, "Mallatoe Robin." The court bound her one-month-old daughter Honner to her master. In November 1723 the court bound her daughter Matrey Munt to her master until the age of thirty-one. Mary had completed her indenture to Richard Cooper by November 1725 when the court sold her to Cooper for another fourteen years as punishment for having two illegitimate "Mullato" children [Judgment Record 1717-9, 303, 383, 386-7; 1722-3, 92; 1723-4, 142-3, 235; 1725-6, 425]. Richard Cooper was taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, Delaware in 1746 [Levy list 1743-67, frame 58]. She left a 7 July 1758 Kent County, Delaware will, proved 14 September 1758, by which gave her daughter Eleanor a shilling, her son Robert a bed, furniture, two mares, a colt, a horse, seven head of sheep, hogs, a cow and calf, pewter dishes and other household items; her son Robert's wife Mary Ann a calimanco gown, a black quilt, a petticoat, mantle and striped apron; her daughter Abigail all her other wearing apparel, a chest, linen wheel, looking glass and frying pan; her daughter Charity a shilling; and her granddaughter Julianna Munt a bed and wool blanket and other household items her son Robert, daughters Eleanor, Abigail, and Charity, her daughter-in-law Mary Ann Munt, and her granddaughter Juliana Munt. She named her son Robert executor and named his wife Mary Ann in a codicil. Robert Munt was granted administration on the estate on 9 August 1775 [DSA, RG 3545, roll 162, frames 453-9; WB K:188-9; L:171]. Mary and Robin were the parents of

i. Honner, born in July 1719, "spinster" of Kent County, died before 13 September 1756 when Mary Munt was granted administration on her estate [DSA, RG 3545, roll 162, frame 451; WB K:143].

ii. Matrey, born about 1722, an illegitimate "Mallato" child sold until the age of thirty-one by the Talbot County court to Richard Cooper for 1,000 pounds of tobacco on 5 November 1723 [Judgment Record 1722-3, 142-3].

iii. Eleanor.

iv. Abigail, sued her brother Robert Munt, labourer, in February 1760 for detaining her property: 3 pewter plates, a pewter dish, an iron pot, a black calimanco gown, a white shalloon mantle, and a striped Holland apron. She discontinued the suit before it came before the court [RG 3815.013, dockets 1760-62, frame 5].

2        v. Robert1, born say 1730.

vi. Charity.

 

2.    Robert1 Munt, born say 1730, was administrator of the Kent County estate of his mother Mary Munt and married to Mary Ann Munt when his mother made her will. He was taxable in Murderkill Hundred, Kent County, from 1759 to 1766. He was allowed 2 pounds by the Kent County levy court on 18 November 1766 for burying a poor man named Henry Smith. He was taxable in Dover Hundred from 1770 to 1774 [Kent County Levy List 1743-67, frames 233, 276, 318, 387, 401, 417, 442, 460, 524, 529; 1768-84, frames 69, 159, 175, 216]. He died before 7 August 1775 when John Penn, Esq., was granted administration on his Kent County estate. Mary Munt was administratrix on 9 August 1775 and returned an inventory worth 77 pounds. He owed money to William Durham and Cornelius Hanser [DSA, RG 3545, reel 162, frames 460-464]. He may have been the father of

i. Robert2 Muns, a "Mulatto" single man, taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, Delaware, in 1798 [RG 3535, Levy List, 1797-8, frame 477], head of a Little Creek, Kent County, Delaware household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:31].

ii. Nathan Mun, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Ann, had an illegitimate daughter by George Sisco in Duck Creek Hundred in 1782 [DSA, RG 3805.0, MS Kent County Court case papers, August 1782 Indictments].

 

MURRAY FAMILY

1.    Margaret Murray, born say 1705, was called Margaret Murrough of Eastern Neck Hundred on 10 October 1718 when she was charged by the Kent County, Maryland Court of having a "Mollatoe" child by a "Negro" man but found not guilty because there was no evidence to prosecute. She was called Margaret Murray and was the servant of Michael Miller in March 1719/20 when the court charged her with the some offense but again found her not guilty [Proceedings 1718-20, 205, 407]. She was convicted of having a "Mollatoe" child sometime before 25 November 1725 when she completed her indenture to Michael Miller and he delivered her up to the court to be sold for seven years. The court sold her to Henry Cully for 2,500 pounds of tobacco. On 10 August 1726 she had an illegitimate child by a white man [Criminal Records 1724-8, 114, 268]. She was probably the ancestor of

i. Penelope, born say 1725, a "spinster" who confessed to the Kent County, Maryland Court on 17 November 1741 that she had an illegitimate child by a "Negro." The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and ordered her child to serve her master, Michael Miller, until the age of thirty-one. She was presented for having another illegitimate child (no race indicated) on 17 June 1746, but she was acquitted because she was then a married woman [Criminal Proceedings 1739-42, 226-7; 1742-7, 277-8, 289]. She was a "Mallatto Woman" who still had 8 years to serve when she was valued at 20 pounds in the inventory of the Kent County estate of Mr. Michael Miller on 6 May 1747 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1747-1748, 350-3].

ii. Abigail, born say 1740, a "Mallatto Girl" who still had 24 years to serve when she was valued at 20 pounds in the inventory of the Kent County estate of Mr. Michael Miller on 6 May 1747 [Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1747-1748, 350-3].

iii. Sarah, born say 1752, plead guilty in Queen Anne's County court in June 1770 that she bore a "mut." (Mulatto) child [Surles, and they Appeared at Court, 1770-1772, 5].

iv. William, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" in 1790 and 1 in 1800 [MD:175].

v. Nathan, head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:175].

vi. Daniel, head of a North Susquehannah, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

vii. Darkus, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:284].

viii. Mary, head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:284].

ix. Rachel, head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:163].

x. Samuel, head of a Montgomery County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [MD:185].

xi. Jude, head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:164].

xii. Nancy, head of a Talbot County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [MD:523].

xiii. George, a "negro" head of a Caroline County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [MD:195].

 

MYERS/ MAYERS FAMILY

1.    Christian Myers, born say 1729, confessed in Prince George's County court on 23 August 1748 that she had an illegitimate "Mulatto" child. The court ordered that she serve seven years and sold her seventeen-month-old daughter Sarah to her master John Carrick until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1747-8, 341]. She was the mother of

i. Sarah, born about February 1747.

2        ii. Molly, born say 1757.

 

2.    Molly Myer, born say 1757, was a "Molatto" girl valued at 15 pounds in the inventory of the Baltimore County estate of James Dawkins on 5 April 1765 [Prerogative Inventories 86:255]. She may have been the mother of

3        i. Samuel, born say 1775.

 

3.    Samuel Mayers, born say 1775, and his wife Jane Mayers were the parents of Hannah Mayers, a "free Mulatto" born in June 1790 and baptized on 9 June 1794 by Rev. Mr. Oliver at St. Thomas Parish, Baltimore County [Reamy, St. Thomas Parish Registers, 1732-1850, 30]. Their child was

i. Hannah, born in June 1790.

 

Another possible descendant was

i. Sarah Ann Myers, born about 1791, obtained a certificate of freedom in Frederick County on 15 November 1819: a bright Mulatto ... about twenty eight years of age ... free born woman and the daughter of Henny Taylor as appears from the affidavit of John Reign [Certificates of Freedom 1807-28, 100].

 

Members of a Myers family on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were

i. ?Jeremiah, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

ii. ?Liddy, head of a Frederick County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:979].

iii. ?Rebecca Miers, head of a Talbot County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [MD:521].

 

NAILOR FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Nuller, born say 1730, a "Molo.," was paid by the Kent County, Maryland Levy Court in 1773 for supporting herself and her child and attending John Woodard and his wife. She was called a "Mola." when the court paid her to maintain herself and child for the years 1774 and 1775. She was probably the mother of

i. Rebecca Nailer, paid by the Kent County Levy Court for maintaining herself and her children in 1783 [1758-1784 Levy List, 281, 292, 307, 401].

ii. Sampson Nailer, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1790 [MD:80] and 5 in 1800 [MD:175].

iii. Rachel Nailor, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1790 [MD:80].

iv. Benjamin Nailer, head of a Kent County household of 7 "other free" in 1800 [MD:164].

v. Henry, born before 1776, head of a Kent County household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

vi. Catherine, born before 1776, head of a Kent County household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

 

NATT FAMILY

1.    Joanna Natt, born say 1750, was the white servant of John Duffey in March 1755 when she confessed to the Queen Anne's County court that she had a child by a "Negroe." The court sold her daughter Martha for 31 years to her master for 1,200 pounds of tobacco. On 25 March 1760 she confessed to the court that she had another child by a "Negro" man. The court ordered her sold for seven years after the completion of her indenture and sold her three-year-old daughter Alce to her master until the age of thirty-one for 250 pounds of tobacco, and sold her one-year-old daughter Elizabeth for 25 pounds [Criminal Record 1751-9, n.p.; 1759-66, 35-7]. She was the mother of

i. Martha, born 10 May 1754.

ii. Alce, born about 1757.

iii. Elizabeth, born about 1759.

 

NELSON FAMILY

1.    Mary Nelson, born say 1675, was the "malato" mother of John Nelson who was born in All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel County, on 10 November 1695 [Wright, Anne Arundel County Church Records, 3]. Mary was the mother of

i. John, born 10 November 1695.

ii. ?Sarah, born say 1700, the servant of Henry Ridgely, confessed to the Anne Arundel County court in March 1720/1 that she had a child by "a Negroe Man belonging to Mr. Richard Warfield." The court bound her child to her master until the age of thirty-one [Judgment Record 1720-1, 87, 355]. She was apparently the mother of "Richard Nelson (Molato)" who was listed in the inventory of the Anne Arundel County estate of Colonel Henry Ridgely on 29 June 1750 [Prerogative Inventories 1750-1751, 62-6].

 

They may have been the ancestors of

2        i. Ann1, born say 1730.

ii. Ann2, "of Coller" head of a Baltimore County household of 1 "other free" and 4 slaves in 1810 [MD:710].

 

2.    Ann Nelson, born say 1730, was the servant of William Brawner of Charles County, Maryland, in March 1755 when she was presented for having a "Mollatto" child. She confessed to the charge, and on 10 June 1755 the court bound her five-month-old son Joseph to Timothy Carington until the age of thirty-one. On 8 November 1757 she was presented for having another mixed-race child [Court Record 1755-1756, 90, 179; 1757-8, 1]. She was the mother of

i. Joseph, born about January 1755.

ii. ?Hannah, a "Mulatto" head of a Charles County, Maryland household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

 

NEWMAN FAMILY

1.    Maria Newman, born say 1735, was the servant of Thomas Maccatee on 10 June 1755 when she confessed in Charles County court that she had a "Mollatto" child. The court bound her four-month-old son William to her master until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1755-6, 127, 180]. She was the mother of

i. William, "Mulatto" head of a Charles County household of 4 "other free" in 1790, 6 in 1800 [MD:515], and 3 in 1810 [MD:303], perhaps the William Newman who was head of a Randolph County, Virginia household of 2 "free colored" in 1830.

ii. ?Benjamin, head of a Montgomery County household of 10 "other free" in 1790.

iii. ?Isaac, born before 1776, head of an Eastern District, Harrison County, Virginia household of 8 "free colored" in 1830.

 

NICHOLS FAMILY

Members of the Nichols family in Maryland were

i. James, born say 1690, a "Mulatto" allowed 450 pounds of tobacco for his support by the Anne Arundel County court in August 1752 [Judgment Record 1751-4, 38].

1        ii. Grace1, born say 1718.

 

1.    Grace1 Nichols, born say 1718, confessed to the Prince George's County court on 22 August 1738 that she had an illegitimate child. The court was informed that the child was a "Mallatto" and ordered that her mistress Salome Docra bring her and the child into court for inspection and that Mary White take care of the child until the next court. On 28 November 1738 the court ruled that the child was "not a Mallatto" and paid Mary White two pounds, ten shillings to teach Grace's daughter Mary Nichols to read the Bible and to give her a decent suit of clothes at the end of her indenture. On 28 November 1749 the court allowed 200 pounds of tobacco a year for Grace's support. Rachel Spriggs sued Grace on 28 August 1750 for a debt of 202 pounds of tobacco [Court Record 1738-40, 119, 192; 1748-9, 72, 133; 1749-50, 231]. She was the ancestor of

2        i. Mary1, born say 1738.

3        ii. ?Ann, born say 1757.

 

2.    Mary1 Nichols, born say 1738, was bound to Mary White by the Prince George's County court on 28 November 1738. On 22 November 1763 she confessed to the court that she had an illegitimate "Mulatto" child. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years (at the end of her service in March 1766) and bound her one-year and five-months-old son Felix to her mistress Johanna Ellson until the age of thirty-one. On 28 November the court ordered that she serve another seven year term and bound her five-month-old "Mulatto" daughter Fido to Johanna Ellson until the age of thirty-one [Court Record 1763-4, 8, 352-3]. She was the mother of

i. Felix, born June 1762, Felix, born June 1762, perhaps identical to Philip Nichols, born about 1762, a "Mulatto" man who still had nine years to serve on 30 July 1784 when Archibald Elson of Prince George's County placed an ad in the Maryland Journal and Baltimore Advertiser stating that Philip had run away in June that year [Windley, Runaway Slave Advertisements, II:314-5].

ii. Fido, born in June 1764.

4        iii. Grace2, born say 1780.

 

3.    Ann Nichols, born say 1757, was head of a Prince George's County, Maryland household of 5 "other free" in 1790. She appeared before the clerk of Prince George's County on 27 March 1804 and named her children: Zingr., Henry, Rachel, Mary, Ace, George, Elizabeth and Kitty Nicholls and their birth dates. She also gave the names and birth dates of three children of Mary Nicholls: Grace, Jane, and John Nicholls. And she stated that Grace Nicholls was the daughter of Mary Nicholls [Land Records JRM, no. 10, p. 273]. She recorded the certificate she received from the clerk in the Court of the District of Columbia in Alexandria on 23 July 1816 [Arlington County Register of Free Negroes, 1797-1861, no. 35, p.31]. She was the mother of

i. Ling, born 2 May 1775.

ii. Henry, born 20 August 1777.

iii. Rachel, born 18 February 1780.

5        iv. Mary2, born 21 May 1782.

v. Asa, born in February 1785.

vi. George, born 30 March 1789.

vii. Elizabeth, born 14 August 1797.

viii. Kitty1, born 17 September 1799.

 

4.    Grace2 Nichols, born 20 August 1776, a "free woman of colour," was the mother of

i. John Elson, born 11 March 1802 according to the deposition of Ann Nicholls, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 26 July 1827: a bright mulatto man, about 25 years old ... born free in Prince George County ... son of Grace Nicholls, a free woman of colour.

ii. Kitty2, born about 1803, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 30 July 1827: a copper-colored woman, about 24 years old ... daughter of Grace Nicholls.

iii. Sophia, born about 1808, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 26 July 1827: a copper-colored woman, about 19 years old ... daughter of Grace Nicholls.

iv. Mary3, born about 1810, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County on 26 July 1827: a bright mulatto girl, about 17 years old ... daughter of Grace Nicholls [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 67].

 

5.    Mary2 Nichols, born 21 May 1782, was the mother of John and Jane Nichols according to the testimony of Ann Nichols in Prince George's County on 27 March 1804. Mary was the mother of

i. Jane, born 10 December 1800.

ii. John, born 15 September 1802.

 

NICHOLSON FAMILY

1.    Ruth Nicholson, born say 1745, was a white woman living in Queen Anne's County on 1 July 1765 when she had a "Mullatto" child by a "Negroe" man [Judgment Records 1766-7, part 1, CD image 37]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Samuel, head of a Chester County, Pennsylvania household of 5 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Andrew, head of a Chester County, Maryland household of 3 "other free" in 1790.

iii. Joseph, head of a Chester County, Pennsylvania household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

 

NORMAN FAMILY

1.    Elizabeth Norman, born say 1695, confessed in Prince George's County court on 24 March 1712/3 that she had an illegitimate child by James Carr and was ordered to serve her master Benjamin Belt a year for the trouble of his house. She was the servant of Benjamin Belt in March 1714/5 when she confessed to having another child. On 23 August 1715 the court ordered Belt to keep her and her "Mallatoe" child until the November court. The court sold her and her child to Richard Keene, the constable for Patuxent Hundred, for 3,600 pounds of tobacco later that year on 22 November. Five years later on 22 November 1720 she confessed to the court that she had an illegitimate child by a "Mullato man of William Digge's." The court sold her to her master for seven years and sold the child to William Maccoy until the age of thirty-one. On 28 August 1722 she confessed to having another "Malatto" child, and the court ordered her sold to Richard Keene for seven years and gave her child to William Harris until the age of thirty-one. She may have been the mother of two children listed in the inventory of the estate of William Harris on 1 July 1730:

1 Mollatto Girl named Beck 9 years old - 12 pounds

1 Mollatto Girl named Jane 5 years old to be free at 16 year old - 15 shillings

[Prerogative Inventories & Accounts 1730-1732, 16-17]. In March 1749/50 the court allowed her 200 pounds of tobacco a year for her support, rejected her petition on 25 June 1751 to have a doctor, but paid Doctor Richard Smith 800 pounds of tobacco on 26 November 1751 for removing a cancerous tumor from her arm. She received 400 pounds of tobacco for her support on 23 November 1756 [Court Record 1710-5, 285, 693, 721, 790; 1715-20, 4; 1720-2, 20-1, 84, 622-3; 1748-9, 133; 1751-4, 71, 157, 355]. She may have been the mother of

2         i. Beck, born about 1720.

3         ii. Jane1, born say 1722.

 

2.    Beck (no last name), born about 1720, may have been identical to "Melattow Rebeccah" who was living at Samuel Selby's when she was presented by the Prince George's County court on 25 March 1739/40 for having an illegitimate child by information of the constable for Mount Calvert Hundred [Court Record 1738-40, 566]. And she may have been the "Mollatto Beck" whose "Molatto" daughter Jane was bound by the Prince George's County court to Joseph Bladen until the age of sixteen on 22 June 1742 [Court Record 1742-1743, 3]. On 25 November 1746 the court convicted "Mullatto Beck belonging to Samuel Selby" of "Mullatto Bastardy" and bound her six-week-old daughter Henrietta to Samuel Selby for thirty-one years [Court Record 1746-7, 200-1]. She may have been the mother of

i. Jane2, born 1 March 1741/2, bound to Joseph Bladen, called "Mulatto Jane" and serving until the age of twenty-one when she was listed in the Prince George's County inventory of Mr. Richard Keene on 1 October 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:156-162].

4        ii. Henrietta, born about October 1746.

 

3.    Jane1 Norman, born say 1722, was called "a Mallatto woman named Jane (no last name) Living at Mr. Richard Keen's" on 23 August 1737 when she confessed to the Prince George's County court that she had an illegitimate child by a "free Mallatto." The court ordered that she receive twenty lashes and serve her master an additional year and a half and sold her two-month-old son James to Edward Swann until the age of twenty-one. She had another child by a free person before 28 November 1738 when the court ordered that she receive fifteen lashes and serve her master twelve months for the trouble of his house, bound her male child to Keene until the age of twenty-one years, and ordered Keene to give the boy a year of schooling and a decent suit of clothes at the end of his indenture. She may have been the "Mallatto Jane" who confessed to the Prince George County court on 25 March 1739/40 that she had an illegitimate child. The court bound her two-month-old female child to Peter Albino until the age of sixteen [Court 1738-40, 569]. She was called "Jan Molato Norman" on 26 November 1745 when the court bound her son Joseph to Richard Keene until the age of twenty-one. On 28 June 1748 and 28 March 1748/9 she was convicted of having illegitimate children by a free person. On 27 November 1750 she was called "Mollatto Jane belonging to Richard Keene" when she confessed to having another child named Basil who was bound to Keene until the age of twenty-one [Court Record 1736-8, 497, 504; 1738-40, 176, 192, 200; 1744-6, 248, 279; 1747-8, 168; 174; 1748-9, 181; 1749-50, 244]. She was the mother of

i. James, born in June 1737, head of a Hampshire County, Virginia household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [VA:770].

ii. Joseph, born about 26 August 1745, three months old when he was bound to Richard Keene until the age of twenty-one.

iii. Jane3, born about 1745, a nine-year-old "Mulatto" girl bound to serve until the age of twenty-one when she was listed in the inventory of the Prince George's County estate of Richard Keene on 1 October 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 60:156-62].

iv. ?Catherine, head of a Montgomery County, Maryland household of 6 "other free" in 1790.

v. ?Delpha, "Mulo." head of a King and Queen County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:172].

vi. Bazil, born in 1750, head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [VA:569].

vii. ?Betty, head of a Frederick County, Virginia household of 3 "other free" in 1810 [VA:575].

 

4.    Henrietta (no last name), born about October 1746, was the daughter of "Mullatto Beck" whose daughter Henrietta was bound by the Prince George's County court to Samuel Selby until the age of thirty-one. She was apparently identical to Henrietta Norman who confessed to the Prince George's County court on 27 August 1765 that she had a "Mulatto" child. The court ordered that she be sold for seven years and bound her two-month-old child Ailce to her master William Deakins until the age of thirty-one [Record 1764-5, 195, 200]. She had two more children which she was charged with on information of William Deakins on 25 November 1766 and 28 March 1769 [Court Record 1766-1768, 15, 167; 1768-1770, 170, 174]. She was the mother of

5        i. Ailce, born June 1765.

ii. William, born about 28 January 1769, two months old on 28 March 1769 when he was bound out by the Prince George's County court until the age of twenty-one [Court Record 1768-70, 174].

 

5.    Ailce/ Elsey Norman, born June 1765, was the mother of Rachel Hawkins who obtained a certificate of freedom for herself and her daughters in Washington, D.C., on 4 October 1826 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 70]. Elsey was the mother of

i. Rachel, mother of Mary Ann Hawkins (born about 1806), Margaret (born about 1808), Martha (born about 1812), Francis (born about 1813), and William Henry (born about 1822).

 

Members of a Norman family in Delaware were

1        i. ?Edward1, born say 1720.

ii. ?Bridget, one of the heirs of Aminadab and Rose Hanser who sold 50 acres in Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, on 5 May 1752 [DB H-1, 329-30].

 

1.    Edward1 Norman, born say 1720, a "mulatto," baptized his son, Edward, on 16 May 1747 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 92]. He may have married Ann Hanser. He witnessed the wills of several white residents of Kent County, Delaware, between 1748 and 1765 and the will of Isabella Hughes in 1757 [deValinger, Kent County, Delaware Probate Records, 125, 136, 145, 173, 190, 215, 217]. He was taxable in Little Creek Hundred, Kent County, in 1753 [Kent County Levy List, 1743-67, frame 107]. His children were

i. Edward2, born say 1747.

ii. Elizabeth, born 26 August 1748, "daughter of Edward Norman," baptized 27 September 1748 at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 94]. She married John Hanzer on 21 September 1768 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 279].

 

NORRIS FAMILY

1.    Mary Norris, born say 1720, was living in Shrewsbury Parish on 14 November 1738 when the Kent County, Maryland Court convicted her of having a "Mollatto" child by a "Negro." The court ordered her to serve her master William Woodland for seven years. She had a child by a white man in 1740 and received 20 lashes [Criminal Proceedings 1738-9, 152, 162-3, 172, 180-1]. She was apparently the ancestor of

i.  George, a "Molatto" who was required to post security of 50 pounds to give evidence in the case of His Lordship against "Negroe Jack" in Kent County court in June 1767 [Criminal Dockets 1766-71].

 

A member of a Norris family in Prince George's County was

i. Catherine, born about 1785, obtained a certificate of freedom in Prince George's County court on 15 October 1815: a mulatto woman about 30 years old ... was raised in the family of Col. Patrick Sim of Prince George's County and is a free woman and was adjudged such by the Prince George's County Court at its September Term 1815 in her petition for her freedom against Sim [Provine, Registrations of Free Negroes, 19].

 

NORWOOD FAMILY

Members of the Norwood family in Delaware were

1        i. Nathaniel1, born about 1735.

ii. Daniel1, born about 1739, a nineteen-year-old farmer born in Angola Hundred (no race or complexion indicated) who enlisted in the French and Indian War on 19 April 1758 and was listed in the 17 May 1758 muster of Captain McClughan's company for the campaign in the Lower Counties [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-3]. He pled guilty and was fined 5 shillings for trespass in Sussex County court in May 1758. He confessed judgment of 6 pounds, 19 shillings to Jacob Kollock, Esq., in April 1764. He was taxable in Indian River and Angola Hundred in 1773 and 1774 [Delaware State Archives, RG 2535, reel 1]. The State charged him with felony in May 1786 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frame 423; 1761-71, frame 154; 1771-93, 385, 391, 404].

 

1.    Nathaniel1 Norwood, born about 1735, was a twenty-three year-old nineteen planter born in Indian River Hundred (no race or complexion indicated) who enlisted in the French and Indian War on 19 April 1758 and was listed in the 17 May 1758 muster of Captain McClughan's company for the campaign in the Lower Counties [Montgomery, Pennsylvania Archives, Fifth Series, 142-4]. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for trespass in May 1758 for which he submitted to the mercy of the court. In February 1759 he was adjudged to serve the estate of Joseph Warrington, deceased, at the rate of 30 shillings per month to pay off his debts [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frame 423; 1761-71, frame 319]. He and his wife, Jemimy, registered the 17 June 1769 birth of their "Melatto" son, Bowen, and their son Nathan at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 99, 103]. Nathan was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1774 to 1784 [Delaware State Archives RG 2535, reels 1&2]. Administration on his Sussex County estate was granted to (his wife) Jemima Norwood on 10 March 1786 [de Valinger, Calendar of Sussex County Probate Records, 173; A 91:116]. Nathaniel and Jemima were the parents of

2         i. ?Eli, born say 1768.

ii. Bowan, born 17 June 1769 (perhaps identical to Eli Norwood).

3        iii. ?Noble, born say 1775.

iv. Nathan2, born 15 February 1777, baptized 27 September 1777 [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 103]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred from 1797 to 1801 [Delaware State Archives, RG 4200.027, reel 2, frames 176, 258].

v. ?John1, head of a Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:354],

 

2.    Eli1 Norwood, born say 1768, married Anna Rust on 4 December 1789 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 304]. Anna was probably related to George Rust, head of a Dagsborough Hundred, Sussex County household of 3 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:388]. Eli was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, in 1789, 1790 and 1796 [Delaware State Archives RG 2535, reel 2; RG 4200.027, reel 2, frame 115], head of a Indian River Hundred, Sussex County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 (Eli Nord) [DE:437] and head of a Sussex County household 5 "other free" in 1810 [DE:412]. On 13 March 1819 he and his wife Elon made a Sussex County deed for a half acre to the trustees of Harmony Meeting House: Purnall Johnson, Burton Johnson, William Hayes, John Cornish and Mitchell Johnson, for the building of a house of worship for the use of the members of the Methodist Episcopal Church [DB 45:124]. He left a 2 January 1838 Sussex County will, proved 23 May 1838, witnessed by Whittington Johnson, naming his widow Elon and seven children: Eli, Stephen M., William D., Wingate P., Samuel B, Mary Jane N., and Ann Johnson, wife of Whittington. He was the father of

i. John2, born 1 January 1794, son of Eli and Anna Norwood, baptized at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 111].

 

3.    Noble Norwood, born say 1775, was taxable in Indian River, Sussex County, in 1796 and 1801 [Delaware State Archives, RG 4200.027, reel 2, frames 115, 258] and head of an Indian River, Sussex County household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [DE:437] and 10 in 1810 [DE:405]. Noble and Lydia Norwood were the parents of

i. Polly, "free Mulatto," daughter of Noble and Lydia Norwood, baptized at Indian River, Sussex County, on 12 February 1797.

ii. Betsey, "free Mulatto," daughter of Noble and Lydia Norwood, baptized at Indian River, Sussex County, on 17 August 1799 [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 391, 399].

 

NUTT(S) FAMILY

1.    Jane Nutt, born say 1700, was living at the house of Joseph Venable in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, in June 1721 when she was confessed that she had a "Mulatto" child in the month of January 1719/20. The court ordered her sold for seven years [Judicial Record 1719-22, 82, 100].

She may have been the ancestor of the members of the Nutts family in Accomack and Northampton counties:

i. William, born say 1750, an Indian living in Accomack County on 25 October 1774 when he and Nathan Addison's slave Jacob were charged with felony [Orders 1774-7, 270, 277].

ii. Daniel, born December 1760, a four-year-old "Mulattoe" bound to Major Joyne by the Northampton County, Virginia court on 11 September 1765 [Minutes 1765-71, 11]. He was head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" in 1810 [VA:45].

iii. Edmund, born Christmas 1774, bound by the Northampton County court to Margaret Addison on 12 February 1782 [Minutes 1777-83, 336]. He was a "free Negro" taxable in Northampton County from 1798 to 1803 [PPTL, 1782-1823, frames 251, 270, 312, 353]. He married Mary Bibbins, 18 June 1800 Northampton County bond, Southy Collins security, consent of Nanny Bibbins. He was head of an Accomack County household of 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA:45]. He was called an Indian when his wife Mary was counted as a "free negro" in Accomack County in 1813 [PPTL 1782-1814, frame 833].

iv. Thomas, head of an Accomack County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:158].

v. Bridget, married Toby Stephens, 7 September 1804 Northampton County bond, Ben Dunton security.

vi. Sabra, married Isaac Stephens, 16 August 1809 Northampton County bond, Isaac Stevens, Sr., security.

vii. Ariena, born say 1779, married Peter Beckett, 10 January 1800 Accomack County bond, Babel Major, surety. Babel Major was head of an Accomack County household of 6 "other free" in 1810 [VA:43]. Ariena may have been the Arena Becket who married Thomas Bibbins, 2 August 1800 Accomack County bond, Peter Bibbins surety.

 

OKEY FAMILY

The Okey family probably has some connection to John Okey and his wife Mary Vincent, early residents of Sussex County, Delaware. Before marrying John Okey, Mary had a mixed-race son (Aminadab Hanser) by a slave in Accomack County, Virginia [see the Hanser history]. It appears that there was another member of the Okey family who was named Aminadab, and he was probably mixed-race as well. However, his origin has not yet been identified. Perhaps he was another mixed-race child of Mary Okey. John Okey owned 400 acres in Sussex County called "Mollattoe Hall" in 1686 [DB A:31, 49; Horle, Records of Sussex County, 412-3].

 

1.    Aminadab Okey, born say 1680, may have been the "strang Child ... which is not Certainly known Whose it is" who was living at John Okey's house in March 1682 when the Sussex County court bound him to Henry Bowman. Aminadab Okey was sued by Aminadab Hanser in Sussex County court on 3 May 1704 [Horle, Records of Sussex County, 155, 1191]. He and Aminadab Hanser were apparently neighbors because on 9 April 1713 he was required to give 100 pounds security to Aminadab Handsor in Sussex County court to guarantee that he would abide by the arbitrators' decision regarding the removal of a fence [DB D-4:225-6]. And Aminadab Hanser's wife Rose mentioned Aminadab Okey's land adjoining hers in her 8 December 1725 deed of sale [DB F-6:220-2]. Aminadab Okey died before 1734 when the account of his estate was recorded in Sussex County court. The account totalled 44 pounds and included 22 pounds for the sale of land [Orphans Court 1728-44, 65a]. He was most likely the ancestor of

2        i. Robert1, born say 1698.

3        ii. Joseph, born say 1725.

iii.Thomas, born say 1726, recorded his ear mark in Sussex County court on 18 November 1747 [Q-16:301]. He submitted to the Sussex County court on the charge of assault and paid a 2 shilling fine in November 1754 [RG 4815.017, 1753-1760, frame 118]. He died before 4 February 1784 when is widow Elizabeth sold half of 106 acres in the forest of Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, which she had purchased on 3 May 1780. She sold the remainder on 10 January 1793 [DB N-13:254, 511].

iv. Alexander1, born say 1732, charged with grand larceny in Sussex County court in May 1754 [RG 4815.017, 1753-60, p.134, frame 71].

4        v. Saunders2, born say 1750.

vi. Sinai, made to post security in Sussex County court in November 1784 to keep the peace. William Jackson and Cornelius Molsely were securities [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frame 349].

vii. Robert2, born say 1746, was sued by Jesse Mackemmy in Sussex County court in May 1768 and agreed with the plaintiff in May 1769. He sued Alexander Stockley in August 1770 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frames 417, 435, 509, 555]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County, in 1774. He was called a tanner on 2 February 1789 when he and Jennett Okey, spinster, purchased as tenants-in-common four acres in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred on the edge of the Rehoboth Road [DB O-14:161]. He was head of a Sussex County household of 9 "other free" in 1800 [DE:438] and 11 in 1810 [DE:462].

viii. Thomas2, Jr., born say 1757, taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred in 1774.

ix. Jonathan1, born say 1757, perhaps the John Okey, Jr., who was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundrds in 1774. Jonathan was head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 4 "other free" in 1800 [DE:41].

5        x. William1, born say 1763.

xi. Jonathan2, head of a Saint Jones Hundred, Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1800 [DE:45] and 3 in Sussex County in 1810 [DE:416].

xii. Robert3, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Kent County household of 3 "other free" in 1800 [DE:40] and 9 in Sussex County in 1810 [DE:468].

xiii. Robert4, born 1776-1794, head of a Sussex County household of 7 "other free" in 1810 [DE:415] and 8 "free colored" in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred in 1820 [DE:306].

xiv. William2, born 1776-1794, head of a Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:306].

xv. Levin, taxable in Broadkiln Hundred, Sussex County, in 1784. He was indicted by the Sussex County court for petit larceny in November 1783 with Elizabeth Oaky as his security [RG 4805, General Sessions Court, 1767-94, frame 321]. He purchased 6-1/2 acres in Broadkiln Hundred at the sheriff's sale for 15 pounds, made additions to the dwelling, added other buildings and improvements and sold it about two years later about 1789 for 40 pounds [DB O-14:154, 622].

xvi. Betty Okey, head of an Accomack County household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:117].

 

2.    Robert1 Okey, born say 1698, was living on 111 acres of land adjoining Samuel and Ann Hanser on 20 May 1733 when they sold 124 acres near Rehoboth Bay, Sussex County. He was mentioned in the 11 June 1742 Sussex County, Delaware deed of his son Samuel who sold land which had formerly belonged to Aminadab Okey and Robert Okey [DB G-7:34-5; H-8:14]. He died before 3 September 1745 when his daughter Sabria and her husband John Parsons petitioned the Sussex County court to divide his land among his heirs [Orphans Court 1744-51, 17]. He was the father of

i. Samuel, born say 1719, called son of Robert Okey on 11 June 1742 when he sold 60 acres in Sussex County which was formerly owned by Robert and Aminadab Okey and by Aminadab Hanzor before them [DB H-8:14]. He was sued by William Taft in Sussex County court in November 1742, but the case was settled out of court, and he sued David McCracken in court in November 1762 but withdrew the suit before it came to trial [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1741-53, frame 45; 1761-71, 118]. He was listed in the account of the Sussex County estate of Cord Hazard, Jr., on 12 March 1750 [Orphans Court 1744-51, 80].

ii. Richard, born say 1721, called brother of Samuel Okey in Samuel's 11 June 1742 Sussex County deed by which Samuel sold land adjoining Richard's [DB H-8:14].

iii. Sabria, born say 1725, wife of John Parsons.

 

3.   Joseph1 Okey, born say 1725, and Elizabeth Oakey sold 89 acres, part of Ebenezer to John Barker for 11 pounds, 10 shillings on 8 August 1744 [DB H-8:66]. He and his wife Arcada Okey were administrators of the Worcester County estate of her father Peter Beckett on 23 January 1754 [Prerogative Inventories 48:98-100; 60:89; Accounts 37:65]. He purchased 212 acres in Broadkill Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware, on Indian River Branch from the sheriff on 5 August 1762 [DB I-9:390]. He sued James Pettyjohn in Sussex County court for assault in February 1759 but he discontinued the suit in February 1760 [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1753-60, frames 510, 526, 585]. He was a "Molatto" taxable in William Burford's District, Granville County, North Carolina, in 1765. He was taxable on two tithes in 1769 and 1771 and was taxed on an assessment of 329 pounds in Nap of Reeds District, Granville County, in 1780. In 1786 he was called Joseph Oakey, Sr., in Nap of Reeds District of Granville County when he was head of a household of 2 "white" men over 60 or under 21 years and 4 "white" women in the state census. He was taxable on 250 acres from 1786 to 1804 and taxable on one poll in 1786 but not free from poll tax by 1790. He was called Joseph Oakley in 1800 when he was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free." Perhaps his widow was Sarah Oakey who was taxable on 50 acres in Ledge of Rock District, Granville County, from 1805 to 1808 [Tax List 1803-1811, 142, 199, 212, 268]. Joseph was probably the father of

6        i. Joseph2, Jr., born say 1750.

ii. Micajah, head of a household of 1 "white" male under twenty-one years of age and 2 "white" females in Nap of Reeds District in the state census for Granville County in 1786.

 

4.    Saunders Okey, born say 1742, was sued for debt by Robert and Mary Jackson in Sussex County court but the case was agreed to before coming to trial [RG 4815.017, General Sessions Court, 1761-71, frame 106]. Saunders and his wife, Mary, "melattoes," registered the 20 October 1771 birth of their daughter, Rhoda, at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 101]. He was taxable in Lewes and Rehoboth, Sussex County in 1774 and a delinquent taxable in 1787. He married, second, Johannah Hansor, widow of Nehemiah Hansor by 12 November 1787 when they were summoned to court to give an account of Nehemiah's estate [de Valinger, Court Records of Kent County, Delaware, 1680-1705, 89]. He was the father of

i. Rhoda, born 20 October 1771.

ii. ?Lina, married Shepherd Harmon on 10 October 1802 in Sussex County, Delaware.

iii. ?Nancy, married Peter Pride on 12 February 1803 in Sussex County, Delaware [Records of the United Presbyterian Churches of Lewes, Indian River and Cool Spring, Delaware 1756-1855, 318, 319].

 

5.    William1 Oakey, born say 1763, and his wife Sarah registered the 5 April 1785 birth of their daughter Polley at St. George's Protestant Episcopal Church, Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 106]. He was taxable in Indian River Hundred, Sussex County, from 1784 to 1790. William and Sarah were the parents of

i. Polly, born 5 April 1785, baptized 5 October 1785.

 

6.    Joseph2 Okey, born say 1750, was taxable on an assessment of 1,810 pounds in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1780. He was called Joseph Oakey, Jr. in 1790 when he was taxable in Dutch District, Granville County and called "Joseph Oakley, Jr." in 1800 when he was head of a Granville County household of 8 "other free." He was taxable on 447 acres in Dutch District, Granville County from 1786 to 1796 and taxable on 250 acres in Ledge of Rock District, Granville County from 1802 to 1804. His 8 August 1804 Granville County will was proved by his wife Elizabeth in August 1805. He (signing) left 100 acres to his son Aaron, 150 acres to his son Willie and daughter Selah, and named his other children: Joseph, Susanna, Elizabeth, and Deborah [Original at N.C. Archives, CR.044.801.29]. His widow Elizabeth Okey was taxable on 250 acres in Ledge of Rock District in 1805 [Tax List 1796-1802, p.283; 1803-1811, 89, 142, 199, 212], and head of a Ledge Neck, Granville County household of 3 "free colored" women in 1820 [NC:18]. They were the parents of

i. Aaron.

ii. Selah.

iii. William4/ Willie.

iv. Joseph3.

v. Susanna.

vi. Elizabeth.

vii. Deborah.

 

OLIVER FAMILY

Anne Arundel County

1.    Ann Oliver, born say 1682, was the mother of a "mulato" son named William Oliver who was baptized in All Hollow's Parish, Anne Arundel County on 18 October 1703 [Wright, Anne Arundel County Church Records, 17]. She was the mother of

i. William, born 18 October 1703.

 

They may have been the ancestors of

i. Robert, "free Negro" head of a Baltimore City household of 6 "other free" in 1800 [MD:320].

 

Kent County

1.    Margaret Oliver, born say 1725, confessed in Kent County, Maryland Court on 18 March 1745/6 that she had a "Mulatto" child by a "Negro" man. The court sold her for seven years and her child until the age of thirty-one. She had another child by Nicholas Fanning, a white man, about August 1748 and paid a fine of thirty shillings. John Matthews was her security [Criminal Proceedings 1742-7, 238-9; 1748-60, 21, 25, 28]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Matthew, "Negro" head of a Kent County household of 2 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Joseph, head of a Queen Anne's County household of 5 "other free" in 1800 [MD:363]. He and William Cork were called "people of Colour" when they purchased 7 acres from Jacob Jefferys, a "Man of Colour," in Queen Anne's County on 15 September 1810 for $45. They sold the land back to him for $50 on 25 May 1811 [DB STW-9:369; JB-1:29-30].

iii. Seb, head of a Kent County household of 1 "other free" and 7 slaves in 1800 [MD:175].

 

ONEY FAMILY

1.    Eleanor Oney, born say 1730, a "Negro," was living in Stepney Parish, Somerset County, on 18 June 1751 when she was convicted of having an illegitimate child by "Negro Quamino," the slave of Henry Lewis. Thomas Moor was her security for payment of her fine. Her "Negro" daughter Levina Oney was bound to Thomas Moor by the court until the age of sixteen. She was convicted of having another illegitimate child on or about 1 February 1762 on the evidence of Thomas Dashiell. In August 1762 she was living in Stepney Parish when the court fined her 20 shillings for an assault on Elizabeth Hull on 22 July 1762 [Judicial Records 1749-51, 293-4; 1760-3, 145d, 151, 168]. She was the mother of

i. Levina, born about 1750, a spinster living in Stepney Parish on 21 June 1768 when the court ordered her to pay a double fine when she refused to identify the father of her illegitimate child. Job Sirmon was her security [Judicial Records 1767-9, 149-150].

ii. ?Patience, born say 1752, a "Negro," of her own free will bound herself as an apprentice to Robert Brown until the age of sixteen in June 1762. On 18 November 1766 the court convicted her of having a child by a "Negro" slave [Judicial Records 1760-3, 136; 1767-9, 36].

iii. ?Perlina, born say 1762, presented by the Somerset County court on 17 March 1772 for having an illegitimate child [Judicial Records 1769-72, 279].

 

They were apparently the ancestors of

i. Daniel, head of a Northwest Fork Hundred, Sussex County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:244].

ii. Martin, head of a Little Creek Hundred, Sussex County household of 8 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:408].

iii. Horatio, head of a Dagsboro Hundred, Sussex County household of 6 "free colored" in 1820 [DE:394].

 

OSBORNE FAMILY

1.    Anne Osborne, born say 1678, the former servant of Elizabeth Smith "of ye River side," was convicted by the Charles County, Maryland Court on 14 June 1698 of having a "Molatto" child. She died before 10 November 1700 when Thomas Parker was paid for looking after her in her sickness and burying her [Court Record 1696-1701/2, 376; 1699/1700-1701/02, 99]. She may have been the ancestor of

i. Squire, head of a New Kent County, Virginia household of 4 "other free" and a slave in 1810 [VA:762].

 

OVERTON FAMILY

Members of the Overton family were

1        i. Caleb1, born 14 July 1750.

ii. John, born say 1780, husband of Sarah Ann Davis (born about 1782) who was born of free parents in St. Mary's County. She and her daughters Elizabeth (born August 1818) and Sarah Ann (born April 1820) obtained certificates of freedom in Washington, D.C., on 1 November 1827 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 111].

 

1.    Caleb1 Overton, born 14 July 1750, was head of a Charles County household of 11 "other free" in 1800 [MD:515]. He was the grandson of a white woman according to the registration of his son Caleb, Jr., in Washington, D.C., on 30 November 1840. He married Margaret Gates of Charles County who was also born free. Margaret had a daughter named Elizabeth Gates, born 29 December 1782, by a previous marriage. Caleb registered their children in Washington, D.C., in October 1814 [Provine, District of Columbia Free Negro Registers, 378-9]. Their children were

i. Margaret.

ii. Patrick.

iii. Richard.

iv. Susan.

v. Samuel, born say 1814.

vi. Mary Magdalene, born say 1816.

vii. Caleb2, Jr., born about 1818, twenty-two years old on 30 November 1840.

 

OWENS FAMILY

Members of the Owens family in Maryland were

i. David, head of a North Susquehannah, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

ii. Jonas, head of a Charles Town, Cecil County household of 1 "other free" in 1790.

iii. James, born about 1786, head of an Anne Arundel County household of 2 "other free" in 1810 [MD:93]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 12 June 1816: aged about thirty years ... bright complexion ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 84].

iv. Delila, born about 1793, obtained a certificate of freedom in Anne Arundel County on 12 June 1816: aged about twenty three years ... yellow complexion, long straight hair ... free born [Certificates of Freedom 1810-31, 84].

 

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